Posts

October 01, 2014

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9:30 PM | "The Influence of Improper Information on Japanese Lay Judges’ Determination of Punishment"
Recently published in Asian Journal of Criminology (2014): "The Influence of Improper Information on Japanese Lay Judges’ Determination of Punishment" Eiichiro Watamura Toshihiro Wakebe Kaori Karasawa Lay judges’ decision-making process in the determination of appropriate punishment appears to be based...
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9:05 PM | "Promises, promises for neuroscience and law
Recently published in Current Biology "Promises, promises for neuroscience and law" Joshua W. Buckholtz David L. Faigman Stunning technical advances in the ability to image the human brain have provoked excited speculation about the application of neuroscience to other fields....
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8:41 PM | "Rational Action and Moral Ownership"
Recently published by Neuroethics: "Rational Action and Moral Ownership" by Vishnu Sridharan Abstract: In exploring the impact of cognitive science findings on compatibilist theories of moral responsibility such as Fischer and Ravizza’s, most attention has focused on whether agents are,...
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8:28 PM | "Will There Ever Be a Drug with No or Negligible Side Effects? Evidence from Neuroscience"
Recently published in Neuroethics: "Will There Ever Be a Drug with No or Negligible Side Effects? Evidence from Neuroscience," by Sylvia Terbeck, Laurence Paul Chesterman. Abstract: Arguments in the neuroenhancement debate are sometimes based upon idealistic scenarios involving the assumption...
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8:21 PM | The Ever Plastic Brain and Intellectual Disabilities
The plasticity of the brain is always somewhat of a shock. It’s near incredible what the brain can achieve, look at people who have strokes, or any other sort of […]

Hans T. Bjornsson, Joel S. Benjamin, Li Zhang, Jacqueline Weissman, Elizabeth E. Gerber, Yi-Chun Chen, Rebecca G. Vaurio, Michelle C. Potter, Kasper D. Hansen & Harry C. Dietz & (2014). Histone deacetylase inhibition rescues structural and functional brain deficits in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome, Science Translational Medicine , Other:

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8:08 PM | Forces of “Nature” limit dissemination of information
Force of nature gave life its asymmetry Excerpt: “In 2011, Meierhenrich and colleages showed4 that such light could transfer its handedness to amino acids. But even demonstrating how a common physical phenomenon would have favoured left-handed amino acids over right-handed...Read more
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6:00 PM | Your nose knows death is imminent | Mo Costandi
Losing the sense of smell predicts death within five years, according to new research.Until as recently as 1987, British coal pits employed caged canaries as sentinels that alerted miners to the presence of poisonous gases. Being more sensitive to them than we are, the birds would get distressed before the gases reached levels that are dangerous to humans, giving the miners time to evacuate and avoid suffocation.According to new research, the sense of smell is the canary in the coalmine of […]
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4:00 PM | Walking the Line: The Complexity of Punishment Decisions
One night, Mark withdraws $200 cash from an ATM. He is on his way to meet his family, and intends to treat everyone to a special dinner at his favorite restaurant for his wife’s birthday. Just as he finishes his transaction, Dan rounds the street corner, pulls out a knife, and threatens Mark to hand … Continue reading →

Buckholtz J.W., Paul E. Dux, David H. Zald, John C. Gore, Owen D. Jones & René Marois (2008). The Neural Correlates of Third-Party Punishment, Neuron, 60 (5) 930-940. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2008.10.016

Greene J.D. (2001). An fMRI Investigation of Emotional Engagement in Moral Judgment, Science, 293 (5537) 2105-2108. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1062872

Knoch D. (2006). Disruption of Right Prefrontal Cortex by Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Induces Risk-Taking Behavior, Journal of Neuroscience, 26 (24) 6469-6472. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.0804-06.2006

Sanfey A.G. (2003). The Neural Basis of Economic Decision-Making in the Ultimatum Game, Science, 300 (5626) 1755-1758. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1082976

Wout M.V., Alan G. Sanfey & Andre Aleman (2005). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex affects strategic decision-making, NeuroReport, 16 (16) 1849-1852. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.wnr.0000183907.08149.14

Yamada M., Saori Fujie, Motoichiro Kato, Tetsuya Matsuda, Harumasa Takano, Hiroshi Ito, Tetsuya Suhara & Hidehiko Takahashi (2012). Neural circuits in the brain that are activated when mitigating criminal sentences, Nature Communications, 3 759. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1757

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3:58 PM | Why do we language?
Aeon has an article on how the genetics that contribute to language are actually part of a much larger system: But over the years, it became clear that the truth about language origins was not quite as simple as a “language … Continue reading →
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3:30 PM | A Status Bar For Wounds: 'Smart' Bandage Emits Phosphorescent Glow For Healing
In video games, and in software downloads and processes, the status bar is often cheered or reviled. But they are here to stay. And now it may be possible to 'gamify' your medical progress.  Inspired by a desire to help wounded soldiers, researchers have created a paint-on, see-through, "smart" bandage that glows to indicate a wound's tissue oxygenation concentration - because oxygen plays a critical role in healing. Mapping these levels in severe wounds and burns can help to significantly […]
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3:30 PM | Drug Addicts Or Mentally Ill? Who The Public Feels Most Negative About
Mental illness has been under a lot of criticism in the last few years. The public feels like the psychology field over-medicates people based on subjective symptoms and recent high-profile violent acts all involved people on psychiatric medications. But there is still recognition that some mental illness is exculpatory and not just bad behavior. That is less so with drug addicts. While addictions are called a disease, and everyone gives lip service to that idea, when it comes to public policy […]
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3:06 PM | Genomic surveillance ends our world of RNA-mediated ecological adaptations
Why is this woman smiling? 1) Identifying Recent Adaptations in Large-Scale Genomic Data Senior author: Sabeti with co-author Rinn Excerpt: “As natural selection can only act on mutations that drive phenotypic variation…”. 2) Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and...Read more
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3:01 PM | Pick Up After Your Dog: Fecal Waste Contaminates Waterways, Shows Genetic Test
Americans love their dogs, and most people clean up after their pets when they are out on a walk, but some do not: people who claim they wouldn't pour toxic chemicals or medicines onto the ground because they recognize it gets into waterways delude themselves into believing dog excrement is "natural" and will be okay in waterways. But it isn't. Bacteria and anti-bacterial strains from dogs can make people sick from dogs just like it does humans, and we recognize that humans should not go […]
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2:31 PM | Not Wimpy: Humans Braved The Northern Cold As Well As Neanderthals
In 1908 the famously plump Venus of Willendorf, thought to be a symbol of fecundity, was discovered during an excavation near the Austrian town of Melk. It has been dated to 30,000 years ago and is one of the world’s earliest examples of figurative art.Now, a team of archaeologists have dated a number of stone tools excavated recently from the same site to 43,500 years ago. Results show they were part of the Aurignacian culture, which is generally accepted as indicative of modern human […]
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2:31 PM | Mutational Robustness: Why Duplicate Genes Remain In The Genome
Geneticists have found a mechanism sought for more than four decades that explains how gene duplication leads to novel functions in individuals.  Gene duplication is a biological phenomenon that leads to the sudden emergence of new genetic material. 'Sister' genes – the products of gene duplication – can survive across long evolutionary timescales, and allow organisms to tolerate otherwise lethal mutations. read more
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2:31 PM | In 2014, Over 80 Percent Of Bowel Cancers Are Halted With Medicines
The public may be critical of the War On Cancer and its hundreds of billions of government money, but pharmaceutical companies have continue to make progress. A new study finds that 80 percent of bowel cancers could be treated with existing JAK inhibitors. The risk of getting colorectal cancer increases with age, more than 90% of cases occur in people 50 years old or older, and it is the second leading cause of cancer death in the US. But there is a genetic commonality in 80 percent of those, […]
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2:01 PM | Emergence: The Remarkable Simplicity Of Complexity
Patterns of emergence are all around us. Credit: Feliciano Guimarães/Flickr, CC BYBy Andy Martin, University of Melbourne and Kristian Helmerson, Monash UniversityFrom the fractal patterns of snowflakes to cellular lifeforms, our universe is full of complex phenomena – but how does this complexity arise? read more
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1:30 PM | Bacteria May Reduce Impact Of Valium In UK Rivers
Valium (Diazepam) and similar medicines degrade naturally in the environment but it takes time, and until it happens there is concern about the freshwater environment. Bacterial breakdown may give it a boost, a team of researchers has said. Diazepam, used to treat anxiety and other similar conditions, has been detected in rivers across the UK and Europe. At the levels recorded, there is concern it may have the potential to produce harmful ecological effects in surface waters, including changing […]
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1:01 PM | Who Your Brain Decides To Make Friends With When You Start University
How many freebies can you carry? Credit: Nottingham Trent University, CC BY-NC-NDBy Kira Shaw, University of Sheffield read more
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12:30 PM | Rewire The Brain's Circuitry To Treat Depression
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex can treat symptoms of depression in humans by placing a relatively small device on a person's scalp and stimulating brain circuits, yet little is known about how TMS produces these beneficial effects. Some studies have suggested that TMS may modulate atypical interactions between two large-scale neuronal networks, the frontoparietal central executive network (CEN) and the medial prefrontal-medial parietal default […]
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12:00 PM | Ultrasound Elastography: 'Virtual Breast' Could Improve Cancer Detection
Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, which is why so many medical professionals encourage women to get mammograms. But the tests are not very accurate: only a minority of suspicious mammograms actually leads to a cancer diagnosis. Bad results lead to needless worry for women and their families—not to mention the time, discomfort and expense of additional tests, including ultrasounds and biopsies. read more
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10:35 AM | White House BRAIN Conference
September 30 is the last day of the fiscal year for the US government. So it's no coincidence that President Obama's BRAIN Initiative1 ended the year with a bang. The NIH BRAIN Awards were announced on the last possible day of FY2014, coinciding with the White House BRAIN Conference. A total of $46 million was dispersed among 58 awards involving over 100 scientists.Census of Cell Types (RFA MH-14-215)  Tools for Cells and Circuits (RFA MH-14-216)  Next Generation Human Imaging (RFA […]
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8:24 AM | “Just try to ignore it”: How neurotic people respond to extreme rudeness at work
We’ve all experienced rudeness at work; at the time it’s offensive and can harm our creativity, but it bears even darker fruits in the long-term, as repeated exposure is associated with depression, anxiety and psychological distress.How do people deal with rudeness? When is it buried away, and when addressed? A new study suggests that we actually tend to ignore it most of the time. However more offensive acts may set us off – unless we are particularly emotionally sensitive, […]
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5:00 AM | Comments for second half of September 2014
For Dorothy Bishop, two peer reviewed papers a year means you’re “totally disconnected from mainstream science.”Science of the South examines which area has historic campus buildings statisically.
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2:52 AM | Raising a child with autism – Oct 2014 update
Originally posted on Baldscientist:Hello all! This post is a little off topic. There is some pharmacology, but the main thing is that for a long time, I have been wanting to express some of the feelings that are part of raising a child with a disability, specifically autism. One way is to share some…
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12:39 AM | Nutrient-dependent memory
Vitamin D prevents cognitive decline and enhances hippocampal synaptic function in aging rats Reported as: Vitamin D in diet might ease effects of age on memory, study suggests Excerpt: “In the current study, researchers placed rats on six-month diets with...Read more
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12:30 AM | Why Japan’s Deadly Ontake Eruption Could Not Be Predicted
Phreatic eruption: Mount Ontake. Credit: EPA/Ministry of Land, InfrastructureBy Rebecca Williams, University of HullMount Ontake, Japan’s second-highest volcano, erupted killing at least 31 people on September 27. Since then, there has been feverish speculation about why tourists were on an active volcano and why the eruption wasn’t predicted. read more
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12:01 AM | Medications: The Leading Cause Of Allergy-Related Deaths
 An analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010 has found that medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S. The study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years.  read more

September 30, 2014

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11:59 PM | Systems biology and memory disorders
Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program Reported as: Memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s reversed: Small trial succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders News Article Excerpt: (1) eliminating all simple carbohydrates, leading to a weight loss of 20...Read more
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11:30 PM | Women Scientists Get Vocal About Top Billing On Twitter
Women ask why there aren't more women in lists of top scientists. Credit: Katrina Cole, CC BY-NCBy Victoria Metcalf, Lincoln University, New ZealandA steady infiltration of scientists onto Twitter has accompanied the growing recognition that a social media presence is just as important as taking the podium at a conference. read more
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