Posts

September 10, 2014

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6:36 PM | Reap What You Sow
While in my fellowship, I became interested in the role of puberty and sex in the progression of kidney disease. I studied this and related sex differences in the renal responses for more than 20 years. Then the NIH would not, could not bring itself to fund my work. My spouse had a new job […]
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3:27 PM | PBS Frontline: The Ebola Outbreak
  # 9060   For those who may have missed the live broadcast last night on PBS’s Frontline, they’ve posted the 30 minute documentary showing conditions in an MSF Ebola hospital in Sierra Leone, and the almost impossible job of contract tracing, on their website http://www.pbs.org. I watched it this morning, and it is a graphic, and somber depiction of the Ebola Outbreak it was in July.  As bad as the conditions shown were, it is far worse today. […]
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1:15 PM | Back to School Suicides
Back to school suicides. No, it’s not the name of the latest band. Worryingly, it is a heavily underreported, and barely understood or investigated, yet wholeheartedly devastating new age phenomenon. Having more than tripled since the 1950s, a recent study may indicate that the rise in youth suicide is strongly linked with attending school, lending […]
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1:15 PM | The unsinkable rubber duck of a myth that bras cause breast cancer
Besides being a researcher and prolific blogger, I still maintain a practice in breast cancer surgery. It’s one of the more satisfying specialties in oncology because, in the vast majority of cases I treat, I can actually remove the cancer and “cure” the patient. (I use the quotes because we generally don’t like to use…
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12:31 PM | ECDC: Ebola Case Definitions
  # 9059   As the West African Ebola epidemic continues unabated, countries around the world must prepare for the possibility that an infected traveler might arrive unannounced on their shores.  Having a working and deployed public health system – and a criteria for identifying infected cases and their potential contacts – greatly limits the potential for any major outbreaks in developed countries.   The CDC has already released, and updated, their […]
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12:00 PM | Return of Results from Next-gen Sequencing
The rapid adoption of next-gen exome and genome sequencing for clinical use (i.e. with patient DNA) raises some difficult questions about the return of results to patients and their families. In contrast to traditional genetic testing, which usually checks for variants in specific genes, high-throughput sequencing has the potential to reveal a number of secondary […]
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11:59 AM | Autism Prevalence Unchanged in 20 Years
That there is an “autism epidemic” is taken as a given by those who feel autism has a dominant environmental cause. The Age of Autism blog, for example, bills itself as a, “Daily Web Newspaper of the Autism Epidemic.” The term “epidemic” also implies an environmental factor, such as an infection. The epidemiology of autism […]
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11:04 AM | How to return to a research career after a break from the lab
The Wellcome Trust Research Career Re-Entry Fellowships (RCREF) support people who want to return to science following a substantial break (2 years or more). Getting back to a career in research is not just a matter of funding, and it may be hard to know where to start. With this in mind, the Trust has created […]
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9:14 AM | Further Integration: The latest update to the MHTF & PLOS Maternal Health Collection
In November 2013, PLOS Medicine and the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) called for submissions to the third year of the MHTF-PLOS Collection on Maternal Health. Today we announce an exciting new update to the Year 3 Collection…The post Further Integration: The latest update to the MHTF & PLOS Maternal Health Collection appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.
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8:57 AM | Andrew Biankin: We need a “We can do this!” attitude to pancreatic cancer
We speak to our pancreatic cancer expert Professor Andrew Biankin about how he's trying to change the picture for people with the disease.
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7:47 AM | ME/CFS: A disease at war with itself
Persuasion Smith shares some thoughts on the stigma that comes with ME/CFS … We can all agree that ME/CFS is a nasty disease, particularly in its severe form, but there are abundant nasty diseases in the world. What is unique and particularly confounding about our disease is that so much controversy surrounds it, and not only surrounds it, but invades it too.  It is not just a case of stigma. Yes, who wants to admit that they have ME/CFS? But then who wants to openly […]
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7:27 AM | The Science of Overpopulation
The Science of Overpopulation Hank talks about the issues of rising global population. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-25aG Credits: Produced by Hank Green Chief Editor: Blake de Pastino Cinematography: Nick Jenkins Video Editor: Matt Ferguson Graphics: AmberRead More »
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1:54 AM | How comparative physiology may save us from mosquitoes
Until now I thought I had come up with enough reasons to dislike mosquitoes, those tiny little blood sucking vectors of disease. With reports of the debilitating mosquito-borne virus chikungunya in the Americas (Carribean), I was ecstatic hear that researchers are working hard to find ways to control mosquito populations. As mentioned in a previous…

September 09, 2014

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11:09 PM | Ebola – the World’s Katrina
To anyone who follows infectious disease outbreaks, it is no great surprise that the most immediate, looming threat, Ebola, has received scant attention until recently. Even now, the world’s response has been incomprehensibly and seemingly irresponsibly slow. Why is this the case? Likely because of disparities in the power and wealth of people affected by [...]
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7:58 PM | Getting your tubes tied at Catholic hospitals: Study reveals OB/GYN frustrations
A new study by UChicago's Debra Stulberg highlights conflicts at Catholic hospitals over common reproductive procedures.
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3:40 PM | Icing on the Cake: Nation's Oldest Medical School Kicks Off Its 250th Birthday Year
The Perelman School of Medicine kicked off its 250th birthday year with a cake-cutting celebration hosted by University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann, PhD, and J. Larry Jameson, MD, PhD, Dean of the Perelman School of Medicine and Executive Vice President, University of Pennsylvania for the Health System, along with...
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2:36 PM | New School Year Brings Old Questions about Autism
Back-to-school shopping, new sneakers and first-day outfits, sharpened pencils and fresh notebooks in oversized backpacks by the door: As a parent, these are the images I’ve come to associate with the start of every school year. But with my 20-plus-year history as a developmental pediatrician specializing in autism at Albert Einstein College of Medicine’s Children’s [...]
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2:11 PM | Is This Right?
Today a new book from Dr. Seuss will hit the stores featuring stories from magazines 60 years ago. Working in pediatrics, Dr. Seuss inspires a lot of stuff around me. Some of our junior artists based their work on his characters as shown below: It took me a minute to realize that this is an […]
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12:22 PM | Has Jack the Ripper Finally Been Solved?
Jack the Ripper is perhaps the most iconic serial killer in history. Part of the mystique of this dark figure is the fact that he was never identified, leaving room for endless sleuthing and speculation. Every Ripper fan has their list of favorite suspects, usually filled with famous and powerful people of the time to [...]
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11:44 AM | NPM14: Because Pandemics Happen
Credit ECDC – 125 years of  Pandemic  History   Note: This is one of a continuing series of preparedness blogs for this year’s National Preparedness Month.  You can search for NPM14 (or last year’s NPM13) to find additional entries. # 9058   While the timing, source, or severity of the next pandemic is unknowable, history tells us that influenza pandemics come along several times each century, making it very likely we will see another […]
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11:00 AM | Spinal Cord Injury and Wearable Robotics
Following a spinal cord injury (SCI), the paramount question in the minds of most patients and their loved ones is: “Will I be able to walk again?” Though there is no simple answer to this question, with advances in medical research and the advent of wearable exoskeletal robotic systems, the hope is that a SCI […]
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10:52 AM | Where did all the pediatric HAIs go?
In keeping with the pediatric theme this week, there is a nice study just published in Pediatrics outlining the general trends in Pediatric HAIs between 2007 and 2012. Stephen Patrick and colleagues from Vanderbilt and Boston Children's Hospital used CDC NHSN data from 173 NICUs and 64 PICUs to track CLABSI, VAP and CAUTI rates.The good news is that CLABSIs declined from 4.9 to 1.5 per 1000 central-line days in the NICU and from 4.7 to 1.0 per 1000 CL-days in the PICU. There were also […]
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10:43 AM | The CDC’s EV-D68 Update Page
    # 9057   Since it first gained national notoriety two weeks ago (see Kansas City Outbreak Identified As HEV 68), the EV-D68 virus has gone from relative obscurity – with mentions relegated to scientific journals or occasional blog posts -  to being the sole topic of a CDC press briefing yesterday.   Late yesterday the CDC unveiled an EV-D68 specific webpage, where we can expect to see updates on this emerging enterovirus as their investigation […]
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10:00 AM | Religious fundamentalists try to prove fetal DNA in vaccines causes autism and fail
There are some myths, bits of misinformation, or lies about medicine that I like to refer to zombie quackery. The reasons are obvious. Like at the end of a horror movie, just when you think the myth is finally dead, its rotting hand rises out of the dirt to grab your leg and drag you…
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9:34 AM | The Science Of REAL Hoverboards
The Science Of REAL Hoverboards Hank gives it to you straight about “anti-gravity technology” — basically, it doesn’t exist. But if you really want to hover, you have options! ———- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check outRead More »
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8:57 AM | Q&A: What it takes to be on an MRC board
It’s that time of year when we open up applications for new members of our boards and panels. Here Professor Moira Whyte, Head of Respiratory Medicine at the University of […]
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7:00 AM | The Reality of Ancient Wisdom: Acupuncture and TCM Weren’t So Great
A mythology has grown up around traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The ancient wisdom of the inscrutable Orient supposedly helped patients in ways that modern science-based medicine fails to understand or appreciate. A typical claim found on the Internet: “The ancient beliefs and practice of traditional Chinese medicine have been healing people for thousands of years.” […]
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4:46 AM | Release of Confronting Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States: Guide for Health Care Sector_Part 1
By Sharon E. ChinThe Institute of Medicine and National Research Council has recently released an abridged version of the 2013 “Confronting Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States” specifically developed for the health care sector. The original, a dense report at 465 pages, was first created to address sexual exploitation and trafficking of minors in the United States by increasing awareness, reviewing current strategies, and providing […]
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2:41 AM | CJASN Activities
Two ASN-related activities to mention happening in the next couple of months. First, CJASN eJC will be hosting a twitter conversation about the recently published commentary "Training the Next Generation's Nephrology Workforce. This will be hosted by Amar Bansal, a fellow at UPenn who is the author of the article. It will take place on September 10th at 9pm and the hastag is #CJASNeJC.The second event is a fellows luncheon at the ASN annual meeting on November 13th from 12.45 to 1.45pm. This is […]

September 08, 2014

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10:40 PM | Free HPV vaccine causes 61% drop in female genital warts in Australia
As I’ve written on many occasions, the HPV quadrivalent vaccine is one of the great achievements of medical science. It protects young men and women against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the USA. There are over 170 subtypes of HPV; however, HPV subtypes 16 and 18 not only cause approximately 70% of cervical cancers, but they are […]Continue reading «Free HPV vaccine causes […]
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