Posts

September 08, 2014

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4:15 AM | perceptions
Ryan Moritz. From the Banzu Tree. 2014. Digital photograph. Thanks to Ryan.
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4:10 AM | Spaghetti with a Dash of Dostoyevsky
by Lisa Lieberman My favorite line from The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966), spoken by the late, great Eli Wallach, captures the essence of the Spaghetti Western. Here's Tuco, the Mexican bandit played by Wallach, taking a bubble...
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4:05 AM | Wow
by Maniza Naqvi Just Wow! At every turn and corner in Istanbul—you are bound to say—Wow. The obvious example is of course, at the Basilica of Aya Sofiya—built by Emperor Justinian in 537 AD. Legend has it, that Justinian wanted...

September 07, 2014

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5:27 PM | From Normativity to Responsibility etc
Richard Marshall interviews Joseph Raz in 3:AM Magazine: 3:AM: One of the ideas you have argued for(in your 2000 Seeley Lectures)is that we ought to accept the legitimacy of difference. So you think someone can reasonably approve of normative practices...
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5:20 PM | The International Interest
Komala Ramachandra in Caravan (Photo: Adnan Abidi/REUTER): OVER THE LAST FEW MONTHS, scrutiny of foreign funding for non-governmental organisations in India has been increasing. Although this trend is widely acknowledged, few commentators have pointed out that growing suspicion of NGOs...
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5:17 PM | The Trouble With Harvard
Steven Pinker in The New Republic: The most-read article in the history of this magazine is not about war, politics, or great works of art. It’s about the admissions policies of a handful of elite universities, most prominently my employer,...
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5:06 PM | What The Economist should have read before suggesting that US slavery wasn’t always so bad
Chris Blattman over at his website: First, remind me, when I’m writing my first book, to try to get The Economist to write a racially insensitive review. I’m pretty sure Edward Baptist’s sales are pretty terrific right now. The Economist...
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5:00 PM | John Betjeman - A Passion For Churches
No summary available for this post.
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4:49 PM | Philip Larkin reads ''The Building''
No summary available for this post.
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4:48 PM | Dear, though the night is gone by W H Auden
No summary available for this post.
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1:06 PM | Tony Albert on Gordon Bennett
From ArtAsiaPacific: Gordon was a real pioneer and set a precedent for political art in Australia. He spoke with an Aboriginal voice that could be universally understood—something that became more and more evident as his career grew and he started...
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12:55 PM | lessons in how to write
Henry Hitchings in The Guardian: If you want to start an argument online, make an assertion about English usage. "Apostrophes are on their way out", or "People who misuse apostrophes deserve to be guillotined". For extra spice, add a dash...
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11:07 AM | Sunday Poem
Djinn Haunted, they say, believing the soft, shifty dunes are made up of false promises. Many believe whatever happens is the other half of a conversation. Many whisper white lies to the dead. "The boys are doing reallt well." Some...
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1:16 AM | Even more videos by Adam Ford
Adam has caught up with the remainder of his interviews with me and put them on Facebook. Once more I remind viewers this was entirely ad hoc and unrehearsed.

September 06, 2014

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11:58 PM | Do you prefer dental fluorosis or tooth decay?
Anti-fluoride propagandists often use the incidence of dental fluorosis as an argument against community water fluoridation. However, they exaggerate the problem by misrepresenting the issue in two ways: 1: They present the issue as if the figures for the incidence … Continue reading →
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2:56 PM | The Oxford Lynch Mob
It is a rare experience for victims of long-term stalking, violent assault and harassment to be harassed by a gang of aggressive Oxbridge thugs. As I put it in March 2014 on Prof. Leiter's blog:[....] behind the scenes a group of graduate students, including some of the signatories of the Open Letter of 5 March 2014, had been campaigning the University to have my contact with students suspended and me fired. My supervisions were reassigned, my seminars were postponed and then reassigned to my […]
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2:15 PM | Outlook: Gloomy
Jacob Burak in Aeon (Photo by Springer Collection/Corbis): I have good news and bad news. Which would you like first? If it’s bad news, you’re in good company – that’s what most people pick. But why? Negative events affect us...
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2:07 PM | Will Scotland Choose Independence?
D.D. Guttenplan in The Nation (AP Photo/Jill Lawlless): The question on the ballot is simple—and binding: “Should Scotland be an independent country?” For most Scots, the answer is simple, too. Polls show at least 40 percent on either side, with...
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2:04 PM | Back to Yalta?: Stephen Cohen and the Ukrainian crisis
Nikolay Koposov in Eurozine (Photo: Zurbagan /Shutterstock.com. Source: Shutterstock): Cohen built his reputation as a leading scholar of Russian studies in the 1970s, and his interest in Soviet history was informed by his leftist political sympathies. Cohen's focus has always...
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2:00 PM | Jean-Luc Godard delivers a monologue from Hannah Arendt's "The Nature of Totalitarianism"
Via Open Culture:
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1:07 PM | The Age of Hobsbawm
Jonathan Freedland at The New York Times: In these lectures and reviews, he argues that the high culture that was once the basic diet of the European bourgeoisie is shriveling fast — either unknown to new generations or else swamped...
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1:04 PM | ON THE LETTERS OF DAVID MARKSON
Laura Sims at The Quarterly Conversation: A recluse is someone who “lives a solitary life and tends to avoid other people . . . often for religious meditation.” The novelist David Markson, famously reclusive in the last few decades of...
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1:00 PM | Philip Larkin: Life, Art and Love
Roger Lewis at the Financial Times: Philip Larkin was the greatest poet of the 20th century, his works an elegy for England and Englishness, a meditation on loneliness and loss. I salute James Booth for making this plain in his...
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11:41 AM | Future Footprints
Rob Nixon in The New York Times: For the first time in history, a sentient species, Homo sapiens, has become a force of such magnitude that our impacts are being written into the fossil record. We have decisively changed the...

September 05, 2014

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3:28 PM | Philosophy, science and expertise
Mark English in Scientia Salon: Let me make a very simple — and, I hope, uncontroversial — point about expertise and authority before looking at some questions pertaining to the current (increasingly bitter) debate about the nature and status of...
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2:48 PM | Can news literacy grow up?
Lindsay Beyerstein in the Columbia Journalism Review: In 2005, as Howard Schneider was developing a plan for Stony Brook University’s new journalism school, he taught a course called Ethics & Values of the American Press as a way to get...
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2:38 PM | The architecture of violence
No summary available for this post.
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1:56 PM | When priority does not matter
Perhaps the post When priority matters gives a false impression. I want to dispel that right away. In that post we see two possible reductions, depending on the PRIORITY CHOICE, either BETA>DIST or DIST>BETA. In the case BETA>DIST the reduction stops quickly. On the contrary, in the case DIST>BETA  the reduction does not stop, because […]
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12:47 PM | Marat and Sade in Las Vegas
Stefany Anne Golberg at The New England Review: In the days before personal computers, when Xeroxing books was a punishable crime, I hand-typed the entirety of The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the...
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12:43 PM | george herbert: writing for god
Mark Jarman at Hudson Review: The most curious event in George Herbert’s short life, after its abrupt change of direction, may be his marriage in 1629 to Jane Danvers, a cousin of his stepfather. Her father, Charles Danvers, had, as...
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