Posts

December 04, 2014

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2:30 AM | Spathognathodus macer Conodont Fossil
This image shows what appears to be a Spathognathodus macer conodont fossil. This creature existed in the Mississippian Period. Fossil was found in the Jacob Chapel Shale of Clark County Indiana USA. Source for ID is Conodonts of the Jacobs Chapel Shale by Carl B. Rexroad, Indiana Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey Bulletin 41 (published Bloomington Indiana 1969). Thanks to

December 03, 2014

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12:41 PM | One small step for Nature..
Macmillan have released an interesting press release, announcing that all research papers published in their 49 Nature Publishing Group (NPG) journals, including Nature, will be made free to read online, via one of Digital Science’s pet projects, ReadCube (note that Digital Science is also owned by Macmillan). These articles can be annotated in ReadCube, but not copied, printed, or downloaded. This is not open access*, and NPG have been very careful and explicit about stating this. […]
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2:30 AM | Ozarkodina Conodont Fossil
This image shows what appears to be an Ozarkodina conodont fossil. This creature existed in the Mississippian Period. Fossil was found in the Jacob Chapel Shale of Clark County Indiana USA. Source for ID is Conodonts of the Jacobs Chapel Shale by Carl B. Rexroad, Indiana Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey Bulletin 41 (published Bloomington Indiana 1969). Thanks to Kenny for

December 02, 2014

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7:50 PM | Snotworms For Dinner
Deep in the sea, on the denuded carcasses of whales, there live humble little scavengers. They’re the snotworms, …
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2:30 AM | Lonchodina Conodont Fossil
This image shows what appears to be a Lonchodina conodont fossil. This creature existed in the Mississippian Period. Fossil was found in the Jacob Chapel Shale of Clark County Indiana USA. Source for ID is Conodonts of the Jacobs Chapel Shale by Carl B. Rexroad, Indiana Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey Bulletin 41 (published Bloomington Indiana 1969). Thanks to Kenny for the

December 01, 2014

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11:00 PM | Your 2014 Winter Solstice Gift Guide!
The days are short, the nights are long, the only solace we can take from the coming cold and darkness is to give each other gifts. If you’re a nerd like us maybe you want those gifts to have a science bent? Well we are here to help you out with that with our annual […]
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10:16 PM | Crocomodiles vs. Allimogators
I just got off a chat with Matt. Here is the whole thing, all but unedited, for your enjoyment. All you need to know is that my wife, Fiona, built a symphony, which Matt refers to as a boxomophone in tribute to Homer Simpson refering to Lisa’s instrument as a saxomophone. Mathew: Hey, how is Fiona’s […]
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5:44 PM | Episode 37: Theropods and birds
Theropods are what we would classically recognise as the meat-eating dinosaurs of the Mesozoic Era. They are best known from genera such as Tyrannosaurus and Velociraptor but the group is much more diverse and includies herbivores, beaked and ostrich-like forms. It is however the link between theropods and birds that has long-caught the public’s attention and perhaps [&hellip
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5:29 PM | Prehistoric Lizard Had the Teeth of a Dinosaur
The Mesozoic is often called the Age of Dinosaurs. This terminology casts a long shadow over ancient life. …
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12:40 PM | The Great 2014 Dinosaur Gift Guide: Volume 2!
Welcome to part two of the LITC 2014 Dinosaur Gift Guide! If you missed the first installment, check it out here. the goal with this brief series of posts is to highlight artists and other independent creators of dinosaur goods. Since paleontology depends on the work of artists to reach the public, it's vital to directly support them when possible. There has never been an easier time to do it, and dinosaur lovers have never had such a wealth of amazing art by so many talented people. Onward […]
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11:40 AM | Discovering dinosaurs in the field
I’ve already written a bit about the fieldtrip to Alberta from this Autumn that I led from Queen Mary with a team of colleagues and undergraduates where we had a great time and found some great stuff. My friend and colleague Rob Knell was with us as pseudo-official photographer and he also had video capacity […]
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4:12 AM | Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Fish-bitten echinoid spines from the Middle Jurassic (Callovian) of southern Israel
This week we revisit a group of fossils covered in an earlier blog post. It is now the subject of a paper that has just appeared in the journal Lethaia entitled, “Bitten spines reveal unique evidence for fish predation on Middle Jurassic echinoids“. My co-authors are my good Polish colleagues Tomasz Borszcz and Michał Zatoń. […]
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2:30 AM | Polygnathus lobatus Conodont Fossil
This image shows what appears to be a Polygnathus lobatus conodont fossil. This creature existed in the Mississippian Period. Fossil was found in the Jacob Chapel Shale of Clark County Indiana USA. Source for ID is Conodonts of the Jacobs Chapel Shale by Carl B. Rexroad, Indiana Department of Natural Resources Geological Survey Bulletin 41 (published Bloomington Indiana 1969). Thanks to
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2:30 AM | Atraktoprion Scolecodont Fossil
This image is of a microfossil fragment that appears to be an Atraktoprion scolecodont. It was found in the Kope or Fairview Formations of Mason County, Kentucky, USA. The creature existed in the Ordovician Period. Field of view is about 1 mm. Thanks to Kenny for the picture.

November 30, 2014

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9:38 PM | Art Every Day – Day 30
This morning I was inspired. I had planned on spending the day grading exams and maybe working on the quiver I told you about earlier this month. Instead, I came upon this post: BEER ADVENT CALENDAR I had to make … Continue reading →
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7:02 AM | Update: overseas shenanigans and PhD... shenanigans
Just a quick update:There's been a bit of radio silence on this blog as of late, due to my being overseas and attending a couple of conferences (Digital Specimen 2014, and SVP 2014, both held in Berlin and hosted by the Museum für Naturkunde). I was also working on my PhD while overseas, and feeling guilty any time I wanted to work on something other than my PhD (e.g. this blog).Making time for the blog, guilt free time, to develop it into something more than a once per 3 months […]
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2:25 AM | Lorem Ipsum is Dead
For most folks, they’ve only seen the phrase ‘Lorem Ipsum’ when using a PowerPoint template for the first time. Lorem Ipsum is a term to describe dummy text inserted to show what a printed page will look like when real … Continue reading →
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1:50 AM | Big-Headed Carnivore a Sign of Triassic Recovery
I’ve spent much of my weekend writing about Jurassic World. I won’t rehash the details here – you …
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12:22 AM | Art Every Day – Day 29 – I’m still here
My goal for November was to do some art every day. It was a challenge I accepted. I failed a bit. The last ten days I’ve done no visual arts, but I did finish writing 50,000 fresh new words on … Continue reading →

November 29, 2014

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8:10 PM | The Great 2014 Dinosaur Gift Guide: Volume 1!
Though any time of year is the right time to bestow a saurian gift upon a friend or loved one, this time of year seems to put special focus on gift-giving. I'm not sure why. In the interest of helping people find unique and inspiring dinosaur gifts, I've put together this guide. It's certainly not meant to be comprehensive, but rather is an attempt help you choose gifts that both delight their recipient and support the forward progress of paleontology. One easy and meaningful way to do that is […]
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2:30 AM | Loxonema yandellana Gastropod Microfossil
The microfossil in this picture appears to be a Loxonema yandellana gastropod (snail). It was found in the Somerset Shale of the Salem Limestone of Meade County, Kentucky, USA. The creature existed in the Mississippian Period. Field of view in picture is about 2 mm. Thanks to Kenny for the picture.

November 28, 2014

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8:44 PM | Thirsty Thursday (on Friday) – Racking the Cider
Two weeks ago, I started a hard cider using locally grown apples. It’s been happily bubbling away in the dining room these past two weeks. It was time, yesterday, to rack it into a smaller carboy.   Time to rack … Continue reading →
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8:36 PM | Friday Headlines: 11-28-14
Friday Headlines, November 28, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Earthquakes tell us about how faults work What are turtles related to? Finding fossils is a lot about luck!     Study of Chile 2010 earthquake identifies … Continue reading →
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6:13 PM | Fossil Friday – turkey
It’s the day after Thanksgiving in the US, so for today’s Fossil Friday we have a probable turkey bone from south of Diamond Valley Lake. I found this bone by accident last week while looking for good examples of packrat … Continue reading →
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8:00 AM | Give the Gift of Paleoart!
One of my favorite things about the Internet Age, among many favorite things, is the way in which it facilitates access to some incredible paleontology-themed art. The talented artists who illustrated the dinosaurs of my childhood reached their audiences through … Continue reading »The post Give the Gift of Paleoart! appeared first on The Integrative Paleontologists.
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4:27 AM | Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Large Miocene barnacles with bioimmurations from Maryland
These two beautiful barnacles are from the Calvert Formation (Middle Miocene) exposed near Parker Creek in Maryland. They are likely of the genus Chesaconcavus. Barnacles are most unlikely crustacean arthropods, cousins of shrimp, crabs and lobsters. Most, like these above, cement themselves head-downwards on a hard substrate like a rock or shell (or boat hull), […]
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2:30 AM | Cleidophorus Pelecypod Microfossil
This image is of a microfossil that appears to be a Cleidophorus pelecypod. It was found in the Kope or Fairview Formations of Mason County, Kentucky, USA. The creature existed in the Ordovician Period. Field of view is about 1 mm. Thanks to Kenny for the picture.

November 27, 2014

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9:00 PM | Vintage Dinosaur Art: WHEN DINOSAURS RULED THE EARTH
With 1980s-style dinosaurs once again grabbing everyone's attention, thanks to the recent trailer for the long-delayed instalment of a certain cinematic franchise, it's only fitting that my latest book is a seminal specimen from the era. Hailing from around the same time as the Normanpedia,WHEN DINOSAURS RULED THE EARTH (which absolutely must be written in all-caps) sees Norman and Sibbick team up again, but this time the results are a little more fun (while avoiding anachronistic humans and […]
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4:54 PM | Open-access megajournals reduce the peer-review burden
Despite the flagrant trolling of its title, Nature‘s recent opinion-piece Open access is tiring out peer reviewers is mostly pretty good. But the implication that the rise of open-access journals has increased the aggregate burden of peer-review is flatly wrong, so I felt obliged to leave a comment explaining why. Here is that comment, promoted […]
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3:23 PM | Social behaviour in the dinosaurs
So yesterday I looked at the groups of Protoceratops specimens and the inference that at least one population of P. andrewsi tended to form groups throughout ontogeny. I also commented on how this was put in really conservative terms – I carefully avoided using the term ‘social’ and didn’t extrapolate up to other populations, species […]
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