Posts

December 10, 2014

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4:10 PM | Is Living Hear High-Power Electricity Lines Bad For Health?
In modern times, it seems a little strange to read claims in Europe and in U.S. cities like San Francisco that cell phone radiation is harmful to humans - but their reasoning is based on work in the 1970s which found an epidemiological association between increased risk of childhood leukemia and living near overhead power lines. Like most epidemiology claims that find two curves going the same way and garner media attention, some skepticism is warranted, and later studies were unable to find […]
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3:35 PM | Cape Verde Volcano - The Biggest Natural Disaster You Aren't Reading About
Many villagers near the Cape Verde volcano will have little to return to. Joao Relvas/EPABy David Rothery, The Open UniversityAround 60 volcanoes erupt in the average year. On any particular day, there are usually about 20 volcanoes erupting somewhere in the world. Naturally, they can’t all make headlines. But when there are human tragedies involved, we need to question the priorities of the news media. read more
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3:30 PM | Brain Inflammation Common In Autism
There are too many factors and combinations of genetic traits to have any definitive cause of autism today, along with a wide range of diagnoses that add to the pool, but a new analysis has found that the autopsied brains of people who had autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses.read more
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3:27 PM | Is the "ticking time bomb scenario" a valid defence of torture?
In the wake of a report published yesterday into the CIA's use of torture, many people are shocked and appalled. Yet one defence of the practice remains popular - "the ticking time bomb scenario".This is the idea that torture is justified if a suspect knows the location of bomb in a public place, and many lives would be saved if he or she were coerced into telling authorities the location in time for it to be deactivated. The new Senate Intelligence Committee report describes how the ticking […]

Spino, J. & Cummins, D. (2014). The Ticking Time Bomb: When the Use of Torture Is and Is Not Endorsed, Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 5 (4) 543-563. DOI: 10.1007/s13164-014-0199-y

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2:50 PM | Flow Cytometry: 21st Century Nuclear Medicine For Cancer Shows Promise
Targeted therapy with radiopharmaceuticals - radioactive compounds used in nuclear medicine for diagnosis or treatment - has a lot of potential to more effectively kill cancer cells that have migrated from primary tumors to lymph nodes and secondary organs such as bone marrow. Disseminated tumor cells can be difficult to treat with a single targeting agent because there are dramatic differences in the number of targetable receptors in each cell.read more
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2:33 PM | Colin Firth and the Slippery Slope of Scientific Authorship
Colin Firth CBE...PhD? Nicogenin (Flickr)I’ve been in research for about seven years now. But if you search my name in PubMed, precisely one scientific paper will pop up—a manuscript published this past spring from my current group. I’m pretty far down on the author list, which reflects my contribution relative to my colleagues on this particular paper. While I helped with some of the writing, the data collection and most of the analyses were performed by others.As you snuggle […]
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2:00 PM | How Unfolded Proteins Move In The Cell - Visualized
When a large protein unfolds in a cell, it slows down and can get stuck in traffic. University of Illinois chemists now can watch the way the unfolded protein diffuses, which could provide great insight into protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's. Researchers have hypothesized that an unfolded protein moves more slowly through the cell, because it would be a big, stringy mess rather than a tightly wrapped package. The team devised a way to measure how diffusion slows […]
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12:01 PM | The Neuroscience of Attachment (Part 2)
Part 2 Here we again borrow extensively from an excellent article by Linda Graham “How relational learning works John Bowlby, British psychoanalyst, founder of attachment theory, hypothesized that attachment is all about safety and protection and emotional regulation in times of perceived threat or danger. Attachment is part of a 3-part motivational system of fear–attachment-exploration. […]
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11:32 AM | The Neuroscience of Attachment (Part 1)
The Neuroscience of Attachment Here we borrow extensively from an excellent article by Linda Graham written six years ago but which gives such a comprehensive review of how the neural development of our brain is affected by attachment – as … Continue reading →
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11:15 AM | Interview with Ph.D. Mª Salud Jiménez Romero, Associate Professor of the University of Córdoba. Specialist care for children with disabilities
Novedades en PsicologíaNovedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. Interview with Ms. Ph.D. Mª Salud Jiménez Romero, Professor at the University of Córdoba. Specialist care for children with disabilities. Interview with Ph.D. Mª Salud Jiménez Romero, Associate Professor of the University of Córdoba. Specialist care for children with disabilitiesDr. Juan Moisés de la Serna
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11:01 AM | Entrevista a la Dra. Mª Salud Jiménez Romero, Profesora asociada de la Universidad de Córdoba. Especialista en atención a niñas y niños con discapacidad.
Novedades en PsicologíaNovedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. Entrevista realizada a la Dra. Mª Salud, Profesora de la Universidad de Córdoba. Especialista en atención a niñas y niños con discapacidad, Entrevista a la Dra. Mª Salud Jiménez Romero, Profesora asociada de la Universidad de Córdoba. Especialista en atención a niñas y niños con […]
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10:57 AM | Torturing the brain (because this is what torture results in: broken brains, minds and bodies)
Given the release of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence study on the use of torture by the CIA, I thought it would be useful to gather together previous pieces on this blog on torture, including reblogs from other places. The following … Continue reading →
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9:33 AM | Snake oil salesmen selling torture
Originally posted on Mind Hacks:The US Government has just released its report on the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program, aptly branded the “torture report”, which is available online as a pdf. It makes for appalling reading but sheds light…
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9:22 AM | Snake oil salesmen selling torture
The US Government has just released its report on the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program, aptly branded the “torture report”, which is available online as a pdf. It makes for appalling reading but sheds light on the role of two psychologists in the creation and running of what turned out to be genuinely counter-productive ‘enhanced […]
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6:55 AM | OYM57: ERKquake!
This week, it business as usual for the On Your Mind team, except for one small exception.  While Liam keeps plugging away at his Westerns and Kat moves ahead with her experiments, Adel has officially finished and submitted his Master’s thesis!  Ok, so maybe that’s a huge exception.  With the end in sight, he’s finally ...read more The post OYM57: ERKquake! appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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2:45 AM | Organic Yields Are Only 20 Percent Lower Than Traditional Agriculture, Says Meta Analysis
The $105 billion organic food industry is not terribly worried about yields. Their customers are primarily wealthy and concerned more about the perception of benefit than they are cost. But to the real evangelists, who insist that the organic process can feed the world, yield differences are a substantial hurdle to overcome. The low hanging fruit in food has already been picked, as it were, wealthy people educated by advertising are already buying organic food, and the rest of the […]

December 09, 2014

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11:30 PM | The Power of a Press Release
In 2011, Petroc Sumner of Cardiff University and his colleagues published a brain imaging study with a provocative …
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11:30 PM | E-Cigarettes Found To Be Less Addictive Than Cigarettes
E-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than cigarettes for former smokers - and this could assist in efforts to understand how to curb cigarette smoking, according to researchers. The popularity of e-cigarettes, which typically deliver nicotine, propylene glycol, glycerin and flavorings through inhaled vapor, has increased in the past five years. There are currently more than 400 brands of "e-cigs" available. E-cigarettes contain far fewer cancer-causing and other toxic substances than […]
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11:11 PM | How do ideas spread?
Cultural transmission is something I’ve written about before. An arXiv paper has a clever way of studying it on twitter: follow the creation of electronic language. For example, the abbreviation ikr, meaning “I know, right?” occurs six times more frequently … Continue reading →
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11:00 PM | Good At Math? 33 Percent Of The Time People Think They Are - But They Aren't
When it comes to math, people mis-characterize themselves quite often. About 20 percent of the people who say they are bad at math score in the top half of tests while about 33 percent of people who say they are good at math score in the bottom half.read more
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10:35 PM | Cognitive Psychology Colloquium Thursday 10th December
When: Thursday 11th December, 12-1pmWhere: Keats Reading Room, Psychology BuildingWhat: Rachel Vickery's PhD Confirmation Seminar  Criterion setting has been largely assumed and unexplored in psychology. Traditionally criteria are used in signal detection models to distinguish between the presence or absence of stimuli on a given trial or in decision making models to quantify the decision criterion or threshold. This thesis will investigate criterion setting via two experimental […]
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10:32 PM | Yeast Cells Can Cure Themselves Of Prions Associated With Alzheimer's
Yeast cells can sometimes reverse the protein misfolding and clumping associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, according to new research which contradicts the idea that once prion proteins have changed into the shape that aggregates, the change is irreversible. Prions are proteins that change into a shape that triggers their neighbors to change, also. In that new form, the proteins cluster. The aggregates, called amyloids, are associated with diseases including Alzheimer's, Huntington's […]
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10:23 PM | They're Not Joking: Laughing Gas For Depression
In modern times, nitrous oxide is a pollutant or a way to make an old custom Nissan go really fast, but it was once common as an anesthetic in medicine and dentistry and that is how it got its common name - laughing gas. In a small pilot study, it was shown to have another modern use - as a treatment for depression.In 20 patients who had treatment-resistant clinical depression, the researchers found that two-thirds experienced an improvement in symptoms after receiving nitrous oxide. In […]
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9:25 PM | Depressed? Laughing gas might help
Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, has shown early promise as a potential treatment for severe depression in patients whose symptoms don’t respond to standard therapies. In other words, it might […]

Nagele P, Duma A, Kopec M, Gebara MA, Parsoei A, Walker M, Janski A, Pahagopoulos VN, Cristancho P, Miller JP, Zorumski CF, Conway C (2014). Nitrous oxide for treatment-resistant major depression: a proof-of-concept trial, Biological Psychiatry, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.11.016

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9:24 PM | Be Wise and Beware: It's the Holiday Season
Thoughts on addiction, immoderation, and Christmas. The Season to be Jolly Careful [Paula Goodyer, Sydney Morning Herald] “More parties, more time with family and less time at work help make Christmas special, but these ingredients can also make it harder for anyone trying to rein in their eating, drinking or drug use….”Addiction During the Holidays: Recovered or Not, It’s Important to be Prepared [Adi Jaffe, Psychology Today]“The holidays are a […]
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7:30 PM | 'Tis the season for white-nose syndrome in bats
While bats are active, the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome stays put in the caves the bats call home in winter. New findings show how the fungus varies through the seasons.
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7:02 PM | 'Tis the season for white-nose syndrome in bats
The fungus that causes the disease attacks as bats cool down for the winter ScicuriousAnimals,Fungi by Bethany Brookshire 2:30pm, December 9, 2014 This northern long-eared bat shows the telltale signs of white-nose syndrome on its wings and face. It probably got infected as it settled into a cave for a long winter hibernation.J.R. HoytFor humans, it’s flu season. We […]
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6:26 PM | The other “cho-” cardiovascular disease biomarker
Jo and Jones team up to examine metabolic signs of atherosclerosis and run into choline The post The other “cho-” cardiovascular disease biomarker appeared first on Lab Land.
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5:46 PM | Tuesday Crustie: But wait, I’ve got a better plan...
... to catch this big red...Watched a lot of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea after school when I was very young. So much so that I don’t remember much of it besides my enjoyment, and thinking that the Seaview was one very cool design for a submarine. And alas, I don’t remember Victor Lundin’s protrayal of the title character of this episode:
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5:23 PM | Incentives in the Treatment of Cocaine Dependence
Relapse rates are high in treatment samples of adults with cocaine dependence.Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a common standard of care for cocaine dependence.A recent clinical trial from Switzerland examined the use of financial prize incentives to augment standard CBT in the treatment of cocaine dependence.Sixty subjects participated in this trial with the following inclusion criteria: least 18 years of age, had a DSM-IV diagnosis of cocaine dependence with at least one […]
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