Posts

January 28, 2015

+
8:00 PM | Wine Production - Now With More Robots!
A European consortium is developing an unmanned robot equipped with non-invasive advanced sensors and artificial intelligence systems which will help manage vineyards. The robot will be able to provide reliable, fast and objective information on the state of the vineyards to growers, such as vegetative development, water status, production and grape composition.VineRobot, whose partners met recently at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), is led by the Universidad de La […]
+
7:15 PM | Science 2.0: Can Large-Scale Analytics Predict Major Societal Events?
Can big data analytics predict population-level societal events such as civil unrest or disease outbreaks?That is the subject of a two-year analysis of the Early Model Based Event Recognition using Surrogates (EMBERS) system. The usefulness of this predictive artificial intelligence system for population-level events could be important. If existing models, which successfully predict the past, were good enough no one would ever lose money in the stock market.read more
+
6:59 PM | Lower Sea Level In Europe Caused By Ocean Surface Slope
GOCE gravity satellite. ESAWe might like to think of the earth as fixed and unmoving but that is not the case. Things are always shifting, even if we may not have noticed in the past.read more
+
6:01 PM | Some visual-form areas are really task areas
There are two paths for visual information, one to the motor areas (dorsal ‘where’ stream) and one to the areas concerned with consciousness, memory and cognition (ventral ‘what’ stream). The visual ventral stream has areas for the recognition of various categories of object: faces, body parts, letters for example. But are these areas really ‘visual’ […]

Abboud, S., Maidenbaum, S., Dehaene, S. & Amedi, A. (2015). A number-form area in the blind, Nature Communications, 6 6026. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7026

Citation
+
5:30 PM | Organ Transplants Have Added 2 Million Years Of Life In The U.S. Since 1987
More than 2 million years of life have been saved by solid-organ transplants since 1987, according to a new report in JAMA Surgery. read more
+
5:17 PM | Mars Dichotomy - Did A Giant Impact Shape The Southern And Northern Hemispheres?
The two hemispheres of Mars are dramatically different - more distinct from each other than any other planet in our solar system. The northern hemisphere is non-volcanic, flat lowlands while highlands punctuated by countless volcanoes extend across the southern hemisphere. Although theories and assumptions about the origin of this so-called and often-discussed Mars dichotomy abound, there are very few definitive answers. read more
+
5:00 PM | Surfing Brainwaves with EEG: A Classic Tool for Recording Temporal Brain Dynamics
Pictures are powerful tools for illustrating quantitative data and capturing public interest.  Each year, NASA releases many beautiful images of Martian dunes and distant nebulae which help win public funding.  Likewise, when it comes to grabbing headlines and commanding public attention, noninvasive studies of functional brain activity often do best when they beautifully illustrate said … Continue reading →
+
4:50 PM | Entrevista a la Dra. Shimi Kang, sobre su libro El Camino del Delfín
A continuación transcribo la entrevista con la Dra. Shimi K. Kang, autora del bestseller # El Camino del Delfín, quien nos habla de su libro. El artículo original está en Entrevista a la Dra. Shimi Kang, sobre su libro El Camino del Delfín
+
4:31 PM | Why we need animal models
mod·el ˈmädl noun 1. a three-dimensional representation of a person or thing or of a proposed structure, typically on a smaller scale than the original. 2. a system or thing used as an example to follow or imitate. 3. a person, typically a … Continue reading →
+
4:23 PM | Prevent Alzheimer's Disease By Drinking Beer?
Wine has gotten more than its share of Miracle Product mainstream media coverage so it's no surprise that beer has been left behind - smooth, balanced beers, the kind of thing that made large brands famous, are out of fashion and now everyone wants hoppy drinks, or something else wildly exaggerated.But beer has always been a science favorite. Sometimes you hear of breakthroughs being celebrated with a bottle of Mogen David, though it is rare.read more
+
4:07 PM | Interview to Shimi Kang MD, about her book The Dolphin Way
Then transcribe interview with Shimi K. Kang MD, Author of #1 Bestseller The Dolphin Way, Media Expert, Speaker, Writer who talks us about her book. El artículo original está en Interview to Shimi Kang MD, about her book The Dolphin Way
+
3:56 PM | 21st Century Space Science Using 18th Century Technology
Balloons are common at childrens' birthday parties - we can thank Professor Michael Faraday of The Royal Institution for inventing "caoutchoucs" - but ever since the Montgolfier brothers took their lives in their hands and flew a hot air balloon over Paris in 1783, they have been common in science too.They're affordable and they're reusable and since the 1950s, with the invention of the 'natural' shaped polyethylene balloon, there has been a surge in the quality and amount of science being […]
+
3:35 PM | Adolescents With Psychological Symptoms Should Be Asked About Hallucinations
Visual distortions and hallucinations related to an elevated risk of psychosis are linked to self-destructive thought processes among adolescents with psychological symptoms, tells the recent study conducted at the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. Early indications of the risk of psychosis can usually be detected long before the onset of a full-blown disorder. Patients with schizophrenia are known to generally show a higher risk of suicide. Previous research on adolescents with […]
+
3:34 PM | Aromatase+: Estrogen-producing Neurons Influence Aggression In Both Sexes
A miniscule cluster of estrogen-producing nerve cells in the mouse brain exerts highly specific effects on aggressive behavior in both males and females, according to new research. The cells in question, known as aromatase-expressing (aromatase+) cells, represent less than five one-hundredths of a percent of the neurons in the mouse brain, but they play crucial roles in sexual differentiation during early development and in regulating sexual and social behavior in adulthood. Though estrogen is […]
+
3:33 PM | Efimov States: Gigantic Molecules Fit Inside Each Other Like Russian Nesting Dolls
scientists have experimentally observed for the first time a phenomenon in ultracold, three-atom molecules predicted by Russian theoretical physicsist Vitaly Efimov in 1970. "Quantum theory makes the existence of these gigantic molecules inevitiable, provided proper--and quite challenging--conditions are created," said Efimov, of the University of Washington. In this quantum phenomenon, called geometric scaling, the triatomic molecules fit inside one another like an infinitely large set of […]
+
3:20 PM | Cannibalism in the Animal Kingdom
In my latest Zoologic post, I take a look at cannibals in the animal kingdom: Who does it, and why? Cannibalism may be a major taboo for humans, but for many other species it makes good evolutionary sense. Read the whole story here: Animal Cannibalism: Who Does It and Why .
+
2:30 PM | Whose Culture is it Anyway? Disentangling Culture and Eating Disorders – Part 4
The more I write about culture and eating disorders, the more I want to know. I keep finding more articles to add to the mix; I know I’m far from the first to be interested in how culture and eating disorders intersect, and for that matter, what counts as “culture.” Still, this has been a fascinating exploration so far! In case you’re curious, this is to be the second last post in the series for now at least. There will be one more after this, about eating disorders in […]
+
2:00 PM | What Medical Journalists Think About Cancer Research - And Press Releases
Self-administered questionnaires sent to 364 Japanese medical journalists allowed them to describe their experiences in selecting stories, choosing angles, and performing research when creating cancer-centered news pieces. The journalists report that they did not find pharmaceutical press releases to be helpful, preferring direct contact with physicians as their most reliable and prized sources of information. This is much different than in America, where it is assumed that the experts know the […]
+
2:00 PM | The Crystal Structure Of Mitochondrial Complex I
Mitochondria produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP), commonly called the universal energy currency of the body. The driver for this process is an electrochemical membrane potential, which is created by a series of proton pumps - positive charges and negative ones. These complex, macromolecular machines are collectively known as the respiratory chain. The structure of the largest protein complex in the respiratory chain, that of mitochondrial complex I, has been examined by scientists from the […]
+
1:30 PM | Fight Cybercrime With Smarter Habits
Wise advice. Julia Wolf, CC BY-NC-SABy Arun Vishwanath, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York read more
+
12:36 PM | El ojo de Polifemo
Este es un ensayo analitico escrito uno de mis estudiantes durante un curso de Maestría en el autismo que dicto online a través de la Universidad de Rioja. Su autor […]
+
9:50 AM | A face that could get away with anything
First impressions lead to a multitude of assumptions, and trustworthiness is one of them: faces with v-shaped eyebrows and frowning mouths are consistently judged as less trustworthy than others with ^-shaped brows and mouths with upturned corners (this may be related to the former betraying a hidden anger and the latter having positive undertones). Now a study by Brian Holtz suggests that a person's looks can colour perceptions, not only of how trustworthy their character […]
+
8:00 AM | Cometary Globule CG4 - From God's Hand To The Mouth Of The Beast
What exactly is cometary globule CG4? That's still a bit of a mystery. Despite the name, it has nothing to do with comets. In 1976, several elongated comet-like objects were discovered in pictures taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia. Because of their appearance, and despite any connection with comets, they became known as cometary globules. They were all located in a huge patch of glowing gas called the Gum Nebula. They had dense, dark, dusty heads and long, faint tails, […]
+
7:57 AM | This Blog Is Brought to You by the Number 9 and the Letter K
The Neurocritic (the blog) began 9 years ago today.I've enjoyed the journey immensely and look forward to the years to come, by Nodes of Ranvier (the band — not the myelin sheath gaps).Node of RanvierAnd now a word from our sponsors,  Episode 3979 of Sesame Street...The Number 9The Letter kThank you for watching! (and reading).
+
6:46 AM | OYM63: Huntin’ Frankenslices with Kimberly Girling
This week, Kim Girling is joining us all the way from the west coast to share what’s on her mind.  Kim is a fifth year PhD student at the University of British Colombia who studies Huntington’s disease, and is working on developing peptides that can be used to decrease the effects of the mutant protein.  ...read more The post OYM63: Huntin’ Frankenslices with Kimberly Girling appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
+
3:13 AM | Are viruses microRNAs?
Evolution of Intelligent Viruses and Jumping Genes Conclusion: “…it is intelligent warfare between mobile genetic elements and the epigenetic responses of the cell that, most likely, determines evolution.” My comment: This conclusion appears to place biologically-based cause and effect into...Read more
+
2:25 AM | Weaponizing Insulin - Predatory Sea Snails Do It
As predators go, cone snails are slow-moving and lack the typical fighting parts. They've made up for it by producing a vast array of fast-acting toxins that target the nervous systems of prey. A new study reveals that some cone snails add a weaponized form of insulin to the venom cocktail they use to disable fish. "It is very unlikely that it is serving a different purpose," said lead author Helena Safavi-Hemami, a research assistant professor at the University of Utah. "This is a unique type […]
+
2:25 AM | Genetic Mutations In Autism Disorders
Recent research has linked autism with a lack of "pruning" in developing brain connections, but a new Dartmouth study suggests instead it is the excessive growth of new connections that causes sensory overload in people with the disorder. The results, which have broad implications for understanding the neurobiological basis of autism spectrum disorders, appear in The Journal of Neuroscience. A PDF of the study is available on request.read more
+
12:01 AM | Collectivism Ruins Creativity
Every business wants to capitalize on imagination and innovation - but a corporate structure may be the wrong way to promote it. And if you really want to kill creativity, have social authoritarians in government controlling your culture.Collectivism is bad for the imagination. It's hard to think about art when you have to think about the good of the state, according to a paper in the Journal of Business Research, which compared nearly 300 individuals from Taiwan, a collectivist society, and […]

January 27, 2015

+
11:37 PM | Juvenile Hormone Antagonists: Natural Plant Compounds Work Against Pests
Scientists may be on the way to genetically modifying plants to naturally protect against pests in new ways. That is good news for people in developing nations and fans of the environment. Older insecticides present environmental and health risks and insects develop resistance to them, complicating pest-control strategies. Along with that, millions of deaths result from diseases transmitted by insects each year, not to mention economic losses totaling billions of dollars annually.read
123456789
885 Results