Posts

November 03, 2014

+
5:15 AM | Siegfried Kühn's Mythmaking
by Lisa Lieberman I recently attended a retrospective on the work of East German filmmaker Siegfried Kühn sponsored by the DEFA Film Library at UMass Amherst. DEFA (Deutsche Film Aktiengesellschaft), a production company founded by the Soviets immediately following World...
+
5:10 AM | CATSPEAK
by Brooks Riley
+
5:05 AM | Instructions for Theatre-Goers
by Mara Jebsen After Edward Hopper's Two On the Aisle, 1927 A dark theatre can curve round you like a snake if you show early and the theatre’s sunk in that deep-hush velvet, against which a body feels bony, wrong....
+
5:02 AM | Islam, Colonization, Imperialism and so on
by Omar Ali At about 6 pm on Sunday evening, a young suicide bomber (said to be 18 years old) blew himself up in a crowd returning from the testosterone-heavy flag lowering ceremony held every evening at the India-Pakistan border...

November 02, 2014

+
7:51 PM | Breaking 43 Years of Silence, the Last FBI Burglar Tells the Story of Her Years in the Underground
The following is excerpted and adapted from the epilogue to the paperback version of Betty Medsger’s The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI, out this month from Vintage Books. Betty Medsger in TruthOut: It was clear to...
+
7:41 PM | Burkina Faso’s Uprising Part of an Ongoing Wave of African Protests
Zachariah Mampilly in The Monkey Cage (Issouf Sanogo/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images): As events in Burkina Faso move ahead at breakneck pace, I’m struck by how much they encapsulate different political struggles that have defined African protest since the anti-colonial...
+
7:35 PM | The man with the golden blood
Meet the donors, patients, doctors and scientists involved in the complex global network of rare – and very rare – blood. Penny Bailey in Mosaic: His doctor drove him over the border. It was quicker that way: if the man...
+
7:33 PM | Home and History in the Fiction of Los Angeles
Sarah-Jane Stratford in the LA Review of Books: LOS ANGELES does not, perhaps, get enough credit for feeding the imaginations of science fiction writers. Our original cinematic visions of imagined futures — often dystopian wastelands — were shaped by their...
+
7:30 PM | Keeping Sex Workers Quiet
Alana Massey in Jacobin: Just as opponents of reproductive self-determination rely heavily on the images of babies murdered by their mothers in an attempt to shame women seeking abortions, those that oppose sex work use the specter of trafficked young...
+
4:49 PM | Moharram 2014
No summary available for this post.
+
4:47 PM | Echo and the Bunnymen - The Killing Moon
No summary available for this post.
+
4:47 PM | Anselm Kiefer: Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow
No summary available for this post.
+
4:46 PM | Before I Knocked by Dylan Thomas
No summary available for this post.
+
3:50 PM | The Growing Pains of the Ancient Hajj
Dan Stone in National Geographic: For centuries, beyond its role as a religious epicenter, Mecca was little more than a trading town. But as Mecca has grown and developed, the hajj—as the pilgrimage is called—has become more complicated. Since 2005,...
+
1:56 PM | Sunday Poem
The Story of the Arjun and the Krishnachura The Arjun tree stood alone in that field An Aryan male - a pillar of aristocracy All the other trees bowed to it This was merely the beginning of the story From...
+
12:06 AM | Peter ­Schneider’s ‘Berlin Now’ and Rory MacLean’s ‘Berlin’
Nicholas Kulish at The New York Times: For centuries Berlin has had something of a chip on its shoulder. It lacks the ancient ruins of Rome or the sophisticated beauty of Paris. It is landlocked and flat, with a climate...
+
12:02 AM | When the Wall fell 25 years ago...
Tony Barber at the Financial Times: From its construction in 1961 to its destruction in 1989, the Berlin Wall was the world’s most compelling symbol of the moral and material bankruptcy of communism. Other dictatorships, from Albania to North Korea,...
+
12:00 AM | denis johnson, anarchy, madness
David L. Ulin at the LA Times: This territory of anarchy and madness — let's call it derangement — is one to which Johnson has returned throughout his career. His 1992 collection "Jesus' Son," which sits on a short shelf...

November 01, 2014

+
9:38 PM | Why process calculi are old industrial revolution thinking: the example with the apple pies
I have strong ideological arguments against process calculi, exactly because of the parallel composition. I think that parallel composition is not realistical, because there is no meaning in the “parallel” unless you have a God view over the distributed computation. This is a very brute argument, but I can make it detailed (and I did it, here and there in […]
+
2:53 PM | An interview with David Winters
Matt Jakubowski in his blog, Truce: David Winters is a literary critic living in Cambridge, England. His reviews, essays and interviews have appeared in a wide variety of print and online publications, including the Times Literary Supplement, The Guardian, The...
+
12:22 PM | This Philosopher Wants to Change How You Think About Doing Good
Uri Bram in Cafe: It's traditional to begin a profile of a Cambridge academic with a description of quads and spires and other quaint English-sounding things. But I meet Will MacAskill not at his college but in the nearby branch...
+
11:51 AM | Saturday Poem
Granizo To have been gone so long But to have forgotten hail, its name in Spanish, granizo, until a storm, as I drove toward a place named Golondrinas, eight miles from the main highway because I was enchanted by the...
+
11:49 AM | Standard burial and cremation take tons of energy and resources. So what's the most environmentally sound way to deal with a dead person?
Shannon Palus in The Atlantic: When Phil Olson was 20, he earned money in the family business by draining the blood from corpses. Using a long metal instrument, he sucked the fluid out of the organs, and pumped the empty...
+
11:43 AM | What a pilot sees landing at one of the world's most dangerous airports
No summary available for this post.
+
10:08 AM | Baddies in books: Captain Ahab, the obsessive, revenge-driven nihilist
Chris Power in The Guardian: The villain in Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick isn’t the monstrous White Whale, but the man that wants to kill him: Captain Ahab. Melville withholds Ahab’s appearance for well over 100 pages of his novel. At first...
+
9:38 AM | How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler’s Men
Deborah E. Lipstadt in The New York Times: In the wake of World War II, America recruited a few leading German scientists in order to advance our space and military programs and to keep these valuable assets from falling into...
+
8:48 AM | Sex is Serious
Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig in Boston Review: It is a strange season when culture warriors and women’s studies departments find common cause, though not unheard of—think pornography. But while Gail Dines’ Pornlandwon acclaim from The Christian Post, conservative Christian sex ethics...
+
1:40 AM | October ’14 – NZ blogs sitemeter ranking
Image Credit: A Pretty Healthy Life PLEASE NOTE: Sitemeter is still playing up but far fewer blogs are effected. I have done a manual work around but it was still impossible to get the stats for a the blogs that I list below. … Continue reading →

October 31, 2014

+
4:25 PM | Profs Bumble Into Big Legal Trouble After Election Experiment Goes Way Wrong
Dylan Scott in TPM: Political scientists from two of the nation's most highly respected universities, usually impartial observers of political firestorms, now find themselves at the center of an electoral drama with tens of thousands of dollars and the election...
+
4:21 PM | Why is the World Ignoring the Revolutionary Kurds in Syria?
David Graeber in The Guardian: The autonomous region of Rojava, as it exists today, is one of few bright spots – albeit a very bright one – to emerge from the tragedy of the Syrian revolution. Having driven out agents...
345678910
283 Results