Posts

July 29, 2014

+
12:00 PM | Arctic Ice Guesses 2014
Have to bite the bullet here and discuss my guesses for the September 2014 Arctic sea ice extent average.  The thing which has made them so difficult is that they're so different from each other.  Now, one method I've retired.  It was simply so bad last year that there's no point in continuing it.  That is the one I did based on a population growth (of ice-free area) curve.That leaves, however, two different model-based guessers.  The first one, which appears at the Sea […]

July 28, 2014

+
11:30 AM | Yabba2 -- Construction
Katherine Monroe:Below are the full instructions on how to build exactly what I built. There is so much that could be done to improve the design. I know it is not anywhere close to perfect. The materials I used were makeshift, whatever was lying around the house or wasn’t too expensive. But that was the point. I like spontaneity. It doesn’t have to be extremely elaborate to work and to be useful. This is for anyone who wants to do anything with it or for anyone who is just […]

July 25, 2014

+
11:30 AM | Yabba -- Building your own stream gauge
Katherine Monroe*, the author/inventor of this stream gauge, is a graduate of Eleanor Roosevelt High School, in the same class as Elliott Rebello.  Her senior project was quite different, and you'll get to see the details in her own words.  Part 1 is today, the narrative.  Part 2 will be on Monday -- the full parts list and construction instructions.Engineering the “Yabba Dabba Doo”By: Katherine MonroeJune 2014Eleanor Roosevelt High SchoolOne year ago, as a rising […]
+
11:22 AM | New Head of BODC
We are delighted to welcome Dr Graham Allen as the new Head of the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC). Graham will be taking up his post on the 4th August 2014.Dr Graham Allen ©BODC's mission is:To develop, coordinate and provide specialist data services for the UK and international marine science communities, to facilitate innovative use and re-use of data, and to ensure long-term curation of valuable and unique marine data resources.As Head of BODC, Graham will be responsible […]

July 23, 2014

+
11:00 AM | Data are ugly
Current news about whether there really is an increase in Antarctic sea ice cover is reinforcing my belief, shared by most people who deal with data, that data are ugly.  This work argues that the trend that some have seen in some trend analyses has more to do with the data processing than with nature.  I encourage you to read the article in full itself.  It is freely available.From the abstract:Although our analysis does not definitively identify whether this change introduced […]
+
3:33 AM | Wintry Warrnambool
While I’m missing the summer flat spells and warm weather activities, there’s something special about winter on the Shipwreck Coast. No tourists around, fresh cold southerlies and some calm clear days when the whiting are biting! Here’s a few shots of the local marine sanctuary from last week- some heavy downpours have caused the river […]

July 18, 2014

+
12:24 AM | Krill: The Most Abundant Animal on Earth
Or specifically, the most biomass on Earth. That would be krill, the small shrimp-like creatures like large whales love to gobble down. My name is Karl, and I am a krill. I live in Antarctic waters. What is it like to be part of a collective or large group? Well, not only am I small […]

July 17, 2014

+
2:17 PM | Microbes Help Corals Pick a Home and Settle Down
[php]Bacteria are everywhere in the ocean. They live in the water, on virtually every living and non-living surface, and even inside other organisms. There are 1 million bacterial cells in every milliliter of seawater; that translates to roughly 5 million bacterial cells per teaspoon! With so many bacteria in the ocean you have to wonder—what are they doing? Thanks to new technological advances, we understand more and more about the important roles that bacteria play in the health and...

July 16, 2014

+
8:11 AM | Shark Weak
No summary available for this post.

July 14, 2014

+
6:24 PM | Females Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
+
6:24 PM | Female Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
+
6:24 PM | Females Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
+
6:24 PM | Female Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
+
2:00 PM | The Ocean Cleanup, Part 2: Technical review of the feasibility study
INTRODUCTION This is the second of a two-part post. In the first installment, Kim presented alternatives to this project. This installment is a collaboration between Kim and Miriam. Dr. Kim Martini is a physical oceanographer who has been involved in the deployment of a variety of deep sea oceanographic moorings. Dr. Miriam Goldstein is a […]
+
2:00 PM | The Ocean Cleanup, Part 2: Technical review of the feasibility study
INTRODUCTION This is the second of a two-part post. In the first installment, Kim presented alternatives to this project. This installment is a collaboration between Kim and Miriam. Dr. Kim Martini is a physical oceanographer who has been involved in the deployment of a variety of deep sea oceanographic moorings. Dr. Miriam Goldstein is a […]
+
1:00 PM | The Ocean Cleanup, Part 1: Alternatives to reduce ocean plastic
This is the first of two-part post. This installment is written by Kim, who will present alternatives to the Ocean Cleanup project to help curb the problem of plastic pollution in the oceans. The second installment is a technical review of the Ocean Cleanup feasibility study and is a collaboration between Kim and Miriam . Last […]
+
1:00 PM | The Ocean Cleanup, Part 1: Alternatives to reduce ocean plastic
This is the first of two-part post. This installment is written by Kim, who will present alternatives to the Ocean Cleanup project to help curb the problem of plastic pollution in the oceans. The second installment is a technical review of the Ocean Cleanup feasibility study and is a collaboration between Kim and Miriam . Last […]

July 12, 2014

+
9:27 PM | Sea Walls: Lessons from a Paint Can
“Any form of art is a form of power; it has impact, it can affect change – it can not only move us, it makes us move.”                                         -Ossie Davis   What better way to bring […]
+
9:27 PM | Sea Walls: Lessons from a Paint Can
“Any form of art is a form of power; it has impact, it can affect change – it can not only move us, it makes us move.”                                         -Ossie Davis   What better way to bring […]

July 11, 2014

+
11:55 PM | Feces Friday: Marine Edition
Here’s your recap of the top excretion-related news in the past few weeks, and what it means to our ocean world: Mo’ Whales, Mo’ Poop, Mo’ Plankton, Mo’ Whales… Several recent studies emphasize the ecological importance of whales and the whale-sized dung they create. Whales defecate at the surface when they come to breathe, and this […]
+
11:55 PM | Feces Friday: Marine Edition
Here’s your recap of the top excretion-related news in the past few weeks, and what it means to our ocean world: Mo’ Whales, Mo’ Poop, Mo’ Plankton, Mo’ Whales… Several recent studies emphasize the ecological importance of whales and the whale-sized dung they create. Whales defecate at the surface when they come to breathe, and this […]

July 10, 2014

+
8:00 PM | And We Add Another To Our Ranks
So I decided to recruit guest poster Dr. Douglas J. Long permanently into the DSN ranks.  And I do mean permanently.  There are only two ways to leave DSN. This man has street cred.  He is a Research Associate in the fish department at the California Academy of Sciences. He’s a professor at St. Mary’s College of California. But most importantly he is the Expedition […]
+
8:00 PM | And We Add Another To Our Ranks
So I decided to recruit guest poster Dr. Douglas J. Long permanently into the DSN ranks.  And I do mean permanently.  There are only two ways to leave DSN. This man has street cred.  He is a Research Associate in the fish department at the California Academy of Sciences. He’s a professor at St. Mary’s College of California. But most importantly he is the Expedition […]

July 09, 2014

+
2:54 PM | History and Modern Science Collide for the 38th Voyage of the Charles W. Morgan
[php]Traveling aboard the Charles W. Morgan, a 173-year-old whaling ship on its 38th Voyage, I’m struck by its paradox: this vessel which spent years chasing and killing whales is now helping us to study these magnificent creatures. This summer's voyage is an unusual one. Along with the scientific research done onboard, I’m also coordinating a cohort of artists and scholars selected as 38th Voyagers, who will sail for a day out of Provincetown, Massachusetts into ...
+
1:17 AM | Gearing up for World Parks Congress in Sydney
In the midst of my final year of university and having a baby daughter join the family, I’ve also been organising with the French marine agency AAMP to help them out at the World Parks Congress in Sydney in November. I enjoyed working with some AAMP members in Fiji last year and was keen to join […]

July 07, 2014

+
2:36 PM | That looks terrible on you Dolphin- take it off!
I hate all the stuff growing on whales. It’s just one of those weird personal tics. All those barnacles look annoying and itchy and the whole thing makes my skin crawl. If a whale was like, “hey Rebecca, pick these off”, I’d be all like, “OMG YES!”  And not only would I be down to help my […]
+
2:36 PM | That looks terrible on you Dolphin- take it off!
I hate all the stuff growing on whales. It’s just one of those weird personal tics. All those barnacles look annoying and itchy and the whole thing makes my skin crawl. If a whale was like, “hey Rebecca, pick these off”, I’d be all like, “OMG YES!”  And not only would I be down to help my […]

July 03, 2014

+
1:56 PM | Giant Squid Spotted on the Streets of Baltimore
The advantage of being a marine biologist is that EPIC things pass by my desk quite often.  Sure my salary is low and the hours long but this week somebody emailed me a picture of new species of starfish.  EPIC.  Even more EPIC when I tell you later in the year why I’m so excited about this specific species.  This […]
+
1:56 PM | Giant Squid Spotted on the Streets of Baltimore
The advantage of being a marine biologist is that EPIC things pass by my desk quite often.  Sure my salary is low and the hours long but this week somebody emailed me a picture of new species of starfish.  EPIC.  Even more EPIC when I tell you later in the year why I’m so excited about this specific species.  This […]

July 02, 2014

+
10:36 AM | From Despair to Repair: Protecting Parrotfish Can Help Bring Back Caribbean Coral Reefs
[php]Reef biologists over a certain age are haunted by memories of what glorious places Caribbean reefs once were. In our youth we studied them for all sorts of reasons but scarcely thought about reef conservation. We took the reefs for granted. Today, however, we know that most Caribbean coral reefs will disappear in 20 years if we don't restore the grazing fish that defend the corals from seaweed. This message comes through loud and clear in a new report, "Status and Trends of Caribbean Coral […]
12
34 Results