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Posts

April 14, 2014

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2:55 PM | Wolves At The Door: Study Finds Recent Wolf-dog Hybridization In Caucasus Region
Dog owners in the Caucasus Mountains of Georgia might want to consider penning up their dogs more often: hybridization of wolves with shepherd dogs might be more common, and more recent, than previously thought, according to a recently published study in the Journal of Heredity (DOI: 10.1093/jhered/esu014).read more
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2:55 PM | Climate Change: The Role Of Oceanic Carbon Reservoir Over Glacial Cycles
Glacial cycles at 104-yr time scale have been the focus of Quaternary paleoclimatology over the last century. In recent years with the emergence of continuous high-resolution records (ice cores, deep-sea sediments etc.) from the longer geological past, increasing evidence underscores the significance of long- duration processes at the time scale of 105-yr or more. WANG Pinxian and colleagues from the State Key Laboratory of Marine Geology, Tongji University, reviewed long-term variations in the […]
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12:30 PM | 8 More Years Of Life From Glucosamine ? Puhhleaze
It’s been all over the news. Depending on the accuracy of the headline, you may conclude that worms live longer when exposed to glucosamine, mice live 10 percent longer when fed glucosamine or that YOU will live 8 years longer if you take the stuff. As usual, the devil is in the headlines. Some were pretty accurate: Glucosamine promotes longevity in worms and mice, study says (from the L.A. Times).  read more
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12:03 PM | Chronic stress and autism
Many years ago Robert Sapolsky wrote a book entitled: “Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers”. The basic idea of the book was that acute stressors (e.g., a lion attacking a zebra) […]
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11:56 AM | Navy Process to Make Fuel from Seawater
Researchers at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) announced that they have successfully tested a process to convert seawater into jet fuel. They can extract CO2 both dissolved and bound from the water as a source of carbon, and can extract H2 through electrolysis. They then convert the CO2 and hydrogen into long chain hydrocarbons: [...]
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11:47 AM | ¿Cómo es el perfil del altruista entre jóvenes estudiantes?
Mucho se habla sobre en qué pueden mejorar los jóvenes, pero es indudable que es en su etapa de formación cuanto más altruistas se muestran a la hora de ayudar Aquí únicamente se muestra el resumen, para leer la entrada entera pulsa sobre el título.
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9:30 AM | "Clinicians’ Attitudes toward Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: A Survey"
"Clinicians’ Attitudes toward Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: A Survey" by Michele Farisco, et al., has been published in the most recent issue of Neuroethics: Abstract Notwithstanding fundamental methodological advancements, scientific information about disorders of consciousness (DOCs)—e.g. Vegetative State/Unresponsive Wakefulness...
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9:21 AM | Aldo Menzione And The Design Of The Silicon Vertex Detector
Below is a clip from a chapter of my book where I describe the story of the silicon microvertex detector of the CDF experiment. CDF collected proton-antiproton collisions from the Tevatron collider in 1985, 1987-88, 1992-96, and 2001-2011. Run 1A occurred in 1992, and it featured for the first time in a hadron collider a silicon strip detector, the SVX. The SVX would prove crucial for the discovery of the top quark. read more
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8:16 AM | Does Psychology have its own vocabulary?
If you were to pick up the flagship journal from a discipline that is foreign to you and flip to an article at random, how much do you think you would understand? Put a different way: how much of the vocabulary employed in that article might you misinterpret?The vocabularies used by any given discipline overlap with those of many other disciplines, although the specific meaning associated with a given term may be dissimilar from discipline to discipline. Anglophone psychology, for instance, has […]
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5:08 AM | Google Earth Mystery Object? - Hardly!
Google Earth Mystery Object? - Hardly!What is it that you can see in this snapshot of Google Earth in the vicinity of Amsterdam Island?If you think it's a special antenna for transmitting earthquake waves in the general direction of people that a Secret Government AgencyTM hates, or if you just know that it's a secret underwater base you are probably a conspiracy theorist.If you think it's Atlantis you are probably some kind of new age hippie.If you think it's an image artifact you are probably […]
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3:04 AM | Mechanism, And Possible Treatment, For Immune Suppression In Liver Disease Uncovered
The mechanism which underlies the susceptibility of liver disease patients to life-threatening infection has been uncovered by Wellcome Trust-funded medical scientists, who have also suggested a possible treatment to reverse immune suppression in these patients. Liver disease, or cirrhosis, is currently the fifth leading cause of death in the UK. Cirrhosis patients are more than five times more likely to pick up infections in hospital than patients with other chronic conditions, due to reduced […]
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2:25 AM | Do Video Games Really Rot Your Brain……. Nope
In conducting my researcher to give a presentation on Internet/gaming addiction, I have found massive quantities of information on the correlates between video games and the effects that they have on people’s behaviors and a little less so on the effects that they have on the brain.  And one thing has been clearly found, that […]

April 13, 2014

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11:56 PM | The First Brain – Book Giveaway
Are you in Goodreads? If so, you can enter to win one of two copies of my book “The First Brain”… Absolutely free! Note: I do not choose the winners, Goodreads does. Good luck! (:-) To enter you can click here or go to the site below: https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/88984-the-first-brain-the-neuroscience-of-planarians Filed under: Blogging Tagged: Books
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10:25 PM | Nuclear Fusion & the Elements of Life
I hope you’ll all forgive this brief post today. I’ve been buried under insane levels of work for the last several weeks. However, as I was taking a short break […]
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9:58 PM | Fish From Acidic Ocean Waters Less Able To Smell Predators
"They can smell but they can't distinguish between chemical cues," Dixson said. Carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere is absorbed into ocean waters, where it dissolves and lowers the pH of the water. Acidic waters affect fish behavior by disrupting a specific receptor in the nervous system, called GABAA, which is present in most marine organisms with a nervous system. When GABAA stops working, neurons stop firing properly. Coral reef habitat studies have found that CO2-induced behavioral […]
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9:58 PM | Hereditary Trauma
The phenomenon has long been known in psychology: traumatic experiences can induce behavioural disorders that are passed down from one generation to the next. It is only recently that scientists have begun to understand the physiological processes underlying hereditary trauma. "There are diseases such as bipolar disorder, that run in families but can't be traced back to a particular gene", explains Isabelle Mansuy, professor at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich. With her research group at […]
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9:58 PM | Glasses Strong As Steel: A Fast Way To Find The Best
Scientists at Yale University have devised a dramatically faster way of identifying and characterizing complex alloys known as bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a versatile type of pliable glass that's stronger than steel. Using traditional methods, it usually takes a full day to identify a single metal alloy appropriate for making BMGs. The new method allows researchers to screen about 3,000 alloys per day and simultaneously ascertain certain properties, such as melting temperature and […]
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9:58 PM | New Technique Takes Cues From Astronomy And Ophthalmology To Sharpen Microscope Images
The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Biological samples bend light in unpredictable ways, returning difficult-to-interpret information to the microscope and distorting the resulting image. New imaging technology developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus rapidly corrects for these distortions and sharpens high-resolution images over large volumes of tissue. read more
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9:58 PM | Finding The Switch: Researchers Create Roadmap For Gene Expression
In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a roadmap that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases. Their work also sheds new light on how heredity and environment can affect gene expression.read more
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6:28 PM | Spike activity 11-04-2014
Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Things I’ve learned since being sectioned. Good piece on the appropriately named Sectioned blog. The New York Times covers the latest in rising fads in proposed psychiatric diagnoses: sluggish cognitive tempo. Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon. Neuroskeptic discusses critiques of […]
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6:11 PM | The Pulse Of Music: Making People The Instrument
Live electronic music is an oxymoron. Clearly if you have hired Paris Hilton as a deejay, you are not hiring her because she is any sort of keen ear. If she never showed up, the music would go on.University of British Columbia music professor Bob Pritchard has seen enough uninspiring laptop music sets to know what is wrong with the genre - backing tracks can only take you so far - and has an idea how to fix it.Pritchard and UBC’s Laptop Orchestra believe digital cameras and […]
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5:56 PM | Gefilte Fish: Why, Oy Why?
Why on earth do Jews eat gefilte fish? …
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4:49 PM | Plastic, Heal Thyself
Self-healing materials can repair themselves by restoring their initial molecular structure after the damage and scientists from Evonik Industries and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have developed a chemical crosslinking reaction that ensures good short-term healing properties of the material under mild heating.   read more
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4:12 PM | Top Gun Drosophila: The Screaming-Fast Banked Turns Of Fruit Flies
Researchers recently used an array of high-speed video cameras operating at 7,500 frames a second to capture the wing and body motion of Drosophila hydei after they encountered an image of an approaching predator.  The fruit flies are about the size of a sesame seed and rely on a fast visual system to detect approaching predators. And scientists found out that even Top Gun pilots might be envious of the screaming-fast banked turns and slick moves the flies employed. In the midst […]
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10:35 AM | Coma alarm dreams
Intensive Care Medicine has published a wonderfully written and vivid account from a teenager who spent time brain injured and hallucinating in an intensive care unit. The writer describes how he was admitted to intensive care at the age of 15 after suffering a head injury and had intense and bizarre hallucinations which are, as […]
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9:40 AM | Circumstances of the life and brain
Neurosurgeon Henry Marsh has written a philosophical, incisive and exasperated book about brain surgery called Do No Harm. It’s a hugely entertaining read as Marsh takes us through the practical and emotional process of operating, or not operating, on patients with neurological disorders. He does a lot of moaning – about hospital management, computerisation, administration […]
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2:56 AM | In 2017, England Will Try To Stop An Ancient Tradition
In 2017, the British will introduce a new coin that should be difficult to counterfeit. The last time a Queen Elizabeth sat on the throne they tried the same thing, to deter “divers evil persons” from damaging the reputation of English coinage and, with it, the good name of the nation. And they tried it plenty of times since. And before.As long as there has been money, there has been counterfeiting. Today, the Royal Mint estimates retailers lose about $25 million a year due to […]
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2:18 AM | Early brain development and heat shock proteins
The brain development of a fetus is really an amazing thing. The first sign of an incipient nervous system emerges during the third week of development; it is simply a thickened layer of tissue called the neural plate. After about 5 more days, the neural plate has formed an indentation called the neural groove, and the sides of the neural groove have curled up and begun to fuse together (see pic to the right). This will form the neural tube, which will eventually become the brain and spinal […]

Hashimoto-Torii, K., Torii, M., Fujimoto, M., Nakai, A., El Fatimy, R., Mezger, V., Ju, M., Ishii, S., Chao, S., Brennand, K. & Gage, F. (2014). Roles of Heat Shock Factor 1 in Neuronal Response to Fetal Environmental Risks and Its Relevance to Brain Disorders, Neuron, DOI:

Citation
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12:13 AM | Book Review: Federation
To call these few words a review is somewhat of an overstatement. I will not give specific details of the plot or the story. I **really** do not want to give anything away… This is one of the few books that I have read more than once; in fact, I finished my last re-read a …

April 12, 2014

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7:27 PM | This is how stigma works
Sussex Police issue a statement about ‘Concern for missing Chichester man’, ITN News report it as ‘Police warn public over missing mental health patient’. Sussex police: Police are appealing for information about missing 43-year old Jason Merriman, who left The Oaklands Centre for Acute Care in Chichester on unescorted leave at 12.45pm on Friday 11 […]
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