Posts

March 25, 2015

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9:16 PM | Pride Before a Fall: The Intertwining of Pride and Shame in Eating Disorders
Is there a link between eating disorders and shame? What about pride? Can understanding these emotions help us to understand how eating disorders develop, and how they are maintained? In reviewing literature for my specialization paper, I stumbled upon a qualitative study by Skarderud (2007) about the role of shame in eating disorders. I found the article quite interesting, so I fired up the “where was this cited” tool on my university library database and uncovered a wealth of […]
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9:01 PM | Common Respiratory Infection Bacteria On Verge Of Becoming Superbugs
Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infection, according to new research.A recent study shows that two genes that confer resistance against a particularly strong class of antibiotics can be shared easily among a family of bacteria responsible for a significant portion of hospital-associated infections. Drug-resistant germs in the same family of bacteria recently infected several patients at two Los Angeles hospitals. […]
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8:46 PM | Primary Mate Ejection Now Commencing: We're Hard-Wired To Get Over It
Had a break up and finding it difficult to move on? It's an evolutionary mandate, according to a review of evolutionary psychology articles on romantic break-ups.People are hardwired to fall out of love and move onto new romantic relationships, the authors suggest after examining the process of falling out of love and breaking up, which they call primary mate ejection, and moving on to develop a new romantic relationship, which they call secondary mate ejection.  read more
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8:10 PM | Raw Milk Is 3 Percent Of The Market But Causes Over 50 Percent Of Milk Foodborne Illnesses
Most people would be horrified if they went to a restaurant bathroom and saw the chef not bother to wash his hands after using the toilet. It's a good thing raw milk fad health buyers do not understand cow milking for the same reason.A new review finds that consumers are nearly 100 times more likely to get foodborne illness from drinking raw milk than they are from drinking pasteurized milk, which is a lower figure than the Centers for Disease Control, which puts that number at 150X. Though a […]
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7:32 PM | You May Never Pay Off Your Student Loans
In the 1980s, student loans were not unlimited, there was a cap on how much you could borrow without getting a regular loan from a bank. As a result, colleges and universities kept their costs down.By the end of the decade, politicians saw a chart showing that people with a college degree made more money than people with a high school diploma. So the obvious solution for politicians was to give students unlimited student loans and secure loyal voters. It certainly worked. Universities now had […]
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6:36 PM | Vitamin D May Keep Low-grade Prostate Cancer From Becoming Aggressive
Taking vitamin D supplements could slow or even reverse the progression of less aggressive, or low-grade, prostate tumors without the need for surgery or radiation, a scientist will report today. His team will describe the approach in one of nearly 11,000 presentations at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting is being held here through Thursday.read more
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5:59 PM | How is the brain relevant in mental disorder?
The Psychologist has a fascinating article on how neuroscience fits in to our understanding of mental illness and what practical benefit brain science has – in lieu of the fact that it currently doesn’t really help us a great deal in the clinic. It is full of useful ways of thinking about how neuroscience fits […]
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5:21 PM | Free Will has lost all meaning
A headline got me going and the summary got me laughing, “Even worms have free will.” ScienceDaily has the item (here) on a paper about reactions of a worm to odors (A. Gordus, N. Pokala, S. Levy, S. Flavell, C. Bargmann; Feedback from Network States Generates Variability in a Probabilistic Olfactory Circuit; Cell, 2015) This […]
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5:03 PM | Cracking the blood-brain barrier with magnetic nanoparticles
The blood-brain barrier, the thorn in the side of medicine. It makes using drugs directed for the brain ineffective at best and unusable at worst. This barrier runs inside almost all vessels in the brain and protects it from elements circulating in the blood that may be toxic to the brain. This barrier means that […]

Tabatabaei, S., Girouard, H., Carret, A. & Martel, S. (2015). Remote control of the permeability of the blood–brain barrier by magnetic heating of nanoparticles: A proof of concept for brain drug delivery, Journal of Controlled Release, 206 49-57. DOI: 10.1016/j.jconrel.2015.02.027

Citation
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4:08 PM | Ebola: Phase 1 Trial Of 2014 Virus Strain Vaccine Results
The first phase 1 trial of an Ebola vaccine based on the current (2014) strain have shown it to be safe and provoke an immune response.  The big question, whether it can protect against the Ebola virus, remain unanswered for now.A team of researchers led by Professor Fengcai Zhu, from the Jiangsu provincial center for disease prevention and control in China, tested the safety and immunogenicity of a novel Ebola vaccine, based on the 2014 Zaire Guinea Ebola strain, and delivered by a […]
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3:57 PM | Good Kind Of RIP: Soil Helps Control Radioactivity In Fukushima
When radiation suddenly contaminates the land your family has farmed and lived on for generations, you might not expect soil to protect crops and human health - that is like expecting the mugging victim to track down the criminal - but that is what happens. On March 11th, 2011, twin perils of a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami caused widespread destruction in Japan, including peril at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The plant released radioactivity into the environment and the […]
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2:37 PM | Parental Education As Risk Factor For Eating Disorders
Genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the risk for anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders.Known risk factors for anorexia nervosa include female gender, young age, family member with anorexia nervosa, weight loss, and participation in weight sensitive sports or activities, i.e. gymnastics, dancing.There has also been evidence that anorexia nervosa is more common in higher socioeconomic classes. This finding has made it one of the few brain disorders more common with this […]
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2:24 PM | Anécdotas Históricas: Salt Lake City y el Autismo
La Reunión Internacional para la Investigación del Autismo (IMFAR) se celebrará este año en la ciudad de Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah. Aunque desconocido para muchas personas, esta ciudad ha […]
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2:16 PM | OYM70: Hyperaroused with Allison Brager
  If you will be in Montreal on April 17th and are interested in NeuroEthics, check out this conference!  OYM will be there alongside some impressive young neuroethicists, and registration is free! We’re elated to welcome Allison Brager (@beastlyvaulter) – post doc, blogger, cross fit athlete and book author extraordinaire – to the guest mic ...read more The post OYM70: Hyperaroused with Allison Brager appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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1:50 PM | A Summary: Working Memory Differences between Children Living in Rural and Urban Poverty – Michele Tine
Working memory (WM) is the process by which we transiently hold and process information required for obtaining a short-term goal. It can be broadly considered to have two main components, verbal WM and visuospatial WM. WM is essential to everyday life, for example, it is used when remembering your friends’ order in a coffee shop … Continue reading A Summary: Working Memory Differences between Children Living in Rural and Urban Poverty – Michele Tine →
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1:30 PM | 'Meat Of The Poor': Science Could Save Beans From Global Warming
Both vegetarians and elite environmental activists have long considered meat as a vital food to cut if we are to reduce global emissions. For poor people, elites in developed nations believe beans would be a good substitute. While their 'it takes a gallon of gas to make a pound of beef' metric has long been debunked, they are not wrong for believing that livestock leads to emissions that would not be evident if we did not want the world's poorest to be equal to the rich when it comes to […]
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1:30 PM | Doomsday Dashboard Makes Tracking The Apocalypse Convenient
Cyber warfare, killer robots, biological pandemics due to mad scientists, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has grown since the old days of just figuring out how to kill nuclear power.read more
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1:00 PM | God Particle Analog In Superconductors Found
The Nobel Prize-winning Higgs boson – the “God particle” - believed to be vital for understanding all of the mass in the universe, was found in 2012 at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, but that's not where the search began.Instead, the first hint of the boson was inspired by studies of superconductors – a special class of metals that, when cooled to very low temperatures, allow electrons to move without resistance. The discovery of the Higgs boson verified the […]
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12:30 PM | Why Some People Have Trouble Telling Left From Right
Do you ever have trouble telling right from left? For example, you’re taking a driving lesson and the instructor asks you to take a left turn and you pause, struggling to think of which way is left. If so, you’re not on your own – a significant proportion of our population has difficulty in telling right from left. read more
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11:43 AM | A Brief History of Controlled Drinking and Irrational Science – Addiction Recovery Blog – addictionland.com
My blog today on Addictionland! A Brief History of Controlled Drinking and Irrational Science – Addiction Recovery Blog – addictionland.com.Filed under: Uncategorized
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11:24 AM | Is Science Being Irrational Rather than AA?
In a recent blog a few days ago I challenged some of Gabrielle Glaser’s “evidence” in her article   “The Irrationality of Alcoholics Anonymous “, which purported to demonstrate the so-called effectiveness of “controlling drinking”. Glaser cited the following in … Continue reading →
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9:55 AM | Textbook coverage of this classic social psychology study has become increasingly biased
One of the pairs of cards used in Asch's1950s research. Image from Wikipedia. Like Zimbardo's prison study and Milgram's so-called "obedience experiments", the research that Solomon Asch conducted at Swarthmore College in the 1950s has acquired an almost mythical quality, being distorted and exaggerated in frequent retellings over time. Asch's studies arguably showed the power of people's independence in the face of an apparently misguided majority, and yet paradoxically they've come to be […]
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8:00 AM | Intellectually Gifted Kids And Learning Disabilities Often Go Hand In Hand
Mention the terms “intellectual giftedness” and “learning disability” and there is a general understanding of what each term means. However, most people are unaware that in many circumstances the two can go hand in hand.Current US research suggests that 14% of children who are identified as being intellectually gifted may also have a learning disability. This is compared to about 4% of children in the general population. No-one has been able to explain this
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6:41 AM | Updating Fermi's Paradox – The Super Fermi Paradox
The Fermi Paradox roughly states that: The universe is both big enough and old enough to have birthed advanced civilizations. Statistically, we are likely not the first. Far older super ETs should have left super artifacts around for us to find, by intention or not. The observational evidence, however, strongly suggests otherwise.  read more

March 24, 2015

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10:28 PM | Was The Recent NY Times Fiasco A Failure For Journalism Or Science?
A columnist at the New York Times has written that he believes that technologies like Apple’s upcoming watch could be as as dangerous as cigarettes and cause cancer. read more
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9:56 PM | What Happens When An Antarctic Iceberg The Size Of A Country Breaks Away?
You never forget the first time you see an iceberg. The horizon of a ship at sea is a two dimensional space and to see a three dimensional piece of ice appear in the ocean is quite something. But, in truth, the first iceberg you see is likely to be small. Most icebergs that make it far enough north from Antarctica to where they are danger to shipping are sometimes many years old and at the end of their lives. They are small fragments of what once left the continent. read more
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9:40 PM | Holistically Tuned - The Brain Sees Words As Pictures, Not A Series Of Letters
When we look at a known word, our brain sees it more like a picture than a series of letters needing to be processed, according to a new paper in the Journal of Neuroscience.Neurons respond differently to real words, such as turf, than to nonsense words, such as turt, showing that a small area of the brain is "holistically tuned" to recognize complete words, says the study's senior author, Maximilian Riesenhuber, PhD, who leads the Georgetown University Medical Center Laboratory for […]
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9:13 PM | Varied Immunity In Children Vaccinated With Serogroup B Meningococcus
Young children who received the 4CMenB vaccine as infants to protect against serogroup B meningococcal disease had waning immunity by age 5, even after receiving a booster at age 3 ½, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) Serogroup B meningococcal disease is the leading cause of meningitis and blood infections in developed countries. Infants and young children under the age of 5 years are especially at risk, and there is a second peak of cases in the […]
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8:14 PM | Is Myopia The New Rickets? Are Schools To Blame?
Is Myopia the new Rickets? A new study compares the history of school myopia with the bone disease rickets. During the 17th century, rickets was common among children in England and then reached epidemic levels through northern Europe and North America. In some cities, 80 percent of children were affected. The remedy proved elusive until the 1920s, when scientists discovered that a lack of sunlight, resulting in vitamin D deficiency, was the cause of rickets. read more
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7:39 PM | One Tommy John Surgery Is Good For Baseball Careers, But A Second...
Ulnar collateral ligament (UCLR) reconstruction surgery, called "Tommy John Surgery" after the New York Yankees pitcher who made it famous in 1974, is now a common procedure for Major League Baseball pitchers after they get a damaged or torn ulnar collateral ligament.It has been a boon for athletes. It had once been a career-ending injury but John pitched for 14 more years and racked up 164 more victories. But it has limits, according to a new study, namely in athletes who have it […]
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