X

Posts

April 19, 2014

+
5:00 AM | 11° IBWS INTEGRAL/BART Workshop
IBWS 2014 is 11th in the series of successful workshops dedicated to high energy astrophysics and supporting ground-based experiments (e.g. robotic telescopes). The workshop will be held in Karlovy Vary […]

April 18, 2014

+
10:13 PM | Shor’s code-breaking algorithm inspired reflections on quantum information
Twenty years ago, physicists met in Santa Fe to explore the ramifications of quantum information.
+
10:11 PM | Shor’s code-breaking algorithm inspired reflections on quantum information
ContextQuantum Physics,History of Science by Tom Siegfried 6:13pm, April 18, 2014 Second of two parts (read part 1)When the Robert Redford film Sneakers hit theaters in 1992, most moviegoers had never heard of the Internet. They’d have guessed “World Wide Web” was a horror film involving spiders. And nobody knew that the secret code-breaking box that the Sneakers plot […]
+
9:47 PM | Quantum experts discuss the measurement problem: A transcript from 1994
ContextQuantum Physics,Science & Society by Tom Siegfried 2:00pm, April 13, 2014 What follows is a fairly complete transcript of a discussion about quantum physics on May 19, 1994, the last day of a workshop in Santa Fe, N.M. It begins with some technical issues, posed by John Denker of Bell Labs, concerning projection operators, mathematical expressions involved in representing quantities […]
+
8:34 PM | Elementary Observations on 2-Categorical Limits
Describes Kelly's "Elementary observations on 2-categorical limits" and the general theory of weighted limits and colimits, which are described here in a special case.
+
7:18 PM | Myelin finding turns neuroanatomy on its head
Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years […]
+
7:15 PM | Religious Music Brings Benefit to Seniors’ Mental Health
A new article published online in The Gerontologist reports that among older […]
+
7:13 PM | Gecko-like adhesives now useful for real world surfaces (w/video)
Researchers report how they have expanded their design theory to allow Geckskin to adhere powerfully to a wider variety of surfaces found in most homes such as drywall, and wood.
+
7:07 PM | Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a molecular scale
Researchers develop system that could one day peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules.
+
6:58 PM | Impurity size affects performance of emerging superconductive material
New research finds that impurities can hurt performance - or possibly provide benefits - in a key superconductive material that is expected to find use in a host of applications, including future particle colliders. The size of the impurities determines whether they help or hinder the material's performance.
+
6:51 PM | Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair
A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine. A team of researchers has just demonstrated that the principle of adhesion by aqueous solutions of nanoparticles can be used in vivo to repair soft-tissue organs and tissues.
+
6:17 PM | New Paper Dance
B. C. Stacey, “SIC-POVMs and Compatibility among Quantum States” [arXiv:1404.3774]: An unexpected connection exists between compatibility criteria for quantum states and symmetric informationally complete POVMs. Beginning with Caves, Fuchs and Schack’s “Conditions for compatibility of quantum state assignments” [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002), 062111], I show that a qutrit SIC-POVM studied in other contexts enjoys […]
+
5:41 PM | Wait for it, Watch for it and You Could Make History
When it moves, Tens of thousands tune in to watch.People invented the term pitch-black for it,Because black was not good enough.If it touched you,you might end up in a hospital.It generates viral videos on YouTubeby doing absolutely nothing. It is the most exciting experiment of nothing happening. “I don’t always drip, but when I do the crowd goes wild,” the University of Queensland’s Pitch Drop Experiment would say if it could speak.There are a handful of pitch drop […]
+
2:35 PM | Moon dust probe crashes
A NASA spacecraft that studied lunar dust vapourized into its own cloud of dust when it hit the far side of the Moon, as planned, in a mission-ending impact on 17 April. Launched last September, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) finished its primary mission in March. In early April, on an extended mission, it made close passes as low as 2 kilometres above the surface, gathering science data on more than 100 low-elevation orbits. Mission controllers deliberately crashed […]
+
2:04 PM | MERS outbreaks grow; Malaysian case had camel link
Outbreaks of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections expanded […]
+
2:03 PM | Study suggests some fathers elevate their games
As parents, we all take cues from mom and dad […]
+
2:01 PM | A biological engine for human language
For more than a decade, North­eastern psy­chology pro­fessor Iris Berent […]
+
2:00 PM | The Cournot model of oligopoly. A success story
Economic models of perfect competition and of monopoly only need to include individual behavior that takes the environment as given. In the case of […] Read more The post The Cournot model of oligopoly. A success story appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Experimenting with markets Modeling diversity in Macroeconomics Experiments in fairness

Ferreira J.L. (2014). Capacity precommitment, price competition and forward markets, Economics Letters, 122 (2) 362-364. DOI:

Citation
+
1:57 PM | New gene variant ups risk of cancer from processed meat
A common genetic variant that affects one in three people […]
+
1:56 PM | Impact of childhood bullying still evident after 40 years
Negative impact of bullying was found to be persistent and […]
+
1:49 PM | Our relationship with God changes when faced with potential romantic rejection
Easter is a time when many people in the world […]
+
1:47 PM | ‘Dressed’ laser aimed at clouds may be key to inducing rain, lightning
The adage “Everyone complains about the weather but nobody does […]
+
1:45 PM | First Earth-Size Planet Is Discovered in Another Star’s ‘Habitable Zone’
A team of astronomers that includes Penn State scientists has […]
+
1:42 PM | Chronic inflammation linked to ‘high-grade’ prostate cancer
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate […]
+
1:23 PM | In Which I Read Hard Science Fiction
Astonishingly, in the last few weeks, I’ve actually found time to read some– gasp– novels. In particular, I finished two books that probably belong in the “Hard SF” genre: A Darkling Sea by James L. Cambias and Lockstep by Karl Schroeder. Both Jim and Karl are people I’ve met many times at cons; I’ve enjoyed…
+
12:20 PM | Kepler Finds First Earth-size Planet in the Habitable Zone
In a April 17 news release NASA has announced that astronomers using the Kepler Space Telescope have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the circumstellar habitable zone, or the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet, aka the Goldilocks Zone. Though […]
+
11:40 AM | Neutrons method to test dark energy theories by sensitive measurements of gravity at small scales
Non sempre occorre un acceleratore di particelle per fare esperimenti di fisica fondamentale. I primi risultati di un esperimento a bassa energia sulla gravità newtoniana, spinto fino ad un limite […]
+
11:30 AM | The biotech industry with Rob Carlson
In this interview, I speak to Dr. Rob Carlson, a Principal at Biodesic, an engineering and strategic consulting firm in Seattle that provides services to governments and corporations around the globe. At the broadest level, Dr. Carlson is interested in the future role of biology as a human technology. He is the author of the book Biology is Technology: The Promise, Peril, and New Business of Engineering Life, published in 2010 by Harvard University Press; it received the […]
+
8:00 AM | At the Tone, it Will be ‘Now’ O’Clock
The Problem of Now I don’t spend much effort thinking about this sort of issue, since I’m much more interested in the experimental aspects of measuring time than the philosophical aspects of it, but I’ve run across some folks who think this problem of “Now” is so perplexing they can’t get past it. (again, because [...]

April 17, 2014

+
9:04 PM | Unexplained Absence: An Engineer’s Cautionary Tale
You may have noticed, (I hope at least), that I haven’t written here in a while. Here’s why. In January, we went camping during a sunny yet cool weekend in Sommerville, TX. It was nice to get outside and to … Continue reading →
123456789
918 Results