Posts

July 21, 2014

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8:45 PM | Our Most Important Social Media Metric: You.
Social media has been around for about two decades now, believe it or not. The concept of it dates back all the way to 1994, with the now largely defunct GeoCities — which most of the technologically-inclined members of my generation used to build at least one very, very ugly...
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8:10 PM | Victim Services: the Federal Strategic Action Plan on Services for Victims of Human Trafficking in the U.S.
By Sharon E. ChinIn January 2014, the Obama Administration released a Federal Strategic Action Plan in response to the President’s address of human trafficking at the Clinton Global Initiative in 2012. While there has been a large effort legally to protect victims and prosecute traffickers via the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA), there has been a disproportionately smaller focus on victim aftercare services. More specifically, safe houses for survivors of human trafficking […]
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3:55 PM | An Interview with Donald Steiner, Diabetes Researcher and 2014 UChicago Alumni Medalist
Steiner has won international acclaim for his discoveries on the biosynthesis of insulin, a key hormone in controlling blood sugar and its utilization.
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3:55 PM | Serial Passage Of H5N2 In Mice
  # 8854   Influenza viruses are prolific, but sloppy, replicators.  They make millions of copies of themselves inside every host, but in the process, often make small transcription errors – amino acid substitutions – that can change the way the replicated virus acts.  Often, these changes are of little or no effect, or are even detrimental to the survival of the virus. Those that favor replication in the host, however, tend to carry on to produce […]
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2:27 PM | 1st Altmetric conference - Sept 25/26th in London
I've been a user of Altmetric for a while now and very much like what they are doing with article metrics. I'm sure many Core Genomics readers will also have seen the Altmetric badge on their own papers. Now Altmetric are hosting their first conference.The meeting aims to demonstrate how users are integrating Altmetric tools into their processes. Hopefully they'll cover lots of interesting topics and spend some time talking about how the community can keep tools like Altmetric from becoming […]
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1:48 PM | WWTPs As `Mixing Vessels’ For Resistant Bacteria
Photo Credit USGS – Wastewater: The Primary Treatment Process 1. Screening 2. Pumping 3. Aerating 4. Removing sludge 5. Removing Scum 6. killing bacteria     # 8853   While it is not a scientifically recognized law, as is Boyle’s or Torricelli’s, all too often the Law of Unintended Consequences (LUC) seems equally immutable and pervasive in the universe.  For every action, we often see an unanticipated, and usually negative, reaction (almost […]
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1:00 PM | “Oh no! What happened?” “W220.2XD: Walked into lamppost, subsequent encounter.”
Last week, I ran across this very entertaining piece over in Healthcare Dive about the new ICD-10 codes. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is an incredibly useful tool in public health that basically can reduce an injury to …The post “Oh no! What happened?” “W220.2XD: Walked into lamppost, subsequent encounter.” appeared first on Public Health.
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12:56 PM | Introducing CELSIUS, our new weekly science trivia quiz
July 21 quiz
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12:21 PM | Moon Hoax Anomaly Hunting
Yesterday, July 20th, was the 45th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the surface of the moon, and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin becoming the first and second humans to walk on the surface of another world. This is, to be sure, one of the greatest achievements of the human species. There are those, however, [...]
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11:30 AM | Optogenetics: An understanding and mastery of brain function
Written by William Godfrey and Christopher Weir.   Before we get into the article, I would first like to welcome the newest addition to our writing team here at Mostly Science, William Godfrey. Will and I are both alumni of the University of Queensland, which is where he went to the T.C. Berne School of […] The post Optogenetics: An understanding and mastery of brain function appeared first on MostlyScience.
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11:00 AM | Switching On Hearing
It’s an iconic and powerful photo. The face of a young child, born deaf, hearing sounds for the first time. Jack Bradley, photojournalist from the Peoria Journal Star, captured the exact moment a doctor fitted five year old Harold Whittles … Continue reading →
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11:00 AM | “Aversive” therapy for autism and developmental disorders?
Ever since I started paying attention to quackery, in particular quackery used on autistic children, I’ve come across some bizarre articles. Of course, the vast majority of autism quackery is related to antivaccine beliefs and the need to “detoxify” autistic children from whatever toxins or mercury antivaccinationists think caused their children’s autism. If only it…
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11:00 AM | Memories Are Made of These
Since the early 1900s, scientists have pondered an age old question: what are memories made of? In the 1920s, Karl Lashley embarked on his famous journey to find “the engram” – the place in the brain where memories are stored. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed his famous postulate of how memories could be formed, insisting […]
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7:18 AM | The false hope of “right-to-try” metastasizes to Michigan
Ed. note: Please read disclaimer in Dr. Gorski’s profile! There are times when supporting science-based health policy and opposing health policies that sound compassionate but are not are easily portrayed as though I’m opposing mom, apple pie, and the American flag. One such type of misguided policy that I’ve opposed is a category of bills […]
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7:00 AM | Wellcome Trust Research Round-up: 21/07/14
Our fortnightly round-up of news from the Wellcome community..  Same genes drive maths and reading ability Around half of the genes that influence how well a child can read also play a role in their mathematics ability, say scientists from UCL, according to a collaborative study published Nature Communications as part of the Wellcome Trust Case-Control […]
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1:01 AM | BiotechDueDiligence Journal Watch
Nature Outlook: Epilepsy [collection of free articles]Clinical Trial Transparency — Antidote to Weaker Off-Label-Promotion Rules?Keith Outterson. New England Journal of Medicine.U.S. Food and Drug Administration Inspections of Clinical Investigators: Overview of Results from 1977 to 2009.Morgan-Linnell et al. Clinical Cancer Research.Overcoming Drug Development Bottlenecks With Repurposing: Old drugs learn new tricksStephen Strittmatter. Nature Medicine.Drug Companies' Patient-Assistance […]
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12:43 AM | Biotech Reading List
Drive-Thru Health Care: How McDonald's Inspired An Urgent Care Gold RushBrian Solomon (Forbes)Each of these Hepatitis C pills cost $1,000. That's actually a great deal.Sarah Kliff (Vox) $GILDAn Alzheimer's Blood Test? Not So FastStudies Show? Not So Fast.Derek Lowe (In the Pipeline)ONE OF A KIND: What do you do if your child has a condition that is new to science?Seth Mnookin (New Yorker)Should Roche's Failed Trial Give Hope To Alzheimer's Patients?Matthew Herper (Forbes)Twenty six of the best […]
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12:11 AM | El conocimiento bíblico – Sam Harris
No hay una sola línea en la Biblia o el Corán que no haya podido ser escrita por una persona del Siglo

July 20, 2014

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10:39 PM | Biodiversidad y mutaciones dibujadas
Ultimamente me he topado, más o menos casualmente, con unos dibujos impresionantes sobre el fenotipo de insectos mutantes. No es del todo casual ya que siempre estoy atento a esas cuestiones (diversidad genética y efecto de las radiaciones en la salud genética humana, escribí sobre eso aquí).Una artista-científica que se dedicó a dibujar insectos mutantes es Cornelia Hesse-Honegger. Algo de su trabajo se puede ver en:Chernobyl’s Bugs: […]
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7:40 PM | Robert Kennedy's Anti-Vaccine Craziness
Robert Kennedy is obsessed with the notion that vaccines cause autism. He’s particularly obsessed with the discredited idea that thimerosal, a preservative used in some vaccines, causes autism. Now Kennedy is about to publish a new book on this topic, and he’s promoting it both in the press and, as described in today’s Washington Post, in the halls of Congress. He’s recently had personal meetings with U.S. Senators Barbara Mikulski and Bernie Sanders to try to convince […]
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1:43 PM | EID Journal: Respiratory Viruses & Bacteria Among Pilgrims During The 2013 Hajj
Credit Wikipedia   # 8852   While MERS cases have thankfully  declined over the summer months, there remain concerns that it may return this fall during the time of the Hajj (early October), when roughly 2 million devout from around the world will make the pilgrimage to the Saudi Holy sites.   Mass gatherings such as the Hajj, Chunyun (Chinese New Years-Spring Festival), Carnival in Rio, Mardi Gras, and the Super Bowl all bring together huge groups of people, and […]

July 19, 2014

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3:50 PM | Are Influenza Pandemic Viruses Members Of An Exclusive Club?
Credit - HHS Interim Pre-Pandemic Planning Guidence: Community Strategy For Pandemic Influenza Mitigation In the United States.   # 8851   While we watch novel avian flu strains like H5N1, H7N9, H9N2 and new upstarts like H10N8 for signs they might better adapt to humans and someday start a pandemic, there is a school of thought the holds that only H1, H2, and H3 influenza viruses have ever been known to spread efficiently in humans, and we ought to be looking more at that pool […]
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10:45 AM | Mackay’s Interactive MERS Charts
Credit VDU Blog      # 8850     It has been a busy couple of days and I’ve been remiss in not highlighting a new set of interactive MERS-CoV charts from Dr. Ian Mackay that deal with gender and ages.  By hovering your cursor over individual elements of each chart, you are provided with additional information.   The static graphic at the top of this blog doesn’t do it justice, but you can view the fully interactive version at: […]
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8:00 AM | News digest – Australian smoking rates, bowel cancer genes and more
It's been a busy week for cancer stories in the news - our bloggers highlight the pick of the bunch.

July 18, 2014

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9:24 PM | The Lone Star Tick
Recently a 65-year-old female was referred to an ED in the state of Missouri complaining of fevers, chills, headache, diarrhea and vomiting occurring over the last week. 3 weeks prior she had received an orthotopic liver transplant. Her post transplant course was unremarkable and she was discharged on prograf 2mf bid, myfortic 360mg bid, prednisone tapering, Bactrim single strength daily and valcyte 450mg od. She also took thyroid replacement, Januvia, warfarin and aspirin. Past medical history […]
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6:33 PM | To Examine or Not to Examine? That is the Question
The field of medicine has a funny way of contradicting itself. Not that it’s on purpose, mind you. Thanks to rapid-fire advances in technology and new research discoveries, medicine is in a constant state of flux, always evolving. Think about it…20 years ago, fat was the dietary demon to avoid...
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6:07 PM | LabBook July 18, 2014
This week’s rundown of recent research publications of note from University of Chicago scientists and physicians.
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5:15 PM | Dr. Randal Kaufman, one of the world’s most influential scientific minds
Dr. Randal Kaufman named as one of the most influential scientists by Thomson Reuters
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4:53 PM | Colorado DPH Statement On 4 Cases Of Plague
Credit CDC     # 8849   Last week in Family Pets, Zoonoses & An Upcoming COCA Call, we briefly discussed a recent story of a man, and his dog, who had contracted plague in Colorado.  While rare – the United States sees perhaps a dozen human cases each year.    But what made this case doubly unusual is that the man was diagnosed with pneumonic plague.   Bubonic Plague (Yersinia Pestis) is a bacterial infection transmitted by fleas, […]
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3:11 PM | Come Together
What an exciting week it’s been! You know those days or moments when you see a lot of groundwork (hard work) start to pay off; like when you see the first tomato appear on the vine or the first sprig of a pepper plant pop up through the dirt? Well, we had one of those […]
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