Posts

September 15, 2014

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4:15 AM | CATSPEAK
by Brooks Riley
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4:10 AM | Is Wine Tasting Nonsense?
by Dwight Furrow Wine tasting has become one of the favorite playthings of the media with articles appearing periodically detailing a new study that allegedly shows wine tasters to be incompetent charlatans, arrogantly foisting their fantasies on an unsuspecting public....
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4:05 AM | Looking Through Glass
by Madhu Kaza In the borrowed apartment where I'm living for a while, on the top floor of a brownstone, a stone Buddha sits on a low table in front of a center window. The crowns of trees some thirty...
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3:47 AM | Short skirts and niqab bans: On sexuality and the secular body
Jennifer A. Selby and Mayanthi L. Fernando in The Immanent Frame: Introduced in Québec in March 2010, Bill 94 proposed requiring women to unveil their faces if they wanted to work in the public sector or access public services, including...
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2:25 AM | Crude dredging of the scientific literature
I am always amazed at how some people will crudely misrepresent the scientific literature in their efforts to pretend their particular political agenda is scientifically valid. The way they will dredge the scientific literature searching for studies they can quote and … Continue reading →

September 14, 2014

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9:37 PM | How space is born (0)
This opens a new series of posts, which will turn us back to the “computing with space” theme, the main interest here at chorasimilarity. Look again at the move R2 of graphic lambda calculus.   The epsilon and mu are, originally, elements of a commutative group. Suggestions have been made repeatedly that the commutative group […]
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5:35 PM | Evolution’s Random Paths Lead to One Place
Emily Singer in Quanta Magazine (photo by Sergey Kryazhimskiy): In his fourth-floor lab at Harvard University, Michael Desai has created hundreds of identical worlds in order to watch evolution at work. Each of his meticulously controlled environments is home to...
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5:29 PM | Reflections on the Independence Referendum
As we approach the referendum on Scottish independence, several pieces reflect on its meaning and implications. Tariq Ali, John Burnside, T.J. Clark, Linda Colley, David Craig, Tom Devine, Norman Dombey, Anne Enright Colin Kidd, Ross McKibbin, Ferdinand Mount, Tom Nairn,...
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5:19 PM | This Isthmus of a Middle State
Robert Paul Wolff over at his website: One must indeed have turned a deaf ear to the chatter of the public square not to have heard the constant invocation of The Middle Class. Politicians, pundits, bloggers, even economists speak of...
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5:15 PM | How Corrupt Are Our Politics?
David Cole reviews Zephyr Teachout's Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United, in the NYRB (photo by Lauren Lancaster): The US attorney for the Southern District of New York, Preet Bharara, is now investigating whether the...
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5:08 PM | The Death of Adulthood in American Culture
A.O. Scott in the NYT Magazine: TV characters are among the allegorical figures of our age, giving individual human shape to our collective anxieties and aspirations. The meanings of “Mad Men” are not very mysterious: The title of the final...
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4:13 PM | Cinema Europe I: Where It All Began
No summary available for this post.
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4:12 PM | Dziga Vertov: Soviet Toys (1924)
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4:10 PM | death carol by walt whitman
No summary available for this post.
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4:08 PM | Is 'Progress' Good for Humanity?
Jeremy Caradonna in The Atlantic: The stock narrative of the Industrial Revolution is one of moral and economic progress. Indeed, economic progress is cast as moral progress. The story tends to go something like this: Inventors, economists, and statesmen in...
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11:23 AM | Sunday Poem
True To judge if a line is true, banish the error of parallax. Bring your eye as close as you can to the line itself and follow it. A master tiler taught me this. People wish to walk where he...

September 13, 2014

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7:43 PM | 'Someday I might end up as a poet': Prison letters from Faiz Ahmed Faiz to his wife
Salima Hashmi in Scroll: Since being Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s daughter has given me privileged access to the family archives, I have become an accidental archivist. In 2009 I embarked upon the Faiz Ghar project to set up a small museum...
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7:38 PM | Los Angeles Time-Lapse - Supermoon
Los Angeles Time-Lapse - TimeLAX 03 - Supermoon from iVideoMaking on Vimeo.
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6:08 PM | Francis Fukuyama’s ‘Political Order and Political Decay’
Sheri Berman at The New York Times: Perhaps Fukuyama’s most interesting section is his discussion of the United States, which is used to illustrate the interaction of democracy and state building. Up through the 19th century, he notes, the United...
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6:05 PM | earth: both extraordinary and insignificant
Tim Radford at The Guardian: His book is an intoxicating collection of questions answered with other questions, and startling discoveries that make creation even more mysterious. A couple of decades ago, physicists spoke confidently of a "theory of everything" and...
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5:48 PM | limits to the pursuit of happiness
Stephen Cave at The Financial Times: For most of the past 2,000 years of western culture, happiness on earth was considered neither achievable nor desirable. “Cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all...
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12:58 PM | Saturday Poem
The Art of Leaving The warmth is leaving your shirt, hanging over the back of the chair. Slowly it is giving back everything it had of yours. by Gabeba Baderoon from: The Best of MA Writing, 2202-2003 publisher: Sheffield
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12:49 PM | Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Galen Strawson in The Guardian: Human beings (members of the genus Homo) have existed for about 2.4m years. Homo sapiens, our own wildly egregious species of great apes, has only existed for 6% of that time – about 150,000 years....
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12:38 PM | Can a Book Ever Change a Reader’s Life for the Worse?
Leslie Jamison in The New York Times: At his sentencing hearing in 1981, after he was convicted of John Lennon’s murder, Mark David Chapman read aloud from J. D. Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye”: “I’m standing on the edge...
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11:02 AM | Time for a predictable, just and independent surveyor of government and politics
This is about Australian politics, so please ignore it if you do not care. In New South Wales there is a quasi-judicial investigative organ called the Independent Commission against Corruption, or ICAC (which a certain news empire’s rags insist upon calling “Icac” to avoid focusing on the meaning of the acronym). It has uncovered extensive […]

September 12, 2014

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4:36 PM | Gold OA with CC licence, Green OA without and a lesson from the dispute between Amazon and Hachette
Further are some data along with my speculations, which may be or may be not accurate, due to my limited understanding. Hey, everybody has a limited understanding, here is mine! TL;DR> The crux of the matter is in this part of  any recent CC 4.0 licence: in Section 2/Scope/a. Licence grant/5. “5. Downstream recipients. Offer […]
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3:55 PM | Letters by Vladimir Nabokov to his wife Véra
Donald Rayfield in the Literary Review: What seems to emerge is a portrait of a marriage of which most male writers can only dream: a wife who devotes all her talents, energy and steely character to nurturing her husband's genius...
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3:31 PM | Mining for Antibiotics, Right Under Our Noses
Carl Zimmer in the New York Times: “Microorganisms are the best chemists on the planet,” declaredMichael A. Fischbach, a chemist himself at the University of California, San Francisco. For evidence, Dr. Fischbach points to the many lifesaving drugs that microorganisms...
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3:24 PM | How Vladimir Putin is revolutionizing information warfare
Peter Pomerantsev in The Atlantic: At the NATO summit in Wales last week, General Philip Breedlove, the military alliance’s top commander, made a bold declaration. Russia, he said, is waging “the most amazing information warfare blitzkrieg we have ever seen...
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3:13 PM | Hans and Ola Rosling: How not to be ignorant about the world
No summary available for this post.
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