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April 11, 2014

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12:09 AM | What does the new Tamiflu data really tell us?
Does Tamiflu have any meaningful effects on the prevention or treatment of influenza? Considering the drug’s been on the market for almost 15 years, and is widely used, you should expect this question has been answered after 15 flu seasons. Answering this question from a science-based perspective requires three steps: Consider prior probability, be systematic […]

Jefferson T., Jones M., Doshi P., Spencer E.A., Onakpoya I. & Heneghan C.J. (2014). Oseltamivir for influenza in adults and children: systematic review of clinical study reports and summary of regulatory comments, BMJ, 348 (apr09 2) g2545-g2545. DOI:

Freemantle N., Shallcross L.J., Kyte D., Rader T. & Calvert M.J. (2014). Oseltamivir: the real world data, BMJ, 348 (apr09 2) g2371-g2371. DOI:

Citation
Editor's Pick

April 10, 2014

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9:53 PM | Saudi MOH Announces 3 More MERS-CoV Cases In Jeddah
  # 8458   While the Saudi Twitterverse has been rife with (unconfirmed) rumors of additional MERS cases (see yesterday’s MERS, The Twitterverse & MOH Damage Control) over the past 24 hours, we have an announcement late this afternoon from the Saudi MOH confirming three more cases from Jeddah.   Few details are provided, so we don’t know exactly how – epidemiologically speaking - these cases fit into the previously announced outbreak (see Saudi MOH […]
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9:47 PM | CRTKL Follow-up: The Videos You Didn’t Get to See
First of all, I want to thank everyone who came to the “Critical Reasoning Tool Kit Lecture” last night at McGill University. I received great feedback from the people who came to see me afterwards and it was particularly stimulating for me to be talking about critical thinking to people outside of the usual local … Continue reading →
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9:47 PM | Former NIH stem-cell chief joins New York foundation
Stem-cell biologist Mahendra Rao, who resigned last week as director of the US National Institutes of Health’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), has a new job. On April 9, he was appointed vice-president for regenerative medicine at the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), a non-profit organization that funds embryonic stem cell research.  Read more
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9:30 PM | Sometimes, what we suffer from is bigger than we think
There was a time when the makers of Tamiflu (oseltamivir) ran ads with the tagline "sometimes, what we suffer from is bigger than we think" urging folks to see their doctor for viral URIs and get treatment for the influenza.  Now, however, I think the tagline is perfect for describing the predicament clinicians, public health officials and governments are in when trying to decide what to do with neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) for influenza prevention and treatment. […]
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8:22 PM | BiotechDueDiligence Reading List
A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad ScienceCompound InterestHow to tell if a merger rumor will come trueCraig Silverman (Quartz) [...]
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7:33 PM | The CDC Responds To The Cochrane Tamiflu Study
Photo Credit CDC   # 8457   Earlier today, in Revisiting Tamiflu Efficacy (Again), I wrote at some length on the BMJ –  Cochrane Library review Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children – that examined a subset of the scientific literature and cast doubt on its effectiveness in treating influenza. While I too lamented the lack of solid, well mounted Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) proving the […]
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7:14 PM | Cerebrovascular physiology – article alert #73
Brain injury 360- Relationship of Vascular Wall Tension and Autoregulation Following Traumatic Brain Injury – Varsos et al. Exercise and the brain 361- Cerebral blood flow and neurovascular coupling during static exercise – Yamaguchi et al. Anesthesia and the brain 362- Impact of sevoflurane anesthesia on brain oxygenation in children younger than 2 years – […]
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6:05 PM | University of Chicago Faculty Named Guggenheim Fellows
Medical ethicist Lainie Ross and geneticist Joe Thornton were among 177 scholars to receive 2014 Guggenheim Fellowships.
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5:45 PM | The American Way
Today in one of my feeds, someone asked why a woman's employer should pay for her birth control. Seems if we ladies want to make the beast with two backs without creating new little beasts, we should be ready to put up our own funds for the privilege. When you get right down to it, […]
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4:00 PM | DNA nanobots perform in living cockroach
The six million dollar man has nothing on these cockroaches. We can rebuild them, better than they were before. We have the technology, and as it turns out, we do! […]
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3:56 PM | “Recombinant Gold”
My review of Nicolas Rasmussen’s latest book Gene Jockeys got the “cover” of the Nature Spring Books issue!
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2:51 PM | Why Hepatitis C Is Vastly Underreported
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) continues to be the number one cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and the primary indicator for liver transplantation in the United States, yet it remains vastly underdiagnosed. More than three million people in the U.S. are infected. Guidelines support widespread screening for HCV, and excellent treatments are now available. So [...]
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2:00 PM | As gene therapy technologies blossom, ddRNAi tries to take root
Before there was Twitter, there was Facebook, and before that, Friendster. And who can forget MySpace? There’s a similar trend of successive usurping technologies in the fast-moving quest to develop therapeutics capable of modifying the genome. Since the late nineties, we’ve witnessed the rise of several gene-silencing approaches, from “antisense” oligonucleotides and RNA interference (RNAi) to the latest targeted genome-editing techniques, such as those based on zinc […]
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2:00 PM | Promoting Scientific Publications from Authors Overseas
PLOS NTDs Deputy Editor Daniel Bausch reflects on a Manuscript Writing Workshop recently conducted in Lima, Peru. On February 19, 2014, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases and the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene held a manuscript writing workshop in …The post Promoting Scientific Publications from Authors Overseas appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.
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1:21 PM | It just makes sense....
No summary available for this post.
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1:15 PM | Entrepreneurship with Steve Blank
In this month’s Windback Wednesday series, we’re exploring entrepreneurship: how to brush up on your business skills, where to get venture capital funding and more. In this podcast, I speak to Steve Blank, an associate professor at Stanford University engineering school, a lecturer at UC Berkeley Haas Business School, Columbia Business School and the University of California in San Fransisco (UCSF). On top of all of that, he is also a thought leader of […]
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12:36 PM | Call the Midwife Evokes Cystic Fibrosis in a Simpler Time
Previous posts bashing SyFy’s Helix and Dan Brown’s Inferno might suggest that I’m hypercritical of TV and films. Happily, the third season premiere of BBC’s excellent Call the Midwife shows that it is indeed possible to get the science right while telling a compelling story, without special effects and nonsensical intrigue.… Read the restThe post Call the Midwife Evokes Cystic Fibrosis in a Simpler Time appeared first on DNA Science Blog.
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12:00 PM | New evidence, same conclusion: Tamiflu only modestly useful for influenza
Does Tamiflu have any meaningful effects on the prevention or treatment of influenza? Considering the drug’s been on the market for almost 15 years, and is widely used, you should expect this question has been answered after 15 flu seasons. Answering this question from a science-based perspective requires three steps: Consider prior probability, be systematic […]
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11:14 AM | WHO MERS-CoV Update KSA & UAE – April 10th
Photo Credit NIAID     # 8456   The World Health Organization has posted an update on the MERS coronavirus, with details on 5 recent cases (4 from Saudi Arabia, 1 from the UAE).  The two cases from Jeddah are part of a much larger event (see Saudi MOH Statement On Jeddah Cluster) which has received considerable attention over the past couple of days, and additional case information is expected.     Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus […]
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11:03 AM | NECSS 2014
I will be at NECSS this weekend – the Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism, in New York City. This is an excellent conference full of science and critical thinking lectures and panels. My podcast, the SGU, will be recording a live show on stage Saturday. I will also be running two 1-hour workshops on [...]
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10:52 AM | Revisiting Tamiflu Efficacy (Again)
      # 8455   Just over two years ago in The Tamiflu Controversy Continues, we looked at the ongoing debate over the effectiveness of oseltamivir (Tamiflu ®) in the wake of the release of a Cochrane group analysis that found insufficient evidence to show whether the drug reduces influenza complications and transmission.   Three weeks later the CDC responded with a statement on their Have You Heard? website, which published their rationale for continuing to […]
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9:28 AM | NPHW Forum Discusses Path Toward a Healthier America
National health leaders joined APHA earlier this week to discuss the vision of becoming the healthiest nation in one generation.
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7:00 AM | Science Writing Prize 2014: How to write a science feature
The Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize 2014 is open for entries – offering you a chance to win £1000 and see your article in The Guardian or Observer. We know that staring at a blank page can be daunting, so we asked Nicola Davis, commissioning editor for Observer Tech Monthly to share her advice on how […]
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5:13 AM | Decoding Annie Parker - Official Trailer
Algo más sobre la historia real:MARY-CLAIRE KING.Mary-Claire King, Wikipedia
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4:10 AM | Uncertainty versus certainty in the mammography wars
As I write this, I am winging my way home from the 2014 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR, Twitter hashtag #AACR14) in San Diego. (OK, I’m revising this to fit the format and, of course, the Insolence of this particular blog. Shockingly, I didn’t have as much time to blog in…
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3:55 AM | I never knew otters were THAT tough…
An river otter was captured on camera taking on an juvenile alligator…and winning. The battle took place at the Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge in Florida in 2011. More images can be seen on their Facebook page where the images were recently posted, impressive! According to National Geographic, the normal diet of a river otter consists of…

April 09, 2014

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9:07 PM | Males compete all the way to sperm shape
Sexual competition may drive the proteins that make up mammalian spermScicuriousPhysiology,Development by Bethany Brookshire 5:09pm, April 9, 2014 Sexual competition persists long after mating, all the way down to the proteins that put an efficient head on a swimming sperm.cornishman/iStockPhotoRams glare, charge and lock horns. Frogs chorus in a deafening battle of the bands. Two walrus […]
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5:55 PM | Acid-bath stem cell scientist apologizes and appeals
Haruko Obokata, the Japanese scientist at the centre of a controversy over studies purporting to turn mature cells to stem cells simply by bathing them in acid or subjecting them to mechanical stress, today apologized for her errors in the work.  Read more
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4:00 PM | More BIG News for Spinal Cord Injuries
It seems like lately we have been reporting left and right about people suffering from paralysis, and for good reason! Today I’m happy to report even more new research that […]
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