Posts

March 04, 2015

+
2:43 PM | Mental Health And The Failure Of The Medicare Principle Of Universality
Researchers say they have clear and detailed evidence of the inequitable delivery of mental health care services for disadvantaged Australians. Introduced in 1975, Australia's national health insurance scheme Medicare (originally Medibank) was envisioned to deliver the most equitable and efficient means of providing health insurance coverage for all Australians.read more
+
2:30 PM | Why Seashells' Mineral Forms Differently In Seawater
For almost a century, scientists have been puzzled by a process that is crucial to much of the life in Earth's oceans: Why does calcium carbonate, the tough material of seashells and corals, sometimes take the form of calcite, and at other times form a chemically identical form of the mineral, called aragonite, that is more soluble -- and therefore more vulnerable to ocean acidification?read more
+
2:30 PM | These Humans Have Evolutionarily Adapted To Arsenic
High up in the high Andes mountains of Argentina, a population has adapted to tolerate the toxic chemical arsenic. For thousands of years, in some regions of the Andes, people have been exposed to high levels of it, because arsenic in volcanic bedrock is released into the groundwater. How could this population adapt to tolerate arsenic, a potent killer of such ill repute that it's often the overused plot-driver of many murder mysteries? read more
+
2:23 PM | OYM67: Such a CRYBB
We’ve stepped up to another level this week, with a new, professional sounding (and looking), recording set up! And we’re taking this as an exciting opportunity to catch up on some Liam and Kat time. It’s been a week since the hosts have had a chance to catch up with each other, even though they ...read more The post OYM67: Such a CRYBB appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
+
2:00 PM | Amazing Metamaterials Mechanical Properties
A “mechanically programmable” metamaterial held by Bastiaan Florijn, Leiden University. Photo credit: Ben P. SteinBy Ben Stein, Inside Science(Inside Science Currents Blog) -- It’s rare when a scientific term is both cool sounding and precise, but the word “metamaterial” might just fit the bill. Although they are made from small, ordinary building blocks such as rods, circles or sticks, metamaterials have striking properties that often do not occur in the natural […]
+
2:00 PM | In Cancer Screening, How Much Over-Detection Is Acceptable?
How much overdetection is acceptable in cancer screening? A UK survey discussed in The BMJ this week affirms what we always knew, that responses are all over the map, depending on how the questions are framed.The article is part of a series on over-detection (over-diagnosis) looking at the risks and harms to patients of expanding definitions of disease and increasing use of new diagnostic technologies. Over-detection describes cancerous lesions that are picked up and treated but would never […]
+
1:30 PM | New Family Of Moth Is Enigmatic Evolutionary Wonder
Male enigma moth, a new species discovered on Kangaroo Island. George Gibbs, Author providedThe discovery of a new family of moth is one of the most exciting finds in entomology in the past 40 years. It was found not in some remote and unexplored region of Australia, but right in our backyard on Kangaroo Island in South Australia. The island that is only 100 kilometers from Adelaide and 13  kilometers from the mainland, that has been settled since 1836 and is one of the loveliest […]
+
1:30 PM | Synchrotron Light Source II First Data Publication
Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory only achieved first light a few weeks ago and already collaborators at the X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XPD) beamline have tested a setup that yielded data on thermoelectric materials. The work was part of the commissioning activities for the XPD beamline, a process that fine-tunes the settings of beamline equipment to ready the facility for first scientific commissioning experiments in mid-March on its way to full user […]
+
1:00 PM | Can civil servants defuse a bomb? An Irish crayfish problem
There are papers you write for your self.There are papers you write for your colleagues.I wrote my latest paper for civil servants.My newest paper on the sale of marbled crayfish is short. I bet that some people reading it might wonder why it’s not just a blog post. I debated with myself a lot whether I should try to get it in a journal. (I assure you, it would have been much easier to blog about it that publish it in a journal.)It started when I was checking my email, and saw one of my […]
+
12:56 PM | El Síndrome de Dravet: Lecciones sobre el Autismo Regresivo
El síndrome de Dravet es un tipo particular de epilepsia de índole severa que comienza entre el primer y quinto año de vida. Su nombre deriva de la Dra. Charlotte […]
+
10:00 AM | Fluctuating existence
The Neurologist has a fascinating case report of a women with Parkinson’s disease who experienced a fluctuating belief that she didn’t exist. Cotard’s delusion is usually described as the ‘belief that you’re dead’ although Jules Cotard, for whom the delusion is named, defined it as a délire des négations – the delusion of negation, or […]
+
9:51 AM | Why do we have flashbulb memories?
MJ Memorial at London's 02 Arena It could be the time you heard about the 9/11 terror attacks, or the moment you discovered that Michael Jackson had died. "Flashbulb memory" is the term psychologists use for when we remember the details of what we were doing and where we were when we heard dramatic news. What's the function of these memories, and is there any difference when the news is public or private, negative or positive?Burcu Demiray and Alexandra Freund surveyed 565 US participants […]
+
6:23 AM | Mutation May Cause Early Loss Of Sperm Supply
The loss of a gene in male mice results in the premature exhaustion of their fertility. Their fundamental new insights into the complex process of sperm generation may have direct applications to a similar loss of fertility in men. What the team discovered is that the loss of the gene that makes the protein TAF4b causes a deficit in the number of progenitor cells at an embryonic stage of a male mouse's reproductive development. Lacking those important precursor cells means that the mice […]
+
5:26 AM | Leukemia-associated Mutations Almost Inevitable As We Age
It is almost inevitable that we will develop genetic mutations associated with leukaemia as we age, according to research published today in Cell Reports. Based on a study of 4219 people without any evidence of blood cancer, scientists estimate that up to 20 per cent of people aged 50-60 and more than 70 per cent of people over 90 have blood cells with the same gene changes as found in leukaemia. read more
+
4:49 AM | A Study Relates The Level Of Pollutants Accumulated In The Body With Obesity Levels
A team of Spanish scientists, which includes several researchers from the University of Granada, has confirmed that there is a relation between the levels of certain environmental pollutants that a person accumulates in his or her body and their level of obesity. Subjects with more pollutants in their organisms present besides higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This is a study published in the prestigious journal […]
+
4:49 AM | Physician-industry Conflict Of Interest In Multiple Sclerosis Treatment
If you're one of the nearly half a million Americans living with multiple sclerosis (MS) - a slowly disabling disease of the central nervous system - you are likely dependent on disease-modifying drugs to prevent symptoms such as vision problems, balance issues and weakness. Often, these treatments have been developed through pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials (ISCT) in collaboration with academic or private practice physicians who care for MS patients. But what do patients […]
+
4:40 AM | Whining to God
**WARNING: SOME RAMBLING THOUGHTS AHEAD*** ~ As most children are, I was rather good at letting my parents know when I was unhappy. I was not a “whiny” kid in the traditional sense, though. With the benefit of hindsight, now I realize that one of my strategies was to look sad, to walk around the …
+
4:22 AM | Vain, Deluded, Indecisive, Biased: The "Average" Australian Consumer, According To Statistics
The "average" Australian according to statistics is a 37 year-old woman with two kids, a mortgage and three bedroom house. But how "typical" are her consumer choices? Image from ShutterstockWho is the “typical” or “average” consumer? Is there such a thing? What do they look like? How do they make decisions? Am I an average (or perhaps a below average) consumer? read more
+
3:36 AM | Know your brain: Pineal gland
Where is the pineal gland? Pineal gland (in red). Image courtesy of life science databases. The pineal gland is considered part of the epithalamus, which is one the main structures that makes up the diencephalon. The pineal gland was so named because it has a pine-cone like appearance. Unlike many structures in the brain, the pineal gland is unpaired; in other words, many brain structures like the hippocampus or amygdala are symmetrically paired with another […]
+
3:15 AM | Concussions: They are all in the Head
Concussions have continually been in the spotlight throughout many different sports. In alpine skiing, the governing body, International Ski Federation (FIS), created an international standard for helmets as far as padding and material. Changes to football helmets have also been made, and more and more soccer players are wearing “concussion headbands”. Players are getting tested […]
+
2:41 AM | Two Of Four Known AIDS Virus Groups Originated In Gorillas
Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) originated in western lowland gorillas, according researchers who conducted a comprehensive survey of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in African gorillas. HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, has jumped species to infect humans on at least four separate occasions, generating four HIV-1 lineages -- groups M, N, O, and P. Previous research from this team found that groups M and N originated in geographically […]

March 03, 2015

+
11:52 PM | You Probably Don't Have The Flu
If you ask doctors what the biggest myth about the flu is, they will tell you that it's people thinking they have the flu. Flu-like illness can be caused by many pathogens, and most people don't go to the doctor for it, making it difficult to assess how often people really have.  Older and young people are more susceptible but adults over the age of 30 only catch flu about twice a decade, according to a new paper.  The immune system responds to flu viruses by producing antibodies […]
+
11:44 PM | New Hormone Mimics Effects Of Exercise, Protects Against Obesity
Scientists have discovered a new hormone that fights the weight gain caused by a high-fat Western diet and normalizes the metabolism - effects commonly associated with exercising.Hormones are molecules that act as the body's signals, triggering various physiological responses. The newly discovered hormone, dubbed "MOTS-c," primarily targets muscle tissue, where it restores insulin sensitivity, counteracting diet-induced and age-dependent insulin resistance.read more
+
9:59 PM | Creating animated gifs in Ubuntu
Something that I do for a lot of my posts is create animated gifs, and usually I forget the whole process and have to re-look up everything. So here I will consolidate the process. There are four steps: 1) record video; 2) convert to images; 3) trim down image set; 4) convert to gif. First, […]
+
9:58 PM | Who’s Leonard Nimoy?
“I’m having a crappy day and to top it off Leonard Nimoy died today.” I told my wife as I was getting into our car after a particularly challenging day. No, I was not a huge trekkie growing up, but I did have a lot of respect for Leonard Nimoy and for Spock, the character that […]
+
7:41 PM | Early life stress may result in a serotonin deficit later
If you have experienced — or are experiencing — mood disorders like anxiety or depression, you know about SSRI’s and chances are they didn’t do much for you. In fact studies indicate that the majority of people with mood and anxiety disorders who receive Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI’s) are not helped by these medications. Sadly, they […]

Coplan, J., Fulton, S., Reiner, W., Jackowski, A., Panthangi, V., Perera, T., Gorman, J., Huang, Y., Tang, C., Hof, P. & Kaffman, A. (2014). Elevated cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in macaques following early life stress and inverse association with hippocampal volume: preliminary implications for serotonin-related function in mood and anxiety disorders, Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 8 DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00440

Coplan, J., Gopinath, S., Abdallah, C. & Berry, B. (2014). A Neurobiological Hypothesis of Treatment-Resistant Depression -- Mechanisms for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Non-Efficacy, Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 8 DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00189

Citation
+
7:00 PM | Are You Allergic To Marijuana?
There are lots of good reasons not to smoke marijuana and you probably heard or read them all growing up - what you may not have heard is that marijuana, like other pollen-bearing plants, is an allergen which can cause allergic responses. A new article summarizes research on the ways in which cannabis can act as an allergen. The article draws attention to allergic responses that may be unfamiliar to marijuana users. read more
+
6:22 PM | Smoking Bans Don't Lead To Smokers Quitting
Picking cultural winners in the name of public interest is a time-honored tool of government and the social engineers giving them input, but the reasons for bans are often suspect. Banning cigarettes in bars and restaurants rather than creating an evidence-based ventilation requirement was going to cut smoking, it was said, but that hasn't happened no matter what sociological Laffer curve was invoked.Pundits wanted to create a ghetto-ized underclass but now smokers happily step outside at bars […]
+
6:03 PM | Weight Loss Drugs Linked To Colon Cancer In Mouse Study
Gastric bypass and similar stomach-shrinking surgeries are a popular option for obese patients looking to lose weight and they have even been linked to a decreased risk in many types of cancers - except colon cancer. A 2013 long-term study of 77,000 obese patients found that colon cancer rates were higher but a new study in mice could explain the association - and raise safety concerns for a new generation of weight-loss drugs. read more
+
5:46 PM | The New York Times On Drugs - Wrong, Naive Or Misleading?
I never know what I'm going to find on the editorial pages of the New York Times. Sometimes I agree with them, and sometimes I don't. But, they usually, at the very least, make sense. That streak ended on March 2nd, when the Times printed an editorial titled "Painkillers Abuses and Ignorance." The paper really dropped the ball on this one. After reading it, I was left wondering whose ignorance was being referred to, because in 433 words, they did nothing short of a superlative job of […]
123456789
854 Results