Posts

January 29, 2015

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3:47 PM | Graphene 3D Lab Ready for Graphene-Enhanced Filament Production
Graphene 3D Lab Inc. has announced that it has received and successfully assembled an industrial scale thermoplastic extruder line to be used in the production of conductive graphene filament. The equipment, which has a production capacity of up to 10 kg per hour of 3D printer filament, is now operational and has been tested for the production of specialty filaments.
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2:59 PM | Light: Going Beyond the Bulb
2015 has been declared the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (#IYL2015) by the United Nations. Working for NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, a space-based telescope that observes X-rays from the Universe, we talk about light all the time. X-rays are a kind of light. There are many different kinds of light that make up the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to gamma rays, but only one that human eyes can detect naturally (known as optical, or visible, […]
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2:58 PM | The Problem with (and Promise of) Word Problems
Math with Bad Drawings has a post about “word problems” that will sound very familiar to anyone who’s taught introductory physics. As he notes, the problem with “word problems” for math-phobic students is that it requires translating words into symbols, and then using the symbols to select a procedure. It adds a step to what…
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2:42 PM | DIADEMS - finding the sensor behind the sparkle
By modifying the structure of a diamond crystal, the DIADEMS project creates a new material that could be used in applications, from the creation of smart medicines to the next generation computers.
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2:34 PM | Paper-based nanoparticle test kit detects dengue antibodies from saliva
Finding out whether you have been infected with dengue may soon be as easy as spitting into a rapid test kit. The paper-based disposable device will allow dengue-specific antibodies to be detected easily from saliva within 20 minutes. This device is currently undergoing further development for commercialization.
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9:19 AM | The anti-aging benefits of environmental enrichment
Aging is not just an irreversible disturbance of homeostasis but it can also be considered as a process where biological and functional complexity is progressively diminishing. With the passage of […]
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9:17 AM | The nanomedicines of the future will build on quantum chemistry
Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow's cancer drugs.
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8:38 AM | 3D printed 'smart glue' leverages DNA assembly at the macroscale
Designing systems that build themselves is one of the great dreams of nanotechnology researchers, and they are taking great strides towards developing such 'bottom-up' nanotechnology fabrication techniques. Fabrication processes based on DNA might change this: DNA origami have been heralded as a potential breakthrough for the creation of nanoscale devices. Researchers have now developed methods to assemble DNA-functionalized microparticles into a colloidal gel, and to extrude this gel with a 3D […]
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8:25 AM | Park NX-Bio, the only 3-in-1 Imaging Nanoscale Tool Available for Life Science Researchers
Park Systems, a leading manufacturer of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoscale metrology products, proudly introduces Park NX-Bio, a powerful 3-in-1 bio-research tool that uniquely combines scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) with AFM and an inverted optical microscope (IOM) on the same platform.
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4:00 AM | Uno strano lampo radio di origine extragalattica
I radioastronomi hanno osservato uno strano fenomeno “colto in flagrante”: stiamo parlando di un cosiddetto radio burst veloce (Fast Radio Burst, FRB). L’evento può essere descritto come una sorta di lampo di onde radio, ben definito e di brevissima durata, che si ritiene provenga da una sorgente ignota di origine extragalattica. Questo ‘nuovo’ fenomeno, che dura qualche … Continue reading Uno strano lampo radio di origine extragalattica […]

January 28, 2015

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5:30 PM | Dry adhesives controlled by a magnetic field
A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field.
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5:11 PM | Podcast: Which Way to Mercury?
Mercury has a big month coming up, with the 40th anniversary of Mariner 10's final flyby on March 16th and the planned conclusion of the MESSENGER mission a couple of weeks later.  To date, these are the only two spacecraft to have visited the innermost planet in our solar system, largely because it's fiendishly difficult to get there and operate in orbit so close to the Sun.  Nevertheless, Mercury remains an exciting destination for planetary exploration, holding clues to the […]
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5:02 PM | Spiders spinning electrically charged nanofibers
A spider commonly found in garden centres in Britain is giving fresh insights into how to spin incredibly long and strong fibres just a few nanometres thick.
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4:32 PM | Demystifying nanocrystal solar cells
Researchers have developed a comprehensive model to explain how electrons flow inside new types of solar cells made of tiny crystals. The model allows for a better understanding of such cells and may help to increase their efficiency.
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4:22 PM | Overweight video game avatars ‘play’ worse than thin ones
Women assigned an overweight avatar in a video tennis game didn’t play as hard as those assigned a slim one — regardless of the player’s actual size, according to a […]
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4:19 PM | Did genetic links to modern maladies provide ancient benefits?
Psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, can cause rashes that itch and sting. So why would a genetic susceptibility to this and other ailments persist for hundreds of thousands of years, […]
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4:17 PM | Can Omega-3 Fatty Acids Combat COPD?
The National Institutes of Health awarded $1.6 million to Rochester researchers to study a group of compounds derived from omega-3 fatty acids and their ability to combat inflammation caused by […]
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4:16 PM | Study: Porches an Overlooked Lead Hazard
A new study in the journal Environmental Health indicates that porches in older homes can be a significant source of lead dust and that housing regulations – which have been […]
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4:14 PM | Brain Region Vulnerable to Aging is Larger in Those with Longevity Gene Variant
People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according […]
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3:46 PM | The Big Bang by Balloon
How an experiment high above Antarctica — Spider — sheds new light on the cosmic microwave background.Continue reading on Medium »
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3:21 PM | Joint international research project leads to a breakthrough in terahertz spectroscopy
Although terahertz spectroscopy has great potential, especially for environmental monitoring and security screening applications, it previously could not be used effectively to study nanocrystals or molecules at extremely low concentrations. An international team has found a solution to this problem by increasing the technique's sensitivity using metallic nanostructures.
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3:14 PM | Electronic circuits with reconfigurable pathways closer to reality
Multitasking circuits capable of reconfiguring themselves in real time and switching functions as the need arises - this is the promising application stemming from a new discovery.
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3:00 PM | Science and the search of beauty (1)
One traditional question in the philosophy of science, or perhaps it would be better to say in the philosophical views about science, is the […] Read more The post Science and the search of beauty (1) appeared first on Mapping Ignorance. Related posts:On the generation of problems by 20th century science and technology Stories of the past as promises of the future Deconstructing intelligent design (1): On Dembski’s wrong “explanatory filter”
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2:45 PM | Nanowire clothing could keep people warm
Scientists have developed a novel nanowire coating for clothes that can both generate heat and trap the heat from our bodies better than regular clothes.
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2:45 PM | Surprise!
Over at Curious Wavefunction, Ashutosh Jogalekar offers a list of great surprising results in physics. This is fairly comprehensive, but leaves out one of my favorites, which is the discovery of the muon. Muons are particles like electrons, but a couple hundred times heavier. When they were first detected in cosmic ray traces in 1936,…
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2:24 PM | Researchers use sound to slow down, speed up, and block light
Researchers have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, the phenomenon of Brillouin Scattering Induced Transparency (BSIT), which can be used to slow down, speed up, and block light in an optical waveguide. The BSIT phenomenon permits light to travel in the forward direction while light traveling in the backward direction is strongly absorbed.
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1:00 PM | Top 10 scientific mysteries for the 21st century
Solving the Top 10 scientific mysteries facing the 21st century will not be all fun but could be mostly games.
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11:30 AM | Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na, Boom Boom
Sodium’s explosive secrets revealed The explosion, say Pavel Jungwirth and his collaborators at the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague, is not merely a consequence of the ignition of the hydrogen gas that the alkali metals release from water. That may happen eventually, but it begins as something far stranger: a rapid exodus of electrons [...]
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10:05 AM | Building a graphene-based future for Europe
The European Union is investing heavily in the exploitation of graphene's unique properties through a number of research initiatives such as the SEMANTICS project running at Trinity College Dublin.
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9:55 AM | Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories
Advance could lead to quantum computing and the secure transfer of information over long-distance fiber optic networks.
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