Posts

January 24, 2015

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12:16 AM | Mothers don’t speak clearly to their babies
People have a distinctive way of talking to babies and small children: We speak more slowly, using a sing-song voice, and tend to use cutesy words like “tummy”. While we might be inclined to think that we talk this way because it is easier for children to understand, new research suggests that, surprisingly, mothers may actually […]

Andrew Martin, Thomas Schatz, Maarten Versteegh, Kouki Miyazawa, Reiko Mazuka, Emmanuel Dupoux, and Alejandrina Cristia. (2015). Kouki Miyazawa, Reiko Mazuka, Emmanuel Dupoux, and Alejandrina Cristia. Mothers Speak Less Clearly to Infants Than to Adults: A Comprehensive Test of the Hyperarticulation Hypothesis., Psychological Science, Other:

Citation

January 23, 2015

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11:10 PM | Cool optical illusion–cross your eyes and try to align these circles
Try and cross your eyes to make the top gridded circles overlap. Give up? Try doing it on the bottom ones that are surrounded by the border. A lot easier, right? The square surrounding the circles helps your eyes stabilize as you cross them. Also notice how your eyes process the diagonal lines themselves. Your […]
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10:59 PM | musicians and non musicians and masked speech
Download our new JASA paper here. We compared musicians and non musicians on a range of tasks, and unlike some previous work, found no signs of enhanced performance by musicians when listening to speech against other sounds.
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9:36 PM | Fatty Acids In Fish May Shield Brain From Mercury Damage
New findings from research in the Seychelles provide further evidence that the benefits of fish consumption on prenatal development may offset the risks associated with mercury exposure. In fact, the new study, which appears today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggests that the nutrients found in fish have properties that protect the brain from the potential toxic effects of the chemical. read more
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9:23 PM | Haggis, Neeps And Badness: Enjoy That Dinner But What About The Real Robert Burns?
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8:43 PM | DNA 'glue' Could Someday Be Used To Build Tissues, Organs
DNA molecules provide the "source code" for life in humans, plants, animals and some microbes. But now researchers report an initial study showing that the strands can also act as a glue to hold together 3-D-printed materials that could someday be used to grow tissues and organs in the lab. This first-of-its-kind demonstration of the inexpensive process is described in the brand-new journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.read more
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8:42 PM | New Hope For Fighting Major Fungal Disease In Durum Wheat
A variety of wheat that is resistant to a destructive fungal disease has been found to have specialized and protective cell walls, according to research published in BMC Plant Biology. These insights could help to produce stronger, disease-resistant varieties of durum wheat for improved pasta production.read more
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6:30 PM | Understanding 'Plant Microbiome' Can Improve Farming And Plant Health
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6:11 PM | Climate Change May Shape Languages Too
Researchers have determined that languages with a wide range of tone pitches are more prevalent in regions with high humidity levels while languages with simpler tone pitches are mainly found in drier regions. They explain this by noting that the vocal folds require a humid environment to produce the right tone. That means climate and weather our voices too. read more
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6:00 PM | Aboriginal Women And High Rates Of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
 Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is one of a group of preventable, lifelong conditions (the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders) that may result from high alcohol use in pregnancy. It can cause low IQ, delays in development and problems with learning, academic achievement, behavior, motor function, speech and language and memory. It is also characterized by abnormal facial features and poor growth, before or after birth.  One in eight children born in 2002 or 2003 and living in remote Fitzroy […]
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5:30 PM | Galactic 'Hailstorm' 13 Billion Years Ago
Two teams of astronomers have used computer models to look back nearly 13 billion years, when the Universe was less than 10 percent its present age, to determine how quasars - extremely luminous objects powered by supermassive black holes with the mass of a billion suns - regulate the formation of stars and the build-up of the most massive galaxies. Using a combination of data gathered from powerful radio telescopes and supercomputer simulations, the teams found that a quasar spits out cold […]
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5:26 PM | The Losing Battle For Perpetual Reward
Or why you can't stay high forever. The amphetamine high, like the cocaine high, is a marvel of biochemical efficiency. Stimulants work primarily by blocking the reuptake of dopamine molecules in the synaptic gap between nerve cells. Dopamine remains stalled in the gap, stimulating the receptors, resulting in higher dopamine concentrations and greater sensitivity to dopamine in general. Since dopamine is involved in moods and activities such as pleasure, alertness and movement, the primary […]
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5:02 PM | Emotions – redefined!
Regular readers of this blog will know that I am a proponent of the eight basic emotions theory of emotions where the eight basic emotions are fear, courage/interest,  sadness, happiness, disgust, surprise/awe and anger and love. Its apparent that they are also paired in opposites as in fear and [...]Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
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5:00 PM | Good Health Is Part Of Native Culture - So Is Bad
Diabetes has been described as an epidemic of modern times so why does it affect aboriginal people more? Over the past several decades diabetes has become a prevalent health concern among Canada's First Nations communities, but it wasn't always so.read more
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4:56 PM | Solving An Organic Semiconductor Mystery
Organic semiconductors are prized for light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic cells. As they can be printed from solution, they provide a highly scalable, cost-effective alternative to silicon-based devices. Uneven performances, however, have been a persistent problem. Scientists have known that the performance issues originate in the domain interfaces within organic semiconductor thin films, but have not known the cause. This mystery now appears to have […]
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4:30 PM | 750 Genes Involved In Long-Term Memory
A new study has identified genes involved in long-term memory in the worm as part of research aimed at finding ways to retain cognitive abilities during aging. The study identified more than 750 genes involved in long-term memory, including many that had not been found previously and that could serve as targets for future research, said senior author Coleen Murphy, an associate professor of molecular biology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton […]
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4:27 PM | A Strange Tale Of Fish Eye Evolution
Fish vision just got more complex. Janderk, CC BY-SABy William Feeney, University of Cambridge read more
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3:39 PM | The Religious Overtones Of Natural Laws: Does The The Universe Create Reason And Morality?
Some suggest that the universe naturally produces complexity. The emergence of life in general and perhaps even rational life, with its associated technological culture, may be extremely common, argues Kelly Smith, Associate Professor of Philosophy&Biological Sciences at Clemson, in a recent Space Policy paper.What's more, he suggests, this universal tendency has distinctly religious overtones and more knowledge of astrobiology may even establish a truly universal basis for […]
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3:18 PM | Doctors Facing Complaints Get Severe Depression And Suicidal Thoughts
UK doctors subject to complaints procedures are at significant risk of becoming severely depressed and suicidal, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. Those referred to the UK professional regulator, the General Medical Council, seem to be most at risk of mental ill health, the findings suggest. The researchers base their findings on an anonymised online survey of more than 95,000 UK doctors in 2012, all of whom were members of the British Medical Association (BMA).read
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3:18 PM | What Role Do Cytokines Have In Breast Cancer?
Emerging data on the role of inflammation and the immune system in the development, growth, and spread of breast tumors have focused increased attention on the role cytokines such as interleukin and transforming growth factor-β play in breast cancer initiation, protection, and metastasis. A comprehensive overview of this new knowledge and its potential to lead to novel therapeutic approaches is presented in a Review article in Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research.read more
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2:30 PM | Personalized Treatment For Intellectual Disability Developed
Researchers have created a new approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels. The method focuses on treating the effects of mutations to a gene known as Syngap1. Damaging mutations in Syngap1 that reduce the number of functional proteins are one of the most common causes of sporadic intellectual disability and are associated with schizophrenia and autism spectrum […]
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2:01 PM | Counterintuitive: Anti-Inflammatory Protein May Trigger Alzheimer's Disease Plaque
Inflammation has long a target in Alzheimer's disease studies so a new finding in Neuron is counterintuitive. In the study, researchers hace uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may trigger the disease and this anti-inflammatory process might actually trigger the build-up of sticky clumps of protein that form plaques in the brain. These plaques block brain cells' ability to communicate and are a well-known characteristic of the illness. The finding suggests that […]
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2:01 PM | Take Science Out Of The Climate Change Debate
Climate science is right – but it isn't winning. NASA, CC BYBy Mathis Hampel, University of East AngliaScientists tell us the world is warming and that a climate catastrophe is imminent.They’re probably right. Yet climate change framed by scientists, politicians and economists as a straightforward pollution problem will neither convince skeptics nor advance the difficult decision-making process. read more
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1:30 PM | New Bacterial Language Discovered
Bacteria communicate using chemical signals and now scientists have described a previously unknown communication pathway that appears to be widely distributed - and even leads to pathogens. The investigation of bacterial communication is valuable because those pathways are a possible therapeutic target for new medicines. If the relevant communication options are prevented, the bacteria cannot develop their pathogenic properties. read more
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12:56 PM | Phishing Techniques Studied
Don’t click it. If you ever get e-mailed a link, no matter how authentic the e-mail looks or from whom it appears to be, don’t click it. If you feel you need to respond to the e-mail, then type the URL of the website directly into your browser. But never click it. As simple as [...]
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10:51 AM | The Relationship between Motivation to Change and Alcoholic Problem Severity.
New Guest Post From The Alcoholics Guide to Alcoholism   Do we have to Hit Rock Bottom to Recover? by alcoholicsguide There has been much recent debate about whether a person has to hit rock bottom in under to surrender and start … Continue reading →
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9:56 AM | Why the risk of losing is more fun than an easy win
I've started playing in a higher division in my local table-tennis league. I'm winning games less, but enjoying the experience more. I'm far from alone in preferring the danger of possible defeat to the comfort of easy wins. Psychologically this is curious because, at whatever level, virtually everyone who plays competitive games finds winning more pleasurable than losing, and most people like to feel good at what they do. In a new study, Sami Abuhamdeh and his colleagues have shone a light on […]
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3:22 AM | The Coupler - New Implant Lowers Blood Pressure After Outpatient Procedure
A new device developed by ROX Medical and named the 'Coupler' is a paper clip-sized implant which is inserted between the artery and vein in the upper thigh that has been shown to significantly lower blood pressure among patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure, compared to those treated with usual drug measures. It can be inserted in a procedure lasting around 40 minutes under local anesthetic.  read more
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2:59 AM | BPA Exposure Affects Heart Health Of Male And Female Mice Differently
Heart function and blood pressure in mice exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) from birth though young adulthood are affected differently in males and females, with females at greater risk of damage from stress, a study from a University of Cincinnati (UC) researcher has found. A research team led by Scott Belcher, PhD, professor of pharmacology and cell biophysics, Robin Gear, principal research assistant, and Eric Kendig, PhD, former UC postdoctoral fellow, found that in young BPA exposed female […]
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2:59 AM | Inventors Are Not As Paranoid About Patents As People Think
Common wisdom and prior economic research suggest that an inventor filing a patent would want to keep the technical know-how secret as long as possible. But a new study of nearly 2 million patents in the United States shows that inventors are not as concerned with secrecy as previously thought. Researchers found that since 2000, most inventors when given the choice opted to disclose information about their patents before patent approval - even small inventors - and this disclosure correlates […]
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