Posts

September 16, 2014

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9:21 PM | Master Jedi Flatworm
Originally posted on Baldscientist:I wanted to share with you something I think is very cool.? If you are one of my regular readers, you know that I like science fiction and flatworm research, not necessarily in that order.? On the other hand, if you are not a regular reader, check?my blog posts out and…
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8:30 PM | Training the overweight brain to abstain
A new study shows that brain changes are associated with a weight-loss behavioral intervention, but it may be a while before we can train our brains to prefer peppers over pork chops.
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5:14 PM | New Cocktail Turns Adult Cells into Stem Cells
For those of us who were following stem cell news, recently the field had a huge setback when a paper, that offered a cheap and novel way to create stem […]

Buganim Y, Markoulaki S, van Wietmarschen N, Hoke H, Wu T, Ganz K, Akhtar-Zaidi B, He Y, Abraham BJ, Porubsky D & Kulenkampff E (2014). The Developmental Potential of iPSCs Is Greatly Influenced by Reprogramming Factor Selection., Cell stem cell, 15 (3) 295-309. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25192464

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4:15 PM | Divide and conquer vs lung cancer
Biomarkers that can predict whether doctors will see a response with common chemotherapy drugs vs lung cancer The post Divide and conquer vs lung cancer appeared first on Lab Land.
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3:59 PM | TEDMED Day 3: The Nature of People, the Peculiar, and the Pint-Sized
Bob Carey knows that laughter is the best medicine.I was sad on the last day because a.) it was the last day, and b.) it started an hour earlier than Day 1 and by this point I was exhausted. (Exhaustion is the curse of the introvert who tries to put oneself out of their comfort zone by surrounding oneself with a thousand strangers for 10 hours a day). But as you can see from the picture on the right, it's clear that my spirits were lifted by midday.Session 7: "Human Nature Inside and […]
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3:58 PM | Collaborating fish(es)
I stumbled across an interesting paper by Bshary and colleagues about collaboration between fishes1. The study is already a few years old (see a recent follow up). But, new or not, collaborating fishes are always cute and worth writing about. The fishes in question are the roving coralgrouper and the giant moray. Both are hunters, but their hunting styles differ. The grouper hunts for prey in the open water. To escape from the grouper, fishes tend to hide in the coral reefs, in small […]
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2:24 PM | Two tenure-track jobs at SDSU
We are writing to let you know of two tenure/tenure-track positions for Fall 2015 that we are currently conducting in the School of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at San Diego State University. Language Clinical Scientist, Bilingual emphasis,  Assistant Professor (Dr. Sonja Pruitt, Search Chair)Tenure-track position in Bilingualism and Language Science. Required: Ph.D. in Language Science and Disorders or related field, excellence in teaching, strong research abilities, […]
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2:00 PM | RNA-mediated species diversification from microbes to primates
Mycobacteriophage-drived diversification of Mycobacterium abscessus Biology Direct (15 September 2014) OPEN ACCESS Excerpt (with my emphasis): “Widespread occurrence of phage sequences in almost all studied M. abscessus complex isolates suggests that the rate of prophage invasion is faster than the...Read more
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12:22 PM | The Genetics of the Schizophrenias
A new study sheds further light on the genetic basis of the group of psychiatric disorders known collectively as schizophrenia. Further, the study (actually a collection of four studies) takes a new approach that might prove generally useful in associating genetic variation with disease risk, even beyond psychiatry. Schizophrenia In popular culture the term “schizophrenic” [...]
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12:00 PM | Tuesday Crustie: Be free!
This is what victory looks like:I know, you probably expected it to look a little less muddy.Photographer Steve Severinghaus wrote, “A gull at Dead Horse Bay abandoned this crab for some reason.” Photo by Steve Severinghaus on Flickr; used under a Creative Commons license.
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11:55 AM | #Brain article of interest: Australian Goldfish Called George Undergoes Surgery To Save His Life
From MashableRead the full article here-> http://ift.tt/1nZmieZ
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10:18 AM | Should Policy Makers and Financial Institutions Have Access to Billions of Brain Scans?
"Individual risk attitudes are correlated with the grey matter volume in the posterior parietal cortex suggesting existence of an anatomical biomarker for financial risk-attitude," said Dr Tymula. This means tolerance of risk "could potentially be measured in billions of existing medical brain scans." 1 -Gray matter matters when measuring risk toleranceLet's pretend that scientists have discovered a neural biomarker that could accurately predict a person's propensity to take financial risks […]

Gilaie-Dotan, S., Tymula, A., Cooper, N., Kable, J., Glimcher, P. & Levy, I. (2014). Neuroanatomy Predicts Individual Risk Attitudes, Journal of Neuroscience, 34 (37) 12394-12401. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1600-14.2014

Levy, I., Rosenberg Belmaker, L., Manson, K., Tymula, A. & Glimcher, P. (2012). Measuring the Subjective Value of Risky and Ambiguous Options using Experimental Economics and Functional MRI Methods, Journal of Visualized Experiments, (67) DOI: 10.3791/3724

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9:58 AM | ATLAS Higgs Challenge Results
After four months of frenzy by over 1500 teams, the very successful Higgs Challenge launched by the ATLAS collaboration ended yesterday, and the "private leaderboard" with the final standings has been revealed. You can see the top 20 scorers below.read more
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8:31 AM | Raj Persaud in conversation with Professor Jeremy Holmes – can Tolstoy help us understand depression?
Jeremy Holmes is a psychiatrist and Professor of psychotherapy at the University of Exeter.  He is best known for his work in Attachment Theory and its applications to psychotherapy and psychiatry.  He also has written extensively on the relationship between literature and psychiatry,  most recently in his book The Therapeutic Imagination: Using literature to deepen […]
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7:00 AM | Forgive yourself for relaxing in front of the TV and the couch time might actually do you some good
There's a snobbishness about relaxation time. Tell someone your hobby is watching TV and chances are they'll look at you with derision. Mention meditation, reading or yoga and you're far more likely to attract nods of approval.And yet there is substantial evidence that time watching TV or playing video games can have a powerful restorative effect - just what many of us need after a hard day. This benefit isn't found for everyone, and in new paper Leonard Reinecke and his collaborators propose […]
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5:00 AM | Comments for first half of September 2014
Rene Bekkers talks about only reviewing for journals that publish open access. I’ve heard that one before.
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4:30 AM | Rapidly Evolving Lizards Show How Some Creatures Can Adapt To Beat Climate Change
Can the brown anole lizard outrun climate change? Credit: Ianaré Sévi, CC BYBy Amanda Bates, University of Southampton read more
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4:00 AM | Radical Rethink: Sugars Are The Only Cause Of Tooth Decay
If we get sugars down to 3% of total energy intake, it may put dentists out of business, according to a paper in BMC Public Health which analyzed the effect of sugars on tooth decay and found that sugars are the only cause of tooth decay in children and adults. Free sugars are defined by the World Health Organisation Nutrition Guidance Advisory Group as "Free sugars include monosaccharides and disaccharides added to foods by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, and sugars naturally present […]
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3:57 AM | RNA-mediated events found everywhere
Transcriptome-wide Mapping Reveals Widespread Dynamic-Regulated Pseudouridylation of ncRNA and mRNA Related articles Related blog posts on this site Reported as Scientists discover RNA modifications in some unexpected places Excerpt 1): “…there are multiple types of RNA, three of which—messenger RNA...Read more
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2:57 AM | Being Too Analytical Could Push Ethics Out The Door
Calculating the pros and cons is a time-honored method for making analytical decisions but focusing too much on numberscalculations, especially those involving money, can lead to negative consequences, including social and moral transgressions, says a new paper. Based on several experiments, researchers concluded that people in a "calculative mindset" as a result of number-crunching are more likely to analyze non-numerical problems mathematically and not take into account social, moral or […]
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2:00 AM | Seeking An Easy Win On Carbon Emissions? Cut Global Trade
Is this really necessary? Credit: EPABy John Weeks, SOAS, University of LondonThe Obama administration has proposed several ad hoc multi-country economic agreements, and in doing so has abandoned de facto the World Trade Organization (WTO) as insufficiently malleable to its interests. The two most important of these are the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the more recent Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). read more
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1:50 AM | Reseachers think copy number variation is genetically determined
Researchers develop new type of genetic test for identifying developmental disorders Excerpt: “…the team sought to find specific genes responsible for certain development disorders, and they appear to have done just that.” My comment: The genes cannot be responsible for...Read more
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1:03 AM | Some neuroscientists think a mutation led to human language development
Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene Excerpt: “Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans’ unique ability to produce and understand speech.” Excerpt: “…the gene that...Read more
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12:03 AM | Genotype, observed phenotype, and distinctly disordered behaviors
Schizophrenia not a single disease but multiple genetically distinct disorders September 15, 2014 By Jim Dryden News article excerpt: “Genes don’t operate by themselves,” said C. Robert Cloninger, MD, PhD, one of the study’s senior investigators. “They function in concert...Read more
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12:00 AM | Here's To Wine, Chocolate And A Long Healthy Life
Good nose. Credit:  Lowjumpingfrog, CC BYBy Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, University of Liverpool read more

September 15, 2014

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11:18 PM | WelO5: New Halogenation Enzyme Discovered
Molecules containing carbon-halogen bonds are produced naturally across all kingdoms of life and constitute a large family of natural products with a broad range of biological activities.  The presence of halogen substituents in many bioactive compounds has a profound influence on their molecular properties and a goal of chemical science has been to find the late-stage, site-specific incorporation of a halogen atom into a complex natural product by replacing an sp³ C-H bond (one of […]
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10:30 PM | Concussion: The 'Hidden Injury' In Sports
In 2010, McGill Redmen receiver Charles-Antoine Sinotte suffered a concussion during his last home game. "It was like nothing I had experienced before," recalls Sinotte. "I felt like I was out of my body." Although he received medical attention and missed the rest of the game, he admits he downplayed his symptoms in order to play in the next game – his last before leaving McGill. read more
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10:05 PM | Im gonna go ahead and just build a therapy robot that rolls up...
Im gonna go ahead and just build a therapy robot that rolls up and plays smooth jams when I need it.
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10:00 PM | Genetically Modified Wheat, Without The GMO Drama
Researchers have discovered "the most famous wheat gene," a reproductive traffic cop of sorts that can be used to transfer valuable genes from other plants to wheat, which clears the way for wheat varieties with disease- and pest-resistance traits of other grasses. Though it would be genetic modification, because of precise legal definitions that ban some genetic optimization but allow mutagenesis and other older forms of genetic modification, it would not have the same regulatory hurdles and […]
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10:00 PM | This Type Of Baldness By Age 45 Linked To More Aggressive Prostate Cancer
Men who had moderate baldness affecting both the front and the crown of their head by age 45 were at a 40% increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer than men with no baldness, according to a new, large cohort analysis from the prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. Aggressive prostate cancer usually indicates a faster growing tumor resulting in poorer prognosis relative to […]
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