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Posts

April 10, 2014

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10:52 AM | Revisiting Tamiflu Efficacy (Again)
      # 8455   Just over two years ago in The Tamiflu Controversy Continues, we looked at the ongoing debate over the effectiveness of oseltamivir (Tamiflu ®) in the wake of the release of a Cochrane group analysis that found insufficient evidence to show whether the drug reduces influenza complications and transmission.   Three weeks later the CDC responded with a statement on their Have You Heard? website, which published their rationale for continuing to […]
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9:28 AM | NPHW Forum Discusses Path Toward a Healthier America
National health leaders joined APHA earlier this week to discuss the vision of becoming the healthiest nation in one generation.
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7:00 AM | Science Writing Prize 2014: How to write a science feature
The Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize 2014 is open for entries – offering you a chance to win £1000 and see your article in The Guardian or Observer. We know that staring at a blank page can be daunting, so we asked Nicola Davis, commissioning editor for Observer Tech Monthly to share her advice on how […]
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5:13 AM | Decoding Annie Parker - Official Trailer
Algo más sobre la historia real:MARY-CLAIRE KING.Mary-Claire King, Wikipedia
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4:10 AM | Uncertainty versus certainty in the mammography wars
As I write this, I am winging my way home from the 2014 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR, Twitter hashtag #AACR14) in San Diego. (OK, I’m revising this to fit the format and, of course, the Insolence of this particular blog. Shockingly, I didn’t have as much time to blog in…
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3:55 AM | I never knew otters were THAT tough…
An river otter was captured on camera taking on an juvenile alligator…and winning. The battle took place at the Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge in Florida in 2011. More images can be seen on their Facebook page where the images were recently posted, impressive! According to National Geographic, the normal diet of a river otter consists of…

April 09, 2014

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9:07 PM | Males compete all the way to sperm shape
Sexual competition may drive the proteins that make up mammalian spermScicuriousPhysiology,Development by Bethany Brookshire 5:09pm, April 9, 2014 Sexual competition persists long after mating, all the way down to the proteins that put an efficient head on a swimming sperm.cornishman/iStockPhotoRams glare, charge and lock horns. Frogs chorus in a deafening battle of the bands. Two walrus […]
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5:55 PM | Acid-bath stem cell scientist apologizes and appeals
Haruko Obokata, the Japanese scientist at the centre of a controversy over studies purporting to turn mature cells to stem cells simply by bathing them in acid or subjecting them to mechanical stress, today apologized for her errors in the work.  Read more
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3:56 PM | A Conversation with Neil Shubin About “Your Inner Fish,” Premiering Tonight on PBS
A Q&A with biologist Neil Shubin about tonight's television premiere of "Your Inner Fish."
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2:59 PM | MERS, The Twitterverse & MOH Damage Control
  # 8454   A sign of increasing concern among residents of Saudi Arabia is that Arabic social media – in particular twitter – has gone ballistic this morning over the MERS coronavirus.     I’m tracking about 30 new tweets a minute containing the word  كورونا (`SK’ or `Corona’) coming across the transom, many with photos attached.  Before Chrome can auto translate a batch, another […]
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12:48 PM | A Smile Makes A Big Difference
Eleanor Ball, who welcomes patients at the main entrance of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, greets everyone with a smile. “Most people are scared when they come in,” she said. “When they see a smile, it makes a big difference.” A smile is just one component of how...
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12:23 PM | Why Do Cancer Surgeons Cure More Patients Than Medical Oncologists?
    Robert A. Nagourney, M.D.   Who does it really serve when a clinical trial involving 597 patients results in an increase in survival by 10 days?   read more
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12:07 PM | Epstein-Barr virus and the immune system – are cures in sight?
Concluding our story on Epstein-Barr virus and cancer, we explore the ongoing research into the virus and how this could lead to treatments in the future.
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11:59 AM | Reminder: CDC COCA Call On Tickborne Diseases Tomorrow
(Credit CDC) # 8453   Although I announced this more than a week ago, the CDC will hold a COCA call tomorrow afternoon on tickborne diseases, with an emphasis on Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.   While primarily of interest to clinicians, the CDC holds frequent COCA (Clinician Outreach Communication Activity) calls which are designed to ensure that practitioners have up-to-date information for their practices.   If you are unable to attend the […]
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11:55 AM | Another Damning Homeopathy Report
What will it take? That is the lingering question, one that has significant implications for the legitimacy and effectiveness of our professional and regulatory institutions. Homeopathy is 100% pure nonsense. It is one of the so-called “alternative” medical systems that has absolutely no basis in reality. It is magic-based medicine. It is based on two-centuries-old […]
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11:30 AM | Paranoid Schizophrenia and Paradoxical Intervention
Psychotic ideation is delusional and illusory. One cannot simply convey to a psychotic individual that he has a valid perspective. To an extent, it has been traditionally asserted in the field of mental health that one should not affirm the psychotic beliefs of the schizophrenic. Contrarily, some clinicians believe that one should persistently deny the […]
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11:28 AM | Xinhua News: Extensive H5N1 Outbreaks In North Korean Poultry
  # 8452   Although we occasionally get hints of outbreaks of bird flu, or FMD, in North Korea, very rarely do we details out of that closed and secretive nation. Given the amount of bird flu activity (H5N1 & H5N8) we’ve seen reported out of South Korea over the past decade, the assumption has been that unreported bird flu outbreaks probably occur with some regularity in the DPRK as well.   This morning Yonhap News, Xinhua News, and others are reporting on a […]
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10:32 AM | Eyewire: Solving mysteries of the brain through gaming
While some may be familiar with the concept–made famous by Foldit, a pioneer online video puzzle where you “fold” protein as part of a University of Washington research project–the crowd at Bibliotheca Alexandria were blown away by a similar game model: Eyewire, neurology’s first ever computation game, open to laypeople.  Read more
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10:28 AM | Saudi MOH Announces 4 MERS Cases In Riyadh (1 fatal)
  # 8451   Although most of the MERS-CoV reportage the past week has centered around Jeddah (see Saudi MOH Statement On Jeddah Cluster), the Riyadh region continues to provide its share of Coronavirus reports as well.  On April 2nd we saw a report of 2 cases in the Saudi Capital, and overnight the MOH has announced an additional 4 cases there.   Unlike in Jeddah, where some cases have been described as asymptomatic, all four of these cases are serious enough to […]
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8:00 AM | Windback Wednesday: Entrepreneurship
The word entrepreneur comes from the 13th century french verb entreprendre, which literally translates to “to do something” or “to undertake”. By the 16th century, the word entrepreneur had developed a meaning of its own: someone who undertakes a business venture. It’s distinguishing features, according to Richard Cantillon (an 18th century economist), are an understanding of risk and being prepared to do business without guaranteed profits. Sounds scary, but it […]
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7:00 AM | By JoVE, I think they’ve got it!  A multimedia approach to intervention description
Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Mary Dixon-Woods is Professor of Medical Sociology at the University of Leicester. She was recently involved in a large international team that published the TIDieR checklist in the BMJ, aimed at improving the way interventions are described in research papers. Better descriptions of interventions can help ensure better care for patients […]
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3:42 AM | National Public Health Week: Start Here
The theme for National Public Health Week (NPHW) 2014 is Public Health: Start Here.
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12:33 AM | Monthly Map
Ireland looks into dairy cows, the UK eyes synthetic biology, and the Philippines grapples with Bt eggplant. (You want it big? Click the image.)  … Read more

April 08, 2014

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10:21 PM | The Elderly: A neglected population with neglected tropical diseases
According to the World Health Organization, many of the world’s developed countries consider 65 years as the chronological age when people are considered “elderly,” while the United Nations uses the ages of 60 and above.  However, in parts of sub-Saharan …The post The Elderly: A neglected population with neglected tropical diseases appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.
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7:59 PM | My Arch Enemy
Oklahoma is recovering from an outbreak of Escherichia coli which has kept me away from the blog recently. E. coli, as we usually call it, lives all around and in us. A good chunk of that microbiome we keep hearing about includes this bacteria. Most strains happily thrive in our guts, living a perfectly benign […]
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6:40 PM | To live longer, eat 7 servings of fruits and vegetables per day
A paper investigating whether the consumption of fruit and vegetables actually affects health in the general population of England was published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health last week (1). The paper measured health as death due …The post To live longer, eat 7 servings of fruits and vegetables per day appeared first on Public Health.
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5:32 PM | Genetic Predisposition To Liking Amphetamine Reduces Risk Of Schizophrenia And ADHD
A study from UChicago shows that genetic variants associated with enjoying the effects of Adderall are also associated with a reduced risk for developing schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Hart A.B., Gamazon E.R., Engelhardt B.E., Sklar P., Kahler A.K., Hultman C.M., Sullivan P.F., Neale B.M., Faraone S.V. & de Wit H. & Genetic variation associated with euphorigenic effects of d-amphetamine is associated with diminished risk for schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI:

Citation
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5:30 PM | The National Autism Association not “antivaccine”? Then why is its president speaking at an antivaccine quackfest?
As I hang out at the San Diego Convention Center, I can’t resist one last note on the Chili’s debacle that I wrote about yesterday. Remember how Wendy Fournier, president of the National Autism Association (NAA), the antivaccine group posing as an autism advocacy group, whined when Chili’s backed out of its deal to donate…
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4:19 PM | Just the Fats: What’s New? What’s Old?
With the Mediterranean diet all the rage, not only because consumers like its tasty composition but because of research touting its health benefits, experts have had to become more specific about recommendations for fats. There’s a steady drumbeat these days—from everyone from chefs to food writers to health gurus—criticizing nutritionists and the “diet police,” who, [...]
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3:25 PM | Saudi MOH Statement On Jeddah Cluster
    # 8450 Amid escalating media reports on the cluster of MERS cases in Jeddah, and the recent announced closure of the King Fahd Hospital Emergency Room (see More MERS-CoV Reports From Jeddah), the Saudi MOH has released a lengthy press release detailing their response, and reassuring the public that the situation is `stable’.   Among the points made:   The closure of the King Fahd Hospital ER is for 24 hours, for disinfection purposes. […]
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