Posts

September 27, 2014

+
3:00 PM | Spike activity 26-09-2014
Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Why most scientists don’t take Susan Greenfield seriously. A serious rebuttal for some poor scientific claims over at BishopBlog. The Guardian has a good profile of food and flavour scientist Charles Spence who specialises in sensory integration. Couvade syndrome: some men develop signs of […]
+
2:52 PM | GMO Feeds In Livestock Diets No Difference In Animals, Meat Or Milk
A review in the Journal of Animal Science has found that feeding livestock diets containing genetically engineered crops has no impact on the health or productivity of those animals. The article documents 30 years worth of livestock-feeding studies, representing more than 100 billion animals, finding that the performance and health of food-producing animals fed GE crops are comparable with those of animals fed non-GE crops.  Since their introduction in 1996, GE feed crops have become an […]
+
2:39 PM | Rolapitant Reduces Nausea, Vomiting From Chemotherapy In Phase III Trial
Rolapitant reduces nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III trial presented for the first time today at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain.read more
+
2:21 PM | Afatinib Improves Progression-Free Cancer Survival
Afatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, significantly improved progression-free survival compared to methotrexate in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, the results of a phase III trial presented at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid show. The Lux-Head&Neck 1 trial showed that patients who received treatment with 40 mg/day oral afatinib had a 20% reduction in risk of progression or death compared […]
+
1:15 PM | Gambling with America’s health!
Here I  simply repost a very comprehensive review of the costs of gambling in the USA – “Gambling with America’s Health”  - THE PUBLIC HEALTH COSTS OF LEGAL GAMBLING this was written by ELAINE MEYER This article cites my friend and author  Catherine Townsend-Lyon who discusses her personal experience of gambling addiction. Publicly, Scott Stevens, a chief […]
+
12:38 PM | Ecological variation and niche construction: 1, 2, 3
Part 1 From its most basic expression in grazing and predatory nematodes with differences in morphological and behavioral phenotypes, neurogenic niche construction is nutrient-dependent and pheromone-controlled. One of these two worms has teeth. It also recognizes self vs other differences...Read more
+
12:37 PM | The Memory Fades, The Emotion Remains
People with Alzheimer’s disease can experience severe memory impairments.However, according to a new study, the emotions associated with events can persist long after the events themselves have been forgotten: Feelings Without Memory in Alzheimer Disease In their paper, the researchers, University of Iowa neurologists Edmarie Guzman-Velez and colleagues, showed volunteers a series of emotional video […]The post The Memory Fades, The Emotion Remains appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Guzmán-Vélez E, Feinstein JS & Tranel D (2014). Feelings without memory in Alzheimer disease., Cognitive and behavioral neurology : official journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology, 27 (3) 117-29. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25237742

Citation
+
4:22 AM | What women want: Science remains baffled
Those wily women with eyes 'false in rolling', who change their moods and affections like chameleons."  Sonnet 20, William Shakespeare 400 years ago when the brilliant Shakespeare first penned this keen observation, commenting on the ever-changing nature of a woman's spirit, the knowledge that a woman's emotions could fluctuate with her hormones was unknown.  The first hormone would not be discovered for another 300 years, and shortly after - the components of the menstrual […]
+
3:01 AM | Epigenetically-effected metabolic shifts and ecological adaptations
Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity: Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages. By Ruth Williams | September 25, 2014 [open access] Excerpt: “...they then analyzed genome-wide distributions of four epigenetic indicators of...Read more
+
2:31 AM | 2-Minute Neuroscience: Receptors and Ligands
In this video, I discuss receptors and ligands. I explain the differences between the two main types of neurotransmitter receptors: ionotropic and metabotropic (aka G-protein-coupled) receptors. I also discuss the general pharmacological actions drugs can have by interacting with receptors, explaining what agonism, antagonism, inverse agonism, and allosterism (aka neuromodulation) are.

September 26, 2014

+
11:01 PM | Team Pressure, Different Rules, Mental Hell – Why The Ryder Cup Is Not Just Another Golf Major
Phil Mickelson tees off at Gleneagles. Credit: EPABy Tony Westbury, Edinburgh Napier University Medinah Country Club, Chicago, Ryder Cup 2012. There were six short feet between Martin Kaymer and the 18th hole. This was the moment. No other player, no spectator, none of the many millions watching on television would have dared breathe. The seconds stretched as the German composed himself for his final shot. read more
+
8:30 PM | Science 2.0: Codifying Collegiality And An Increase In Data-Sharing
The public is not aware of this, but academic science is more like a small business than being part of a vast university structure. An investigator is the business owner and the researchers are independent contractors, augmented by graduate students who go to the school. In that sort of environment, where the life and death of the business is determined by beating other labs for a finite pool of money, while the government spends billions to try and increase the number of competitors who want […]
+
8:00 PM | Pacific Ocean: Cold Cloud Tops In Tropical Storm Rachel
NASA's Aqua satellite captured strong thunderstorms with colder cloud tops that have grown within Tropical Storm Rachel in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Aqua passed over the large Tropical Storm Rachel on Sept. 25 at 4:41 p.m. EDT and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument, saw that the extent of colder cloud tops had increased, indicating thunderstorm heights were increasing and it was strengthening. The expansion of those stronger thunderstorms also suggests that the northeasterly […]
+
8:00 PM | How The Atmosphere Produces Its 'Detergent'
Earth's atmosphere is a complicated dance of molecules involving the output of plants, animals and human industry in sequences of chemical reactions. Such processes help maintain the atmosphere's chemical balance; most topically during protest week in New York City, they break down pollutants emitted from the burning of fossil fuels. Understanding exactly how these reactions proceed is critical for predicting how the atmosphere will respond to environmental changes, but some of the steps of […]
+
7:14 PM | Periodontitis Is Sixth Most Prevalent Health Condition In The World
Periodontitis, gum infection that damages the soft tissue and destroys the bone that supports teeth, is the sixth most prevalent condition in the world affecting 743 million people worldwide, according to research from 2010. Between 1990 and 2010, the global age-standardized prevalence of severe periodontitis was static at 11.2%. The age-standardized incidence of severe periodontitis in 2010 was 701 cases per 100,000 person-years, a non-significant increase from the 1990 incidence of severe […]
+
6:46 PM | Two post docs in Philly
Postdoctoral Fellowship in Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Neurorehabilitation and Aphasia Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation (LCNS), University of PennsylvaniaA postdoctoral fellowship is available in the Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation (LCNS) under the direction of Roy Hamilton, MD, MS, a behavioral neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn). The central thrust of work in the LCNS is to use electrical and magnetic noninvasive brain stimulation to […]
+
6:43 PM | Fish Harvests: Natural Processes Cause Dramatic Drops In Populations - So Do Humans
Ryan Rykaczewski, an oceanographer and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina, is part of a team that are looking deep into the ocean's past, and they have shown that natural processes can cause dramatic year-to-year drops in fish populations and growth rates. They also raise questions about whether human activities might be making those declines more frequent. Upwelling means phytoplankton, the perfect 'sea food' The focus of the research is the California current, which […]
+
6:15 PM | “GMO” Foods (Once Again) Proven Safe
GMO, I shudder every time I hear someone talk about the “dangers”. It’s one of the new buzzwords that doesn’t actually mean anything, but still manages to scare people. Well […]

Van Eenennaam AL & Young AE (2014). Prevalence and impacts of genetically engineered feedstuffs on livestock populations., Journal of animal science, PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25184846

Hirschberg, J. (2001). Carotenoid biosynthesis in flowering plants, Current Opinion in Plant Biology, 4 (3) 210-218. DOI: 10.1016/S1369-5266(00)00163-1

Paine JA, Shipton CA, Chaggar S, Howells RM, Kennedy MJ, Vernon G, Wright SY, Hinchliffe E, Adams JL, Silverstone AL & Drake R (2005). Improving the nutritional value of Golden Rice through increased pro-vitamin A content., Nature biotechnology, 23 (4) 482-7. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15793573

Ahloowalia, B., Maluszynski, M. & Nichterlein, K. (2004). Global impact of mutation-derived varieties, Euphytica, 135 (2) 187-204. DOI: 10.1023/B:EUPH.0000014914.85465.4f

Brian P. Forster et al. (2001). Mutation genetics of salt tolerance in barley: An assessment of Golden Promise and other semi-dwarf mutants, Euphytica, DOI: 10.1007/978-94-015-9996-2_1

Citation
+
5:31 PM | Questions of the Brain
Originally posted on Discover Research Dublin:Join Prof. Marina Lynch & Prof. Shane O’Mara as they discuss the implications of their research in the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience. Marina will give her Talk - ‘Your aging brain’ a slide…
+
4:29 PM | Ice Loss Due To Warming Is Even Changing Gravity
Ice ebbs and flows, that is no secret - but lost in claims that ice is as widespread as ever is the reality that it is now thinner, and the difference is so noticeable the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite can detect it.The strength of gravity at Earth’s surface varies subtly from place to place owing to factors such as the planet’s rotation and the position of mountains and ocean trenches. Changes in the mass of large ice sheets can […]
+
3:59 PM | Why most scientists don't take Susan Greenfield seriously
©CartoonStock.com […]
+
3:38 PM | Cows Are Smarter Than Whole Foods Shoppers
read more
+
3:30 PM | Drugs For Your Pets
By:  Karin Heineman, Inside Science(Inside Science TV) – Dogs and cats can suffer from some of the same illnesses as humans such as allergies, cancer and even Alzheimer's disease. Currently pets are often given drugs designed for the human body that may not work the same way in the body of another species.For example, dogs with allergies are often prescribed the popular allergy drug Allegra. But, the formula was not designed for use by a dog and may not work correctly.Now, […]
+
3:22 PM | What you need for strong hypotheses
Given how important hypothesis testing is in science, I am continually frustrated by how much trouble students have in making good, strong hypotheses ones.When I ask students, even our graduate students, “What’s your hypothesis?”, the answer often start with something like, “I’m studying,” “I’m looking at,” or, “My question is...” Those are not hypotheses.Some more advanced students (particularly in proposal seminars) will say, […]
+
3:15 PM | FDA Takes On Essential Snake Oils
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is tasked with ensuring quality and transparency in the foods and drugs that are sold to consumers. This is a daunting task, and by all accounts the FDA is commonly understaffed, without the resources to thoroughly do its job. Further, politics often hamstrings the agency, so they don’t have [...]
+
2:40 PM | Genetic Engineering Helps Food Crops Tolerate Drought
Outside the developed world, global population continues to rise but all of the best agricultural locations are in use. If we want people to be self-sufficient (and we do) science is going to need to be able to help the developing world with innovative and sustainable solutions. Modern agriculture has not reached any kind of limit, we can easily boost food production by as much as 70-100% in the next few decades. To grow in more difficult areas, and to be resistant to swings in weather, […]
+
2:12 PM | Professor or Reader in Human Neuroscience Royal Holloway, University of London - Department of Psychology
Location:EghamSalary:£49,462 to £112,365 includes London AllowanceHours:Full TimeContract:PermanentPlaced on:15th September 2014Closes:29th October 2014Job Ref:0914-186Full Time - permanent roleProfessorial salary is in the range £60,791 to £112,365 per annum inclusive of London Allowance,dependent on assessment through the College Professorial Pay Banding Scheme.Reader salary is in the range £49,462 to £56,975 per annum inclusive of […]
+
12:49 PM | Dissecting the Agony and the Ecstasy of Win-Win Choices
Guest Post by Amitai Shenhav, Princeton University Tonight, after dinner, I will go out for ice cream at one of my favorite spots in Princeton. I will salivate in anticipation of my visit, delighting in all of the options that await me. I will carry that excitement with me as I enter the shop and examine all […]
+
12:30 PM | Indonesia Cassava Might Be Saved By Parasitic Wasp
Researchers in Indonesia are releasing the parasitic wasp Anagyrus lopezi in an attempt to save cassava crops from destructive mealybugs.Credit:CIAT International Center for Tropical Agriculture .Rights information: http://bit.ly/otwhKGBy: Ker Than, Inside Science. (Inside Science) -- Scientists today released 2,000 South American parasitic wasps in Indonesia as part of a project aimed at thwarting an invasive insect pest that is devastating the country’s cassava food […]
+
12:01 PM | Could There Really Be Such A Thing As Volcano Season?
Volcano season. Some think it's the time of the year. Credit: EPABy Robin Wylie, University College London read more
123456789
891 Results