Posts

November 17, 2014

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10:20 PM | La logica dello stato
Lì dove finisce la logica, inizia lo statoE' quello che ha detto un carabiniere a un mio studente, che ha citato la frase per commentare la situazione attuale della scuola italiana che, per esempio, ad anno scolastico in corso (dopo due mesi, ormai), ha avuto come conseguenza il cambio di almeno un paio di insegnanti.E i cambi potrebbero non essere finiti.
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10:19 PM | What Happens as a Bubble Deflates?
Having written a couple of guest posts about bubbles possibly inflating (college tuition, high end Manhattan condos), I thought it might be interesting to consider what a deflating bubble looks like. A number of observers point to the oil markets, where the price of crude has fallen by about 30% since June of this year, […]
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9:32 PM | Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem).
This post is by Phil Price. I’m posting it on Andrew’s blog without knowing exactly where he stands on this so it’s especially important for readers to note that this post is NOT BY ANDREW! Last week a prominent scientist, representing his entire team of researchers, appeared in widely distributed television interviews wearing a shirt […] The post Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem). appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]
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5:54 PM | Christmas Presents
The Internet is full with Christmas present ideas and I believe that the lists that you can find on other people’s blog posts are extremely useful. I always take some time to look at some before I go shopping. Moreover, … Continue reading →
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4:00 PM | This is what “power = .06” looks like. Get used to it.
I prepared the above image for this talk. The calculations come from the second column of page 6 of this article, and the psychology study that we’re referring to is discussed here. The post This is what “power = .06” looks like. Get used to it. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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2:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” Tues: In which I play amateur political scientist Wed: Retrospective clinical trials? Thurs: “If you’re not using a proper, informative prior, you’re leaving money on the table.” Fri: Hey, NYT: Former editor Bill Keller said that any editor who fails to confront a writer about an […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:28 AM | Uniformitarian or Paretoist
A uniformitarian view is that everything is equally important. For example, there are 118 elements in the periodic table, so all 118 are equally important to know about. The Pareto principle would say that importance is usually very unevenly distributed. The universe is essentially hydrogen and helium, with a few other elements sprinkled in. From […]
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1:01 AM | Some Jokes
* * * A mathematical tragedy: two parallel lines fall in love. * * * Life is not fair, even among gadgets: the desktop misbehaves, the monitor gets smacked. * * * An amazing magic trick! Think of a number, add 5 to it, then subtract 5. The result is the number you thought of! […]

November 16, 2014

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11:14 PM | a probabilistic proof to a quasi-Monte Carlo lemma
As I was reading in the Paris métro a new textbook on Quasi-Monte Carlo methods, Introduction to Quasi-Monte Carlo Integration and Applications, written by Gunther Leobacher and Friedrich Pillichshammer, I came upon the lemma that, given two sequences on (0,1) such that, for all i’s, and the geometric bound made me wonder if there was […]
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9:47 PM | ICERM postdoctoral positions
I’m co-organizing the program Dimension and Dynamics at the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics in Spring 2016. (Yes, this means that I hope to participate in the program. Details to follow when they are finalized.) ICERM has several … Continue reading →
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4:00 PM | Links for November 16
When you are listening to corn pop, are you listening to the Central Limit Theorem? 12 Scientific Sculptures: Intangible Data in Physical Form Kokichi Sugihara uses computation to make three-dimensional illusion Markov Chains vs Simulation: Flipping a Million Little Coins. … Continue reading →
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2:02 PM | Question about data mining bias in finance
Finance professor Ravi Sastry writes: Let’s say we have N vectors of data, {y_1,y_2,…,y_N}. Each is used as the dependent variable in a series of otherwise identical OLS regressions, yielding t-statistics on some parameter of interest, theta: {t_1,t_2,…,t_N}. The maximum t-stat is denoted t_n*, and the corresponding data are y_n*. These are reported publicly, as […] The post Question about data mining bias in finance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
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2:01 PM | Jaynes on Mathematical Courtesy
Edwin Jaynes rails against modern mathematical writing.
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1:18 PM | snapshot from UF campus (#2)
Filed under: pictures, Running, Travel, University life Tagged: Florida, Gainesville, Griffin-Floyd Hall, Spanish moss, University of Florida
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6:03 AM | Linkage
An experiment in allowing journal reviewers to reveal their names (the G+ post has several additional links on academics including some well known graph theorists taking money to deliberately distort university rankings)Pumpkin geometry: stereographic projection of shadows from carved balls (G+; no actual pumpkins involved)Clint Fulkerson: an abstract artist whose work feels somehow both geometric and organic (G+)Paper popups by Peter Dahmen (G+)Crochet Platonic polyhedra by June Gilbank […]

November 15, 2014

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11:14 PM | Le Monde puzzle [#887bis]
As mentioned in the previous post, an alternative consists in filling the permutation of {1,…,N} by adding squares left and right until the permutation is complete or no solution is available. While this sounds like the dual of the initial solution, it brings a considerable increase in computing time, as shown below. I thus redefined […]
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10:10 PM | Cosmic Geometry
I know that I have never talked about an editing photo app before, but this one made me a little curious. It is Pixrl. Everything because they made a set of new interesting effects that made me incredibly impressed. It’s … Continue reading →
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2:56 PM | Times have changed (sportswriting edition)
The name Tom Boswell came up in a recent comment thread and I was moved to reread his 1987 article, “99 Reasons Why Baseball Is Better Than Football.” The phrase “head injury” did not come up once. Boswell refers a few times to football’s dangerous nature (for example, “98. When a baseball player gets knocked […] The post Times have changed (sportswriting edition) appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:18 PM | snapshot from UF campus
Filed under: pictures, Running, Travel, University life Tagged: Challis Lecture, Florida, Gainesville, University of Florida, USA
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6:06 AM | Integral Octonions (Part 8)
With a suitable Lorentzian metric, the lattice of self-adjoint 3 x 3 octonionic matrices with integral octonions as entries becomes isometric to a 27-dimensional lattice that may play a role in bosonic string theory.

November 14, 2014

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11:14 PM | Le Monde puzzle [#887]
A simple combinatorics Le Monde mathematical puzzle: N is a golden number if the sequence {1,2,…,N} can be reordered so that the sum of any consecutive pair is a perfect square. What are the golden numbers between 1 and 25? Indeed, from an R programming point of view, all I have to do is to […]
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10:25 PM | Will Demographics Solve the College Tuition Problem? (A: I Don’t Know)
I’ve got two girls in middle school. They are lovely and (in my opinion as a proud dad) smart. I wonder, on occasion, what college will they go to and what their higher education experience will be like? No matter how lovely or smart my daughters are, though, it will be hard to fork over […]
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3:07 PM | Is this a nonsense formula for the perfect TV episode?
Stardate November, 2014. These are the continuing adventures of the website The Aperiodical. Its mission: to explore the pages of strange newspapers, to catalogue nonsense formulas, to boldly disapprove of them in ways no blog has done before. What a joy it was to open my browser this morning and see this delicious headline waiting for me: (by... Read more »
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2:14 PM | “The Statistical Crisis in Science”: My talk in the psychology department Monday at noon
Monday 17 Nov at 12:10pm in Schermerhorn room 200B, Columbia University: Top journals in psychology routinely publish ridiculous, scientifically implausible claims, justified based on “p The post “The Statistical Crisis in Science”: My talk in the psychology department Monday at noon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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9:32 AM | In memoriam: Alexander Grothendieck
By Catarina Dutilh NovaesAlexander Grothendieck, who is viewed by many as the greatest mathematician of the 20th century, has passed away yesterday after years of living in total reclusion. (To be honest, I did not even know he was still alive!) He was a key figure in the development of the modern theory of algebraic geometry, among others, but to philosophers and logicians he is perhaps best known as one of the major forces behind the establishment of category theory as a new foundational […]
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7:12 AM | Terence Tao on prime numbers on the Colbert Report
The Colbert ReportGet More: Daily Show Full Episodes,Indecision Political Humor,The Colbert Report on FacebookH/T Tina Eliassi-Rad (And comments that pick on Tao for (sort of) calling 27 a prime will be summarily deleted.)
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1:32 AM | 254A announcement: Analytic prime number theory
In the winter quarter (starting January 5) I will be teaching a graduate topics course entitled “An introduction to analytic prime number theory“. As the name suggests, this is a course covering many of the analytic number theory techniques used to study the distribution of the prime numbers . I will list the topics I […]
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1:07 AM | Time to Short 57th Street?
As a New Yorker, it’s hard to travel through the city these days without coming across construction sheds, scaffolding and giant cranes. New building construction is everywhere and much of it is for residential apartments. Midtown Manhattan and 57th Street in particular, sometimes referred to as “Billionaire’s Row”, seems to be overrun with giant new condo buildings […]

November 13, 2014

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11:43 PM | Grothendieck
Alexander Grothendieck est mort. He was 86. It’s a shame he didn’t make it to 87, because he probably would have thought it was prime. (The link goes to Allyn Jackson’s profile in the Notices of the American Mathematical Society, … Continue reading →
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11:14 PM | that the median cannot be a sufficient statistic
When reading an entry on The Chemical Statistician that a sample median could often be a choice for a sufficient statistic, it attracted my attention as I had never thought a median could be sufficient. After thinking a wee bit more about it, and even posting a question on cross validated, but getting no immediate […]
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