Posts

July 24, 2014

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9:45 AM | Director’s Update: Thinking about our grant schemes
Originally posted on Wellcome Trust Blog:Since he joined us last year, Jeremy Farrar, Director of the Wellcome Trust, has been listening – to staff, to researchers, to members of the Wellcome community, and more. In this post he explains…
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9:02 AM | When interviewers try to sell the job, they become bad interviewers
It’s hard to find the best person for the job through an interview. New research uncovers part of the problem: judging a candidate’s calibre becomes trickier when we’re also trying to sell them the benefits of joining the organisation.In an initial study, participants were asked to interview a person (another participant) who was acting as an applicant for a fictional position. Half the interviewers were told their priority was to get a good sense of the applicant, while the […]

July 23, 2014

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8:21 PM | Five Top Clinical Trials in Traumatic Brain Injury
I recently published a list of six top recently published clinical trials in TBI.I want to add to this list five more trials in progress that will be important to follow for results as they are published.A registry of active clinical trials is located on the website www.clinicaltrials.govI reviewed some the recently completed and ongoing clinical trials in subjects with traumatic brain imaging (TBI). Here are five that I think are interesting, innovative and important.Clicking on the trial […]
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8:00 PM | The Chemistry Between Us: The Science of Love and Bonding
As part of the Brain Matters! Vancouver Thematic Sessions Video Podcast, we present: The Chemistry Between Us: The Science of Love and Bonding by Larry J. Young, Director, Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, Emory University This video podcast highlights the … Continue reading →
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6:00 PM | Hybrid Nanowires And A Crystal Wedding In The Nanocosmos
Researchers have succeeded in embedding nearly perfect semiconductor crystals into a silicon nanowire. They say the new method of producing hybrid nanowires, very fast and multi-functional processing units, can be accommodated on a single chip in the future.  Nano-optoelectronics are considered the cornerstone of future chip technology, but the research faces major challenges: on the one hand, electronic components must be accommodated into smaller and smaller spaces. On the other hand, […]
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5:30 PM | Ketamine, The Emergency Room Wonder Drug
Ketamine has been used by emergency departments for analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation in critically ill patients but decades-old studies suggested it raised intracranial pressure.  A systematic review of 10 recent studies comparing ketamine to sufentanil, fentanyl and other pharmacological agents (vasopressors, neuromuscular blocking agents, sedatives) found no differences in intracranial and cerebral pressures of patients who had been treated with […]
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5:21 PM | Voyager has hit interstellar space…. maybe?
Poor Voyager, he just can’t catch a break. We’ve said it’s hit interstellar space more times than we want to admit and in 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that […]

G. Gloeckler & L. A. Fisk (2014). A test for whether or not Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause, Geophysical Research Letters, Other:

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5:13 PM | Preregistration for All Medical Animal Research
Writing in the European Journal of Clinical Investigation, three Dutch researchers say that All preclinical trials should be registered in advance in an online registry Citing the fact that all clinical trials are (in theory) already registered, authors Jansen of Lorkeers et al say that the system should be extended to cover preclinical medical research, […]The post Preregistration for All Medical Animal Research appeared first on Neuroskeptic.

Jansen of Lorkeers, S., Doevendans, P. & Chamuleau, S. (2014). All preclinical trials should be registered in advance in an online registry, European Journal of Clinical Investigation, DOI: 10.1111/eci.12299

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5:00 PM | Climate Change And Soil Respiration
The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. This soil respiration and the enormous release of carbon is balanced by carbon coming into the soil system from falling leaves and other plant matter, as well as by the underground activities of plant roots.  Short-term warming studies have documented that rising temperatures increase the rate of soil respiration. As a result, scientists […]
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4:46 PM | As a butterfly flaps its wings in Tokyo, a neuron in your head veers slightly heavenward…
When you look at the edge of a table, there is a neuron in your head that goes from silence to pop pop pop. As you extend your arm, a nerve commanding the muscle does the same thing. Your retina has neurons whose firing rate goes up or down depending on whether it detects a light spot […]

Kaufman MT, Churchland MM, Ryu SI & Shenoy KV (2014). Cortical activity in the null space: permitting preparation without movement., Nature neuroscience, 17 (3) 440-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24487233

Mante V, Sussillo D, Shenoy KV & Newsome WT (2013). Context-dependent computation by recurrent dynamics in prefrontal cortex., Nature, 503 (7474) 78-84. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24201281

Churchland, M., Cunningham, J., Kaufman, M., Foster, J., Nuyujukian, P., Ryu, S. & Shenoy, K. (2012). Neural population dynamics during reaching, Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature11129

Shenoy KV, Sahani M & Churchland MM (2013). Cortical control of arm movements: a dynamical systems perspective., Annual review of neuroscience, 36 337-59. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23725001

Ames KC, Ryu SI & Shenoy KV (2014). Neural dynamics of reaching following incorrect or absent motor preparation., Neuron, 81 (2) 438-51. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24462104

Churchland, M., Cunningham, J., Kaufman, M., Ryu, S. & Shenoy, K. (2010). Cortical Preparatory Activity: Representation of Movement or First Cog in a Dynamical Machine?, Neuron, 68 (3) 387-400. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2010.09.015

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4:04 PM | Has Voyager 1 Really Left The Solar System?
Where does the solar system end and interstellar space begin? There are no 'Now Leaving...' signs so it's somewhat subjective. If you think the argument over Pluto was confusing, you'll be intrigued that the argument over the solar system takes that to a whole new level. Two years ago, it was announced that wherever the boundary of the solar system was, Voyager 1 had passed it, traveling further from Earth than any other manmade object. But some scientists insist it is still within the […]
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4:00 PM | An Easier Way To Create Photonic Crystals
Highly purified crystals that split light with uncanny precision are key parts of high-powered lenses, specialized optics and, potentially, computers that manipulate light instead of electricity. Producing these crystals often involves etching them with a precise beam of electrons and can be difficult and expensive. Researchers at Princeton and Columbia universities have proposed a new method that could allow scientists to customize and grow these specialized materials, known as photonic […]
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4:00 PM | The Split Brain: Making Two Hemispheres Whole
Admit it!  You’ve taken one of those online quizzes to see if you’re more “right-brained” or “left-brained.”  Too bad it’s all bunk!    Popular culture would have you believe that creative and artistic people are right-brain dominated, while logical, methodical, and analytical people are left-brain dominated.    The fact of the matter is that you … Continue reading →
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3:55 PM | Babies’ brains practice words long before they can speak
When listening to speech, babies’ brains are active in motor areas required for moving the mouth and tongue in ways that produce words.
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3:28 PM | Babies’ brains practice words long before they can speak
Growth CurveNeuroscience by Laura Sanders 11:55am, July 23, 2014 A one-year-old sits in a brain scanner while researchers record her brain responses to spoken syllables.   Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences/UWNewborn babies arrive as strangers in a strange land. They know nothing of the customs or language of their new mysterious world. Yet astonishingly, with almost no […]
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3:26 PM | Genetic inheritance – is it decision making deficits that are inherited?
There has been a lot of debate in the last thirty – forty years about genetic inheritance – with at least half of children of alcoholic families at risk for later alcoholism. What is less known is what exactly is inherited … Continue reading →
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3:19 PM | Do alcoholics drive through life with Faulty Brakes!
There has been a lot of debate in the last thirty – forty years about genetic inheritance – with at least half of children of alcoholic families at risk for later alcoholism. What is less known is what exactly is inherited in our genes? What marks us out for later alcoholism? Prior to drinking are there aspects […]
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2:53 PM | Valley Fever: The Increased Dangers Of Desert Dust
The rapid rise in valley fever cases in the arid southwest has become a serious health concern, as human habitation has pushed further into desert areas where the soil spores are widespread. Currently, Valley Fever affects an estimated 150,000 people a year, with most cases occurring in Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah. The disease has no cure at present and is tricky to diagnose because it is similar to community-acquired pneumonias.read more
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2:46 PM | How Children Categorize Living Things
How would a child respond to this question? Would his or her list be full of relatives, animals from movies and books, or perhaps neighborhood pets? Would the poppies blooming on the front steps make the list or the oak tree towering over the backyard? How might the animals children name compare to those named by children raised in a different cultural or language background or in a community that offers more direct contact with the natural world?read more
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12:00 PM | Way down south: stumbling across Lepidopa websteri
“Hey Meera, check this out.”Not as powerful or concise as Archimedes’s “Eureka!”, but that was what I said at the moment of discovery – exactly two years ago today! – that led to my newest paper.I have been making regular trips to collect sand crabs on South Padre Island for a few years now (e.g., Murph and Faulkes 2013). A couple of years back, I had a summer intern, Meera (pictured), who was working on the parasites of the local species, Lepidopa […]
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11:58 AM | Another Lawsuit To Suppress Legitimate Criticism – This Time SBM
I suppose it was inevitable. In fact, I’m a bit surprised it took this long. SGU Productions, the Society for Science-based medicine, and I are being sued for an article that I wrote in May of 2013 on Science-Based Medicine. My SBM piece, which was inspired by an article in the LA Times, gave this summary: [...]
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11:54 AM | La Solucion Mineral Milagrosa: un Riesgo a su Salud
Si le gusta el contenido de esta página, por favor considere convertirse en un seguidor de mi blog. Esto se puede hacer yendo a la primera página del blog localizada […]
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10:31 AM | A New Player In Mental Disease
Astrocytes, the cells that make the background of the brain and support neurons, might be behind mental disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, according to new research by a Portuguese team from the ICVS at the University of Minho.  The study, in this month Molecular Psychiatry, shows how a simple reduction of astrocytes in the prefrontal cortex (which is linked to cognition) can kill its neurons and lead to the cognitive deficits that characterise several mental […]
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8:55 AM | What the textbooks don't tell you - one of psychology's most famous experiments was seriously flawed
Zimbardo speaking in '09Conducted in 1971, the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) has acquired a mythical status and provided the inspiration for at least two feature-length films. You'll recall that several university students allocated to the role of jailor turned brutal and the study had to be aborted prematurely. Philip Zimbardo, the experiment's lead investigator, says the lesson from the research is that in certain situations, good people readily turn bad. "If you put good apples into a bad […]

Griggs, R. (2014). Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Textbooks, Teaching of Psychology, 41 (3) 195-203. DOI: 10.1177/0098628314537968

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5:42 AM | Multi-Bit MRAM May Be Better Than Flash Memory
Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is intriguing because of demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM relies on manipulating the magnetization of materials for data storage rather than electronic charges, boasts all of these advantages as an emerging technology, but so far it hasn't been able to match flash memory in terms of storage density.read more
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5:06 AM | J1023 And A 'Transformer' Pulsar
In June of 2013, an exceptional binary containing a rapidly spinning neutron star underwent a dramatic change in behavior never before observed - the pulsar radio beacon vanished and the system brightened fivefold in gamma rays, the most powerful form of light. A binary consists of two stars orbiting around their common center of mass. This system, known as AY Sextantis, is located about 4,400 light-years away in the constellation Sextans. It pairs a 1.7-millisecond pulsar named PSR J1023+0038 […]
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12:00 AM | 92 Percent Of People Eat What They Put On Their Plates
There is a lot of concern about food waste and it may be due to leftovers that never get used but it probably isn't the bulk of Americans - 92 percent of people eat everything. Obviously that can be bad for people in other ways if people put a lot on their plate. "If you put it on your plate, it's going into your stomach," says Cornell University Professor of Marketing Brian Wansink Ph.D.read more

July 22, 2014

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11:30 PM | With Asthma, Thinking They Might Smell Something Harmful Causes Inflammation
A new paper finds that asthmatics who believe that an odor is potentially have increased airway inflammation for at least 24 hours following exposure, which highlights the role that expectations and psychology can play in health-related outcomes. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the lungs. According to the National Institutes of Health, over 25 million Americans have the disease, which can interfere with quality of life. The airways of asthmatics are sensitive to 'triggers' that […]
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10:54 PM | The Live Volcano Of Jeju Island
In Jeju, a place emerging as a world-famous vacation spot with natural tourism resources, a recent study revealed a volcanic eruption occurred on the island. The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) indicated that there are the traces that indicated that a recent volcanic eruption was evident 5,000 years ago. That is the first time to actually find out the date when lava spewed out of a volcano 5,000 years ago in the inland part of the island as well as the one the whole […]
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10:47 PM | When Crazy becomes a Crime
My friend has a glass eye, you would never notice and unless you knew the story you might not think anything of it. His older brother did it. Yes, you […]

Dana Goldman,, John Fastenau,, Riad Dirani,, Eric Hellend,, Geoff Joyce,, Ryan Conrad, & Darius Lakdawalla, (2014). Medicaid Prior Authorization Policies and Imprisonment Among Patients With Schizophrenia, The American Journal of Managed Care, 20 (7) Other:

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