Posts

December 18, 2014

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7:38 PM | Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough
If data could instead be encoded without current it would require much less energy, and make things like low-power, instant-on computing a ubiquitous reality. Researchers have made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field.
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7:09 PM | Creation of 'Rocker' protein opens way for new smart molecules in medicine
Human cells are protected by a largely impenetrable molecular membrane, but researchers have built the first artificial transporter protein that carries individual atoms across membranes, opening the possibility of engineering a new class of smart molecules with applications in fields as wide ranging as nanotechnology and medicine.
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6:54 PM | Researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity
Four pulses of laser light on nanoparticle photocells in a spectroscopy experiment has opened a window on how captured sunlight can be converted into electricity.
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6:49 PM | Bringing oxides into the visible realm
New method to reduce the optical band gap of strontium titantate thin films.
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6:42 PM | Eureka: Radio, Radio
Two radio appearances upcoming as I continue to promote Eureka: Discovering Your Inner Scientist: — Tomorrow, Friday the 19th, I’ll be going down to WAMC around 11am to be on Roundtable, talking with Joe Donahue. This will be live, but fairly short. This is available on a whole host of stations in the not-The-City part…
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6:33 PM | Revealing the quantum geometry of the graphene lattice
Team realizes an Aharonov-Bohm type interferometer to measure the band topology in graphene type lattices.
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5:21 PM | Black Hole Fingerprints: Help Radio Galaxy Zoo Reach Its 1 Millionth Classification
The long winter nights are upon us — what better way to pass the evening than by doing your bit for science? Best part is, you can still watch that favorite holiday movie.Last week we featured a podcast all about the power of citizen scientists helping to analyze very large datasets.This week, I want to highlight one such citizen science project that just celebrated its one year anniversary! This project is known as Radio Galaxy Zoo, a title that you might recognize from the very […]
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4:42 PM | Multiferroic heroics put instant-on computing in sight
Reseaerchers have made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field.
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4:41 PM | Stop telling boys to go into STEM
Stereotyping is always a bad thing, and most people don’t realize that men suffer just as badly from stereotypes as women. Let’s look at science: there has been a ton of work going into how to attract girls and women into scientific endeavors, particularly those that are very math-intensive.  Much of the discussion centers on […]
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4:36 PM | Scientists identify metal organic framework candidates for methane storage
Cars that run on natural gas are touted as efficient and environmentally friendly, but getting enough gas onboard to make them practical is a hurdle. A new study led by researchers at Rice University promises to help.
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3:57 PM | Research aims to improve rechargeable batteries by focusing on graphene oxide paper
An engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide's important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries.
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3:47 PM | Carbon nanotubes enable new way of sound generation
Carbon nanotube assemblies enabled design of a hybrid thermo-electromagnetic sound transducer with unique sound generation features that are not available from conventional diaphragm and thermo-acoustic speakers. New work describes a hybrid thermo-electromagnetic sound transducer (TEMST) fabricated using highly porous multi-walled carbon nanotube sheet that was placed in the proximity of a permanent magnet. Upon electrical AC excitation, thermal response of the material is combined with […]
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3:21 PM | Advent Calendar of Science Stories 18: Third Time’s the Charm
The winter solstice holidays are a time for family and togetherness, so building off yesterday’s post about the great Marie Skłodowska Curie, we’ll stay together with her family. Specifically her daughter Irène Joliot-Curie and her husband Frédéric. The Joliot-Curies are possible answers to a number of Nobel Prize trivia questions– only mother and daughter to…
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3:15 PM | Expectant fathers experience prenatal hormone changes
Impending fatherhood can lower two hormones–testosterone and estradiol–for men, even before their babies are born, a new University of Michigan study found. Other studies indicate that men’s hormones change once […]
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3:14 PM | Wild blueberries (bilberries) can help tackle the adverse effects of a high-fat diet
Eating bilberries diminishes the adverse effects of a high-fat diet, according to a recent study at the University of Eastern Finland. For the first time, bilberries were shown to have […]
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2:44 PM | Study Hints that Ancient Earth Made Its Own Water—Geologically
Evidence that rock circulating in the mantle feeds world’s oceans even today A new study is helping to answer a longstanding question that has recently moved to the forefront of […]
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2:42 PM | Healthy brain development balanced on edge of a cellular ‘sword’
A new Yale-led study of children with neurodevelopmental abnormalities of the brain identifies a “cutting” enzyme crucial to the shaping and division of brain cells as well as the replenishment […]
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2:36 PM | Probing bacterial resistance to a class of natural antibiotics
Antimicrobial peptides are a distinctive class of potent, broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by the body’s innate immune system – the first line of defense against disease-causing microbes. In a new study, […]
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2:32 PM | Stem cells faulty in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
In a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle stem cells express connective-tissue genes associated with fibrosis and muscle weakness, according to a new study. Like human patients, mice with […]
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2:28 PM | Fine particulate air pollution linked with increased autism risk
Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy—particularly during the third trimester—may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers […]
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12:00 PM | SETI Talk - Dr. Alexander...
Dr. Claudia Alexander - Geophysics, NASA Project Scientist, APSHere we have a talk by Claudia Alexander who will explain the science background of some of the mysteries of comets including pros and cons about why we think comets might have brought Earth’s water, concepts regarding missing nitrogen in the outer solar system, and material the comet is made of. Finally Dr Alexander will set the stage for the landing and walk through the 60 hours of time spent on the comet’s surface. […]
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11:59 AM | Logos for science projects – NQO COST Action
Here some test for the logo of our COST Action on Nanoscale Quantum Optics that will start shortly. Together with Andrè Xuereb we have produced this first logo. I like that it highlights that nanotechnology deals with the constituent of matter down to the nanoscale. In particular nanophotonics is the science of light (hence the […]
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10:37 AM | Electron spin could be the key to high-temperature superconductivity
Scientists take a significant step in our understanding of superconductivity by studying the strange quantum events in a unique superconducting material.
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10:30 AM | New technique moves researchers closer to new range of GaN biosensors
Researchers have found a way of binding peptides to the surface of gallium nitride (GaN) in a way that keeps the peptides stable even when exposed to water and radiation. The discovery moves researchers one step closer to developing a new range of biosensors for use in medical and biological research applications.
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10:26 AM | Gold nanorods target cancer cells
Using tiny gold nanorods, researchers have demonstrated a potential breakthrough in cancer therapy.
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10:21 AM | New sensor could improve one of nanotechnology's most useful microscopes
Spotting molecule-sized features may become both easier and more accurate with a sensor developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). With their new design, NIST scientists may have found a way to sidestep some of the problems in calibrating atomic force microscopes (AFMs).
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8:00 AM | Being Disagreeable
Scientific method: Defend the integrity of physics (via zapperz) Faced with difficulties in applying fundamental theories to the observed Universe, some researchers called for a change in how theoretical physics is done. They began to argue — explicitly — that if a theory is sufficiently elegant and explanatory, it need not be tested experimentally, breaking [...]
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7:50 AM | EU publishes nanomaterial guidance for employers and workers
This Guidance document offers an overview of the issues surrounding the safe use of manufactured nanomaterials in the workplace, sets out the broad outlines of preventive action and provides a practical tool for complying with specific aspects of ensuring workers' safety, such as risk assessment and risk management.
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5:00 AM | ORNL Microscopy Pencils Patterns in Polymers at the Nanoscale
Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have used advanced microscopy to carve out nanoscale designs on the surface of a new class of ionic polymer materials for the first time.
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5:00 AM | Crown Ethers Flatten in Graphene for Strong, Specific Binding
ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more.
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