Posts

December 12, 2014

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1:21 PM | Image of the Week: Prof John O’Keefe receives his Nobel Prize
The image of the week is Professor John O’Keefe, being awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which he shares with Edvard Moser and May-Britt Moser. The Wellcome Trust has supported O’Keefe’s work for over ten years and he is Director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour. The Nobel Laureates […]
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12:39 PM | Egyptian Media: 16th H5N1 Case Of Year
  # 9433   The bird flu situation in Egypt continues to evolve, with many suspected cases being tested (most of whom turn out negative), and the occasional positive result.  According to multiple media sources, overnight the MOH announced their 16th case of the year – that of a 16 month old toddler who is reportedly in stable condition – in addition to announcing the death of a teacher yesterday.    Although still less than half of the totals we […]
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11:23 AM | How Knowledge Sharing Moves Countries Towards UHC
Stefan Nachuk, Amanda Folsom, and Nathaniel Otoo are members of the Joint Learning Network for Universal Health Coverage (JLN). The JLN provides a forum for countries to learn from one another and work together towards achieving UHC. As the global … Continue reading »The post How Knowledge Sharing Moves Countries Towards UHC appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.
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10:19 AM | Behind the picture: New microscope tech that’s as good as gold
Christmas decoration? Modern art? Anything to do with science at all? Of course it is. As well as being pretty to look at, this little grid full of holes could […]
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10:00 AM | “I want to make sure that radiotherapy is accessible to everyone” – Elizabeth’s story
Cancer Campaigns Ambassador Elizabeth Bailey shares her personal story of breast cancer and why she campaigns for Government to improve access to radiotherapy.
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8:26 AM | Homotoxicology
What you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and […]
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6:42 AM | The flu shot isn’t a good match this year. Is it ever?
The CDC announced recently that this year’s flu vaccine is missing a key strain, one that accounts for 48% of what’s circulating. That strain, a “drifted” version of H3N2, was discovered in March 2014, but the vaccine strains for the … Continue reading »The post The flu shot isn’t a good match this year. Is it ever? appeared first on Public Health.

December 11, 2014

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10:28 PM | Coffee Science: Stimulating Knowledge!
ByThe Toombst Let’s skip research about cancer and brain diseases and handle a more stimulating subject. coffee science! What makes the black hot beverage have its effect and how does it affect your health and your brain. Coffee the most widely used central nervous system stimulant worldwide. People drink it to stave off sleep and keep focus even though they might have built up a resistance to those positive effects already. Caffeine is found naturally in plants, one being the coffee […]
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10:00 PM | Gardasil prevents cancer–does not lead to risky sexual activity
There are really few ways to keep your children from contracting cancer. Make sure they don’t smoke. Keep them out of the sun. Watch their weight and maintain it at healthy levels. Don’t let them near radiation. And vaccinate them against human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes over 5% of the cancers world wide. Gardasil, which is now […]Continue reading «Gardasil prevents cancer–does not lead to risky sexual activity»
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9:27 PM | BOOK REVIEW: Disability & The Good Human Life (2014)
What constitutes the good human life? This is one of philosophy’s oldest questions, employed towards dialogues of moral obligation, civic virtue, distribution of happiness, as well as issues of social policy and human rights. Historically, the topic of disability has … Continue reading →
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9:01 PM | The world will end in 2050 because...resistance
UK Prime Minister David Cameron requested a review of the health and economic burden of antimicrobial resistance in July. Quicker than you can say supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, economist Jim O'Neill has delivered his report and the results are surprising (at least for those who don't follow this blog). Utilizing commissioned studies from KPMG and Rand Europe, the Review estimates that the economic losses attributable to antimicrobial resistance will total $100 trillion and 10 million […]
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8:20 PM | More powerful cancer-preventing Gardasil vaccine cleared by FDA
Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the USA. There are more than 40 HPV sub-types that can infect the genital areas of males and females. Additionally, some HPV types can also infect the mouth and throat. HPV is generally transmitted from personal contact during vaginal, anal or oral sex. HPV is linked to cancers […]Continue reading «More powerful cancer-preventing Gardasil vaccine cleared by […]
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7:32 PM | Waterboarding the Brain – The Neural Effects of Enhanced Interrogation Techniques
The Question of Morality vs. The Question of Efficacy The recent Senate Intelligence Committee report detailing the CIA’s use of enhanced interrogation techniques (EITs) like waterboarding has reinvigorated debate over the appropriateness of such methods for counterterrorism efforts. Many protest the use of EITs on moral or legal grounds, citing the inhumanity of the physical […]
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7:26 PM | Immune system unleashed: Immunotherapy shows promise for some of the toughest cancers
What if our immune system could be mobilized to attack a tumor in the same way it fights the common cold or fends off an infection? Cancer experts at UChicago are leading the way in unleashing the body's ability to fight back.
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7:16 PM | Candy Cane 11: Are we leaping (like the lords) to conclusions?
 December 11 - Managing Information and/or Managing Data I admit that I struggle greatly with how easily we librarians interchangeably use the terms information and data. I believe that there are significant differences between managing information and managing data. I also think that our history, professionally, is in the former more than the latter. That said, […]
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7:00 PM | Guest post: Claims of a cure for cancer? Ask For Evidence
Early career researcher Lydia Le Page blogs about Sense About Science’s new initiative, ‘Ask For Evidence’.
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5:55 PM | Believe it or not, sugar doesn’t cause hyperactivity
Despite widespread belief in the myth that sugar causes hyperactivity, scientists have known for more than two decades that the link is all in the mind.Read the rest of this post at the Big Think.
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5:54 PM | Is This the Most Misleading Image in Neuroscience?
One image has had an incalculable effect on policy around the world, but is it even remotely representative of what happens in the real world? Children who have been neglected can look forward to a more positive… Read the rest of this post at the Big Think.
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5:38 PM | What's New: #ISpyPhysiology
The last day or so I have engaged with other members of the American Physiological Society's (APS henceforth) Communication Committee. We kicked around all sorts of ideas for improving outreach to the non-physiologist world, as well as continuing internal communication in an effective manner. Since I had my twitter feed open during the meeting, I […]
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4:55 PM | A conference to keep cancer on the political agenda
We look over the key political announcements made at this year's Britain Against Cancer conference - including treatments, early diagnosis, prevention and more.
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4:15 PM | Salmonella enteritidis Outbreak in US
A few thoughts on the outbreak of (possibly) bean sprout-associated Salmonella enteritidis infections in multiple states of USA.
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3:52 PM | Informed Consent in Comparative Effectiveness Research
“Standard of care” research (also known as “comparative effectiveness” research) is a design that compares two therapies in routine use to determine which has greater benefits or fewer risks. All institutions that perform this research, including Albert Einstein College of Medicine and its University Hospital, Montefiore Medical Center, face questions about how to handle patient [...]
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3:31 PM | Severe Flu Season in the US: Too early to call for antivirals?
The CDC came out with a press release last week which expressed the fear that the US was destined to face a severe season of influenza in the upcoming few months. It is still early on in the influenza season and the disease activity is low in the US at this point of time, but…
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2:53 PM | Breast Cancer Drug Tamoxifen Reduces Cancer Rates
ByThe Toombst New evidence finds that the breast cancer drug tamoxifen reduces breast cancer rates by nearly 30% over at least 20 years. Tamoxifen is a common breast cancer drug. Used to treat breast cancer by blocking the estrogen receptor on cancer cells. This action prevents hormone dependent breast cancer from growing and spreading throughout the body. Attacking the cancer this way is very efficient, the threat against it comes from mutations that makes it possible for the cancer to grow […]
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2:53 PM | Breast Cancer Drug Tamoxifen Reduces Cancer Rates
ByThe Toombst New evidence finds that the breast cancer drug tamoxifen reduces breast cancer rates by nearly 30% over at least 20 years. Tamoxifen is a common breast cancer drug. Used to treat breast cancer by blocking the estrogen receptor on cancer cells. This action prevents hormone dependent breast cancer from growing and spreading throughout the body. Attacking the cancer this way is very efficient, the threat against it comes from mutations that makes it possible for the cancer to grow […]
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2:00 PM | Elegy for Rural Community Hospitals
In a pattern being repeated across the country, the Boothbay, Maine peninsula’s hospital has been shuttered, and the communities just lost their bid to even have a 24 hour urgent care on the peninsula. Citing financial need—which has been disputed—Lincoln County Healthcare (LCH), part of MaineHealth, closed St. Andrews Hospital, a critical access hospital (CAH), [...]
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1:51 PM | Sierra Leone To Impose 2-Week Regional `Lockdown’
Credit CDC # 9432     Two months ago the `official’ WHO tallies showed Sierra Leone trailing far behind Liberia (2304 to 3696) in total Ebola cases, but since then we’ve seen Sierra Leone catch up and pull ahead in the case count.   From the most recent WHO assessment: Sierra Leone EVD transmission remains intense in Sierra Leone, with 397 new confirmed cases reported in the week to 7 December (3 times as many as Guinea and Liberia combined). The […]
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1:41 PM | Another Terrible Anti-Consumer Health Bill
On the desk of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is a bill that would protect doctors practicing substandard medicine from being investigated by the Office of Professional Medical Conduct. The bill is similar to one unfortunately passed in Connecticut a few years ago – it is meant to protect doctors who prescribe long and recurring [...]
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1:36 PM | Sequencing Kids’ Exomes: More Good News
“Exome” hasn’t yet entered the normal lexicon, like genome has. Yesterday, for example, I wore my clinical exome T-shirt from Ambry Genetics to Zumba class, and a woman came up and peered at my chest. “What the heck is that? What … Continue reading »The post Sequencing Kids’ Exomes: More Good News appeared first on DNA Science Blog.
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12:38 PM | An Avian Flu Assessment From The Chinese Academy of Sciences
Credit FAO # 9431   Although the Chinese press can often be faulted for selective reporting, since the emergence of the H7N9 virus two years ago we’ve seen some refreshingly straightforward talk coming out of China’s scientific community.    Unlike with the SARS epidemic of 2003, we’ve seen rapid publication of avian flu papers – both in Chinese and International journals – and a willingness to point out some of the policies (live bird […]
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