Posts

August 29, 2014

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1:30 AM | Stuck Fermentation In Wine Triggered By Prions
A chronic problem in wine making is when yeast that should be busily converting grape sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide prematurely shuts down, leaving the remaining sugar to instead be consumed by bacteria that can spoil the wine.read more
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1:00 AM | Malaise: 70 Percent Of Americans Believe Recession Is Permanent
Though the rich get richer and the stock market is booming, which has led to claims by the administration that things are fine, the American public hasn't been this pessimistic about the future since Jimmy Carter was president. Pessimism has instead leaped 40% higher since 2009, when the Great Recession was in full swing.read more
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1:00 AM | The UK Government Is Undermining One Of Its Most Valuable Exports: Education
Credit: Birkbeck Media Services Centre, CC BY-NC-NDBy Gina Rippon, Aston University read more
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12:30 AM | PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)
Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Is There Such a Thing as a 'Good Psychopath'? NPR: The Protojournalist In The Popular Press: Using Light Technique, Scientists Find Dimmer Switch for Memories in Mice, NY Times Scientists Turn Bad Memories Into Good...

August 28, 2014

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11:33 PM | Babies may be good at remembering, and forgetting
Studies in kids suggest that young children can form memories but can’t recall them later, offering new clues to how memory-storing systems form in young brains.
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11:32 PM | Babies may be good at remembering, and forgetting
Growth CurveNeuroscience,Human Development by Laura Sanders 7:33pm, August 28, 2014 A young baby may be capable of forming a memory of nuzzling her soft toy, but she may easily forget it, too.Damircudic/iStockphotoIn one of my earliest memories, I’m wiggling around on the kitchen floor of my childhood home. My mom had just dropped a bunch of oranges for my brother and me to bang around, […]
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9:31 PM | Old Dope, New Tricks: The New Science Of Medical Cannabis
Somewhere in this much-incinerated plant lies valuable medicine: perhaps a treatment for cancer or an antidote to obesity.Prensa 420/Flickr, CC BY-NCBy David J. Allsop, University of Sydney and Iain S. McGregor, University of SydneyMedicinal cannabis is back in the news again after a planned trial to grow it in Norfolk Island was blocked by the federal government last week. The media is ablaze with political rumblings and tales of public woe, but what does science have to say on the […]
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9:01 PM | Mom Was Almost Right: Junk Food Will Spoil Your Appetite, Except Permanently
A diet of junk food not only makes rats fat, but also reduces their appetite for novel foods, a preference that normally drives them to seek a balanced diet, according to a study in Frontiers in Psychology which helps to explain how excessive consumption of junk food can change behavior, weaken self-control and lead to overeating and obesity.read more
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9:01 PM | Old Tires Lead To Better Anodes In Lithium-Ion Batteries
In the 1970s, Florida environmentalists who had invented the notion that landfills were going to overrun America came up with the idea of making coral reefs out of tires. A few short decades later, the clean-up costs when those all came loose were 100X the supposed savings and tires have fallen out of favor as clever quick fixes since then. Leave it to people in Tennessee to find a new use for old tires.  Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers have found a way to use them to make […]
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8:53 PM | This is your Brain. This is your Brain on Drugs
Drugs are bad for the brain. That is (excuse the horrible pun) a no-brainer, but while scientists have seen the after effect drugs have on the brain, we have never […]

You, J., Du, C., Volkow, N. & Pan, Y. (2014). Optical coherence Doppler tomography for quantitative cerebral blood flow imaging, Biomedical Optics Express, 5 (9) 3217. DOI: 10.1364/BOE.5.003217

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8:00 PM | Oxidized Lipids: Protein In HDL May Be Key To Treating Pulmonary Hypertension
Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. Using a rodent model, the researchers showed that a peptide mimicking part of the main protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the so-called "good" cholesterol, may help reduce the production […]
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7:30 PM | E-Cigarettes Versus Cigarettes: 10X Decrease In Second-Hand Smoke
In the culture war on cigarette smoking that lingered long after the science and health issues were settled, nothing spoke to the fuzzy, non-evidence-based nature of arguments than claims that second-hand smoke would give someone lung cancer. Cigarette smoking is annoying and smelly, to be sure, and asthmatics can't be happy in a smoke-filled room any more than non-smokers are, but there are no instances where second-hand smoke has caused cancer. The American Heart Association recently went to […]
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7:30 PM | Zombie Bacteria Invasion? Nothing To Worry About
Cellular reproduction seems simple but the ability to faithfully copy genetic material and distribute it equally to daughter cells is fundamental to all forms of life - and complex. Even seemingly simple single-celled organisms must have the means to meticulously duplicate their DNA, carefully separate the newly copied genetic material, and delicately divide in two to ensure their offspring survive.read more
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7:01 PM | How To Save Brazil’s Atlantic Forest On A Shoestring Budget
The Brazilian Atlantic forest is home to animals, birds, plants, and tourist trains. Credit: EPABy Cristina Banks-Leite, Imperial College LondonBrazil’s Atlantic forest – Mata Atlântica – is one of the world’s great biodiversity hotspots, rivalling even the Amazon. Running on and off for several thousand kilometres along the coast, the forest is home to 10,000 plant species that don’t exist anywhere else, more bird species than the whole of Europe, and more […]
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6:42 PM | A Further Note on "Contagious Shooting"
In my recent history of "Contagious Shooting," I suggested that mechanical metaphors would be mobilized in media discourse to shape further public attitudes about the physiological nature of police over-reaction. Yesterday, Joel F. Shults, writing in The Washington Post, delivered this fine nugget:Brain processes take time and often move slower than reality. A study published in 2003 showed that it takes a shooter about one-third of a second to recognize a threat, then each […]
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6:36 PM | Non-Adaptive Evolution In Cicada Gut: 2 Genomes Function As 1
Organisms in a symbiotic relationship will often shed genes as they come to rely on the other organism for crucial functions but researchers have uncovered an unusual event in which a bacterium that lives in a type of cicada split into two species - doubling the number of organisms required for the symbiosis to survive.read more
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6:35 PM | #Brain article of interest: Children with Autism Have Extra Synapses in Brain
From Neuroscience RSS Feeds - Neuroscience News UpdatesRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/1mYubkv
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6:30 PM | New Solutions To Recycle Fracking Water
Rice University scientists have produced a detailed analysis of water produced by hydraulic fracturing of three gas reservoirs and suggest environmentally friendly remedies - advanced recycling rather than disposal of "produced" water pumped back out of wells - could calm fears of accidental spillage and save millions of gallons of fresh water a year.read more
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6:00 PM | The Saddam Tapes: Hussein Was A Mass-Murdering Despot, But A Sincere One
Politicians often say one thing in public and other things in private. That is no surprise, people in all jobs do the same thing. Saddam Hussein, the genocidal former dictator of Iraq, has left a legacy most despots do not; he recorded so many of his private conversations that political scientists can analyze what he said in private and compare those to his public statements. Their conclusion; he believed what he said.read more
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6:00 PM | Better At Computer Games? You Probably Have A Better Vocabulary
It is not a "All your base are belong to us" world in video games any more. Today, if you want to make a mark in the world of computer games you had better have a good English vocabulary, according to a study by the University of Gothenburg and Karlstad University, Sweden. And games do. The study confirms what many parents and teachers already suspected: young people who play a lot of interactive English computer games gain an advantage in terms of their English vocabulary compared with […]
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6:00 PM | Ontario Is A Worldwide Inflammatory Bowel Disease Hub
Why do so many people in Ontario have inflammatory bowel disease? One in every 200 Ontarians has been diagnosed with IBD, an increase by 64 percent between 1999 and 2008, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), and the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. That puts Ontario in the 90th percentile for IBD prevalence in the world. The study in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases is the first and […]
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6:00 PM | Brain Zaps Boost Memory
Researchers who study memory have had a thrilling couple of years. Some have erased memories in people with electroshock therapy, …
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5:57 PM | #Brain article of interest: Ask Anything: Why Don’t Woodpeckers Get Brain Damage?
From Popular ScienceRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/1zdLUK6
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5:55 PM | Trapjaw ants, filmed at 600 frames per second
By Adrian Smith; taken from Myrmecos.
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5:40 PM | The smell of rain: what is petrichor?
pet·ri·chor ˈpeˌtrīkôr/ noun a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather. “other than the petrichor emanating from the rapidly drying grass, there was not a trace of evidence that it had … Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | Ignore The IQ Test: Your Level Of Intelligence Is Not Fixed For Life
You can do better. Answer sheet via Wichy/ShutterstockBy Bryan Roche, National University of Ireland Maynooth read more
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4:52 PM | The Things Living on your Toothbrush…
Did you remember to brush? I hope you did, but you may be throwing away your toothbrush soon. Get ready for your daily amount of gross, because have I got […]

Morris DW, Goldschmidt M, Keene H & Cron SG (2014). Microbial contamination of power toothbrushes: a comparison of solid-head versus hollow-head designs., Journal of dental hygiene : JDH / American Dental Hygienists' Association, 88 (4) 237-42. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25134956

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4:48 PM | Schrödinger's Picture: Researchers Take An Image Without Ever Detecting Light
Here is something counter-intuitive: researchers have developed a new quantum imaging technique in which the image has been obtained without ever detecting the light that was used to illuminate the imaged object, while the light revealing the image never touches the imaged object.  As everyone knows, outside the world of quantum mechanics, to obtain an image of an object one has to illuminate it with a light beam and use a camera to sense the light that is either scattered or […]
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4:25 PM | How Does It Feel To Be Old In Different Societies?
People aged 70 and over who identify themselves as 'old' feel worse about their own health in societies where they perceive they have lower value than younger age groups. New research from psychologists at the University of Kent, titled 'Being old and ill' across different countries: social status, age identification and older people's subjective health, used data from the European Social Survey. Respondents, who were all aged 70 and over, were asked to self-rate their health.read more
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4:13 PM | New Synthesized Fungus-Derived Antibiotic
Researchers at Rice University have synthesized a recently discovered natural fungus-derived  antibiotic, viridicatumtoxin B, which may shelp bolster the fight against bacteria that evolve resistance to treatments in hospitals and clinics around the world.   The work reported this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS) focused on a tetracycline discovered in 2008 by scientists who isolated small amounts from penicillium fungi. The yield wasn't nearly enough for […]
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