Posts

April 30, 2015

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2:35 PM | Bupropion: A Non-stimulant ADHD Drug Treatment
Stimulant drugs including dextroamphetamine (Adderall) and methylphenidate (Ritalin) remain among the most common and effective drug treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).Alternative to stimulant drugs are needed to expand treatment options for clinicians and patients.One problem with the stimulants is the potential for misuse and diversion of prescription drugs to illicit drug use.One non-stimulant FDA approved drug (atomoxetine/Strattera) is available in the U.S.An […]
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1:37 PM | Groundwater Detected Under Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys?
Antarctica's Dry Valleys may not be so dry. A helicopter-borne sensor that penetrates below the surface of large swathes of terrain has found compelling evidence that ice-free McMurdo Dry Valleys may be hiding a salty aquifer. Brines, or salty water, form extensive aquifers below glaciers, lakes and within permanently frozen soils. If they are present, it might provide answers about the biological adaptations of previously unknown ecosystems that persist in the extreme cold and dark of the […]
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1:33 PM | New Atlantic Ocean Open Water Dead Zones
Researchers have discovered areas in the tropical North Atlantic, several hundred kilometers off the coast of West Africa, with extremely low levels of oxygen, making them uninhabitable for most marine animals. The levels measured in these 'dead zones' are the lowest ever recorded in Atlantic open waters.read more
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1:01 PM | How Fluid Flow Affects Bacteria
Researchers have used mathematical equations to shed new light on how flowing fluid hinders the movement of bacteria in their search for food. Many bacteria are mobile and inhabit a variety of dynamic fluid environments: from turbulent oceans to medical devices such as catheters. Since the first attempts at classifying bacteria in the 17th century, shape has been an important feature, yet it is still not fully understood how shape affects the ability of bacteria to navigate their […]
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12:50 PM | Airplane De-Icing Agents Linked To Reduced Oxygen In Groundwater
Spring is here and that means fewer airplanes need to be de-iced. That may be good, according to a new study which finds that de-icing agents accumulated during the winter, which end up on unpaved areas and infiltrate into the soils during snowmelt, could end up in groundwater.read more
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12:32 PM | Weight Management Therapy Or Gastric Band Surgery - Which Is Better For Weight Loss?
Weight loss is never easy but obesity is the big risk factor Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, so clearly people who have it aren't likely to just diet and for that reason gastric band surgery has become more popular. Yet it may not be necessary. A small pilot programl led by Joslin Diabetes Center and Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers found that an intensive group-based medical diabetes and weight management program achieved similar improvements in controlling blood sugar levels after one […]
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12:23 PM | Shedding Light On The Dark Zone Of Cell Division
The human body is a cross between a factory and a construction zone -- at least on the cellular level. Certain proteins act as project managers, which direct a wide variety of processes and determine the fate of the cell as a whole. One group of proteins called the WD-repeat (WDR) family helps a cell choose which of the thousands of possible gene products it should manufacture. These WDR proteins fold into a three-dimensional structure resembling a doughnut -- an unusual shape that allows WDR […]
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12:22 PM | Rociletinib For EGFR Lung Cancer: Phase I/II Trial Results
The investigational anti-cancer agent rociletinib (CO-1686) has received the new FDA 'Breakthrough Status' designation, developed to accelerate the approval process for very promising new medical treatments. For a new study, patients were initially given free base and later hydrogen bromide salt formulations of the drug rociletinib in ongoing 21-day cycles. The hydrogen bromide salt produced better absorption and higher drug exposure in patients and was adopted as the sole form moving […]
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12:18 PM | Neonicotinoids, GMOs, and Colony Collapse Disorder
A new propaganda point has entered the anti-GMO repertoire – that GMOs are killing the honey bees. This claim, like many of their claims, is highly misleading, as the actual cause is incidental to the technology of genetic modification or even its use. This hasn’t stopped headlines like this one from organicconsumers.org: GMOs Are Killing [...]
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12:15 PM | Review Determines The 3 Big Factors To Achieve Healthier Eating
If you want to know the secrets of healthier eating, think of the kitchen fruit bowl. A fruit bowl makes fruit more convenient, attractive, and normal to eat than if the same fruit were in the bottom of the refrigerator. A new Cornell study analyzed 112 studies that collected information about healthy eating behaviors and found that most healthy eaters did so because a restaurant, grocery store, school cafeteria, or spouse made foods like fruits and vegetables visible and easy to reach […]
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12:12 PM | We're Wired To Hate Dieting
If you're finding it difficult to stick to a diet, a new paper says you can likely blame hunger-sensitive cells in your brain known as AGRP neurons. According to new experiments, these neurons are responsible for the unpleasant feelings of hunger that make snacking irresistible. read more
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10:33 AM | Why the message – that we're all prone to stereotyping others – is so dangerous
Telling people they are biased in their treatment of others – that they are racist or ageist, for example – can make them defensive and result in backlash. For this reason, change-makers nowadays often spread a different message: that stereotyping others isn’t a personal sin, but near-universal and something we must all aim to resist. However a new paper from researchers Michelle Duguid and Melissa Thomas-Hunt argues that this "Everyone Stereotypes" message, far from reducing […]
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3:53 AM | Gene Editing Corrects Mutation In Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis is an inherited, life-threatening disorder that damages the lungs and digestive system. It is most commonly caused by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene known as F508del. The disorder has no cure, and treatment typically consists of symptom management. Previous attempts to treat the disease through gene therapy have been unsuccessful. read more
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3:41 AM | OYM75: Flies are the Shi-TS with Ian Blum and Robin Keeley
  We’re doubling up on guest hosts this week, with Ian Blum and Robin Keeley calling in from Baltimore!  They’re coming to us from the safety of Robin’s living room, where they’ve got some thoughts on the “two body problem” – the struggle that a couple in academia goes through when trying to find careers ...read more The post OYM75: Flies are the Shi-TS with Ian Blum and Robin Keeley appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.

April 29, 2015

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11:19 PM | 98 Percent Want To Know If Genetic Data Contains A Serious Preventable Or Treatable Disease
A survey of nearly 7,000 people found that 98 percent want to to know if their genetic data contains indicators of a serious preventable or treatable disease. The study comes after the Government's announcement that Genomics England will sequence 100,000 genomes by 2017, begins an important and on-going conversation about how our genomic data is used. read more
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11:00 PM | Life Expectancy Inequalities In England And Wales Going Up
By 2030, life expectancy in England and Wales is expected to reach 85.7 years for men and 87.6 years for women, losing the gap between male and female life expectancy from 6 years in 1981 to just 1·9 years by 2030, according to a new study.  Between 1981 and 2012, national life expectancy in England and Wales increased by 8·2 years in men (to 79·5 years) and 6·0 years in women (to 83·3 years). However, national progress has come at the cost of rising […]
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9:12 PM | Polar Caps On Pluto?
For not being a planet, Pluto certainly has some intriguing features of one.  NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has sent back images of bright and dark regions on the surface of faraway Pluto as it gets closer to flyby in mid-July. The images were captured using its telescopic Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera in early to mid-April, as it closed within 70 million miles. A technique called image deconvolution sharpens the raw, unprocessed images beamed back to Earth. […]
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8:43 PM | How baby cries bore into mom’s brain
Mouse moms’ brains are sculpted by pups’ pleas for help, which make her into a better mother.
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8:38 PM | How baby cries bore into mom’s brain
Growth CurveNeuroscience,Health by Laura Sanders 4:43pm, April 29, 2015 A baby’s cries can change the behavior of key cells in mom’s brain, a study in mice suggests. Nikuwka/iStockphotoHere I am, fresh off of my second maternity leave ready to serve up lots of juicy fresh science about babies. And I would love to do that, if only I were sleeping more at night. With her […]
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8:30 PM | Superbug Season Is Spring - And It's Most Prevalent In The Northeast US Region
Rates of infection with the deadly superbug Clostridium difficile were highest in the Northeast region of the country and in the spring season over the last 10 years, according to a new study.Researchers from the University of Texas retrospectively analyzed 2.3 million cases of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) from 2001-2010 and found the highest incidence in the Northeast (8.0 CDI discharges/1000 total discharges), followed by the Midwest (6.4/1000), South (5.0/1000), and the West […]
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8:12 PM | GM Crops: New Folate Biofortified Rice Could Prevent Spina Bifida
When we think of genetically modified organisms, we usually picture the modern legal definition and a controversy related to how science can aid in herbicide tolerance and insect resistance, but there are other applications of such engineered plants, such as the incorporation of genes for specific nutrients.  Golden Rice is a famous example. Though it is protested by environmental groups, it has been shown to be able to help prevent blindness and death for millions of children.A new paper […]
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7:59 PM | Positive Vs. Negative Association Brain Circuitry Discovered In Mice
Neuroscientists have discovered brain circuitry for encoding positive and negative learned associations in mice. After finding that two circuits showed opposite activity following fear and reward learning, the researchers proved that this divergent activity causes either avoidance or reward-driven behaviors. read more
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7:54 PM | Why There Is A 200-year Lag Between Climate Events In Greenland And Antarctica
Greenland climate during the last ice age was very unstable, the researchers say, characterized by a number of large, abrupt changes in mean annual temperature that each occurred within several decades. These so-called "Dansgaard-Oeschger events" took place every few thousand years during the last ice age. Temperature changes in Antarctica showed an opposite pattern, with Antarctica cooling when Greenland was warm, and vice versa.read more
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7:12 PM | Psychologists share the three secrets to healthier eating
You don’t need a crazy diet to lose weight. In fact, your typical fad diet won’t help you keep weight off long term and could be harming your health. If you want to know the secrets of healthier eating, think of the kitchen fruit bowl. A fruit bowl makes fruit more convenient, attractive, and normal […]

Wansink B (2013). Convenient, attractive, and normative: the CAN approach to making children slim by design., Childhood obesity (Print), 9 (4) 277-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23865529

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6:47 PM | Translational Findings: How fruit flies are helping us find cures for cancer
At universities and companies around the world, scientists are studying the mechanisms of cancer and tumors using fruit flies. They hope to identify failures in the genes that lead to cancer, and develop treatments to prevent or reverse these problems. Because approximately 60% of the genes associated with human cancers are shared with fruit flies, […]

Vidal M. (2006). Drosophila models for cancer research, Current Opinion in Genetics , 16 (1) 10-16. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gde.2005.12.004

Miles W.O. & J. A. Walker (2011). Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila, Disease Models , 4 (6) 753-761. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dmm.006908

Ntziachristos P., Julien Sage & Iannis Aifantis (2014). From Fly Wings to Targeted Cancer Therapies: A Centennial for Notch Signaling, Cancer Cell, 25 (3) 318-334. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2014.02.018

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6:34 PM | High-Speed Camera - 1 Trillion Frames Per Second
When a crystal lattice is excited by a laser pulse, waves of jostling atoms can travel through the material at about 28,000 miles/second, close to one sixth the speed of light. Now researchers can take movies of such superfast movement.STAMP - Sequentially Timed All-optical Mapping Photography -  is a new high-speed camera that can record events at a rate of more than 1-trillion-frames-per-second, 1000X faster than conventional high-speed cameras. read more
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6:25 PM | Placebo Marketing And Why Cheap Wine Can Taste Great
When consumers taste cheap wine and rate it highly because under the belief it is expensive, is it just a placebo or has belief actually changed their brain function, causing them to experience the cheap wine in the same physical way as the expensive wine? People enjoy identical products such as wine or chocolate more if they have a higher price tag so a new study examined the neural and psychological processes required for such marketing placebo effects to occur. The authors conclude that […]
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6:18 PM | An Inclusive Fitness Twist On How Spite Came To Be
The occurrence of altruism and spite - helping or harming others at a cost to oneself - depends on similarity not just between two interacting individuals but also to the rest of their neighbors, according to a new model developed by psychologist DB Krupp and mathematician Peter Taylor of Queen's University.Individuals who appear very different from most others in a group will evolve to be altruistic towards similar partners, and only slightly spiteful to those who are dissimilar to them but […]
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5:30 PM | Target Brown Fat And You Target Obesity
A study has shown a new way that brown fat, a potential obesity-fighting target, is regulated in the body.  In an upcoming Cell Metabolism article,  researchers examined long non-coding RNA (Ribonucleic acid) in adipose (fat) tissue in mice. Long non-coding RNAs have recently become appreciated as important control elements for different biological functions in the body. The team created a catalog of 1,500 long non-coding RNA in mouse adipose tissues - which is the most comprehensive […]
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4:55 PM | Create A Carbon Sink From Your Organic Farm
Agriculture is a breathtaking achievement of modern science. We are on the path to being able to feed the world for the first time in history and the upward trend in obesity is due to the fact that more food has been produced at lower cost with less environmental strain than ever believed realistic. But it still has a price. There are claims that approximately 35% of global greenhouse gases come from agriculture. A new paper argues that regenerative, organic farming, ranching and land use […]
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