Posts

November 18, 2014

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7:16 PM | ADHD Surge Is More Marketing Than Medicine
You can't catch attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) but you wouldn't know that by the way diagnoses are spreading - up 10X in some countries. read more
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7:16 PM | Tuesday Crustie: Back of the line!
The segment above (from the BBC series Life Story) shows hermit crabs exchanging shells in a rather remarkable way. I wondered if this had been documented in scientific literature. I’ve read a fair number of papers on hermit crab shell choice, but not this queuing behaviour. And with a little searching in Google Scholar, voila!Lewis SM, Rotjan RD. 2009. Vacancy chains provide aggregate benefits to Coenobita clypeatus hermit crabs. Ethology 115(4): 356-365. […]
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6:28 PM | 'Mexican Waves' In The Brain Revealed
Neurons - cells in the brain that communicate chemical and electrical information - belong to one of two groups, inhibitory or excitatory. Much is known about excitatory neurons but not so much for inhibitory ones.read more
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6:27 PM | Acculturative Stress Causes Depression, Suicide In Latino Youth
An epidemiology analysis finds that acculturative stress, which is a term created to highlight that immigrants straddling two different cultures have greater stress than natives, is the reason Latino youth in Indiana have higher suicide and depression rates than white counterparts. Young people are forced to be one thing in their homes and then also part of the larger outside culture and the conflict between Latino teens and their parents regarding what they do and how they should act […]
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5:59 PM | RNA-mediated species specificity
Species-Specific Scientists uncover striking differences between mouse and human gene expression across a variety of tissues. By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | November 17, 2014 Excerpt: “…results published today (November 17) in PNAS reveal widespread differences between human and mouse gene expression,...Read more
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5:50 PM | Another Look at Acamprosate
The most popular pharmaceutical treatment for alcoholism, explained.(First published February 17, 2014)“Occasionally,” reads the opening sentence of a commentary published online earlier this year in Neuropsychopharmacology, “a paper comes along that fundamentally challenges what we thought we knew about a drug mechanism.” The drug in question is acamprosate, and the mechanism of action under scrutiny is the drug’s ability to promote abstinence in alcoholics. The […]
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5:19 PM | Coffee Creamer, Crackers Linked To Worse Memory
A new study finds that people of 1914 may have had worse memory than people of 1814. The reason is partially hydrogenated oil - trans fats - that became a cheaper, healthier replacement for the saturated fats in butter. Crystallized cottonseed oil - Crisco - came onto the marketplace in 1911 and it revolutionized pie crusts but now the government says they should be banned and they now have a new reason why.read more
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5:06 PM | Ancient Chinese Secret: Turmeric Spices Up Your Memory
A single gram of turmeric at breakfast could help improve the memory of people who are in the very early stages of diabetes and potentially at greater risk of cognitive impairment. Turmeric is widely used in Asian cooking. Its characteristic yellow color is due to curcumin, which accounts for 3 to 6 per cent of turmeric and has been found in some studies to reduce the risk of dementia. The finding has particular significance given that the world's aging population and higher risk of […]
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5:00 PM | With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility: Neural Stem Cells
Stem cells have two characteristic and essential properties: Self-renewal. They can divide to give rise to another stem cell. Potency. They are capable of differentiating into specialized cells. Totipotent cells are stem cells that are capable of differentiating into all cell types in the entire organism. Pluripotent cells are descendant of totipotent cells, and are … Continue reading →
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4:58 PM | Microvascular Dysfunction Common In Cocaine Users
Cocaine users complaining of chest pain may have microvascular dysfunction, improper blood flow through the smallest blood vessels that may not be detected in regular testing, putting these patients at risk for heart complications or death, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014.read more
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4:57 PM | Some Poor People Have Better Health
It is a weekly event in epidemiology - some medical or health outcome is linked to socioeconomic inequality, as if more spending makes people healthy.read more
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4:17 PM | Family Planning: Involving Men Empowers Women
In America, and to a much less extent in Europe, there can be a lot of angst when an aerospace engineer wears the wrong shirt on television. Women have a great deal of power in western nations, so much so that they can overwhelm science breakthroughs with cultural Gerrymandering.read more
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3:57 PM | Entrevista a Judith Levy autora del libro para el cuidado de Alzheimer
Entrevista a M. Judith A. Levy, autora de "Actividades que hacer con tu pariente cuando tenga Alzheimer", quien nos revela las claves de su libro. La entrada Entrevista a Judith Levy autora del libro para el cuidado de Alzheimer aparece primero en Novedades en Psicología.
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2:00 PM | PIWI Pathway Isn't Perfect But It's What Keeps Transposons From Destroying Your Genes
We like to think of evolution as a fine-tuning process, one that whittles away genetic imperfections and redundancies and converges on a more efficient system because of 'survival of the fittest'. But natural selection is just one mechanism of evolution and what is fittest at one point may not have been fittest at another, yet could still be inherited. Our bodies are full of parts that we inherited and either don't work anymore or are rather buggy and other parts have simply found a way to […]
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1:41 PM | Director’s Update: Simple, flexible funding
Originally posted on Wellcome Trust Blog:Having listened to our grantholders, colleagues at the Wellcome Trust and others in the UK and international research communities, Wellcome Trust director Jeremy Farrar now introduces a new way of understanding the Trust’s funding…
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12:26 PM | Interview to Judith A. Levy author of book to Alzheimer’s care
Interview to M. Judith A. Levy, author of "Activities to Do with Your Parent Who Has Alzheimer's Dementia", which reveals the keys of her book. La entrada Interview to Judith A. Levy author of book to Alzheimer’s care aparece primero en Novedades en Psicología.
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12:20 PM | Personhood Week: Do Kids Count?
It’s Personhood Week here on Only Human. Today’s installment is about young people: When do they get autonomy? When do …
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11:01 AM | Phthalates And Prostates: Endocrine Disruptors Shortening The Distance Between Male Anus And Penis
Men are becoming more effeminate. That is not news. If you watched the ESA's Rosetta mission arrive at Comet P67 you saw a tattoo-covered fellow talk about engineering and he looked manly, but two days later he was crying during a press conference because his bowling shirt had offended women on Twitter.read more
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10:46 AM | The Misreading of Greene and Cohen
One of the most cited papers in neurolaw circles is For the Law, Neuroscience Changes Nothing and Everything by Joshua Greene and Jonathan Cohen. Many neurolaw scholars seem taken by its claims that we lack free will and that the...
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8:47 AM | Evidence based debunking
Originally posted on Mind Hacks:Fed up with futile internet arguments, a bunch of psychologists investigated how best to correct false ideas. Tom Stafford discovers how to debunk properly. We all resist changing our beliefs about the world, but what…
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8:39 AM | Evidence based debunking
Fed up with futile internet arguments, a bunch of psychologists investigated how best to correct false ideas. Tom Stafford discovers how to debunk properly. We all resist changing our beliefs about the world, but what happens when some of those beliefs are based on misinformation? Is there a right way to correct someone when they […]
Editor's Pick
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5:57 AM | Coconut oil: A brain cell defender against Alzheimer’s disease protein #SfN14
Poster: Treatment of neurons with coconut oil and constituent fatty acids attenuates the effects of amyloid beta in vitro When someone finds out that I study the neurobiology of Alzheimer’s disease, all too often I get asked the heartbreaking question – ‘Is there a cure?’ Currently, there is no cure. Even within the field of Alzheimer […]
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3:24 AM | Chemical warfare in terrestrial flatworms – OUP blog
Did you know that some terrestrial flatworms contain a pretty nasty toxin? Read about it in my latest OUP blogpost! ~~ Want to see more of the things I write? Go here for some other posts. By the way, I wrote a book! TFB is available as an ebook (Kindle, Nook, as well as in iTunes). …
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12:21 AM | Omega-3 Fatty Acids Decrease Heart Disease - It's No Fish Tale
Increasing the amount of omega-3s in your diet will likely decrease your risk of getting heart disease, according to Penn State nutritionists who cite evidence supporting the heart-health benefits of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA and DHA), marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. read more

November 17, 2014

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11:59 PM | SfN2014: Day3 – Attention/Reward Symposium, More Exhibit Fun, Perception/Imagery Posters
It’s the third day of the conference.  I didn’t attend a special lecture. So no intro by the SfN president and so no idea how many people are now registered. … Continue reading →
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9:35 PM | Major brain pathway rediscovered
A massive white matter tract at the back of the brain, overlooked for the past century, might be crucial for skills such as reading.A team of neuroscientists in America say they have rediscovered an important neural pathway that was first described in the late nineteenth century but then mysteriously disappeared from the scientific literature until very recently. In a study published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they confirm that the prominent white matter tract is […]
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9:30 PM | The Collapse Of The Bronze Age - Climate Change Didn't Do It
Empires have risen and fallen and often it has been due to changes in the climate. When agriculture was a more demanding endeavor people wanted the most fertile lands and as that shifted, so did cities. For that reason, climate change has often been cited as the most logical reason for a huge population collapse in Europe at the end of the Bronze Age. Now archaeologists and environmentalists say they can prove definitively that climate change could not have been the culprit. Because the […]
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9:28 PM | Are mutations beneficial?
Researchers develop non-invasive method to detect tumor-causing mutations in saliva Excerpt: “…a multiplexible electrochemical sensor uses electrode chips to enable vesicular entities in saliva called exosomes to rapidly release molecular constituents (DNA, RNA and proteins) while simultaneously detecting any mutations...Read more
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9:01 PM | Can GPS Satellites Detect Dark Matter?
"Dark matter" is a blanket term for inferred matter that is undetected but must exist in order for gravity at very large scales to make any sense at all. Based on inference, 27 percent of the universe is generally acknowledged to be dark matter, even though it is not visible and eludes direct detection and measurement. Whatever dark energy might turn out to be gets a number of about 68 percent of the universe. The rest of the universe, what we can detect and feel, is what we know to be […]
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8:33 PM | The (Re)discovery of a major brain pathway
It was like something out of a mystery movie, a couple of years ago a scientist, looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising. A large, […]

Brian Wandell, Jason Yeatman & Kevin Weiner (2014). The vertical occipital fasciculus: A century of controversy resolved by in vivo measurements, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Other:

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