Posts

February 24, 2015

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12:40 PM | I’ve Just Seen a (DNA-Generated) Face
Heather Murphy in The New York Times: The faces here, which look a bit like video game avatars, are actually portraits drawn from DNA. Each rendering was created by plugging an individual genetic profile into a predictive tool created by...
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11:56 AM | Tuesday Poem
The Nobodies Fleas dream of buying themselves a dog, and nobodies dream of escaping poverty: that one magical day good luck will suddenly rain down on them–will rain down in buckets. But good luck doesn’t rain down yesterday, today, tomorrow,...
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10:34 AM | ‘Hindu Right’s appropriation of svaraj is hypocrisy’ —Akeel Bilgrami
From The Hindu: In an interview to Rajgopal Saikumar, Prof. Bilgrami, the Sidney Morgenbesser Chair in Philosophy; Professor, Committee on Global Thought; Director, South Asian Institute at Columbia University and author of Secularism, Identity and Enchantment (2014) explained what autonomy...

February 23, 2015

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9:08 PM | I Wanna Live Forever
If you’re one of those people who look the universe in the eyeball without flinching, choosing to accept uncomfortable truths when they are supported by the implacable judgment of Science, then you’ve probably acknowledged that sitting is bad for you. … Continue reading →
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11:48 AM | What chemlambda can do for you
This post follows after What can I do with chemlambda, which questions to ask about it? and FAQ: chemlambda in real and virtual worlds. 1. Is chemlambda another visualization tool for lambda calculus? NO. Visualization is an independent part, for the moment I use d3.js. Moreover chemlambda is only tangentially related to lambda calculus. 2. … Continue reading What chemlambda can do for you →
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5:45 AM | In Praise of the Chapaterati
Curry houses are also a dominant setting in much writing by authors of South Asian heritage in the UK. Writers working in Urdu, English, and Bengali have evoked both South Asians living in Britain and the restaurant fare they produce. In this essay, Claire Chambers extrapolates a strand from her forthcoming book Britain Through Muslim Eyes, Literary Representations, 1780−1988 (Palgrave: autumn 2015) and discusses the history and cultural representation of curries in Britain.
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5:40 AM | The Love Of Money
by Mandy de Waal "I never realised that I had a problem until quite recently. Before this I thought it was normal. I thought that everyone thinks (about money) the way I do," says Charles Hugo (not his real name)...
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5:35 AM | Poem
OLD FORMS WILL NOT BE ENTERTAINED (a sign at the India Consulate, New York) For David Barsamian Old chants to the Ganges shall not be entertained Dead cows float in holy water unrestrained Family roots shall be ascertained Nationality of...
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5:30 AM | Information: the Measure of All Things? Part I: Communication, Code and Computation
by Yohan J. John Metaphor is a hallmark of human communication, and a vital tool of scientific thinking. Along with its more formal cousin, analogy, metaphor allows us to create linguistic and conceptual bridges from the known to the unknown....
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5:25 AM | Perceptions
Loris Gréaud. The Unplayed Notes Museum. 2015 "What exactly will happen during the opening on Saturday? “If I tell you too much,” the artist says, following something like secret-agent protocol, “It will kill the idea.”" ... "On the evening of...
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5:20 AM | The Return of the Aam Aadmi Party
by Namit Arora What to make of the verdict in Delhi’s Assembly elections this month? After a dismal show in the national election last year, when many had written it off, the Aam Aadmi (‘common man’) Party achieved a crushing...
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5:15 AM | CATSPEAK
by Brooks Riley
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5:10 AM | Papered Over
by Lisa Lieberman He had told me that he shredded street posters himself to uncover the ones hidden beneath the newer strata. He pulled the strips down layer by layer and photographed them meticulously, stage by stage, down to the...
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5:05 AM | Who's Building Tomorrow's Monopolies?
by Aditya Dev Sood This standalone piece is part of a special series on Startup Tunnel, a new incubator based in New Delhi. Links to earlier articles appear at the end of the article. This past week I led a...

February 22, 2015

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8:13 PM | The working factorial
Continuing from Experiments with a little lisper tutorial, recall that at that moment I succeeded to compute with chemlambda a relative of the factorial, but not the factorial itself. Now, I learned how to do it and it works all the time (compared with 20% success last time). Last time I took a lambda term … Continue reading The working factorial →
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5:55 PM | The Boys Who Loved Birds
Phil McKenna in The Big Roundtable: “In this area you should go just behind me,” the stout man says, the th of his this buzzing like a bee. Then, as if to reassure me, he adds, “I’ve been here before,...
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5:46 PM | The Joyful, Gossipy and Absurd Private Life of Virginia Woolf
Emma Woolf in Newsweek: “I caused some slight argument with Leonard this morning by trying to cook my breakfast in bed. I believe, however, that the good sense of the proceeding will make it prevail; that is, if I can...
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5:42 PM | Nostalgia Just Became a Law of Nature
Simon Dedeo in Nautilus: John Ruskin called it the pathetic fallacy: to see rainstorms as passionate, drizzles as sad, and melting streams as innocent. After all, the intuition went, nature has no human passions. Imagine Ruskin’s surprise, then, were he...
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5:29 PM | Experiment.com
A for-profit company called Experiment connects researchers with public donors offers an alternative model for Life Science research. As you can see in the table below, this model could lead to cost-cutting in research and over-employment of junior academics. It could also lead to a qualitatively new and exciting form of public science engagement. I’m […]
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3:23 PM | Sunday Poem
—From the Washington Post - November 13, 1980: "It defies the laws of orbital mechanics as I understand them but two components of the fifth ring out are braided," said Dr. Bradford Smith of the University of Arizona, one of...
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2:01 PM | The Evolution Catechism
Adam Gopnik in The New Yorker: Darwin Day, February 12th, passed last week without much fuss, even from those of us who have written at length about the man it honors. Celebrating Charles Darwin’s birthday has some of the vibe...
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1:48 PM | philip levine (1928 - 2015)
No summary available for this post.
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1:45 PM | Writing by Charles Bukowski
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1:43 PM | Breaking the Code: Biography of Alan Turing
No summary available for this post.
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1:04 PM | "Niggerization of America" - Cornel West
The fundamental irony of American history is that we follow the better angels of our nature when we honestly and compassionately confront the devilish realities we would like to ignore or deny. The founding of this most American of periodicals...
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12:05 PM | Through the looking glass: Shahzia Sikander, Pakistan’s most celebrated global icon of the arts
Raza Rumi in The Friday Times: It is a pity that I got to discover Shahzia Sikander’s work only when I left Pakistan. After her initial successes in the 1990s, with her migration to the United States, she slowly disappeared...
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4:57 AM | The Price of Black Ambition
Roxane Gay in the Virginia Quarterly Review: I am thinking about success, ambition, and blackness and how breaking through while black is tempered by so much burden. Nothing exemplifies black success and ambition like Black History Month, a celebratory month...

February 21, 2015

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10:36 PM | Dirty tactics by anti-fluoride activists in Taupo
Fly fishing in Lake Taupo. Image credit: Great lake Taupo Local body councils have had a gutsful of the fluoridation issue. Most councillors don’t have the skills to objectively judge submissions – and the field is so controversial they get … Continue reading →
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9:41 PM | In Defense of Islam
Ross Douthat in the New York Times: Consider this post a kind of complement, maybe, to my anti-anti-Crusades commentary of late. The big foreign policy piece that everyone is talking about this week, and deservedly, is Graeme Wood’s deep Atlantic...
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5:23 PM | The Silk Road might have started as a libertarian experiment, but it was doomed to end as a fiefdom run by pirate kings
Henry Farrell in Aeon: The Hidden Wiki holds the keys to a secret internet. To reach it, you need a special browser that can access ‘Tor Hidden Services’ – websites that have chosen to obscure their physical location. But even...
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