Posts

October 14, 2014

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11:30 PM | The History Of Genetically Modified Tomatoes
What's not red and about the size of your thumb? Tomatoes, before ancient scientists set out to make them patabale.  This genomic history of tomato breeding, based on sequencing of 360 varieties of the tomato plant, has vaulted beyond the first tomato genome sequence completed just two years ago. It will lend insight into science for people who believe genetic modification only began happening during the Clinton administration. Analysis of the genome sequences of these 360 varieties and […]
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11:30 PM | How Bacterial Species Evolve Antibiotic Resistance
Given a critical change in the environment, how exactly do species adapt? read more
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10:34 PM | Hydraulic Fracturing Correlated To Earthquakes In Ohio
Hydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking, is a way to extract natural gas from shale rock, by using a modern process to inject a high-pressure water mixture at the rock to release the gas inside. By all accounts it has been an environmental boon, responsible for causing energy emissions from coal to plummet back to early 1980s levels without causing energy prices to rise and harm poor people.read more
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10:33 PM | The importance of olfactory receptors
Smell Turns Up in Unexpected Places By ALEX STONEOCT. 13, 2014 Excerpt: “I’ve been arguing for the importance of these receptors for years,” said Dr. Hatt, who calls himself an ambassador of smell, and whose favorite aromas are basil, thyme...Read more
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10:30 PM | New Amsterdam On Mars Is Bold, But Is It Feasible?
The Dutch have always been bold. Not just any culture would make wooden shoes a thing and turn tulip bulbs into a luxury investment. And if you like New York City, you can thank New Amsterdam. Now Holland wants to be a colonial power again, this time on Mars. The "Mars One" project, announced in 2012, wants to establish the first human colony on the Red Planet by 2025. It's a one-way trip but there is no shortage of people willing to be one of the four that will build the first human […]
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10:03 PM | A stressful youth makes for a devoted finch dad
ScicuriousAnimals,Neuroscience BY Bethany Brookshire 9:30am, October 15, 2014 Male zebra finches stressed during development turn out to be better dads, a new study shows.David Cook Wildlife Photography/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)Stress is our coping response.  Whether emotional or physical, stress is how […]
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9:36 PM | There Is No Such Thing As Reptiles Any More – Here's Why
No, it's nothing to do with a reptilian existential crisis – just a name game. Credit: melanie cook/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SABy Dustin WelbourneYou have likely been to a zoo at some point and visited their reptile house. A building where the climate control dial is stuck on the “wet sauna” setting, and filled with maniacal children competing to be the first to press their ice cream covered face and hands on every available piece of clean glass. read more
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8:58 PM | Carbon’s Place in a Silicon World
Everything is silicon based, well mainly your computer, your TV, your ipad, and pretty much every piece of electronics in existence. Still the world turns and so does technology; at […]

Sharon Bahena-Garrido, Norihiro Shimoi, Daisuke Abe, Toshimasa Hojo, Yasumitsu Tanaka & Kazuyuki Tohji (2014). Plannar light source using a phosphor screen with single-walled carbon nanotubes as field emitters, Review of Scientific Instruments, Other:

Citation
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8:21 PM | Modern Droughts Are Nothing - 1934 Was The Worst Of The Last 1,000 Years
In an instantaneous, 24-hour news cycle, a lot of being made of current U.S. droughts but the 1934 version was 7X larger than other comparable intensity droughts that struck North America between 1000 A.D. and 2005, and nearly 30 percent worse than the next most severe drought that struck the continent in 1580, finds a new analysis.  read more
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7:40 PM | Biologically-based EES cause vs the pseudoscientific nonsense of SET
The EES expands what is recognized as causally relevant in the process of evolution (link opens pdf) www.nature.com/polopoly_fs/7.20356.1412604225!/suppinfoFile/514164a_s1.pdf Excerpt: “organisms inherit a wide variety of materials from their ancestors, including epigenetic marks, hormones, symbionts, learned knowledge and skills, and ecological...Read more
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6:21 PM | BMAL1 and Memory
This post is long overdue. I finished my PhD at the end of May. Finishing was a whirlwind of dissertation writing, manuscript submitting, review addressing. My paper on the requirement of the circadian protein BMAL1 for hippocampal-dependent memory was accepted soon after I defended. I created this illustration for the cover of Learning & Memory, abstractly […]
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6:08 PM | Revisiting landmark folate-autism study
Geneticist Joe Cubells is re-examining a Chinese study of folic acid supplementation and its impact on autism risk The post Revisiting landmark folate-autism study appeared first on Lab Land.
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5:44 PM | Recent College Graduates See Job Boom
Though the American economy remains in a malaise, with alarming numbers of people chronically unemployed for so long they no longer are considered unemployed because they can't get unemployment benefits any more, two areas have been exempt from that - government employees and new college graduates. Unlike the rest of the economy, those two sections never had negative growth and now hiring is expected to jump a whopping 16 percent for newly minted degree-holders in 2014-15, according to […]
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5:31 PM | Pregnancy Pressure: Now You Should Watch Diet And Exercise Too
Mothers are already responsible for propagating the species, a thankless job which men wisely avoid in all ways, but now they may be tasked with a better diet and exercising more also, because it has been directly associated with a range of improved outcomes at birth by researchers from the University of Adelaide. They say it is the  biggest study of its kind two papers were published on the findings in BMC Medicine.read more
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5:31 PM | Lamar Smith's attack on NSF a thinly veiled attempt to suppress environmental education
It's no secret that Lamar Smith (R-TX), Chairman of the Science, Space and Technology committee, has been waging a war on the National Science Foundation. See here, here, here and here. In a 2013 piece in USA Today, Smith, writing with Eric Cantor stated:While the NSF spends most of its funds well, we have recently seen far too many questionable grants, especially in the social, behavioral and economic sciences. A link to a more complete list of the suspect grants on which […]
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5:03 PM | Family history of alcoholism interacts with alcohol to affect brain regions involved in behavioral inhibition
We cite and quote directly from a very interesting article on how a family history of alcoholism contributes to impulsivity, the one psychological domain that turns up repeatedly and is supported in studies of alcoholics, addicts and those at risk … Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | Uprooted, Again
For me, the hardest part of writing a story is finding the end. It often feels arbitrary, or …
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4:54 PM | Next-Gen Lighting May Be Flat Panel Lights Based On Carbon Nanotubes
The Obama administration only recently banned incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent bulbs are getting all of the marketing due to generous government subsidies, so light emitting diodes (LEDs) are yet to even get off the cultural ground but researchers are already moving on to their successors.  Enter carbon electronics. Electronics based on carbon, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are emerging as successors to silicon for making semiconductor materials. And they may enable a […]
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4:50 PM | Tuesday Crustie: Hoax
Does this need to be said?Yes, apparently, someone does need to say that there are not crabs wider than two or three cars are long. And that someone was Dr. Verity Nye:(I)t is not inconceivable that new species could be found, but I laughed when I saw this picture.The news article is being kind to call this a “a well-doctored hoax.” A good hoax should have some plausibility to it. This one is ridiculous.External linksIs 'Crabzilla' real or not? Leading marine biologist rules picture […]
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4:40 PM | The Rats Of New York
It's not a secret that rats carry diseases, they quite literally carried the pests that caused the Bubonic Plague across Europe in the middle ages. But New York City has always felt like their rats were exceptional compared to rats beyond the Hudson River, and so scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health trapped 133 Norway rats at 5 sites in New York City, focusing on rats trapped inside residential buildings. They examined them for identified bacterial pathogens, […]
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4:27 PM | Emodiversity: why a mix of emotions is good for you
Neuroskeptic covered a paper (pdf) that postulates that it is healthiest to have a mix of emotions: It turns out that emotional diversity was a good thing (in terms of being associated with less depression etc.) for both positive and for negative emotions. … Continue reading →
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4:17 PM | In Search of the Marijuana Breathalyzer
Pissing in a cup may be on the way out. The good news: Marijuana breathalyzers are coming. The bad news: Marijuana breathalyzers are coming. For years now, urinalysis using a mass spectrometer has been, if you’ll excuse the expression, the gold standard for drug testing. But in the case of alcohol, exhaled breath has always been the detection matrix of choice. And now, after the publication of several papers analyzing the detection of various drugs of abuse in exhaled breath, companies […]
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3:01 PM | Designer Viruses Could Be The New Antibiotics
Bacteria under attack by a flock of bacteriophages. Credit: Graham Beards/Wikimedia CommonsBy Luc Henry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne read more
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2:54 PM | The Secret of Success Which Explains Why the Cleverest Country in Europe Doesn't Win Nobel Prizes
The young Afghan Malala Yousafzai's winning of the Nobel Peace Prize last week gained worldwide attention, while John O'Keefe's Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine was a particular source of national pride in the UK.
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2:36 PM | Antibiotic Resistance At The Ribosome Level
High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy has revealed in unprecedented detail the structural changes in the bacterial ribosome which results in resistance to the antibiotic erythromycin.read more
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2:29 PM | #Brain article of interest: How sleep acts as a cleaning system for the brain
From Scope BlogRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/11gkKbS
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1:42 PM | Evolutionary theorists and evolutionary theists live under rocks
CRISPR/Cas: Not Just for DNA Anymore Excerpt 1) “Unless you’ve been living under a rock the past two years, you’ve heard of CRISPR/Cas9, an RNA-guided nuclease that’s redefining synthetic biology and genome engineering.” Excerpt 2) “The authors propose several additional...Read more
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1:25 PM | Exercise Adapts the Aging Brain for Cognitive Health
Scientists are still trying to figure out exactly why exercise promotes cognitive health, especially in older adults. Some researchers posit that physical activity helps maintain youthful brain structures, but a new study instead suggests exercise changes the way seniors’ brains process information – making the aging brain more adaptable. Understanding how this adaptation occurs can […]
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1:00 PM | Through The Combining Glass To The Future Of Public Interaction
In the future, it may be possible to try on clothes even when the shop is closed, thanks tosemi-transparent mirrors in interactive systems presented at the ACM UIST 2014 human-computer interface conference.The work, led by Professor Sriram Subramanian, Dr. Diego Martinez Plasencia and Florent Bethaut from the University of Bristol’s Department of Computer Science, builds on a mirror’s ability to map a reflection to one unique point behind the mirror, independently of the […]
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1:00 PM | Why Do Tropical Ecosystems Have Higher Biodiversity?
Why is biodiversity is higher in the tropics than in colder regions? It's one of ecology’s unsolved puzzles and has been since the European explorers and naturalists of the 17th and 18th centuries discovered there is a stunningly rich biodiversity in the tropics compared to the temperate regions of the world.A research effort led by University of Arizona ecologists has now unearthed unexpected answers and helped found a new discipline, they call it functional biogeography, in the
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