Posts

August 20, 2014

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9:40 PM | Electroacupuncture prevents the post-meal rise in blood sugar
A new study published in  AJP-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology suggests that electroacupuncture to the abdominal region may prevent increases in blood sugar concentrations after a meal by affecting insulin sensitivity and circulating free fatty acid concentrations.  Granted this is not comparative physiology research, I find it interesting that electrical stimulation can have such a large impact…
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6:23 PM | NHC: Watching The Tropics
NHC 5 Day Experimental Outlook   # 8979   With the caveat that this is 5-day experimental outlook, and that it is far to early in the game to begin thinking about what areas of the United States might be impacted, the National Hurricane Center has nonetheless increased the odds that a disturbance now approaching the Windward Islands will organize into a tropical cyclone to 60% over the next 5 days.   TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER […]
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5:01 PM | WHO Ebola Update – August 20th
  # 8979   The World Health Organization has just released their latest Ebola update, covering cases reported between Aug 17th-18th, and with it comes the biggest 2-day jump in numbers that we’ve seen to date.    We’ve known for some time that the numbers being posted were likely undercounts, and with more resources making it into the region over the past two weeks, this huge jump may – in part – simply reflect improvements in local […]
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4:38 PM | FAO: Animal Health `Weak link’ In Preventing Human Diseases
Source CDC – How Ebola likely jumped to humans     # 8978   Although we’ll never know the exact route of its spillover, the Ebola outbreak tragedy in West Africa likely began when a bat (or perhaps some other small forest mammal), passed the virus on to some kind of bushmeat animal, which was then captured, killed and consumed by a human.    MERS-CoV, which has killed hundreds in the Middle East, likely also originated in bats, and moved on to […]
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4:17 PM | Video Post – 5 Tools Everyone Should Own
In today’s video post, I talk about 5 tools everyone should own to assist in daily maintenance and recovery of their bodies – specifically their muscles, which can get very tight from non-deal lifestyle factors, sports, or training. Be sure to go to Science for Fitness’ YouTube channel and subscribe if you haven’t already.
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3:07 PM | Peak Zone
In June 1958, 17-year-old Edson Arantes do Nascimento, better known as Pelé, arrived in Stockholm with the rest …
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3:02 PM | Barðarbunga Update & Webcams
Source Icelandic Met Office    # 8977   Two days ago, in Iceland: Watching Bárðarbunga,  I wrote about the swarm of (mostly small) earthquakes close to Iceland’s second tallest volcano, and the raising of the aviation warning status for the volcano to Orange. Monday morning saw the largest quake – an M4.5 – but since then well over a thousand smaller quakes have continued to rumble. Yesterday, local authorities – out of an […]
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2:30 PM | A summer of learning and research
With summer ending, we take a closer look at a group of high school summer interns and their experiences learning fundamental lab techniques and research methods in various labs on our Lake Nona campus.
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1:48 PM | Hong Kong Launches Ebola Preparedness & Response Plan
  #8976   Although there have been dozens of suspected Ebola infected travelers tested in countries outside of Africa, thus far, none of them have tested positive for the virus. Although I’m not attempting to keep track all of these media reports, for the best day-to-day coverage, I would highly recommend checking in with Crofsblog several times a day.    Despite our current lucky streak, governments around the world are understandably preparing for the day […]
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1:28 PM | The Discoverability Challenge – How Can We Make Research Data Easier to Find and Use?
Enhancing the discoverability of public health and epidemiology research data is a key to ensuring that it gets more widely used. This was the topic of a recent workshop hosted by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, where researchers and data experts explored the findings of a recent Wellcome Trust report on data […]
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1:10 PM | Dr. Frank Arguello doesn’t much like science-based criticism of his atavistic chemotherapy
As I happened to be out last night at a function for my department, I didn’t have the time necessary to lay out a 2,000 word bit of Insolence. I did, however, have time to note that yet another practitioner unhappy with being criticized over his scientifically questionable treatment, in this case, Dr. Frank Arguello,…
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12:09 PM | Vitamin K Refusal – The New Anti-Vax
A small but increasing number of parents are refusing vitamin K injections for their newborns, an intervention recommended since 1961. This is yet another example of the difference between a science-based and philosophy-based approach to medicine. Science has given us the tool of knowledge, and in medicine that knowledge can have very practical applications. The […]
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11:38 AM | PNAS: A Vaccine Evading Variant Poliovirus
Photo Credit WHO   # 8975   For those born after 1960, it is probably difficult to understand the kind of fear that Polio generated in the United States and around the world during the 1950s.  While only one infection in a hundred resulted in paralysis or death, polio was extremely infectious, and the United States routinely saw between 18,000 and 25,000 paralytic cases each year – mostly among young children.   Hospital wards were filled with paralyzed […]
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11:00 AM | Thinking Slow About Thinking Fast – Part III – The Monty Hall Problem
To wrap our minds around human behavior it’s helpful to consider why certain behaviors may have evolved. Natural selection tells us that behaviors that increase our chances of passing along our genes will continue to show up in future generations. It therefore follows that aspects of our behavioral tendencies at some point likely conferred an […]
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10:15 AM | The Science of Depression
The Science of Depression What’s going on inside of a depressed person? Watch ‘Do Dogs Get Depressed?’: http://bit.ly/1pb2GZi Get Your FREE Audiobook: http://bit.ly/XIcZpz SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 —Links to follow us below— Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1fjWszw Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71 Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF Vine: Search […]
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9:24 AM | Bob Marley, genomics, and a rare form of melanoma
Our researchers in Manchester are using the power of DNA technology to study the genetic faults in the rare type of melanoma that killed Bob Marley.
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9:18 AM | CDC Interim Ebola Guidance: Environmental Infection Control In Hospitals
Credit CDC PHIL     # 8974     The CDC continues to roll out new interim guidance documents for health care professionals and facilities that at some point may be called upon to deal with an imported Ebola case in the United States.  As always, these are `works in progress’, and are subject to revision over time as more is learned about dealing with this virus.   Although laboratory experiments have shown that the Ebola virus can remain viable on […]
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7:31 AM | New Exercise Study Brings Both Illumination and Questions
Simon McGrath looks at new objective evidence of abnormal response to exercise in ME/CFS patients, and the questions that researchers are still trying to answer … Exercise testing at Dr. Keller’s lab Given the doubt, scepticism and even denial of benefits that often confronts ME/CFS patients, it’s not surprising that many patients crave clear-cut, objective evidence of physiological problems in the illness. Preferably something that will explain at least some of the […]
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7:00 AM | Blood lust and the mosquito
Today is World Mosquito Day, marking the 1897 discovery by the British doctor, researcher and military officer Sir Ronald Ross that the female Anopheles mosquito spreads malaria. Here our senior […]

August 19, 2014

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8:29 PM | Human Trafficking and Healthcare: A Historical Perspective
By: Jeffrey J. Barrows, D.O., M.A. In a landmark article on child abuse entitled "The Battered Child Syndrome" published in July of 1962 in JAMA, Dr. Henry Kempe and his coauthors attempted to estimate the incidence of child abuse in America. A survey of 71 hospitals uncovered 302 cases. At the same time, they surveyed 77 District Attorneys who had knowledge of 447 cases across the country. While certainly not a scientific nationwide survey, this article represented the best estimation of child […]
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7:25 PM | Taking lab mice back to their roots
Wild traits are bred back into lab mice, revealing a new gene function on the way ScicuriousBiomedicine by Bethany Brookshire 4:12pm, August 19, 2014 This wild mouse has some behaviors, such as aggression toward other mouse pups, that aren’t present in its soft, docile lab counterpart. A new study shows that breeding lab mice back to the wild could uncover new […]
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5:01 PM | Sanford-Burnham announces next CEO
Sanford-Burnham's Board of Trustees today announced that it has appointed Perry Nisen, M.D., Ph.D., as chief executive officer. Dr. Nisen joins Sanford-Burnham from pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline.
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4:32 PM | How a microscopic ‘pump’ could get drugs into cancer cells
We explore a new US study that could be used to help spot where tumours are in the body and deliver drugs to cancer cells more efficiently.
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4:07 PM | Why the ice bucket challenge is different
When something starts to show up enough on your Facebook or Twitter feed, you get sick of it. I get it. The ALS ice bucket challenge is now so big that TV news shows, while reading tweets to fill time …The post Why the ice bucket challenge is different appeared first on Public Health.
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3:30 PM | NPPTL N95 Day Webinar: Respirator Preparedness in Healthcare
  # 8973     A follow up to yesterday’s post (CDC Guidance: Donning & Removing PPEs), two weeks from this coming Friday (Sept 5th), NIOSH and NPPTL (The National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory) will hold a webinar designed for Health care workers on Respirator Preparedness as part of their annual  N95 day promotion.   For details on how to register (attendance is limited), and for more on other N95 day activities, here are some excerpts from […]
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3:17 PM | Ebola: What if? How worried should we be?
The current Ebola outbreak, the largest ever for this virus, is far from under control. We asked infectious disease specialist Emily Landon, MD, hospital epidemiologist, to help us determine the appropriate level of anxiety.
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2:31 PM | Nutrition Lessons in the Bronx: “What Would LeBron James Eat?”
When I was a child, one of my favorite sugary snacks was basically a small vat of frosting. It came with cookies for dunking. I won’t lie; some of that stuff is delicious, but with help from my family and what I learned in school, I came to appreciate healthier alternatives. No question, it seems [...]
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2:30 PM | What are the most common marathon training injuries?
We spoke to sports medicine specialist Ryan Hudson, MD, recently about the most common injuries facing runners preparing for a marathon, how to prevent them, and how to tell if it’s something serious, or something you can push through for the big race.
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12:54 PM | VDU Blog: How To Support Ebola Relief Efforts
    # 8972   Dr. Ian Mackay has just posted a blog on how you can help to get PPEs and other needed supplies to those on the front lines battling the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa.   I’ll not delay you any further, and simply ask that you go visit – and then take to heart – his appeal.     Protect the healthcare workers>>save lives>>stop Ebola virus disease
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12:33 PM | The Reid Technique of Investigation
If you like crime dramas, you have probably seen this countless times. The officer interrogating a suspect chums up to them, says they understand, and then offers them a face-saving version of guilt to which they can confess. It’s compelling drama. What is being depicted is known as the Reid Technique, developed by John Reid [...]
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