Posts

September 10, 2014

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10:53 PM | Can The Parietal Cortex Predict Risky Behavior?
Some people avoid risk while others will roll the dice with wealth, health, and safety. Is it just personality? Media influence? Researchers led by Ifat Levy, assistant professor in comparative medicine and neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine believe that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain can predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum. read more
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10:30 PM | Can Blood Type Affect Memory?
People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a paper in Neurology, but what does that really mean? AB is the least common blood type, found in about 4 percent of the U.S. population. The study found that people with AB blood were 82 percent more likely to develop the thinking and memory problems that can lead to dementia than people with other blood types. Previous studies have shown that people with type O […]
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10:04 PM | Sunshine And Suicide Connected
A pop song goes that rainy days and Mondays bring people down. There was always some truth to that and a new paper in JAMA quantifies the link between a lack of sunshine and suicide. The authors found that lower rates of suicide are associated with more daily sunshine in the prior 14 to 60 days. Light interacts with brain serotonin systems and possibly influences serotonin-related behaviors. Those behaviors, such as mood and impulsiveness, can play a role in suicide.read more
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9:58 PM | Gibbon Genome And The Fast Karyotype Evolution Of Small Apes
Gibbons are small, tree-living apes from Southeast Asia, many species of which are endangered. They are part of the same superfamily as humans and great apes, but sit on the divide between Old-World monkeys and the great apes. These creatures have several distinctive traits, such as an unusually large number of chromosomal rearrangements, and different numbers of chromosomes are seen in individual species. Researchers recently completed analysis of the mobile elements in the gibbon genome. […]
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9:43 PM | The solution to the research funding problem is simultaneously obvious and nigh impossible
American National Public Radio has been running a series about the state of funding for basic medical research. Today’s entry was When scientists give up.Scientists hear these sorts of stories routinely. What bugs me about them is their faux simplicity.American federal government reduces money for research.Scientists issue dire warnings of bad effects of cuts.Most articles stop there. The implication always seems to be, “More money will fix everything! So give us more!” I am […]
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9:05 PM | Mental health debates without the stress
If you work in mental health, you could do much worse than reading the editorial in today’s Lancet Psychiatry about unpleasant debates and how to avoid them. Unfortunately, debates in mental health tend to get nasty quite quickly – but I’ve seen no part of the debate spectrum which has a monopoly on bigotry or […]
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8:04 PM | Seismic Tension Building Near Istanbul
By tracking seismic shifts, researchers say they may be able to predict a major quake off the coast of Istanbul.When a segment of a major fault line goes quiet, it can mean one of two things - an inactive “seismic gap” which is the result of two tectonic plates placidly gliding past each other, or the seismic gap may be filled by an earthquake after quietly building tension for decades.Researchers say they have found evidence for both types of behavior on different segments of the […]
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7:37 PM | Sex Hormones Implicated In Autism
Males get more diagnoses of Autism Spectrum Disorders than females and it may be related to changes in the brain's estrogen signaling, writes a paper in Molecular Autism.  Autism Spectrum Disorders are a broad category of diagnoses that include brain development and assessments of impaired social interaction, along verbal and non-verbal communication and restricted and repetitive behavior. The disorders may have a genetic basis and are around four times more common in men than in women. […]
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7:30 PM | A Good Reason To Do Re-Analysis Of Failed Clinical Trial Data
It's uncommon for there to be reanalyses of data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) - once a product has failed, it isn't smart to keep putting more money into it.read more
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7:17 PM | Neurolaw in Sydney
Allan McCay writes with the following information: Inter-university Neuroscience and Mental Health Conference Monday and Tuesday, 29 and 30 September, 2014 University of Sydney, Australia Conference Website http://sydney.edu.au/neuroscience-network/news-events/ NEUROLAW WORKSHOP (TUESDAY) My brain made me do it! 10:30 Diseased preferences:...
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7:14 PM | Messier 54 Has A Lithium Problem
The Milky Way galaxy is orbited by more than 150 globular star clusters - balls of hundreds of thousands of old stars dating back to the formation of the galaxy. In the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), the French comet hunter Charles Messier found one such cluster and it was given the designation Messier 54.For more than two hundred years after its discovery Messier 54, was thought to be similar to the other Milky Way globulars, but in 1994 astronomers determined that it was actually […]
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6:30 PM | 18 Percent Of Nurses Leave First Job Within A Year, 33 Percent Within Two Years
Like most young people, the first job is not the best job and they will often leave when a better opportunity comes along.  There is strong demand for nurses so it's no surprise that there is turnover among young ones. Once they prove they can do the job, hospitals and practices are going to recruit them and pay higher salaries, because they are not paying training costs. A study in the current issue of Policy, Politics&Nursing Practice reveals that an estimated 17.5 percent of […]
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6:26 PM | Multiple Sclerosis and Myelin loss
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. The […]

Vasily L. Yarnykh, James D. Bowen, Alexey Samsonov, Pavle Repovic, Angeli Mayadev, Peiqing Qian, Beena Gangadharan, Bart P. Keogh, Kenneth R. Maravilla & Lily K. Jung Henson & (2014). Fast Whole-Brain Three-dimensional Macromolecular Proton Fraction Mapping in Multiple Sclerosis, Radiological Society of North America , Other:

Citation
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5:47 PM | The (almost non-existent) science of potty training
When it comes to toilet training your child, science will offer you almost no help whatsoever.
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5:36 PM | When Talking About Body Size, Women And Doctors Are Speaking Different Languages
African American women and their female children have the highest obesity prevalence of any demographic group in the United States, and they are also most likely to underestimate their body weight, according to a paper from Rush University Medical Center. The authors say cultural norms for body size may prevent awareness among many African American women about the potential risks of obesity and the benefits of weight loss.read more
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5:29 PM | Can we improve the diagnosis of epilepsy?
There are currently standardized methods to perform safely and reliable diagnosis of epilepsy, but fails to all patients.
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5:20 PM | The (almost non-existent) science of potty training
Growth CurveHuman Development by Laura Sanders 1:47pm, September 10, 2014 The science of potty training is woefully thin, leaving parents to figure out how to ditch the diapers on their own.Joxxxxjo/ iStockphotoThis morning, as I watched my toddler slurp milk out of her cereal bowl, I was struck by how much parental energy I spend handling the things that go into her body and the things that […]
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5:09 PM | Divorce Boost Children Behavioral Problems In High-Income Families
Before they reach young adulthood, many children in the United States will experience their parents separating, divorcing, finding another partner or getting remarried.  When families change structure, it is more common for children to exhibit behavior problems, such as aggression and defiance, and a new psychology paper say that behavior problems in children increased in high-income families most, and that children's age also played a part in their likelihood of having behavior […]
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5:09 PM | Divorce Boosts Behavioral Problems In High-Income Families
Before they reach young adulthood, many children in the United States will experience their parents separating, divorcing, finding another partner or getting remarried.  When families change structure, it is more common for children to exhibit behavior problems, such as aggression and defiance, and a new psychology paper say that behavior problems in children increased in high-income families most, and that children's age also played a part in their likelihood of having behavior […]
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4:44 PM | Catorce efectos de la epilepsia en el cuerpo - Infografía
El portal de salud Healthline.com publicó en agosto de 2014 una creativa e interesante infografía sobre los efectos de la epilepsia en el cuerpo. Aquí se las compartimos: Autor: Ann Pietrangelo http://www.healthline.com/health/epilepsy/effects-on-body EFECTOS DE LA EPILEPSIA EN EL CUERPO Infografía en: www.healthline.com. La epilepsia es una condición neurológica crónica. Su principal
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4:30 PM | New Evidence Points To Old Jack The Ripper Suspect – but Here Is Why I’m Not Convinced
A Ripper murder, Illustrated Police news, c. 1888.By Rosalind Crone, The Open UniversityA panic erupted in Britain 126 years ago. At daybreak on Saturday September 8, the mutilated body of Annie Chapman, a prostitute, had been found in the back yard of 29 Hanbury Street, Spitalfields. Her injuries and the removal of some of her abdominal organs led investigators and journalists to link Chapman’s murder with that of another woman, only a week earlier. read more
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4:30 PM | Catching Some Xe's Has Strange Effects On The Body
Image credit: Pslawinski via Wikimedia | http://bit.ly/1lzJKDEBy Chris Gorski, Inside Science(Inside Science) -- Xenon is one of the so-called noble gases. It's odorless, colorless and a loner. It very rarely combines with other atoms, or even itself, to form molecules. Like helium, neon, argon, krypton and radon, it's kind of a wallflower that rests on the far right of the periodic table.Unlike most of those others, though, recent reports show that xenon might improve athletic performance in […]
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4:08 PM | Dolphins and Belugas Squeal With Delight
In a new study, researchers analyzed years of recordings of ‘victory squeals’ – sounds made by dolphins and belugas after they received a fish reward, heard a whistle indicating a reward was forthcoming, or performed a task correctly. The sounds appear to be related to the release of dopamine, indicating they’re related to feelings of pleasure. Read the whole story at Zoologic: Underwater Victory Squeals Signal a Job Well Done .
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3:31 PM | Proteomics Can Reveal Changes In The Body Of The Ocean
For decades, doctors have developed methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted biomedical techniques to study the vast body of the ocean. In a Science paper, scientists demonstrate that they can identify and measure proteins in the ocean, revealing how single-celled marine organisms and ocean ecosystems operate.read more
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3:30 PM | Voices From The Old Bailey
Or abandon hope? Credit: chrisdorneyBy Tim Crook, Goldsmiths, University of LondonThe Old Bailey’s Central Criminal Court is an Edwardian building that bears the inscription “Defend the children of the poor and Punish the wrongdoer.” An Italian visitor more than 100 years ago suggested it should be replaced with an aphorism from Dante’s Inferno: “Abandon All Hope Ye Who Enter here.” read more
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3:30 PM | OYM48: Ratolesence
We’re running a two man show on this, the one year anniversary of On Your Mind.  Liam’s had yet another successful committee meeting and he’s come out of it with some new insights into his project, and his presentation style.  He’s switching from an exploratory to a hypothesis-driven approach to his project, and in the ...read more The post OYM48: Ratolesence appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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3:01 PM | Biologists Delay The Aging Process By 'Remote Control' Of A Gene
Biologists have found that increasing the amount of the gene AMPK that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems.read more
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3:01 PM | Go With The Co-Flow To Stabilize Chaotic 'Whipping' In Microfluidic Jets
When researchers created a whipped jet in polydimethylsiloxane oil, a viscous dielectric material, they were surprised to see the chaotic motion switch over to a steady-state helical structure. So they got a high-speed, microscope-based video camera operating at 50,000 frames per second to study the waveforms emerging from the experimental jets, which were less than five microns in diameter. The resulting video allowed precise examination of the waveforms produced when the liquid flowed […]
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2:01 PM | Living with an alcoholic is like living in a war zone!
Al-Anon Family Groups About one in ten children in the United States lives with a parent with an alcohol misuse problem. In a word, “devastating.” That’s how Dr. George Koob describes the impact of a loved one’s alcoholism on family members and friends. Dr. Koob is the Director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse […]
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2:00 PM | Why You Can't Catch Any: Fish Are As Smart As Chimpanzees
Coral trout are fast when chasing prey above the reefs of their habitat, but can't pursue their quarry if it buries itself into a hard-to-reach reef crevice - so they instead team up with a snake-like moray eel to flush out the unfortunate fish, which is a remarkable piece of interspecies collaboration: either the eel takes the prey in the reef, or scares it back into the open so the trout can pounce.read more
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