Posts

December 19, 2014

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7:06 PM | Why “fat shaming” makes the problem worse
Thanks to the internet age we have lost touch with the fact that there is a human out there reading these words. Because of this, the golden rule –treat others […]

LOGEL, C., STINSON, D., GUNN, G., WOOD, J., HOLMES, J. & CAMERON, J. (2014). A little acceptance is good for your health: Interpersonal messages and weight change over time, Personal Relationships, 21 (4) 583-598. DOI: 10.1111/pere.12050

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1:00 PM | Fly Life: Watching fruit flies sleep
Did you know that fruit flies sleep? There are actually a lot of similarities between sleep in fruit flies and sleep in humans and other mammals. For example… Image modified from Colwell, 2007 Like us, fruit flies get most of their sleep at night, and they also have an afternoon slump (although unlike us, they […]

Potdar S. (2013). Lessons From Sleeping Flies: Insights from Drosophila melanogaster on the Neuronal Circuitry and Importance of Sleep , Journal of Neurogenetics, 27 (1-2) 23-42. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/01677063.2013.791692

Koh K., M. N. Wu, Z. Yue, C. J. Smith & A. Sehgal (2008). Identification of SLEEPLESS, a Sleep-Promoting Factor, Science, 321 (5887) 372-376. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1155942

Liu W., Beika Lu & Aike Guo (2008). amnesiac regulates sleep onset and maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 372 (4) 798-803. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.05.119

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12:00 PM | This Is a Goodbye Post
Some bittersweet news: This is the last installment of Only Human. After two stimulating and fun years blogging at …
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10:05 AM | Our most popular posts of 2014
1. Jailed criminals think they are kinder, more trustworthy and honest than the average member of the public2. The ten most controversial psychology studies ever published3. Happy people think they're good at empathising with the pain of others. They're wrong4. What the textbooks don't tell you - one of psychology's most famous experiments was seriously flawed5. A man's fighting ability is written in his face6. Ten of the most counterintuitive psychology findings […]
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9:39 AM | Interview with Nacho D. Bermejo Bosch, Director of the Institute of Biomechanics of Valencia
Interview with Nacho D. Bermejo Bosch, Director of rehabilitation and personal autonomy in Institute of Biomechanics of Valencia (IBV). Por / By Dr. Juan Moisés de la Serna En Novedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. / In News in Psychology. Blog with news interviews and articles of Psychology.
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9:30 AM | Entrevista a D. Nacho Bermejo Bosch, Director del Instituto de Biomecánica de Valencia
Entrevista a D. Nacho Bermejo Bosch, Director de rehabilitación y autonomía personal en Instituto de Biomecánica de Valencia (IBV). Por / By Dr. Juan Moisés de la Serna En Novedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. / In News in Psychology. Blog with news interviews and articles of Psychology.
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12:52 AM | Conserved molecular mechanisms
In RNA-mediated events: chromosomal rearrangements and genomic rearrangements, I wrote: John Hewitt is the only science journalist I know who may have the knowledge required to link bio-physically constrained epigenetically-effected cell type differentiation via Luca Turin’s Molecular Vibration-Sensing Component in...Read more
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12:34 AM | Semester 2 Highlights
[…]
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12:20 AM | The Evolution Of Trichromatic Color Vision In Humans
The evolution of trichromatic color vision in humans occurred by first switching from the ability to detect UV light to blue light between 80 and 30 million years ago and then by adding green-sensitivity(between 45-30 million years ago to the preexisting red-sensitivity in the vertebrate ancestor, according to Shozo Yokoyama et al. in PLOS Genetics.read more

December 18, 2014

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11:35 PM | The Origin Of Theta Auroras Revealed
Auroras are the most visible manifestation of the sun's effect on Earth, but many aspects of these spectacular displays are still poorly understood. One particular type of very high-latitude aurora is known as a theta aurora -- seen from above it looks like the Greek letter theta, an oval with a line crossing through the center -- which sometimes occurs closer to the poles than normal aurora. While the genesis of the auroral oval emissions is reasonably well understood, the origin of the theta […]
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11:27 PM | A Line In The Sea: NOAA Picks 'Tipping Points' For Sea Level Related Flooding
Predictions about specific effects of climate change were once common - but they turned out to be spectacularly wrong so there are fewer these days. In 2006, former Vice-President Al Gore said by 2016 it would be too late to do anything, while the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said African farmers would be suffering 50% yield drops by 2020 and the Himalayan glaciers would be gone by 2035.  Today, the IPCC is more scientific and cautions against attributing specific […]
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11:01 PM | The celebrity analysis that killed celebrity analysis
Most ‘psy’ professionals are banned by their codes of conduct from conducting ‘celebrity analysis’ and commenting on the mental state of specific individuals in the media. This is a sensible guideline but I didn’t realise it was triggered by a specific event. Publicly commenting on a celebrity’s psychological state is bad form. If you’ve worked […]
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10:18 PM | Blame City Life, Not Fast Food, For The Surge In Diabetes
City folk may not think much of rural living - but they are healthier. A new study finds that diabetes, once rather uncommon, is now affecting 387 million people worldwide - and 77 percent of it is in developed nations. The reason is stress, write the authors of a paper in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology&Metabolism. City life - noise, crime and traffic all lead to higher stress and the body producing more of the stress hormone cortisol. Cortisol can counteract insulin, […]
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10:02 PM | Finally, We May Get Instant-On Computers
Computers don't really boot up any faster than they have in decades and that is due to limitations in electric currents (and ignoring the bloated software rolled out after every new chip), which are also a significant power drain. The solution may be on the horizon. A team has created a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device, equivalent to one computer bit, that could lead to next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric […]
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7:56 PM | You Can Self-identify With Any Ancestry You Want, But Genetically...
There is a running joke in America that there are three times as many people in the U.S. claiming to be Irish as there are actual people in Ireland.  Though it's nice to claim to be Irish because of a last name, America is a melting pot. And it is so melted that the genetic ancestry of racial and ethnic groups varies significantly even across different geographic regions in the United States. A paper in the American Journal of Human Genetics, researchers analyzed the genomes of more than […]
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7:38 PM | How Will Climate Change Impact Agriculture?
Climate change impacts could mean uncertain transformations of global agriculture systems by 2050, according to a new paper from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. read more
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7:35 PM | Gene fragments linked to brain development and autism
While the anti-vaccine movement enjoys the simple (and very wrong) answer to the cause of autism, there are people who want the actual truth. This drive had lead to a […]

Irimia, M., Weatheritt, R., Ellis, J., Parikshak, N., Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, T., Babor, M., Quesnel-Vallières, M., Tapial, J., Raj, B., O’Hanlon, D. & Barrios-Rodiles, M. (2014). A Highly Conserved Program of Neuronal Microexons Is Misregulated in Autistic Brains, Cell, 159 (7) 1511-1523. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.11.035

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7:04 PM | No cerebellum? No problem!
What happens when you are born missing 80% of your neurons? Well, pretty much nothing, as it turns out, at least when it comes to those missing a cerebellum. Comprising 70 billion of the brain’s 85 billion neurons (Herculano-Houzel 2009), this hindbrain structure is “the primary center of motor coordination in the central nervous system” […]
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6:40 PM | Connections between starvation and immunological memory
Focus on autophagy's functions in memory T cells The post Connections between starvation and immunological memory appeared first on Lab Land.
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6:38 PM | 5 Common Misconceptions About Seasonal Flu
If you're sick, stay home. ShutterstockBy Derek Gatherer, Lancaster UniversityIt’s that time of the year again. You probably think I mean Christmas, but as a virologist the sight of glitter, fairy lights and moulting pine trees immediately makes me think of the flu season. And if there’s one thing that can ruin your family’s Christmas, it’s the arrival of that particular unwanted guest. read more
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6:35 PM | Foldscope: A Microscope You Can Carry In Your Pocket
I finally received a Foldscope beta test kit. “Foldscope is an origami-based print-and-fold optical microscope that can be assembled from a flat sheet of paper,” according to the website. The Foldscope “can provide over 2,000X magnification with sub-micron resolution (800nm), weighs less than two nickels (8.8 g), is small enough to fit in a pocket (70 × 20 × 2 mm3), requires no external power, and can survive being dropped from a 3-story building or stepped on by a […]
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6:25 PM | When Embryonic Stem Cells Don't Know What To Make Of Themselves
A new paper has found that inhibiting or blocking stem cells ability to make a specific decision, leads to better cell growth and could lead to defined ways to differentiate stem cells. Th authors say their research is the first comprehensive analysis of a pathway important for stem and cancer cell decisions known as Erk. As a result, they hope the work could contain clues to cancer treatment as well as helping to establish a platform to make stem cell treatments for gut related disorders like […]
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6:13 PM | Interview with José Manuel Petisco, Psychologist expert in nonverbal behavior
Novedades en PsicologíaNovedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. Interview with José Manuel Petisco, who tells us about the valuable information you provide nonverbal behavior. Interview with José Manuel Petisco, Psychologist expert in nonverbal behaviorDr. Juan Moisés de la Serna
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5:55 PM | Entrevista a D. José Manuel Petisco, Psicólogo experto en comportamiento no verbal
Novedades en PsicologíaNovedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. Entrevista realizada a D. José Manuel Petisco, quien nos comenta sobre la valiosa información que proporciona el comportamiento no verbal. Entrevista a D. José Manuel Petisco, Psicólogo experto en comportamiento no verbalDr. Juan Moisés de la Serna
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5:47 PM | Who is getting hired in neuroscience?
I am always a bit jealous by how organized the field of academic economics is when compared to, well, anyone else. To get an academic job, young economists put up their one “job paper” into some sort of database for … Continue reading →
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5:22 PM | Novel Object Recognition: Recognizing a great test
Welcome back to the MazeEngineers blog! Today we’re going to talk about how basic object recognition is tested in mice/rats. Object recognition is a complex process that requires multiple brain... The post Novel Object Recognition: Recognizing a great test appeared first on Maze Engineers.
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5:22 PM | Novel Object Recognition: Recognizing a great test
Welcome back to the MazeEngineers blog! Today we’re going to talk about how basic object recognition is tested in mice/rats. Object recognition is a complex process that requires multiple brain... The post Novel Object Recognition: Recognizing a great test appeared first on Maze Engineers.
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4:45 PM | HIP 116454b Shows That Despite Malfunction, Kepler Can Still Find Planets
Despite a malfunction that ended its primary mission in May 2013, the Kepler spacecraft is still alive and working and its data has found a new "super-Earth". NASA's Kepler spacecraft detected planets by looking for transits, when a star dims slightly as a planet crosses in front of it. The smaller the planet, the weaker the dimming, so brightness measurements must be precise and that requires maintaining a steady pointing. Kepler can't really do that any more, its primary functionality came to […]
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4:20 PM | Histamine and Anorexia Nervosa
Most of us have at some point in our lives taken antihistamines–drugs that block the action of histamine (e.g., Claritin, Allegra)–to relieve allergy symptoms. And while histamine is best known for its role in the immune response, it also has many other important roles in the central nervous system. In the brain, histamine release is important for arousal (this is why antihistamines tend to make us drowsy). It has also been implicated in regulating appetite, taste […]
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4:17 PM | Studying species you like
As an undergraduate, one of my professors recommended that you should study organisms that you like. In a new paper, Ferry and Shiffman talk about not getting that advice... in fact, they received advice that was about 180° away from it:Scientists should not, according to this instructor while singling out DS and a student studying marine mammals as examples, pick a species that they “like” and then come up with a research question related to it. Author LF had a similar […]
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