Posts

July 10, 2014

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7:53 PM | HNTBW Publicity Roundup 5
Review up at the Boston Globe: If the feel of sand between your toes gets you thinking about Zeno’s Paradox or Pascal’s Wager, Ellenberg’s book is ideal beach reading. But even if your interests lie elsewhere, you may find it a challenging but welcome companion. at NewCity Lit: To the mathematician, math is a curious […]
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6:39 PM | Chicago alert: Mister P and Stan to be interviewed on WBEZ today (Fri) 3:15pm
Niala Boodho on the Afternoon Shift will be interviewing Yair and me about our age-period-cohort extravaganza which became widely-known after being featured in this cool interactive graph by Amanda Cox in the New York Times. The actual paper is called The Great Society, Reagan’s revolution, and generations of presidential voting and was somewhat inspired by […] The post Chicago alert: Mister P and Stan to be interviewed on WBEZ today (Fri) 3:15pm appeared first on Statistical […]
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2:44 PM | The history of “scientist”
Today is a red-letter day for readers of The Renaissance Mathematicus; I have succeeded in cajoling, seducing, bullying, bribing, inducing, tempting, luring, sweet-talking, coaxing, coercing, enticing, beguiling[1] Harvard University’s very own Dr Melinda Baldwin into writing a guest post on … Continue reading →
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1:15 PM | Open-source tools for running online field experiments
Dean Eckles points me to this cool new tool for experimentation: I [Eckles] just wanted to share that in a collaboration between Facebook and Stanford, we have a new paper out about running online field experiments. One thing this paper does is describe some of the tools we use to design, deploy, and analyze experiments, […] The post Open-source tools for running online field experiments appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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11:34 AM | Describing PROPs Using Generators and Relations
What's a good reference for 'presentations' of symmetric monoidal category?
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11:00 AM | Some Infinities Are Bigger than Other Infinities, and Some Are Just the Same Size
Warning: contains minor spoilers for The Fault in Our Stars. I recently read The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, now a major motion picture that has led to theft in Amsterdam and a shortage of dry... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:49 AM | The parity problem obstruction for the binary Goldbach problem with bounded error
Two of the most famous open problems in additive prime number theory are the twin prime conjecture and the binary Goldbach conjecture. They have quite similar forms: Twin prime conjecture The equation has infinitely many solutions with prime. Binary Goldbach conjecture The equation has at least one solution with prime for any given even . […]
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2:36 AM | Methodology in the Philosophy of Logic and Language
This M-Phi post is an idea Catarina and I hatched, after a post Catarina did a couple of weeks back at NewAPPS, "Searle on formal methods in philosophy of language", commenting on a recent interview of John Searle, where Searle comments that"what has happened in the subject I started out with, the philosophy of language, is that, roughly speaking, formal modeling has replaced insight".I commented a bit underneath Catarina's post, as this is one thing that interests me. I'm writing a more […]

July 09, 2014

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10:23 PM | June Favorites
I know that it is almost the middle of July, but believe me that the beginning of this month was a lot harder for me (not complicated, but like my free time has just been divided by 2, which was … Continue reading →
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10:14 PM | Bayes’ Rule [book review]
This introduction to Bayesian Analysis, Bayes’ Rule, was written by James Stone from the University of Sheffield, who contacted CHANCE suggesting a review of his book. I thus bought it from amazon to check the contents. And write a review. First, the format of the book. It is a short paper of 127 pages, plus […]
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5:14 PM | impressions, soleil couchant
Filed under: pictures, Travel Tagged: Paris, Paris suburbs, plane, RER B, Roissy, sunset, train
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2:18 PM | Making change
How many ways can you make change for a dollar? This post points to two approaches to the problem, one computational and one analytic. SICP gives a Scheme program to solve the problem: (define (count-change amount) (cc amount 5)) (define (cc amount kinds-of-coins) (cond ((= amount 0) 1) ((or (
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1:02 PM | “P.S. Is anyone working on hierarchical survival models?”
Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes: I’m working on building a predictive model (not causal) of the onset of diabetes mellitus using electronic medical records from a semi-panel of HMO patients. The dependent variable is blood glucose level. The unit of analysis is the patient visit to a network doctor or hospitalization in a […] The post “P.S. Is anyone working on hierarchical survival models?” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
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10:51 AM | Great news: for-profit college Corinthian to close
I’ve talked before about the industry of for-profit colleges which exists largely to game the federal student loan program. They survive almost entirely on federal student loans of their students, while delivering terrible services and worthless credentials. Well, good news: one of the worst of the bunch is closing its doors. Corinthian College, Inc (CCI) got caught lying […]

July 08, 2014

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10:14 PM | thick disc formation scenario of the Milky Way evaluated by ABC
“The facts that the thick-disc episode lasted for several billion years, that a contraction is observed during the collapse phase, and that the main thick disc has a constant scale height with no flare argue against the formation of the thick disc through radial migration. The most probable scenario for the thick disc is that […]
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7:34 PM | Hilbert’s fifth problem and approximate groups
Due to some requests, I’m uploading to my blog the slides for my recent talk in Segovia (for the birthday conference of Michael Cowling) on “Hilbert’s fifth problem and approximate groups“.  The slides cover essentially the same range of topics in this series of lecture notes, or in this text of mine, though of course […]
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1:02 PM | Just wondering
It would be bad news if a student in the class of Laurence Tribe or Alan Dershowitz or Ian Ayres or Edward Wegman or Matthew Whitaker or Karl Weick or Frank Fischer were to hand in an assignment that is obviously plagiarized copied from another source without attribution. Would the prof have the chutzpah to […] The post Just wondering appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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12:00 PM | Medical terminology Twitter account
Learn basic medical vocabulary a little at a time by following my new account @MedVocab on Twitter. See the full list of my daily tip Twitter accounts here. The icon for the site is taken from one of Leonardo da Vinci’s anatomical drawings.
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11:25 AM | Zephyr Teachout to visit Alt Banking this Sunday
I’m excited to announce that Zephyr Teachout, a Fordham Law School professor who is running against Andrew Cuomo for Governor of New York, will be coming to speak to the Alternative Banking group next Sunday, July 13th, from 3pm-5pm in the usual place, Room 409 of the International Affairs Building at 118th and Amsterdam. More about […]
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9:24 AM | Shen: Foundations of probability theory and Kolmogorov complexity
Alexander Shen, Основания теории вероятностей и колмогоровская сложность. (Foundations of probability theory and Kolmogorov complexity).
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7:09 AM | Calling a spade a spade
Calling a spade a spade: Mathematics in the new pattern of division of labour Abstract The growing disconnection of the majority of population from mathematics is becoming a phenomenon that is increasingly difficult to ignore. This paper attempts to point to deeper roots of this cultural and social phenomenon. It concentrates on mathematics education, as […]
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5:10 AM | Flip-Flops and the Art of Computer Memory
Flip-Flops and the Art of Computer Memory It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards. ~The White Queen to Alice (Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass) This is the fifth part in my multi-part series on how computers work. Computers are thinking machines, and the … Continue reading → The post Flip-Flops and the Art of Computer Memory appeared first on The Physics Mill.
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12:54 AM | The Categorical Origins of Lebesgue Integration
A simple universal property characterizing the space L^1 of Lebesgue-integrable functions.

July 07, 2014

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10:14 PM | posterior predictive checks for admixture models
In a posting coincidence, just a few days after we arXived our paper on ABC model choice with random forests, where we use posterior predictive errors for assessing the variability of the random forest procedure, David Mimno, David Blei, and Barbara Engelhardt arXived a paper on posterior predictive checks to quantify lack-of-fit in admixture models […]
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8:38 PM | Visiting Stuttgart
This post is mostly a tourist-traveling post, so you might be surprised to see this on a math-blog. But I thought that this is better to introduce you to my week in Stuttgart, also another post will be about the … Continue reading →
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3:37 PM | “Bayes Data Analysis – Author Needed”
The following item came in over the Bayes email list: Hi, My name is Jo Fitzpatrick and I work as an Acquisition Editor for Packt Publishing ( www.packtpub.com ). We recently commissioned a book on Bayesian Data Analysis and I’m currently searching for an author to write this book. You need to have good working […] The post “Bayes Data Analysis – Author Needed” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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3:05 PM | A puzzle puzzle
Jigsaw puzzles that say they have 1,000 pieces have approximately 1,000 pieces, but probably not exactly 1,000. Jigsaw puzzle pieces are typically arranged in a grid, so the number of pieces along a side has to be a divisor of the total number of pieces. This means there aren’t very many ways to make a […]
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1:24 PM | What constitutes evidence?
My most recent Slate Money podcast with Felix Salmon and Jordan Weissmann was more than usually combative. I mean, we pretty much always have disagreements, but Friday it went beyond the usual political angles. Specifically, Felix thought I was jumping too quickly towards a dystopian future with regards to medical data. My claim was that, […]
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1:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: “Bayes Data Analysis – Author Needed” Tues: Just wondering Wed: “P.S. Is anyone working on hierarchical survival models?” Thurs: Open-source tools for running online field experiments Fri: Hey—this is a new kind of spam! Sat, Sun: As Chris Hedges would say: That’s the news, and I am outta here! The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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10:20 AM | The subspace theorem approach to Siegel’s theorem on integral points on curves via nonstandard analysis
Let be the algebraic closure of , that is to say the field of algebraic numbers. We fix an embedding of into , giving rise to a complex absolute value for algebraic numbers . Let be of degree , so that is irrational. A classical theorem of Liouville gives the quantitative bound for the irrationality […]
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