Posts

November 26, 2014

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7:39 AM | Watch “Cowards and Cowardice – Chris Walsh bravely discu…” on YouTube
Cowards and Cowardice – Chris Walsh bravely discusses his new book with Raj Persaud: http://youtu.be/LGkTJSnxc1w From Princeton press website Coward. It’s a grave insult, likely to provoke anger, shame, even violence. But what exactly is cowardice? When terrorists are called cowards, does it mean the same as when the term is applied to soldiers? And […]
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4:37 AM | OYM55: SFN Good!
This week on the On Your Mind Neuroscience Podcast: We’re back on home soil!  After an exhausting and exhilarating week in Washington, D.C. for SfN, Liam and Kathryn are back to share some of the things they’ve seen.  Besides the amazing research that Kat got to hear about, Liam found some time away from the ...read more The post OYM55: SFN Good! appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.
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4:13 AM | Not Neonics: Parasites Are Bad For Honey Bees
For a short window, it appeared that bees were dying off. Environmentalist were quick to blame a new kind of pesticide, Neonicotinoids, known in short form as neonics, but then it turned out that the die-offs were in just one geographical area, which would not be the case if it were due to a pesticide. Instead, it was likely a combination of environmental changes and perhaps a different sort of pest may try to kill them in the future; the exotic parasite Nosema ceranae and its original native […]

November 25, 2014

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10:30 PM | You Are Not Alone, Shows Hacked Webcam Site
If you don't put a piece of tape over your webcam, get used to being watched. adafruit, CC BY-NC-SABy Gordon Fletcher, University of Salford read more
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10:17 PM | Blu-ray solar power
  So here’s something you don’t see everyday. Blu-ray disks, you know the stuff we use for video games or DVDs also improve the performance of solar cells—suggesting a second […]

Smith, A., Wang, C., Guo, D., Sun, C. & Huang, J. (2014). Repurposing Blu-ray movie discs as quasi-random nanoimprinting templates for photon management, Nature Communications, 5 5517. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6517

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9:31 PM | The molecular path of best resilience
Many studies focus on susceptibility to stress and how it triggers depression. But a new study highlights a protein important in resilience, showing that resisting stress takes work, too.
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9:30 PM | The molecular path of best resilience
Stress resistance may come from one protein and its many effects ScicuriousNeuroscience by Bethany Brookshire 4:31pm, November 25, 2014 Most mice will spend a lot of time making friends. But some mice that have been bullied at the paws of another mouse prefer to stay away. This susceptibility to defeat is often used in studies as a proxy for depression.Christopher Wood; […]
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8:47 PM | Blind Scottish Centipede Reveals How Venomous Carnivores Evolved
Usually blind sages revealing the secrets of the universe are Asian. Scotland doesn't get enough respect that way but a centipede is defying the stereotype. Arthropods are one of Earth's real success stories, with more species than any other animal phylum. Genome sequencing has been skewed towards the more popular insects, and even an arachnid and a crustacean, and now finally the myriapods (centipedes and millipedes) are emerging from the dark.read more
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8:39 PM | Book review: Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?: A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain
Do Zombies Dream of Undead Sheep?: A Neuroscientific View of the Zombie Brain Hardcover–September 22, 2014 by Dr. Timothy Verstynen and Dr. Bradley Voytek Princeton University Press I loved this book, but be aware that it is not about what most people expect. It is in fact a book that uses Zombie lore as a …
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8:00 PM | Strain 115 : The Killer Bacteria Inside Your Thanksgiving Turkey
While an alarming number of wealthy people think organic food contains no chemicals, the opposite is true. Not only is everything chemical, the most organic of organic Thanksgiving meals is stuffed full of mutagens and carcinogens, at least in environmental toxicology studies on rats. But in the real world, outside environmental fundraising, Thanksgiving dinner is not only harmless, it might even be beneficial. The turkey Americans eat on Thursday contains Strain 115, which produces the […]
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7:30 PM | Fuzzy Trace Theory: People Know Antibiotics Don't Cure Viruses But Still Ask For Them
People know that antibiotics won't help viruses. So why ask doctors for antibiotics? Subbotina Anna/ShuttstockBy David Broniatowski, George Washington University; Eili Klein, Johns Hopkins University, and Valerie Reyna, Cornell University read more
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7:00 PM | Australia: Incomes Fell As Stressed Economy Continued To Struggle
Australia recently had an election where they asked for a dramatic departure from previous fiscal policies.  The reasons were simple, in hindsight. Everyone wanted more money from an increasingly larger government but incomes were declining. Inflation is still happening, government employees still get raises, but average Australian income declines showed what government claims about economic health did not.   Increases and declines in economies have always happened but new work […]
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5:44 PM | Not Just The Wealthy: Feeling Like You Have Enough Drives Opposition To More Taxes
There is a perception that 'the wealthy' are opposed to more taxes and income redistribution in America. But the wealthy already pay an alarming amount in taxes and 47% remain loyal to tax-cutting politicians every election cycle. People have ideological reasons to oppose government redistribution of their work, of course, but it may also be relative. Someone who is in a poor neighborhood but doing better than others may not like the idea of higher taxes either, according to a paper […]
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5:29 PM | Diversity Fatigue: Why Businesses Struggle To Close The Gender Gap
Diversity is listed at the bottom of priorities for human resources professionals in large firms yet many mangers still feel threatened by diversity policies.shutterstockBy Jennifer Whelan, Melbourne Business SchoolMany large organizations are now on their second or third wave of diversity and inclusion programs.A good number of them are still struggling to identify obvious improvements in the metrics they hoped to see changes in. Yet, ironically, increasing numbers of people are beginning to […]
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5:24 PM | New #Brain Painting: The Brain and Identity
Hello!Our brain is as unique to each of us as our fingerprint. Our experiences overtime form a brain that is one-of-a-kind to each of us. Even identical twins do not have the same brain.With this thought in mind, I wanted this new brain painting to be in the composition of my own fingerprint. The finger I chose to use for this was my thumbprint. What do you think?Unique Identity30" x 24"Acrylic on Canvas 2014 ©Michelle HunterIN PROGRESS PHOTOS:2014 ©Michelle Hunter2014 […]
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4:05 PM | Bitcoin And Anonymity: User's Identity Can Be Revealed Much Easier Than Thought
Bitcoin calls itself the new money and says it can be minted and exchanged on the Internet, faster and cheaper than a bank. It's gotten a lot of attention but how anonymous is it? Not very, if you have computers and about $1,500. Several groups worldwide have shown that it is possible to find out which transactions belong together, even if the client uses different pseudonyms but it has only recently become clear that it is also possible to reveal the IP address behind each […]
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4:05 PM | New Tool Use in a Bird
Under the right environmental conditions, and with a little innovation, great antshrikes prove they’re capable of cognitively flexibe tool use. Tool-use is a new behavior for this species – they’re using anvils to crack open the shells of invasive land snails. Read my latest Zoologic post: Faced With Invasive Snail, A Bird Learns to Use Tools .
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4:04 PM | Postivie Early Phase 1 Results For AG-120 In IDH1 Mutated AML
Results presented at the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Symposium in Barcelona show "extremely promising" early phase 1 clinical trial results for the investigational drug AG-120 against the subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harboring mutations in the gene IDH1. The finding builds on phase 1 results of a related drug, AG-221, against IDH2 mutations, presented at the most recent meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research. Results at […]
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3:55 PM | Turn Sawdust Into Gasoline Additive
Researchers using a new chemical process have converted the cellulose in sawdust into hydrocarbon chains, building blocks for gasoline.  Cellulose is the main substance in plant matter and is present in all non-edible plant parts of wood, straw, grass, cotton and old paper.  These hydrocarbons can be used as an additive in gasoline or as a component in plastics.  "At the molecular level, cellulose contains strong carbon chains. We sought to conserve these chains, but drop the […]
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3:45 PM | Can music benefit addicts in treatment?
Novedades en PsicologíaNovedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. One of the problems with respect to addiction therapy is that there is no benefit treatment to addicts. Can music benefit addicts in treatment?Dr. Juan Moisés de la Serna
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3:36 PM | ¿Puede la música beneficiar a los adictos en tratamiento?
Novedades en PsicologíaNovedades en Psicología - Blog de Psicología con actualidad, novedades y artículos. Una de las problemáticas con respecto a las terapias de la adicción es que no existe un tratamiento que permita beneficiar a los adictos . ¿Puede la música beneficiar a los adictos en tratamiento?Dr. Juan Moisés de la Serna
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2:02 PM | El Niño Blamed For Stunted Growth Of Peruvian Children
Epidemiologists have linked El Niño, a recurring pattern where every 2-7 years warm waters in the Equatorial Pacific change the weather, to short stature, also known as stunting,  which is usually due to chronic malnutrition. The authors found that children born in coastal Peru during and after the 1997-98 El Niño, the last strong one, have a lower height-for-age than others born before the event.  El Niño has also been linked to epidemics of malaria, dengue […]
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2:02 PM | Which Government Created Regin, One Of The Most Sophisticated Espionage Bugs Ever Discovered?
Worry only if you have something to hide. FinchenBy Andrew Smith, The Open UniversityThe computer-security firm Symantec says it may have found some of the most sophisticated malicious software ever made. The cyber-espionage bug, called Regin, has been making attacks for many years without being caught. read more
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12:24 PM | Does Science Show What 12 Steps Know (part 1)?
How It Works Here we address a question I have asked myself many times – why does AA and other 12 step fellowships seem to have a better understanding of the alcoholic/addict and offer better treatment of them than that … Continue reading →
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9:44 AM | The wrong sort of discussion
The Times Higher Education has an article on post-publication peer review, and whether it will survive legal challenges The legal action launched by a US scientist who claims that anonymous comments questioning his science cost him a lucrative job offer has raised further questions about the potential for post-publication peer review to replace pre-publication review. […]
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9:00 AM | When Korea imposed a limit on working hours, did it make people happier?
Across different professions, many people are familiar with the sense of having to deliver more with less, meaning clocking-off time falls later and later. One way to protect workers’ rights, and look after their wellbeing, is to introduce working hours restrictions. But a new paper by Korea University's Robert Rudolf investigates the impact of such a reform, and its conclusions are disappointing.Beginning its roll-out in 2004, the (South) Korean Five Day Working Reform was intended to […]
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5:21 AM | Read the full transcript here, and the one dated August 20th...
Read the full transcript here, and the one dated August 20th here
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5:08 AM | "Former New York state Chief Judge Sol Wachtler famously remarked that a prosecutor could persuade a..."
“Former New York state Chief Judge Sol Wachtler famously remarked that a prosecutor could...
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4:17 AM | JUST PUBLISHED: Not Just Pineapple and Water: How do People Integrate Information from Multiple Sources?
When choosing a restaurant for a dinner with friends we need to combine information prior to decision, concerning the location, menu, and price range. Similarly, when crossing a busy road, we sometimes need to integrate information from multiple sources, such as horn sounds and the sight of approaching cars. A recent paper published by myself and colleagues does not tell you which restaurant to choose for your party or how to safely cross the road. Rather, it provides a means for evaluating how […]
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1:49 AM | Violence, Sex And Taboo: The Original Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales Back In Print
Jacob and Wilhelm were Grimm. Wikimedia CommonsBy Marguerite Johnson, University of NewcastleFairy tales have a tumultuous and fragile history. They originated as tales told by “folk”. They were passed down over generations to while away long winter nights, to provide entertainment at special occasions and for simple enjoyment.Inevitably, as more people became literate and scholars began to record fairy tales, they were published. And then, with a wave of a magic wand, they entered […]
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