Posts

August 29, 2014

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4:45 PM | Should Scientific Progress Affect Religious Beliefs?
Sure it should. Here’s a new video from Closer to Truth, in which I’m chatting briefly with Robert Lawrence Kuhn about the question. “New” in the sense that it was just put on YouTube, although we taped it back in … Continue reading →
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3:47 PM | Energy Considerations and a Magnet Test: Lab Book 2014_08_29
Summary:  The energy and flux calculations show that the maximum sample size for the fiberglass Dewar should have a maximum energy of 308 keV.  This energy can easily overcome the Dewar attenuation.  A bit of research into computing an accurate theoretical spectrum was done.  The detector was recalibrated to place 320 keV in the highest channel.  Source runs with this setup were performed with Am 241 and Cs 137.  Things look good in this direction so far, (the […]
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2:00 PM | The mobilization of science for World War One
Author:. Shaul Katzir is a Marie Curie senior research fellow of the Gerda Henkel Foundation (M4HUMAN programme), at the Minerva Centre for Humanities – […] Read more The post The mobilization of science for World War One appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:Raw Science: The 600,000 year-old human who lost 2 teeth in the II World War. On the generation of problems by 20th century science and technology Selective ignorance in science
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1:47 PM | Nanopositioner PZ700 With Increased Life Time And Freedom From Maintenance
The nanopositioner PZ700 from piezosystem jena convinces in a long?term test with a high number of cycles and freedom from maintenance.
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1:13 PM | Interstellar Space Can Be Pebbly
We’re used to thinking of the space between the stars as void, bereft of all but the most sparsely distributed atoms and molecules, or the occasional microscopic grain of silicon or carbon... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:03 PM | Copper shines as flexible conductor
Bend them, stretch them, twist them, fold them: modern materials that are light, flexible and highly conductive have extraordinary technological potential, whether as artificial skin or electronic paper. Making such concepts affordable enough for general use remains a challenge but a new way of working with copper nanowires and a PVA 'nano glue' could be a game-changer.
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11:57 AM | Safety check for nanoparticles
Researchers at FAU work on safety checks for minute particles.
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11:53 AM | Growing nanotubes in a targeted way
New method gives carbon nanotubes the desired structure.
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11:49 AM | Plug 'n' play protein crystals
Pauling's Rules describe the principles governing the structure of complex ionic crystals. These rules essentially describe how the arrangement of atoms in a crystal is critically dependent on the size of the atoms, their charge and type of bonding. According to scientists, similar rules can be applied to prepare ionic colloidal crystals consisting of oppositely charged proteins and virus particles.
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11:49 AM | Planet-satellite nanostructures from gold nanoparticles and RAFT star polymers
Researchers have produced nanoparticles surrounded by a group of smaller nanoparticles like a planet orbited by satellites. They equipped larger gold nanoparticles with special star-shaped polymers, which in turn bind to smaller gold nanoparticles.
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9:34 AM | Simpler process to grow germanium nanowires could improve lithium ion batteries
Researchers have developed what they call a simple, one-step method to grow nanowires of germanium from an aqueous solution. Their process could make it more feasible to use germanium in lithium ion batteries.
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9:00 AM | Che cosa illuminò il cosmo?
Che cosa produce più luce? Una città molto grande o più città minori? Certo, le città più grandi producono più luce ma è anche vero che i paesi piccoli sono più numerosi. Dunque, se capiamo come è distribuita la luminosità, allora saremo in grado di avere maggiori indizi, ad esempio, su come è strutturata una nazione. E’ quanto […]
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8:47 AM | Physics — It’s Practical!
Helmhurts A few posts back I was concerned with optimising the WiFi reception in my flat, and I chose a simple method for calculating the distribution of electromagnetic intensity. I casually mentioned that I really should be doing things more rigorously by solving the Helmholtz equation, but then didn’t. Well, spurred on by a shocking [...]
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7:06 AM | Back to the future for quantum computers
An oscillator once used to build early computers could become a core part of quantum computers.
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7:02 AM | Separating the buckybowl twins
Selective enrichment of one of the mirror-image forms of corannulene molecules could lead to exciting new possibilities in nanotechnology.
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6:57 AM | Breakthrough in light sources for new quantum technology
One of the most promising technologies for future quantum circuits are photonic circuits, i.e. circuits based on light (photons) instead of electrons (electronic circuits). First, it is necessary to create a stream of single photons and control their direction. Researchers around the world have made all sorts of attempts to achieve this, but now scientists have succeeded in creating a steady stream of photons emitted one at a time and in a particular direction.
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6:51 AM | Intracellular imaging gets interactive
A so-called bioparallel chemistry approach is successfully used to image and activate an essential metabolism compound inside a cell.
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6:48 AM | Precision control of the timing, structure and functions in molecular self-assembly
New technology for the materials production method essential to the organic electronics field.
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6:00 AM | WISE J0304, una ‘palla gigante’ gassosa di tipo gioviano
Un gruppo di astronomi hanno identificato un pianeta gigante gassoso che potrebbe avere avuto una origine particolarmente diversa, trascorrendo gran parte delle sue fasi iniziali come una stella calda fino ad arrivare oggi con una temperatura molto bassa tipica di un pianeta. L’attuale temperatura è di circa 100-150°C, intermedia a quella che caratterizza Venere e […]
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5:29 AM | Nordita Workshop for Science Writers, Day Two
The second day of the “Quantum Boot Camp” was much lighter on talks. The only speaker was Ray Laflamme from the Institute for Quantum Computing in Waterloo, who gave a nice introduction to quantum technologies. While he did spend a bit of time at the start going through Shor’s algorithm for factoring numbers (following up…
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1:32 AM | Throwback Thursday: Back-to-school advice for STEM students
What every middle-to-high schooler should know.Continue reading on Medium »

August 28, 2014

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8:28 PM | Lontano dal pianeta silenzioso
C.S. Lewis non è solo lo scrittore de Le cronache di Narnia, ma ha anche realizzato una trilogia fantascientifica di cui recentemente (2011) la Adelphi ha proposto uno dei tre romanzi, Lontano dal pianeta silenzioso.Il protagonista, Elwin Ransom, professore di filologia, viene portato contro la sua volontà da due loschi scienziati su Marte. Sembra quasi l'incipit di Paolino Paperino e il mistero di Marte di Federico Pedrocchi, e infatti anche nel romanzo di Lewis i due rapitori […]
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7:45 PM | Using nanotechnology to regulate gene expression at the transcriptional level
Gene transcription is tightly regulated by proteins called transcription factors. These transcription factor (TF) proteins are master regulators of transcriptional activity and gene expression. Transcription factors are responsible for transcribing the correct genes and therefore for producing the right quantity of proteins. TF-based gene regulation is a promising approach for many biological applications, however, several limitations hinder the full potential of TFs. To overcome these […]
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7:28 PM | Watching the atomic structure of glass under pressure
Glass has many applications that call for different properties, such as resistance to thermal shock or to chemically harsh environments. Glassmakers commonly use additives such as boron oxide to tweak these properties by changing the atomic structure of glass. Now researchers have for the first time captured atoms in borosilicate glass flipping from one structure to another as it is placed under high pressure.
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5:12 PM | Do theoretical computer scientists despise practitioners? (Answer: no, that’s crazy)
A roboticist and Shtetl-Optimized fan named Jon Groff recently emailed me the following suggestion for a blog entry: I think a great idea for an entry would be the way that in fields like particle physics the theoreticians and experimentalists get along quite well but in computer science and robotics in particular there seems to […]
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4:39 PM | "Water Tractor Beam" Makes a Splash
A new paper from researchers at the Australian National University is making waves in physics this month; the group claims to have developed a “tractor beam” of sorts. However, as is usual for claims of science-fiction technology made real, there’s a catch—it won’t be useful for pulling in rogue spaceships, but it might one day find applications helping guide the path of steamships. The report details the creation of never-before-seen flow patterns using waves on […]
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3:10 PM | Playing twenty questions with molecules at plasmonic junctions
Toward engineering ultrasensitive probes of nanoscale physical and chemical processes.
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3:03 PM | A new, tunable device for spintronics
An international team of scientists realizes a tunable spin-charge converter made of GaAs.
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2:59 PM | Nanoscale assembly line for biological molecules
Researchers have realised a long-held dream: inspired by an industrial assembly line, they have developed a nanoscale production line for the assembly of biological molecules.
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2:26 PM | Could Dark Matter just be Normal Stuff that’s Dark?
There’s plenty of gas, dust, planets and rocky bodies out there. Could some combination of them explain dark matter?Continue reading on Medium »
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