Posts

September 02, 2014

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12:00 PM | Battery-Less Pacemaker Works Like An Automatic Wristwatch - Powered By Heart Motion
A new battery-less cardiac pacemaker is based on the automatic wristwatch concept - it is powered by heart motion. The prototype device  presented at ESC Congress 2014 by Adrian Zurbuchen from Switzerland does not require battery replacement. Zurbuchen is a PhD candidate in the Cardiovascular Engineering Group at ARTORG, University of Bern and said, "Batteries are a limiting factor in today's medical implants. Once they reach a critically low energy level, physicians see themselves forced […]
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11:27 AM | The Point of Pointing
Five years ago cognitive scientist Rafael Núñez found himself in the Upper Yupno Valley, a remote, mountainous region …
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11:20 AM | Book Review: Piers J. Hale, Political Descent: Malthus, Mutualism, and the Politics of Evolution in Victorian England (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2014)
 “Malthus,” philosopher of biology Robert J Richards has observed, “brought Darwin to recognize the tremendous fecundity of organisms and their consequent struggle to acquire the necessities of survival” (Richards 1987, 100) but Darwin also, “misread Lamarck from the beginning, for clearly neither the Histoire naturelle nor the Philosophical zoologique invoked will to explain the inheritance of acquired characteristics”(Richards 1987, 93). Piers J. […]
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10:37 AM | Olympus competition
Olympus would like to invite you to submit several of your images and/or digital video clips to the 2014 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition, which will honor extraordinary microscope images of life science subjects. Up to five images or videos can be entered via the Internet. Entries for the contest can be uploaded through a […]
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8:17 AM | On being labelled "schizophrenic", in the words of the diagnosed
The label "schizophrenic" is loaded with connotations. For many, its utterance provokes thoughts of madness, of violence and oddity. No wonder that clinical psychologist Lorna Howe and her colleagues found the people they interviewed - all diagnosed with the illness - had strived to avoid the label.In all, the researchers conducted in-depth interviews lasting up to 90 minutes with seven participants diagnosed with schizophrenia. There were three men, four women (average age 44), and they'd […]
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7:55 AM | A brief history of psychedelic psychiatry | Mo Costandi
In the 1950s a group of pioneering psychiatrists showed that hallucinogenic drugs had therapeutic potential, but the research was halted as part of the backlash against the hippy counterculture.On 5th May, 1953, the novelist Aldous Huxley dissolved four-tenths of a gram of mescaline in a glass of water, drank it, then sat back and waited for the drug to take effect. Huxley took the drug in his California home under the direct supervision of psychiatrist Humphry Osmond, to whom Huxley had […]
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3:46 AM | Unpacking Recovery Part 4: Are We All on the Same Page?
Another issue in defining and understanding recovery is that patients and clinicians may have different opinions about what recovery looks like and how to get there. Certainly, there is a body of literature from the critical feminist tradition in particular that explores how at times, patients can “follow the rules” of treatment systems to achieve a semblance of “recovery,” from a weight restoration and nutrition stabilization perspective, but feels nothing like a full […]

Noordenbos, G. & Seubring, A. (2006). Criteria for Recovery from Eating Disorders According to Patients and Therapists, Eating Disorders, 14 (1) 41-54. DOI: 10.1080/10640260500296756

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3:46 AM | #Brain article of interest: Your Brain Likes Plain Old Paper More Than It Likes E-Readers
From EntrepreneurRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/1sVnCGe
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3:05 AM | Just a Look: The Threat and Persona of Assault and Violence
This post is part of a collaborative narrative series composed of my writing and Chris Arnade’s photos exploring issues of addiction, poverty, prostitution and urban anthropology in Hunts... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:19 AM | Another misrepresentation of molecular epigenetics
Tiny, Vast Windows Into Human DNA By CARL ZIMMER SEPT. 1, 2014 Excerpt 1): “Sometimes, a single transcription factor may switch on dozens of other genes. And sometimes, those genes encode transcription factors of their own, enabling a cell to...Read more
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1:24 AM | The neuroscience of self-control
In the 1960s, a psychologist at Stanford named Walter Mischel began a series of experiments exploring the dynamics of self-control in children. In one such experiment, Mischel gave preschoolers the choice between two outcomes, one of which was clearly preferable. For example, they were able to choose between 2 marshmallows and 1 marshmallow (the experiments became known as the Stanford marshmallow experiments for this reason).But there was a catch. The experimenter would tell the children that […]
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1:22 AM | Wockhardt Is First Indian Pharmaceutical Company To Get FDA QIDP Status
Wockhardt Limited announced that two of its drugs, WCK 771 and WCK 2349, received the coveted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) status from U.S. Food&Drug Administration (FDA). QIDP status is granted to drugs which act against pathogens which have a high degree of unmet need in their treatment and are identified by the Centers for Disease Control. QIDP status allows for fast track review of the drug application by U.S. FDA, paving way for an early launch. This is the first […]
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12:53 AM | Low Carb Vs. Low Fat Diets: Which Is Better?
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September 01, 2014

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8:29 PM | Chronic immobilization stress occludes in vivo cortical activation in an animal model of panic induced by carbon dioxide inhalation
It has been known since at least the 1920’s that inhaling high amounts of CO2 (20%) induces panic attacks in healthy individuals. There is a remarkable literature deriving from diving and respiratory physiology in submariners available treating this topic. The great … Continue reading →
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8:26 PM | Explaining how negative Negative Urgency can be.
In various blogs we have suggested that one of the main aspects of addictive behaviours is to act as the result of distress-based impulsivity or negative urgency. Here we explore in more details what we mean by that term negative … Continue reading →
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8:00 PM | Do We Need A Law To Help People Try Experimental Drugs?
People with life-threatening or incurable diseases may be willing to try experimental drugs and unproven treatments. Credit: juicyrai/Flickr, CC BY-NC-NDBy Tina Cockburn, Queensland University of Technology and Bill Madden, Queensland University of Technology read more
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7:12 PM | Inhibiting Inflammatory Enzyme After Heart Attack Does Not Reduce Risk Of Subsequent Event
In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event (such as heart attack or unstable angina), use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis) did not reduce the risk of recurrent major coronary events, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.read more
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6:12 PM | Assemblages: 50 Years Later, We Know Nothing About Them
You would think we learn about every part of a cell in biology, but we really don’t. Case in point, about 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of […]

Toretsky, J. & Wright, P. (2014). Assemblages: Functional units formed by cellular phase separation, The Journal of Cell Biology, 206 (5) 579-588. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201404124

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6:10 PM | New Creature Feature: Meet the Thorny Devil
The thorny devil has spikes, camouflage, and a false head to protect it from predators. Plus, it can survive in its desert habitat by concentrating and drinking dew. But do they live up to their devilish name? Read my latest Creature Feature to find out: The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About the Thorny Devil .
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6:00 PM | New Cancer-Hunting 'Nano-Robots' To Seek And Destroy Tumors
Nano-robots have cancer in their sights. Credit: StephenMitchell/Flickr, CC BY-NC-NDBy Dr. Jason Liu, Monash UniversityIt sounds like a scene from a science fiction novel – an army of tiny weaponized robots traveling around a human body, hunting down malignant tumours and destroying them from within. read more
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5:52 PM | Neuronal man, Neuronal Worm
A couple of posts ago, I showed you a picture of one of my notebooks with some scribbles about the idea for a blog. I also found some notes on my early ideas for ‘The First Brain': Credit: Baldscientist Those of you bored enough to read my posts (yes, I am in **that** mood today). …
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5:11 PM | Neil Tyson On The Politics Of Science Denial
Spend any time in American science media and you may find some of them are pretty far out of the political mainstream; so far out, they may not even be friends with anyone who has not always voted the same way as them.So it's unsurprising that much of science media once perpetuated the claim that 'science votes Democrat.'  Humans are fallible and confirmation bias is sneaky. As was apocryphally attributed to New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael after the 1972 Presidential election and a […]
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4:30 PM | Brain Size Matters When It Comes To Remembering
Want more working memory? Then you need to expand your brain. Credit: Flickr/Elena Gatti, CC BYBy Joel PearsonBefore we had mobile phones, people had to use their own memory to store long phone numbers (or write them down). But getting those numbers into long-term memory could be a real pain. read more
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4:00 PM | Antarctic Sea Level Rising Faster Than Elsewhere
A new analysis of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2 centimeters more than the global average of 6 centimeters. Researchers at the University of Southampton detected the rapid rise in sea-level by studying satellite scans of a region that spans more than a million square kilometers. read more
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4:00 PM | Blood In Urine Can Be Invisible - And It May Indicate Bladder Cancer
Visible blood in urine is the best known indicator of bladder cancer but new research  finds that invisible blood in urine may be an early warning sign of bladder cancer.  Scientists at the University of Exeter Medical School found that 1 in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine transpired to have bladder cancer. Thay's about half those who had visible blood in their urine but higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant […]
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3:30 PM | The Sport Science Regime That Helped Boxer Kell Brook Become A World Champion
Kell Brook and two of the Sheffield Hallam University team. Credit: Sheffield Hallam University.By Alan Ruddock, Sheffield Hallam UniversityAmid all the flashing lights, it was a moment of sheer exhilaration when the winner was finally announced: “By a majority decision, the new IBF welterweight champion on the world – Kell Brook.” read more
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3:30 PM | Synaptic Plasticity And Memory In Silent Neurons
When we learn, we associate a sensory experience with other stimuli or with a certain type of behavior. The neurons in the cerebral cortex that transmit the information modify the synaptic connections that they have with the other neurons and according to a generally accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical pulse, combined with the signal received […]
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3:27 PM | An “interview” with Laboratory Life
Note: Reading Latour’s “Laboratory Life”, I found that there were too many great quotes to summarize. Having once been chastened by a High School teacher that “when there is a great writer, you should let them have their voice”, I … Continue reading →
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3:02 PM | Caffeine Syndrome: Energy Drinks Linked To Heart Problems
Energy drinks can cause heart problems according to research presented yesterday at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014 today by Professor Milou-Daniel Drici from France.read more
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2:53 PM | Your Insurer Could Soon Know A Lot More Than How Fast You Drive
Image credit:  Peter Blanchard via flickr | http://bit.ly/1q1sNlt. Rights information: http://bit.ly/c34AwzBy:  Benjamin Plackett,  Inside Science(Inside Science) -- It may be unintentional, but it’s possible that your car insurer may know a lot more about where you go than you’d like. read more
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