Posts

October 27, 2014

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6:52 PM | The Red Effect, in People and Monkeys
Research shows that people find members of the opposite sex more attractive when they are in close proximity to the color red. Does this reflect cultural influences, or is there a more ancient, evolutionary explanation? Scientists tested monkeys to see how they reacted to photos of opposite sex monkeys on a red or blue background to get to the bottom of the red effect. Read the whole story at Zoologic: The Red Effect, in People and Monkeys .
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6:31 PM | For Better Learning, Make Some Mistakes
If you take an online practice test, which answer is most likely to stick with you, the ones you got correct or that one you got wrong? A new paper finds that making mistakes while learning can benefit memory and lead to the correct answer, but only if the guesses are close. "Making random guesses does not appear to benefit later memory for the right answer , but near-miss guesses act as stepping stones for retrieval of the correct information – and this benefit is seen in younger and […]
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6:31 PM | Will The Ebola Epidemic Ever End?
Not everyone who contracts the Ebola virus dies, the survival rate is actually around 30%, which means some kind of immunity to the disease is possible. Experimental treatments and vaccines against Ebola exist but there was little interest from governments in streamlining the bureaucracy before the recent outbreak, so they have not undergone phase 2 trials - the U.S. Congress did add $90 million to the $29 billion budget of the National Institutes of Health after Director Francis Collins said […]
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6:31 PM | Better, Quicker-Thinking Umpires? There’s An App For That!
During last night's World Series game between the San Francisco Giants and the Kansas City Royals, the batter dropped down a surprise bunt and sprinted to first base. The umpire called him safe and slow motion replay showed he had beaten the throw by mere inches. A good runner will make it from home to first in 5 or 6 seconds so seeing the foot hit the bag before the ball reached the glove was an amazing feat of ocularity.read more
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6:31 PM | How The Air We Breathe Was Created By Earth's Tectonic Plates
By Simon Redfern, University of CambridgeHow is it that Earth developed an atmosphere that made the development of life possible? A study published in the journal Nature Geoscience links the origins of Earth’s nitrogen-rich atmosphere to the same tectonic forces that drive mountain-building and volcanism on our planet. It goes some way to explaining why, compared to our nearest neighbors, Venus and Mars, Earth’s air is richer in nitrogen. read more
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5:53 PM | How Is Thermodiffusion Different In A Weightless Environment?
Thermodiffusion is when a temperature difference establishes a concentration difference in a mixture. Two recent studies build on recent experimental results from the IVIDIL (Influence Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) research project performed on the International Space Station under microgravity to avoid motion in liquids.read more
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5:53 PM | Red Baron: Air Ace, Nazi Killer, Emotional Patriot – Changing Faces Of A German War Hero
Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, with other members of his unit. Credit: Germany Army.By Ingrid Sharp, University of LeedsThe idea of a war hero is still strong in the UK and in the other Allied countries. War memorials are a central feature of the regular commemoration services, Churchill is regularly rolled out in biographical and fictional form, and there are soon to be a total of 888,246 ceramic poppies for 888,246 war heroes adorning the Tower of London. read more
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5:39 PM | Finished my latest #brain #painting!! Phew! #sciart #neuroscience #science #art
via Instagram http://ift.tt/1txYTIW
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4:26 PM | Marangoni Effect: Why Your Future GPS Could Be Chemistry
Researchers on an international team recently showed a way to quickly and reliably find the fastest way through a city maze. But rather than using a satellite navigation system, they used chemistry.It needs a little work before UPS can use it, since the chemical processor was in alkaline liquid, bit it is intriguing proof of concept.read more
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4:07 PM | The psychology of violent extremism - digested
Today the UK and its allies are at war with an extremist group based in Syria and Iraq that calls itself the Islamic State (IS; a name rejected by mainstream Muslim organisations). The group declared a caliphate in June this year and is seeking to expand its territory.Amnesty International has accused IS of war crimes including ethnic cleansing, torture, abductions, sexual violence and the indiscriminate killing of civilians. Prime Minister Cameron has branded the group "evil" and says they […]
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4:00 PM | NeuWrite Reads: Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep? by Timothy Verstynen and Bradley Voytek
If you’ve come to our website via Google, there’s a good chance it’s because you wanted to know about zombies.  The search term that brings the most people to our site by far is “are zombies real?”.  Ashley’s post is an awesome primer on real-life zombies, but for those of you who want to go […]
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4:00 PM | Understanding the Visual System: A Conversation with Botond Roska
When we see the world, there is a huge amount of processing that occurs in the neural circuits of the retina, thalamus, and cortex before we can even begin to comprehend our environment. And all of this computation happens very quickly! In this interview with Dr. Botond Roska, Senior Group Leader at the Friedrich Miescher … Continue reading →
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3:31 PM | Simple New Test For Vitamin B12 Deficiency
A novel method to test for vitamin B12 deficiency is sensitive enough to work on anyone, including newborn babies and large swaths of the general population. It uses a single drop of blood collected from a finger prick which is then blotted and dried overnight on a card consisting of filter paper. The dried blood spot card analysis is sensitive enough to measure the amount of methylmalonic acid (MMA), an indicator of a person's B12 level, according to study author Yvonne Lamers of the […]
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3:31 PM | E. Coli: Bacterial Diarrhea Vaccine Candidate Highly Efficacious
Each year, nearly 600,000 children die from severe, dehydrating diarrhea and millions more are hospitalized. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) may be the first enteric illness encountered by many infants, and it causes several hundred million cases of diarrhea each year, mainly in children. read more
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3:10 PM | Brain Imaging In Alcoholic Brain Thiamine Deficiency
Chronic consumption of large quantities of alcohol can produce severe deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1).This can precipitate an acute brain failure known as Wernicke's encephalopathy. Wernicke's encephalopathy is characterized by sudden onset of mental status changes, eye muscle impairment and disturbed gait or ataxia.Other illnesses can also produce this level of severe thiamine deficiency. A partial list of these non-alcoholism causes for thiamine deficiency with encephalopathy […]

Manzo G, De Gennaro A, Cozzolino A, Serino A, Fenza G & Manto A (2014). MR imaging findings in alcoholic and nonalcoholic acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: a review., BioMed research international, 2014 503596. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25050351

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3:00 PM | Stand By Your Maine: Country Music's Northern Roots
Country music's soaring popularity in the Northeast isn't so much a novelty as it is a rebirth. Image: US NavyBy Clifford Murphy, University of Maryland, Baltimore County read more
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2:26 PM | 10 Million Suns: That Bright Pulsar May Not Be Alone
A team of astronomers recently reported discovering a pulsating star that appears to shine with the energy of 10 million suns. A pulsar is a type of rotating neutron star that emits a bright beam of energy that regularly sweeps past Earth like a lighthouse beacon. What are the odds finding another one so bright? According to one of the paper's authors, quite good.  Professor Deepto Chakrabarty of the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research at the Massachusetts Institute of […]
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2:07 PM | 4 Things Needed To Make The Perfect Cup Of Coffee
There are four factors to making the perfect cup of coffee. Credit: Andy Ciordia/Flickr, CC BY-NC-NDBy Don BrushettIt’s hard to get a bad coffee these days. Plenty of baristas have fine-tuned the process of making espresso, but really there are only a handful of variables they can control: read more
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1:50 PM | New CMS Results
The Large Hadron Collider at the CERN laboratories in Geneva is currently in shutdown, finalizing the upgrades that will allow it to restart next year at the  centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV - over 60% more than the last 8 TeV run. ATLAS and CMS have collected no more proton-proton collisions since almost two years ago; yet the collaborations are as busy as ever producing physics results from the analysis of the 2012 data.Rather than focusing on any single result, below I give some […]
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1:37 PM | When It Comes To Ebola, How Much Risk Is Too Much?
How much risk can health workers be asked to take on? Mike Segar/ReutersBy Catherine Womack, Bridgewater State UniversityTaking care of sick people has always involved personal risk. From plague to tuberculosis to smallpox to SARS, health-care workers have put themselves in danger in the course of fulfilling their duties to care for others. Many have lost their lives doing just that. read more
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1:00 PM | Cocoa Flavanols Reverse Age-Related Memory Decline
A new study has found that  age-related memory decline in healthy older adults can be reversed by dietary cocoa flavanols, the naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa. read more
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12:43 PM | 7 Propaganda Talking Points Against GMOs
After reading about genetically modified organisms for years, it seem pretty clear to me that the anti-GMO activist position is not an objective science-based position. Rather it has all the features of a political/marketing campaign. The campaign has talking points that are all spin and propaganda. Like a slick car commercial, it is selling a [...]
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12:21 PM | Embodied thinking
TalkingBrains has a posting, “Embodied or Symbolic? Who Cares?” (here). Greg Hickok is asking what exactly is the difference between embodied and symbolic cognition. He takes a nice example of a neurocomputation that is understood, the way a barn owl turns its head to a sound source. If you have not seen it before have […]
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12:03 PM | The Waisman Center and its Autism-Related Efforts
This path month I had the opportunity to visit the Waisman Center in Madison, Wisconsin in order to provide the John D. Wiley Seminar Series. I was hosted by my […]
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9:32 AM | Doing the "happy walk" made people's memories more positive
Walking in a more happy style could help counter the negative mental processes associated with depression. That's according to psychologists in Germany and Canada who used biofeedback to influence the walking style of 47 university students on a treadmill.The students, who were kept in the dark about the true aims of the study, had their gait monitored with motion capture technology. For half of them, the more happily they walked (characterised by larger arm and body swings, and a more upright […]
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6:15 AM | Cognitive Psychology Colloquium NOT ON THIS WEEK
Due to the CTMHN postgraduate conference there will be no meeting this week, but please come along next week to hear about the future of statistics (see preview below)!When: Thursday 6th November, 12-1pmWhere: Keats Reading Room, Psychology BuildingTitle: JASP ̶ A free and open alternative to SPSS, a rich and user friendly alternative to R.Authors: Jonathon Love(a), Ravi Selker(a), Josine Verhagen(a), Martin Smira(b), Anneliese Wild(c), Maarten Marsman(a), Quentin Gronau(a), Richard D. […]
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5:51 AM | OMgp! Molecules that make Neuron Growth a Nogo
In the dark, cramped setting of the newborn brain, you slither along your guidepost. You have been slowly creeping on your chemically-determined path for what seems like ages wanting only to make a connection. As you stretch your greedy filopodia out, you hit something. An obstruction? A competing axon? Nothing obvious blocks you, yet you […]
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5:43 AM | http://nupsychnews.blogspot.com/2014/10/the-school-of-psychologys.html
The School of Psychology’s Sensory, Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Group is pleased to present the following PhD completion seminar. All Welcome!Theta oscillatory networks influence individual differences in cognitive control ability.Patrick S. Cooper, PhD Candidate School of Psychology Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory University of Newcastle, Callaghan. NSW 2308 AUSTRALIAWednesday 29th October 12-1pm in the Keats Reading Room, Psychology Building Callaghan Campus (video […]
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4:05 AM | #Brain article of interest: How Sugar Affects The Brain
From Farnam StreetRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/1wvtGHp
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3:40 AM | Pharmacogenomics
“The gene, cell, tissue, organ, organ-system pathway is a neuroscientifically established link between sensory input and behavior. Marts and Resnick (2007) stress the importance of this pathway in the context of a systems biology approach to pharmacogenomics.” (Kohl, 2012) “Naftolin...Read more
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