Posts

April 17, 2015

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10:10 PM | Doctoral Student Position – Neurodevelopment of speech-motor control
The Neurodevelopmental Speech Disorders Laboratory (PI Deryk Beal, PhD) at the University of Alberta invites applications for a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC - http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca) funded doctoral student position in the areas of developmental cognitive neuroscience, sensorimotor integration and speech-motor control.The Neurodevelopmental Speech Disorders Laboratory provides a rich and multidimensional advanced doctoral training program. The lab is […]
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7:56 PM | Artificial blood vessel lets researchers assess clot removal devices
For the first time, researchers have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices used to extract life-threatening blood clots in the brain. The artificial vessel could have significant implications for future development of endovascular technologies, including reducing the need for animal models […]

Teng, D., Pannell, J., Rennert, R., Li, J., Li, Y., Wong, V., Chien, S. & Khalessi, A. (2015). Endothelial Trauma From Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Stroke: In Vitro Live-Cell Platform With Animal Validation, Stroke, 46 (4) 1099-1106. DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.007494

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7:18 PM | Uninsured People Pay Far More For Cancer Drugs Than Medicare Patients
Uninsured cancer patients are asked to pay anywhere from 2 to 43 times what Medicare would pay for chemotherapy drugs, according to a new paper. Uninsured patients who did not negotiate the billed amounts could expect to pay $6,711 for an infusion of the colorectal cancer drug oxaliplatin. However, Medicare and private health plans only pay $3,090 and $3,616 for the same drug, respectively. Although uninsured cancer patients were asked to pay on average two times more than Medicare paid for […]
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5:45 PM | An even cooler demo of saccadic suppression?
The previous post described a demo of saccadic suppression (also described here) in which you get up close to a mirror and move your eyes back and forth while taking a selfie video.  Your own eye motion is typically not visible in the mirror but is quite visible in the selfie. Is this just an effect in which signals from the retina are "shut down" during a rapid saccade?  To find out, try this: do the same experiment but instead of fixating on one eye then the other repeatedly, move […]
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4:16 PM | Can Moons Have Moonlets? Or Rings?
New Horizons will soon reach Pluto, and is expected to find new moons and possibly a ring system. Could it find a moon of a moon? Or a moon with rings? Or, is that impossible? Is there anywhere else in the solar system that could have moons with moonlets?As we search for an answer, we will find out about why our Moon finds it hard keep a satellite at all, even just for a few years, and why an early satellite released by Apollo 16 unexpectedly crashed into the Moon. Also we'll chase up an […]
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4:16 PM | Can Moons Have Moonlets? Or Rings? Moonlets Of Pluto's Moons?
New Horizons will soon reach Pluto, and is expected to find new moons and possibly a ring system. Could it find a moon of a moon? Or a moon with rings? As we search for an answer, we will find out about why our Moon finds it hard keep a satellite at all, even just for a few years, and why an early satellite released by Apollo 16 unexpectedly crashed into the Moon. Also we'll chase up an intriguing puzzle about Saturn's moon Rhea. Let's start with our own Earth / Moon system. Why is the Moon's […]
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3:54 PM | Eating In Restaurants Linked To High Blood Pressure In College Students
A study of college students links eating in restaurants with high blood pressure, even in young people. Globally, high blood pressure - hypertension - is the leading risk factor for death associated with cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that young adults with slightly elevated blood pressure are at very high risk of hypertension. Eating meals away from home has been shown to be associated with higher caloric intake, higher saturated fat intake and higher salt intake, which are […]
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3:30 PM | What Savants Can Teach Us
When Seattle man, Jason Padgett, walked into a bar for a drink a few years ago, he was an ordinary man with seemingly average intelligence leading an unremarkable life. He worked contentedly in his father's furniture shop and had never done well academically or ever cared to do so. On exiting the bar that night, he was viciously mugged, hit on the head and knocked out. read more
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3:17 PM | Twin Studies in ADHD: Research Links
Twin studies provide a strong research study design in understanding the genetics of a variety of brain conditions.This is true for understanding the genetics of ADHD.Here are a few selected recent twin studies in ADHD that I think are important and noteworthy.Readers can access the abstract and in some cases the free full-text manuscript by clicking on the title.Shared Features of ADHD and AutismThis study featured results of an analysis of over 17000 adult twins from Sweden. The authors […]
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3:08 PM | Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer’s
Sleep apnea affects many Americans, with more than 3 million new cases each year.  Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder in which breathing becomes shallow, infrequent, and may even stop during sleep.  It has been recognized for quite some time as being a fairly serious disorder, with complications including heart problems and high blood pressure. […]
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3:01 PM | Virgin Births: Here Is Why Males Are Still Not Irrelevant
Evolution has endowed females of certain species of amphibians, reptiles and fish with the ability to clone themselves and perpetuate offspring without males. It has even happened more recently but these virgin births don't mean males are unneeded. Fertilization is still ensuring the survival of the maximum number of healthy offspring.A species can increase its numbers faster in harsh environments when its females do not have to find worthy males and scientists have speculated that this […]
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2:52 PM | Chemobrain: Even A Cancer Diagnosis Affects Cognitive Function
Breast cancer patients often display mild cognitive defects even before chemotherapy and doctors are attributing that to a kind of preemptive post-traumatic stress disorder induced by diagnosis of the disease.Studies have shown that cancer patients often exhibit mild attention deficit and some decrease in memory and other basic cognitive functions. The phenomenon has generally been attributed to putative side-effects of chemotherapeutic drugs on the brain, and the condition is therefore […]
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2:33 PM | Top 8 Neuroscience and Behavior Podcasts
Get those auditory neurons firing! This blogpost is an update to my post from 3 years ago on neuroscience podcasts. I’m a complete podcast addict and really believe that podcasts are the way of the future–they’re a great way to learn on the go, while you do chores, or exercise. Also, you can control the speed of what you’re listening […]
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2:00 PM | Physician Support For Obamacare In California Is Along Party Lines
A survey of California doctors found that a majority of the 525 who responded believe the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA, also called Obamacare) will steer the country's health care in the right direction, but California has only 28 percent Republicans so that isn't a huge surprise. Doctors were on the side of their political affiliations but were also distinctly divided by medical specialties. Private practices are on the decline and independent business owners are strongly […]
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1:30 PM | How Salmonella Survives Macrophage's Acid Attack
Macrophages destroy bacteria by engulfing them in intracellular compartments, which they then acidify to kill or neutralize the bacteria. Some pathogenic bacteria, such as Salmonella enterica, have evolved to exist and even grow within these acidified compartments. Yet, how Salmonella responds to the acidic environment and how that environment affects the virulence of this pathogen are unclear. New research reveals that Salmonella fights acid with acid, by lowering the pH of its own interior […]
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1:14 PM | LP Resurgence: The Reasons Behind Vinyl's Unlikely Comeback
In a music buying industry now dominated by iTunes and music streaming sites such as Spotify, Napster, Pandora and Jay-Z’s recently released Tidal, the CD and physical music store are reportedly in sharp (and potentially terminal) decline. But a curious development in music consumption has seen vinyl, the format ostensibly rendered extinct by the compact disc with its “perfect” digital sound, make an unlikely, but significant cultural and commercial comeback. read more
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1:00 PM | Typhoon Haiyan May Contaminate Philippines Aquifer For Years
In 2013, Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 6,000 people and destroying nearly $3 billion worth of property in the Philippines. While the country is still recovering from the storm, researchers have found that an aquifer on the island of Samar inundated with salt water by the storm surge could remain undrinkable for up to 10 years - a second aquifer on the island that was also inundated has recovered much more quickly. Geology and infrastructure play key roles in determining whether aquifers that […]
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1:00 PM | 3 Easy Steps To Making Beer The Scientific Way
Karin Heineman, Inside Science TV –  Beer! Most Americans choose it over all other alcoholic beverages.It's also one of the world's oldest beverages. In fact the first evidence of beer production dates back to Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia in the fifth millennium BC. People have been brewing beer for a very long time, even before anyone really understood what turns its ingredients into alcohol. read more
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12:30 PM | Genetic Modification Led To Maize Roots Evolving To Be More Nitrogen Efficient
Genetic modification of maize over the last century has led to desirable shoot characteristics and increased yield - and that likely contributed to the evolution of root systems that are more efficient in acquiring nutrients, such as nitrogen, from the soil, according to a new study. About half of the yield gains in commercial corn in the last 100 years has come from improved plant genetics, explained Larry York, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Nottingham. The other […]
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12:12 PM | Grab Your Torch and Pitchforks
I always find it disturbing to see people, especially in large crowds, apparently acting according to primitive emotions rather than enlightened thinking. It makes it seem like the veneer of civilization is paper thin, and we are not far removed from apes huddled around the monolith and hitting each other over the head with bones. [...]
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12:07 PM | How the Developing Brain Moves from Cooties to Crushes
For the first time, researchers have found the signals for “cooties” and “crushes” in the developing brain. In a new study, cognitive neuroscientists have highlighted how the brain responds to gender across a range of ages. Led by Eva Telzer of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, the researchers found that young children had heightened brain […]
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11:30 AM | Psychology students are seduced by superfluous neuroscience
It seems as though neuroscience is particularly popular and seductive. Not only is the discipline enjoying some eye-spinningly massive new grants, there are also ever more brain-branded products (like brain games and brain drinks), there are new disciplines like neuroleadership, and there's a growing obsession about the brain among many journalists, many of whom invoke brain science in odd contexts (check out "The neuroscience of ISIS" for a recent example).This atmosphere has led to a […]
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10:18 AM | ¿Hasta qué punto usamos adecuadamente la tecnología?
Actualmente estamos inmersos en un mundo cambiante, donde la tecnología juega un papel destacable en nuestras vidas, estando presente en todos los ámbitos. El artículo original está en ¿Hasta qué punto usamos adecuadamente la tecnología?
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10:18 AM | what extent do we use technology properly?
We are currently involved in a changing world where technology plays a prominent role in our lives. The original article is in what extent do we use technology properly?
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3:21 AM | Food odors and chemosignals in body odor
A Sniff of Happiness Excerpt: We observed that exposure to body odor collected from senders of chemosignals in a happy state induced a facial expression and perceptual-processing style indicative of happiness in the receivers of those signals. Our findings suggest...Read more
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2:25 AM | Professional Golf: For Most It Is A Lonely Life On A Meager Income
If you just watched the Master's Tournament in Augusta, Georgia, you saw the second-youngest player ever to win. That is a pretty good way for a young man to spend the next year.But for most golfers, like most young baseball players, the reality is much different. An EPGA tour player for 12 years commented to Dr. John Fry of Myerscough College on the life: "The word that jumps in my head is lonely".read more
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1:32 AM | The Impact of Multiple Concussions on the Brain in Retired NFL Players – New Diagnostic Technique Developed by UCLA Researchers
The prevalence of repeated closed head injury in sports has gained a lot of attention in the past decade. The National Football League (NFL), in particular, has received criticism for their practices surrounding brain safety. In 2011, a federal lawsuit was filed against the NFL for withholding information on the harmful effects of repetitive head […]

April 16, 2015

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11:11 PM | Myth: You Have To Finish All Your Antibiotics
Most people believe – and have been told by health professionals – that it’s essential to finish a course of antibiotics to prevent antibiotic resistance. But this advice is not only wrong, it could actually be harmful. read more
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9:53 PM | LEM - Newly Discovered Protein Boosts Immunity To Cancer
A newly discovered protein plays a central role in promoting immunity to viruses and cancer, according to experiments in mice and human cells. The hitherto unknown protein, which the researchers named lymphocyte expansion molecule, or LEM, modulates the proliferation of human T cells as well as in mice, by promoting the proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, which kill cancer cells and cells infected with viruses. The discovery was unexpected because the new protein had no known function […]
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9:44 PM | Do All These Health Awareness Day Campaigns Actually Help Anyone?
In 2014, there were almost 200 health awareness days, weeks or months on the 2014 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Health Observances calendar.  Since there are only 250 days in a working year, that means one day each week was not given over to some kind of health awareness effort. H.H.S. says their mission is to advocate for "evidence-based" interventions for health problems, so what evidence did they use that 200 health "awareness" campaigns were making a […]
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