Posts

November 12, 2014

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12:17 PM | Mali MOH Statement On Newly Confirmed Ebola Case
Mali with 500 mile-long border (in red) With Guinea   # 9310   While it doesn’t tell us anything more than we already knew, a statement has been posted on Mali’s MOH website (http://www.sante.gov.ml) that confirms the media reports of last night indicating a nurse had died from Ebola at a clinic in Bamoko after treating a patient from Guinea roughly 2 weeks ago. Unlike Mali’s earlier case – that of a 2 year-old from Guinea who died in October – […]
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12:00 PM | Pneumonia Affects People of All Ages: Interview with Carlos J. Orihuela
For World Pneumonia Day 2014, PLOS Pathogens interviews Associate Editor, author, and researcher Carlos J. Orihuela on his recent publication in PLOS Pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae Translocates into the Myocardium and Forms Unique Microlesions That Disrupt Cardiac Function, describing how the disease can lead to heart … Continue reading »The post Pneumonia Affects People of All Ages: Interview with Carlos J. Orihuela appeared first on Speaking of […]
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1:08 AM | Media Reports: A Second Ebola Case In Mali
    # 9309   A story the newshounds on FluTrackers and elsewhere have been watching (see FluTrackers Thread) most of the day has concerned reports of a suspected second Ebola case in Mali, unrelated to the first case, a 2 year-old who traveled while ill from Guinea in October. .   Over the past few hours several media sources have reported that a nurse has died and has tested positive for Ebola. The nurse had reportedly treated a patient from Guinea, who also […]

November 11, 2014

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10:23 PM | Worldwide vaccine uptake-2014
I make it a point to update this blog with the most current CDC analysis of vaccine uptake in the USA for kindergarten children (usually around 5 years old). Generally, the numbers have stayed stable, at around 95% vaccinated, although there is high variance from state to state, and locality to locality. The weakness in […]Continue reading «Worldwide vaccine uptake-2014»
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10:19 PM | What Factors Might Have Led to the Emergence of Ebola in West Africa?
This manuscript has been conditionally accepted by PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases for publication prior to formal review. Following a successful outcome of independent peer review, a revised version will be formally published by PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases and a link to the final … Continue reading »The post What Factors Might Have Led to the Emergence of Ebola in West Africa? appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.
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9:59 PM | Serotonin lies at the intersection of pain and itch
ScicuriousNeuroscience,Health by Bethany Brookshire 5:00pm, November 11, 2014 When you've got an itch, you have to scratch. But often scratching just makes the itch worse. The reason? Serotonin.magdasmith/iStockPhotoI itch. Constantly. Evenings tend to be the worst. But then, mornings are pretty bad too. I have atopic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema. The symptoms include very dry, scaly […]
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8:59 PM | 11th annual Christopher Reeve “Hot Topics” in stem cell biology
11th Annual Christopher Reeve Satellite Symposium at Society of Neuroscience
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8:51 PM | Ebola Quarantines: Can we stop the charade now?
“I’m a believer in an abundance of caution but I’m not a believer of an abundance of idiocy.” Ashish Jha, MD Quarantine craziness has continued since my last post, with more states joining in the fray. The sudden silence since Election Day has been quite striking, but since the irrational hodgepodge of regulations persists, here [...]
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7:20 PM | Blogger night at #KidneyWk14 on Thursday
Thursday night at 8:30 pm, Blogger Night (after the ASN Presidents Reception). If you like the Neph Social Media Crew from Twitter, Renal Fellow Network, AJKDblog or NephJC, join us for drinks at Field House Philly sports bar. Look for Joel in his AJKD hat.
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6:31 PM | Shubin, colleagues win AAAS Kavli science journalism award for broadcast adaptation of “Your Inner Fish”
The University of Chicago's Neil Shubin will share the 2014 Kavli Science Journalism Award for "in-depth television reporting" for their three-part PBS series.
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5:11 PM | The ER doesn’t have to be scary: Reducing anxiety for kids with a dose of fun
As a former hospital clown, pediatric emergency medicine physician Benjamin Heilbrunn, MD, knows first hand how creating a less stressful environment in the ER can help kids.
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4:33 PM | Dr Julian Huppert MP: “What will it take to make UK science great? Investment, people and collaboration”
A guest post from Lib Dem MP and former research scientist, Dr Julian Huppert, on what will keep UK science great
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4:13 PM | Anorexia Nervosa: Brain Connectivity Abnormalities
Functional magnetic resonance imaging is providing a new tool for understanding brain circuitry in normal brain development and in brain disorders. Anorexia nervosa is an restrictive calorie eating disorder often resistant to treatment.No effective drug treatment for anorexia nervosa currently exists and psychotherapy is often only partially effective. A better understanding of the brain pathophysiology in anorexia nervosa is needed to aid in treatment development.Stephanie Kullman along […]
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3:58 PM | Saudi MOH: 1 New MERS Case In Al-Kharj
  # 9308   The Saudi MOH today announced a new MERS case in Al-Karj – roughly 80 kilometers south of Riyadh – along with the recovery of 5 earlier cases, and one death.  About a month ago we saw another case from Al-Karj which was tentatively linked to consumption of camel’s milk.
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3:55 PM | From the Bronx to Baghdad: Helping Physicians Help Children
Editors’ Note: When she heard about dearth of rehabilitation facilities for children in war-torn Iraq, Dr. Huma Naqvi, assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and an attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center, Einstein’s University Hospital, decided that she had to find a way to help, even if she couldn’t physically [...]
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1:56 PM | ECDC: New Public Health Management Guidelines On Ebola
  # 9307   The ECDC has released a pair of technical reports today on the public health management of Healthcare workers returning from Ebola-affected nations, and on anyone who might have been exposed to Ebola while in the EU.  We’ve seen similar guidance issued by the CDC, PHAC, Public Health England, and other government agencies – and while similar in many ways – each approaches the topic a bit differently.   A few excerpts follow, but download […]
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1:04 PM | Lessons From Three Months Of Dealing With Ebola In The United States
Photo Credit- CDC   # 9306   Later today, America’s last hospitalized Ebola patient – Dr.  Craig Spencer – will be released from the New York Hospital where he has been treated for the past 3 weeks, cured of his Ebola virus infection (see Maggie Fox’s report Last U.S. Ebola Patient Is Cured: Dr. Craig Spencer to Be Released).     Since the epidemic still rages in West Africa, our respite may be short-lived.  Our next Ebola […]
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12:00 PM | Reiki propaganda in U.S. News & World Report
Sigh. Just a week ago, I deconstructed an awful article touting how the mass of prescientific quackery known as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as somehow being “validated” by modern science. Specifically, some truly misguided scientists were attempting to use modern systems biology techniques to look for biomarkers associated with TCM diagnoses such as “hot” or…
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8:00 AM | Oxygen Myths That Refuse to Die
One of my early forays into the world of pseudoscience was an investigation of “Vitamin O” (the O stands for oxygen). The story is hilarious; please click and read; I guarantee you won’t be able to read it without at least a chuckle. Vitamin O is still for sale; it’s even available on Amazon.com. You can […]
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6:58 AM | Excerpt: Mindfulness Protects Adults' Health from the Impacts of Childhood Adversity
This research study was led by Dr. Robert C. Whitaker, M.D., M.P.H., at Temple University.Adults who were abused or neglected as children are known to have poorer health, but adults who tend to focus on, and accept their reactions to, the present moment—or are mindful—report  having better health, regardless of their childhood adversity. These findings, to be published in the October issue of Preventive Medicine, are based on the first study ever conducted to examine the […]
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3:35 AM | Biotech Reading List
What Happens After Your First Drug Approval?Derek Lowe (In the Pipeline)Change Is Unsettling … But Our Message Remains the SameAlliance for a Stronger FDAWhat You Need To Know About IMPROVE-ITLarry Husten (CarbioBrief / Forbes)Beg, Borrow, or Steal: Accessing Unaffordable Science JournalsStewart Lyman (Xconomy)Prostate Cancer Advertising: Lies and the Damn Lies (Part 1)Benjamin Davies (Forbes)Defining ‘Natural’ Is a Waste of F.D.A. ResourcesRichard Williams (New York Times) […]
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2:55 AM | Getting to zero
By my count, there are now zero persons in the United States who are actively infected with Ebola virus.  This is the perfect time to donate your time or your money to Ebola response in West Africa.Also, Kaci Hickox still doesn't have Ebola. She should be allowed to go bowling.Finally, one observation about our weirdly, uniquely American response to Ebola virus. The CDC Guidance for Monitoring and Movement Restriction treats healthcare workers who have "direct contact while using […]

November 10, 2014

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10:43 PM | FAO-EMPRES Report On The Emergence And Threat Of H5N6
  # 9305   For many years Southeast Asia has been considered `the cradle of influenza’, an area of the world where both human and animal influenza viruses circulate more-or-less year round, and where humans and farm animals often live in close proximity with one another.   In March of 2013, in EID Journal: Predicting Hotspots for Influenza Virus Reassortment, we looked at a study that selected East-Central China a one of the top hotspots in the world for the […]
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10:18 PM | Designs and Redesigns
With the Fall 2014 issue of Penn Medicine, we unveiled a redesigned magazine. Graham Perry of NCS Studios remains our designer, but he and his colleagues have introduced a new look to our pages. Many photos are now run larger; the body text has changed; most articles are now set...
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9:19 PM | Why we immunize against the flu–save healthy children’s lives
If you break your arm, go to an emergency department, you see that medicine has an effect. Your fracture is set (very painful), and then you have a cast (very itchy). You can observe, without much bias, that a physician and his medical knowledge has fixed you. And you can show everyone else your cast, get it […]Continue reading «Why we immunize against the flu–save healthy children's lives»
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9:12 PM | HiSeq X Ten: when might they be available one at a time?
In the Summer I posted a Christmas letter to Santa. He's already delivered number 2 (cheaper RNA-seq) and 3 (longer RNA-seq reads via PE250), and number 4 might be coming soon (exomes at PE125). I'd also asked that he not deliver HiSeq X Ten as an individual instrument just yet, but as there are just 44 days left till Christmas I thought I'd look head and see what might be the reasons for, or not for gift wrapping a single X Ten this Christmas.The HiSeq X Ten is an awesome system capable of […]
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9:10 PM | The Chicago Pancreatic Cancer Initiative: An Innovative Approach to Personalized Treatment
UChicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers are tackling the one of the leading cancer killers with a bold initiative to personalize care using genomic information.
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9:03 PM | Product Recommendation – This Pie is Nuts
My Product Recommendations section has expanded now with the addition of a new category of product, namely Baked Goods. The inaugural member of this section is a baking company known as This Pie is Nuts. They are a fledgling business serving only locally here in NYC, but I am really hoping things take off for … Continue reading »
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7:11 PM | How has UChicago’s response to Ebola benefited from its biosafety programs?
We spoke to Joseph Kanabrocki, VP for research safety, about how UChicago's Ricketts Laboratory for studying dangerous pathogens gives it a big advantage when it comes to Ebola preparedness.
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6:48 PM | “Top Hat” gala raises $2.1 million for medical research
Premier entertainment, great food, and good friends hit high notes at the Sanford-Burnham “Top Hat” gala held Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 at the Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa. The evening raised a grand total of $2.1 million for medical research.
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