Posts

March 21, 2015

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5:50 PM | The Link Between Hair Disorders And Susceptibility To Dental Caries
Hair and teeth are ectodermal appendages that share common developmental mechanisms. However, the major structural components making up hair and teeth are very distinct. The hair shaft is essentially made of keratin filaments that are highly cross-linked. Tooth enamel matrix is primarily composed of enamel proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin) that are degraded and replaced by minerals during enamel maturation. Fully mineralized enamel contains a small fraction of cross-linked organic material […]
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5:00 PM | No Cleanse Needed: You Have A Liver, It Even Has A Backup System
Scientists writing in Nature Communications have discovered an antioxidant system that, like a generator kicking in when the power fails, helps sustain the liver when other systems are missing or compromised. This understudy 'takes the stage' when the lead actor is sick and is fueled by methionine, an amino acid that can't be manufactured in the body and doesn't come from herbal teas or supplements. People get it only by eating protein.read more
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3:21 PM | Mechanisms Of Cancer-causing Mutations Uncovered
Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego, have described for the first time the molecular mechanism of cancer development caused by well-known "resistance" mutations in the gene called epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While these mutations were known for quite a long time, the question as to why they cause cancer or make some drugs ineffective was still not answered. The study demonstrates how […]
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3:21 PM | World's First Method For Continuous Purification Of Valuable Antibodies
Without antibodies we would be at the mercy of pathogens or cancer cells. Therapeutic antibodies are used as passive vaccines, for cancer therapy or for controlling autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. According to "bccresearch.com" the global market for antibody drugs was worth nearly 70 billion USD in 2014 and should rise to 122 billion USD until 2019. Two thirds of those molecules are produced biotechnologically using Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Actually the major cost […]
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3:15 PM | Will Elsevier say sorry?
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1:30 PM | What Are Fundamental Particles?
It is often claimed that the Ancient Greeks were the first to identify objects that have no size, yet are able to build up the world around us through their interactions. And as we are able to observe the world in tinier and tinier detail through microscopes of increasing power, it is natural to wonder what these objects are made of.We believe we have found some of these objects: subatomic particles, or fundamental particles, which having no size can have no substructure. We are now seeking to […]
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1:00 PM | Synthetic Cannabinoids - Please Don't Call It Fake Weed
By Benjamin Plackett, Inside ScienceThere is an ongoing competition of bureaucratic one-upmanship between the U.S. government and renegade pharmacists. The government is playing defense. When they ban a variation of a drug, pharmacists then quickly create a newly formulated and therefore legal variation. read more
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12:48 PM | #Brain article of interest: This strange color graphic changed the way we think about the brain
From Business InsiderRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/1GAZhsI
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12:30 PM | Comparative Genomics Shows Squid Optimize DNA 'Blueprint' Through RNA Editing
Humans, worms and flies are all completely different organisms and yet we have a more or less common set of genes. Given that similar DNA blueprint, how do species develop such vast differences in physical shape, size, and complexity?One so-called "central dogma" of molecular biology says that genetic information passes faithfully from genomic DNA to messenger RNA to the synthesis of proteins but a new study finds that such information can be significantly altered along the way by a […]
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12:16 PM | Asperger Syndrome and Classic Autism
This is a guest-posting by one of our readers. Claudia Mazzucco has had an almost thirty year golfing career as writer, researcher, historian, editor and teacher of the history of […]
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9:00 AM | Link feast
Our pick of this week's best psychology and neuroscience links:The Revolution That Could Change the Way Your Child is TaughtLittle is more important for your child's education than the effectiveness of their teacher, writes Ian Leslie in The Guardian.The Psychology of the ExecutionerA look inside the minds of those who have participated in firing squads and lethal injections.A Point of View: The Upside of Losing One's MemoryTom Shakespeare worries about his mental decline, but ends his […]
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2:37 AM | New Insight On Asthma And COPD
In diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the body produces too much mucus, making breathing difficult. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis provides clues to potentially counteract inappropriate mucus production. "The new study lays the groundwork for developing treatments for diseases such as asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis and even certain cancers," said senior author Thomas J. Brett, PhD, assistant professor of medicine. […]
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1:43 AM | Lost archives and cell type differentiation information
A Sexologist and his two Archives: Erwin J. Haeberle Excerpt: I did read the great study Die Prostitution (1912) by Iwan Bloch, one of the great pioneers of sexology. My comment: See also by Iwan Bloch: Odoratus Sexualis: A Scientific And...Read more

March 20, 2015

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11:21 PM | Hiding things about neo-Darwinism
Biologists devise invasion plan for mutations Excerpt:  “…researchers describe a technique for creating mutations that invade the genome and transmit themselves across to the next generation with near 100% success, defying the classic laws of Mendelian genetics.” My comment: Placed...Read more
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10:19 PM | Can Monkeys Get Depressed?
According to a new study from Chinese neuroscientists Fan Xu and colleagues, some monkeys can experience depression in a similar way to humans. The researchers studied cynomolgus monkeys, also known as crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis), a species native to Southeast Asia. Cynomolgus monkeys are highly social animals. Xu et al. previously showed that isolating a monkey from its companions caused it to develop depression-like behaviors. In their new paper, the authors say that they'v

Xu F, Wu Q, Xie L, Gong W, Zhang J, Zheng P, Zhou Q, Ji Y, Wang T, Li X & Fang L (2015). Macaques exhibit a naturally-occurring depression similar to humans., Scientific reports, 5 9220. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25783476

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9:45 PM | Maternal Genes And Letting Go Of The DNApron Strings
How does a mother transition genetic control to offspring early in development? It's part of a larger mystery regarding how embryos regulate cell division and differentiation into new types of cells.A new article in Cell provides some insight into the mechanism for this genetic hand-off, which happens within hours of fertilization, when the newly fertilized egg is a zygote.read more
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9:09 PM | Don’t be left in the dark: eclipse facts.
A solar eclipse is one of the few astronomical events that actually gets people on mass to look up and think about what happens in the heavens. In this article, I want to indulge your astronomical interests with five interesting … Continue reading →
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7:32 PM | The Shame Of America's "Public Health"
Our nation’s most influential, respected and powerful public health officials and academics are engaged in a vast,corrupt and fraudulent conspiracy to keep desperate smokers ignorant of the facts about how reduced-harm devices (such as e-cigarettes) are likely to help them quit smoking.  read more
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6:05 PM | Not Cro-Magnon, Volcanoes May Have Doomed Neanderthals
A new paper notes that the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption in Italy 40,000 years ago, one of the largest volcanic cataclysms in Europe and responsible for injecting a significant amount of sulfur-dioxide (SO2) into the stratosphere, coincided with the final decline of Neanderthals as well as with dramatic territorial and cultural advances among modern humans.  Scientists have long debated if this eruption and the resulting volcanic sulfur cooling and acid deposition could […]
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5:53 PM | Know your brain: Spinal cord
Where is the spinal cord? Spinal cord (in red). image courtesy of William Crochot. The spinal cord runs from the medulla oblongata of the brainstem down to the first or second lumbar vertebrae of the vertebral column (aka the spine). The spinal cord is shorter than the vertebral column, and overall is a surprisingly small structure. It is only about 16.5-17.5 inches long on average, with a diameter of less than 1/2 an inch at its widest point.What is the […]
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5:49 PM | Obama Administration New Guidelines For Fracking On Public Lands
The big question in policy circles for the last month has been, would the Obama administration that has repeatedly said that putting solar panels on public land should be allowed side with science or with environmentalists when it came to natural gas?read more
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4:06 PM | ASPET blogging at Experimental Biology 2015
Boston Convention and Exhibition Center at night  (Source: Groupe Canam) Hello, readers! I'm an official blogger again this year for the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) at the Experimental Biology conference next week. It starts next Saturday, March 28 and runs throughout Wednesday, April 1 (no joke). I'll be there from Saturday through Tuesday.
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3:52 PM | ¿Se puede medir la felicidad de un país?
Uno de los indicadores más sensibles de cómo están funcionando las cosas en un país es precisamente cómo se siente sus habitantes en el nivel de felicidad. El artículo original está en ¿Se puede medir la felicidad de un país?
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3:52 PM | Can you measure happiness of a country?
One of the most sensitive indicators of how things are working in a country is precisely how residents feel about the level of happiness. The original article is in Can you measure happiness of a country?
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3:45 PM | Leading Theory Of What Causes Ice Ages Cast Into Doubt
The leading theory of what causes ice ages around the world -- changes in the way the Earth orbits the sun- has been cast into doubt by a new study. The study raises questions about the Milankovitch theory of climate, which says the expansion and contraction of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets are influenced by cyclic fluctuations in solar radiation intensity due to wobbles in the Earth's orbit; those orbital fluctuations should have an opposite effect on Southern Hemisphere […]
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2:19 PM | Power Naps Produce Significant Memory Performance Boost
A new study finds that even a brief nap can significantly improve memory retention of learned material.Saarland University graduate student Sara Studte, PhD supervisor Axel Mecklinger and co-researcher Emma Bridger have examined how power naps influence memory performance.read more
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2:03 PM | AstraZeneca's Antibiotic Spin Off
I just came back from Boston and the annual meeting of BAARN – the Boston Area Antibiotic Resistance Network symposium held at the Broad Institute.  The meeting was interesting but the atmosphere was funereal. Many of those losing their jobs with the closure of Cubist’s research center in Lexington, Mass were there as were many whose jobs are threatened at AZ’s facility in Waltham, Mass. One major topic of discussion during the breaks was – where will all the […]
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1:48 PM | Medications Used To Treat Diabetes May Trigger Heart Failure
A comprehensive study examining clinical trials of more than 95,000 patients has found that glucose or sugar-lowering medications prescribed to patients with diabetes may pose an increased risk for the development of heart failure in these patients.read more
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1:48 PM | Clinical Trial Shows Bendavia Doesn't Reduce Scarring From Angioplasty After Heart Attack
Patients who received the new drug Bendavia before undergoing angioplasty or receiving a stent to clear blocked arteries after a heart attack showed no significant reduction in scarring as compared to patients given a placebo, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.read more
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1:42 PM | Short post – my science fiction vision of how science could work in the future
Sadly I missed the recent #isScienceBroken event at UCL, which from all reports was a smashing success. At the moment i’m just terribly focused on finishing up a series of intensive behavioral studies plus (as always) minimizing my free energy, so it just wasn’t possible to make it. Still, a few were interested to hear my take on […]
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