Posts

September 17, 2014

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5:24 PM | Biofilms: Using Bacteria for new Designer Nanomaterials
For most people biofilms conjure up images of slippery stones in a streambed and dirty drains. While there are plenty of “bad” biofilms around – they are even the same […]

Peter Q. Nguyen,, Zsofia Botyanszki,, Pei Kun R. Tay, & Neel S. Joshi (2014). Programmable biofilm-based materials from engineered curli nanofibres, Nature Communications, Other:

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5:00 PM | Blood Test To Diagnose Depression Uses 9 RNA Blood Markers
Northwestern Medicine researchers say they have developed the first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults, by measuring the levels of nine RNA blood markers. RNA molecules are the messengers that interpret the DNA genetic code and carry out its instructions. read more
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4:30 PM | Iberian Pig Genome Unchanged For The Last 500 Years
Humans may think we are eating paleo - like ancient ancestors - or organic - like before the advent of modern fertilizers and pesticides in the early 1800s - but nothing could be further from the truth. The microbiome of today shares little in common with people of even 100 years ago and if epigenetic claims about diet are true, our genome is different as well. And nothing should be changed like pigs, which are commonly now descended from Asian and European mixes. But a team of Spanish […]
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4:08 PM | PTH for stroke: stem cells lite
Spur the body's regenerative agents to emerge from the bone marrow The post PTH for stroke: stem cells lite appeared first on Lab Land.
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4:00 PM | (Transneuronal) Attack of the Mutant Huntingtin!
Huntington’s disease (HD) is an incredibly debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. Currently, there is no treatment that effectively reverses the progression of the disease or delays its onset. Huntington’s is a particularly difficult diagnosis because it is an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, meaning that any child of an affected parent has a 50% chance of inheriting the … Continue reading →

Pecho-Vrieseling E., Sascha Fuchs, Dorothee Bleckmann, Maria Soledad Esposito, Paolo Botta, Chris Goldstein, Mario Bernhard, Ivan Galimberti, Matthias Müller & Andreas Lüthi & (2014). Transneuronal propagation of mutant huntingtin contributes to non–cell autonomous pathology in neurons, Nature Neuroscience, 17 (8) 1064-1072. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.3761

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3:48 PM | The Future May Mean Carhacking Instead Of Carjacking
An older, mechanical car is a closed system - the only way to hack it is to be physically present. But as automobiles become increasingly chip-oriented, any way to update software remotely means the potential to be hacked.  You won't be carjacked, you'll be carhackedThe car of the future will be safer, smarter and offer greater high-tech gadgets, but be warned without improved security the risk of car hacking is real, according to a QUT road safety expert.read more
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3:30 PM | Climate Council: Without Action, Rising Seas Will Cost Us Billions
Australia's coast is famous around the world - but rising sea levels are poised to make things a lot less fun. Credit: Adam J.W.C./Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SABy Martin Rice; John Hunter, University of Tasmania; Lesley Hughes, and Will Steffen, Australian National University read more
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3:28 PM | Antidepressants Modulate Memory in the Healthy Brain
The mechanism of antidepressant drug response is not well understood.One theory posits antidepressant effects are only seen in those with clinical depression leaving the healthy brain unchanged.In a previous post, I outlined a study demonstrating effects of antidepressants on brain connectivity measures in the healthy brain.A recent fMRI study extends our understanding of the potential mechanisms for antidepressant drugs.CT Cerqueira and colleagues from Brazil studied the effects of the […]

Cerqueira CT, Sato JR, de Almeida JR, Amaro E Jr, Leite CC, Gorenstein C, Gentil V & Busatto GF (2014). Healthy individuals treated with clomipramine: an fMRI study of brain activity during autobiographical recall of emotions., Translational psychiatry, 4 PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24984192

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3:01 PM | Dark Matter Is A A Bose-Einstein Condensate?
What is dark matter? No one can say because it can't be detected or measured, but in science inference can help and we know that something is making gravity not work properly at the large scale. What we know as matter - stars, planets, us and other organisms - is baryonic matter, but it is only a small fraction of the universe. The rest gets lumped under blanket terms like dark energy and dark matter. Dark matter must be a form of matter the particles of which move slowly in comparison […]
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3:01 PM | Dark Matter Is A Bose-Einstein Condensate?
What is dark matter? No one can say because it can't be detected or measured, but in science inference can help and we know that something is making gravity not work properly at the large scale. What we know as matter - stars, planets, us and other organisms - is baryonic matter, but it is only a small fraction of the universe. The rest gets lumped under blanket terms like dark energy and dark matter. Dark matter must be a form of matter the particles of which move slowly in comparison […]
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3:00 PM | Sea Lamprey Shows The Origins Of Brain Development
Parasitic lamprey are a challenge to study but an important one - they are an invasive pest in the Great Lakes but difficult to study under controlled conditions because they live up to 10 years and only spawn for a few short weeks in the summer before they die.  Lamprey are slimy, eel-like parasitic fish with tooth-riddled, jawless, sucking mouths, and rather disgusting to look at, but thanks to their important position on the vertebrate family tree, they can offer important insights […]
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2:48 PM | Treatment needs to allow addicted clients to “earn Attachment”
In this article (1) we look at attachment in relation to affect regulation and interpersonal functioning among substance use disorders inpatients.  The conclusions of this study give some therapeutic insight into how these individuals with insecure attachment even in adulthood need … Continue reading →
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2:31 PM | Trees Love Climate Change
Last decade, science faced an ecological puzzle: under hotter, drier conditions of global warming, forests should have been penalized but instead the rainforests thrived. It isn't the first time - the climate change that caused the death of the dinosaurs gave them a big boost also.read more
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2:18 PM | Mini-Mouth: Making Wine Better, Thanks To Nanoscience
Wine, with its thousands of chemical combinations, can be hard to judge. As numerous studies have shown, getting experts to distinguish between a $4 bottle of wine and a $40 one is in the luck range Can a nanosensor do better? Researchers at Aarhus University believe they are on that path, at least when it comes to dryness.read more
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2:04 PM | Yoga Is Not A Treatment For Bipolar Disorder
One way to know there will be no science at a nutrition conference is to find a yogic flying instructor on the panel roster. Yoga has a variety of mental and physical health benefits, just like all exercise and sports do, but it is not going to cure bipolar disorder or any other disease. Even taking a few dozen surveys of people with bipolar disorder who do hatha yoga, a questionable methodology, does not find clinical benefits outside the placebo range, according to a paper in the Journal […]
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1:24 PM | Pride comes before a fall – are Scots too proud? Why excessive national pride is bad for everyone. Raj Persaud and Peter Bruggen
Pride comes before a fall – are Scots too proud? Why excessive national pride is bad for everyone. Raj Persaud and Peter Bruggen Whatever the outcome of the vote on Scottish independence, the campaign has been marked by a surge of Scottish pride and nationalism. Both sides of the debate have united over the idea […]
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12:30 PM | How Richard III Died: Nine Blows To The Head And Then He Was Dead
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12:00 PM | The Wealth Under Afghanistan
Credit: Image of map courtesy of the USGS and composite image by Patricia WaldronBy: Patricia Waldron, Inside Science(Inside Science) -- People living in Afghanistan have mined precious gems from their land, such as lapis lazuli, since the times of the Egyptian pharaohs. But modern analyses of the country's mineral deposits show that the Afghan people have barely scratched the surface of their mineable wealth. read more
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11:15 AM | Temple Grandin en la Sociedad de Autismo de America 2014
Recientemente tuve la oportunidad de ponerme al día con Temple Grandin en la Sociedad de Autismo de América 2014 celebrada en Indianápolis. Habíamos planeado el reunirnos en la susodicha conferencia […]
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9:46 AM | They can fuck you up, your mum and dad.
They fuck you up, your mum and dad.     They may not mean to, but they do. They fill you with the faults they had     And add some extra, just for you. Phillip Larkin – This Be The Verse Looking back on my own childhood it is easier now to observe the fertile ground […]
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9:27 AM | John Ellis On The Ascent Of The Standard Model
Being at CERN for a couple of weeks, I could not refrain from following yesterday's talks in the Main Auditorium, which celebrated the 90th birthday of Herwig Schopper, who directed CERN in the crucial years of the LEP construction.A talk I found most enjoyable was John Ellis'. He gave an overview of the historical context preceding the decision to build LEP, and then a summary of the incredible bounty of knowledge that the machine produced in the 1990s.read more
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8:43 AM | There's a problem with assuming the most intelligent candidates make the best employees
Workplace research through the 20th Century suggested that selecting for intelligence is the best way to identify good performers. General mental ability (GMA), a popular recruitment measure that maps closely to the colloquial meaning of "intelligence", is strongly correlated with on-the job performance, well ahead of any other single measure.This consistent finding came from studies that mostly defined job performance as carrying out the duties expected in that role. Although intuitive, this […]
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8:22 AM | Pride Comes Before a Fall - Are Scots too Proud?
Whatever the outcome of the vote on Scottish independence, the campaign has been marked by a surge of Scottish pride and nationalism. Both sides of the debate have united over the idea that it's wonderful to be proud to be Scottish. But is it possible that excessive nationalism could damage Scotland?
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7:02 AM | Ebola Virus And Protein Secrets
The current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 2000 lives and has spurred calls for a deeper understanding of the molecular biology of the virus that could be critical in the development of vaccines or antiviral drugs to treat or prevent Ebola hemorrhagic fever. A team at the University of Virginia, under the leadership of Dr. Dan Engel, a virologist, and Dr. Zygmunt Derewenda, a structural biologist, has obtained the crystal structure of a key protein involved in Ebola […]
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3:41 AM | Women,This Is Your Brain On Junk Food
Magnetic stimulation of a brain area, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), involved in "executive function" affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a paper in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine.read more
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2:42 AM | OYM 49: Then the next one’s still 50
The computer ate the podcast. Again. So this is just a minute of Liam rabling about how frustrated he is about it. Back next week with real episodes, until then check out all our past episodes at www.OnYourMind.ca The post OYM 49: Then the next one’s still 50 appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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1:00 AM | In Psychopaths, The Line Between Fantasy And Reality Is Thin
A new paper indicates that people with psychopathic traits have a preference for non-romantic sexual fantasies with anonymous and uncommitted partners. read more
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12:30 AM | Historical Global Carbon Cycle Needs A Rethink
A recent study of the global carbon cycle offers a new perspective of Earth's climate records through time. One of the current methods for interpreting ancient changes in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and oceans may need to be re-evaluated. A measurement of the abundance of carbon-12 and carbon-13 isotopes in both the organic matter and carbonate sediments found in a nearly 700-meter marine sediment core from the Great Bahama Bank. The analyses showed a change to lower […]
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12:00 AM | Superfast Data Using Radio Waves Rather Than Optics
Using twisted light to send data at almost unimaginable speeds is not new but researchers have developed a similar technique using radio waves - high speeds without the hassles that go with optical systems. read more
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12:00 AM | Betavoltaics: Water-Based Nuclear Battery Developed
We live in a battery world - just visit any airport and see people huddled around a wall outlet to witness our battery culture. Yet batteries haven't made any real improvements in decades and that holds back electric cars and solar energy and laptop computers. An old technology may finally have come of age that can help us enter the world of 21st century portable electricity - betavoltaics, a battery technology that generates power from radiation, has bee created using a water-based solution, […]
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