X

Posts

April 06, 2014

+
11:08 PM | Why Global Warming Will Cross a Dangerous Threshold in 2036
Michael E. Mann in Scientific American: If the world continues to burn fossil fuels at the current rate, global warming will rise 2 degrees Celsius by 2036, crossing a threshold that many scientists think will hurt all aspects of human...
+
11:04 PM | himiko
No summary available for this post.
+
11:03 PM | The Mental Life of Plants and Worms, Among Others
Oliver Sacks in the NYRB: Charles Darwin’s last book, published in 1881, was a study of the humble earthworm. His main theme—expressed in the title, The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms—was the immense power of worms,...
+
7:05 PM | Where Did You Sleep Last Night
No summary available for this post.
+
4:22 PM | Intelligence without a brain? Um, no.
I am placing this post here because it it addresses a question that arises frequently—on twitter, Wikipedia reference desks, etc.  It is extracted from a longer essay titled Metaphorical Dualism and the Cartesian Airplane. One often sees claims that there are people with severely damaged brains who nevertheless have normal minds. The most widely discussed … Continue reading »
+
2:20 PM | A God In Every Stone
Michele Roberts in The Independent: Pink may be the colour of an Empire's territories shown on a map of the world, while for modern shoppers trawling that world it denotes gifts suitable for girls. Kamila Shamsie's passionate new novel, set...
+
1:47 PM | Epic Fail
Scott A. Sandage in The New York Times: Books about failure put both their authors and their readers in awkward positions. Writers are at pains to abase themselves somewhat, to show that they know the terrain by sacrificing some dignity...
+
11:04 AM | Sunday Poem
Performance I starred that night, I shone: I was footwork and firework in one, a rocket that wriggled up and shot darkness with a parasol of brilliants and a peewee descant on a flung bit; I was busters of glitter-bombs...

April 05, 2014

+
11:15 PM | Leaves from Satan's Book (1921) - Carl Dreyer
No summary available for this post.
+
9:12 PM | Microbiome OS
Your computer could be sitting alone and still be completely outnumbered for your operating system  is home to trillions upon trillions of tiny passengers – chemlambda molecules. The programs making the operating system of your computer are made up of around ten million code lines, but you harbour a hundred million artificial life molecular beings. […]
+
5:23 PM | One Of The World's Most Dangerous Cities Is Emerging As An Indie Music Capital
Mallika Rao in the Huffington Post: Karachi, Pakistan is one of the world’s most violent cities. And yet some of the music coming out of it would fit right in at a garden party on Cape Cod. The disconnect is...
+
5:09 PM | For nearly two hundred years America was one of the healthiest and longest-lived countries, but today, over thirty countries have better health by many measures. What happened?
Stephen Bezruchka in the Boston Review: In answering this question, the distinction between health and health care is a critical one, but something that seems not to be well understood by the lay public, health care professionals, or policy makers....
+
4:56 PM | Ken Roth: Rationales governments use to claim mass snooping is legal
Ken Roth in the Sydney Morning Herald: Edward Snowden has done us all a service by revealing how extensively our private communications are being monitored - not because of any targeted inquiry into criminality, but as part of a broad...
+
4:47 PM | Alan Lightman: The physicist as novelist
No summary available for this post.
+
1:28 PM | Barbara Ehrenreich faces the mystical
David L. Ulin at The LA Times: "[W]hat do you do with something like this — an experience so anomalous, so disconnected from the normal life you share with other people," Ehrenreich asks in the foreword to the book, "that...
+
1:21 PM | It's a Living: the glum designs behind the world of modern work
Jerry Stahl in BookForum: One of my favorite moments in Cubed, Nikil Saval’s lush, funny, and unexpectedly fascinating history of the workplace, comes in a chapter called “The Birth of the Office,” in which the author describes the insane yet...
+
1:21 PM | Charlie Chaplin
Susie Boyt at The Financial Times: Peter Ackroyd’s compact new life of Charlie Chaplin opens magnificently in the heart of south London in the last decade of the 19th century. This is a London rife with the “suspect pleasures” of...
+
1:13 PM | The Repercussions
Sonali Deraniyagala in The New York Times: “Where is Ajay? What was the point of having raised him?” an elderly woman grumbles to her husband about their adult son in the opening pages of Akhil Sharma’s semi-autobiographical new novel, “Family...
+
12:56 AM | Speciation – A brief history: The late eighteenth century
After Linnaeus had settled on the older mechanism of hybridisation of genera with other genera or with varieties formed by geographical conditions as the cause of new species, the topic began to pick up speed. Hybridisation remained the usual method … Continue reading →

April 04, 2014

+
1:12 PM | The Limits of Muslim Liberalism
Zaheer Kazmi reviews two new books on the Middle East and Islam, one by Tariq Ramadan and another by Bassam Tibi, in the LA Review of Books: As at the end of the Cold War, the recent tumult in the...
+
1:06 PM | Poland's Gender Dispute
Jaroslaw Kuisz and Karolina Wigura in Eurozine: Among scholars, gender studies are seen as supporting a wide-ranging and on-going discussion on the social roles of men and women, on the time they devote to housework and childcare, on the perception...
+
12:56 PM | Invisible world, invisible saviors: The secret to overcoming the threat of extinction
Nicholas P. Money in Salon: Our highly bacterial nature seems significant to me in an emotional sense. I’m captivated by the revelation that my breakfast feeds the 100 trillion bacteria and archaea in my colon, and that they feed me...
+
12:23 PM | Siri Hustvedt, art and the patriarchy
Lidija Haas at The Times Literary Supplement: Not everyone translates what they read into images, a man once told Siri Hustvedt; “I just see the words”. More than once, Hustvedt has expressed something like compassionate horror at the thought of...
+
12:15 PM | Lydia Davis's inimitable decision process
Christine Smallwood at Bookforum: Davis is the author of a novel and five volumes of short stories, some of which are as long as fifty pages and some of which are no more than a phrase. (It’s the latter that...
+
12:12 PM | geoff dyer can't see
Geoff Dyer at The London Review of Books: It seemed inconceivable that I could have had a stroke. I was 55, way too young, and of all of my contemporaries I would have put myself last in line for such...
+
11:20 AM | Off the shelf, on the skin
From Phys.Org: Wearing a fitness tracker on your wrist or clipped to your belt is so 2013. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University have demonstrated thin, soft stick-on patches that stretch and move with the...
+
10:38 AM | Friday Poem
. at this moment, writing, I sense what poetry is about but when I think about it it eludes me by definition just as water cupped in your hand disappears between your fingers when you spread them or the sky...
+
10:25 AM | How malaria defeats our drugs
Ed Yong in Mosaic: The meandering Moei river marks the natural boundary between Thailand and Myanmar. Its muddy waters are at their fullest, but François Nosten still crosses them in just a minute, aboard a narrow, wooden boat. In the...
+
10:19 AM | Carl Zimmer: Darwin in the City
No summary available for this post.
+
10:17 AM | The Independent Republic of New York
As New York—a city that often has more in common with Europe than with the United States—prepares to be invaded by the red-state hordes during an election that has much of the city fearing the prospect of four more years,...
34567891011
344 Results