Posts

November 16, 2014

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2:01 PM | Jaynes on Mathematical Courtesy
Edwin Jaynes rails against modern mathematical writing.
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1:18 PM | snapshot from UF campus (#2)
Filed under: pictures, Running, Travel, University life Tagged: Florida, Gainesville, Griffin-Floyd Hall, Spanish moss, University of Florida
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6:03 AM | Linkage
An experiment in allowing journal reviewers to reveal their names (the G+ post has several additional links on academics including some well known graph theorists taking money to deliberately distort university rankings)Pumpkin geometry: stereographic projection of shadows from carved balls (G+; no actual pumpkins involved)Clint Fulkerson: an abstract artist whose work feels somehow both geometric and organic (G+)Paper popups by Peter Dahmen (G+)Crochet Platonic polyhedra by June Gilbank […]

November 15, 2014

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11:14 PM | Le Monde puzzle [#887bis]
As mentioned in the previous post, an alternative consists in filling the permutation of {1,…,N} by adding squares left and right until the permutation is complete or no solution is available. While this sounds like the dual of the initial solution, it brings a considerable increase in computing time, as shown below. I thus redefined […]
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10:10 PM | Cosmic Geometry
I know that I have never talked about an editing photo app before, but this one made me a little curious. It is Pixrl. Everything because they made a set of new interesting effects that made me incredibly impressed. It’s … Continue reading →
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2:56 PM | Times have changed (sportswriting edition)
The name Tom Boswell came up in a recent comment thread and I was moved to reread his 1987 article, “99 Reasons Why Baseball Is Better Than Football.” The phrase “head injury” did not come up once. Boswell refers a few times to football’s dangerous nature (for example, “98. When a baseball player gets knocked […] The post Times have changed (sportswriting edition) appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:18 PM | snapshot from UF campus
Filed under: pictures, Running, Travel, University life Tagged: Challis Lecture, Florida, Gainesville, University of Florida, USA
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6:06 AM | Integral Octonions (Part 8)
With a suitable Lorentzian metric, the lattice of self-adjoint 3 x 3 octonionic matrices with integral octonions as entries becomes isometric to a 27-dimensional lattice that may play a role in bosonic string theory.

November 14, 2014

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11:14 PM | Le Monde puzzle [#887]
A simple combinatorics Le Monde mathematical puzzle: N is a golden number if the sequence {1,2,…,N} can be reordered so that the sum of any consecutive pair is a perfect square. What are the golden numbers between 1 and 25? Indeed, from an R programming point of view, all I have to do is to […]
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10:25 PM | Will Demographics Solve the College Tuition Problem? (A: I Don’t Know)
I’ve got two girls in middle school. They are lovely and (in my opinion as a proud dad) smart. I wonder, on occasion, what college will they go to and what their higher education experience will be like? No matter how lovely or smart my daughters are, though, it will be hard to fork over […]
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3:07 PM | Is this a nonsense formula for the perfect TV episode?
Stardate November, 2014. These are the continuing adventures of the website The Aperiodical. Its mission: to explore the pages of strange newspapers, to catalogue nonsense formulas, to boldly disapprove of them in ways no blog has done before. What a joy it was to open my browser this morning and see this delicious headline waiting for me: (by... Read more »
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2:14 PM | “The Statistical Crisis in Science”: My talk in the psychology department Monday at noon
Monday 17 Nov at 12:10pm in Schermerhorn room 200B, Columbia University: Top journals in psychology routinely publish ridiculous, scientifically implausible claims, justified based on “p The post “The Statistical Crisis in Science”: My talk in the psychology department Monday at noon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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9:32 AM | In memoriam: Alexander Grothendieck
By Catarina Dutilh NovaesAlexander Grothendieck, who is viewed by many as the greatest mathematician of the 20th century, has passed away yesterday after years of living in total reclusion. (To be honest, I did not even know he was still alive!) He was a key figure in the development of the modern theory of algebraic geometry, among others, but to philosophers and logicians he is perhaps best known as one of the major forces behind the establishment of category theory as a new foundational […]
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7:12 AM | Terence Tao on prime numbers on the Colbert Report
The Colbert ReportGet More: Daily Show Full Episodes,Indecision Political Humor,The Colbert Report on FacebookH/T Tina Eliassi-Rad (And comments that pick on Tao for (sort of) calling 27 a prime will be summarily deleted.)
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1:32 AM | 254A announcement: Analytic prime number theory
In the winter quarter (starting January 5) I will be teaching a graduate topics course entitled “An introduction to analytic prime number theory“. As the name suggests, this is a course covering many of the analytic number theory techniques used to study the distribution of the prime numbers . I will list the topics I […]
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1:07 AM | Time to Short 57th Street?
As a New Yorker, it’s hard to travel through the city these days without coming across construction sheds, scaffolding and giant cranes. New building construction is everywhere and much of it is for residential apartments. Midtown Manhattan and 57th Street in particular, sometimes referred to as “Billionaire’s Row”, seems to be overrun with giant new condo buildings […]

November 13, 2014

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11:43 PM | Grothendieck
Alexander Grothendieck est mort. He was 86. It’s a shame he didn’t make it to 87, because he probably would have thought it was prime. (The link goes to Allyn Jackson’s profile in the Notices of the American Mathematical Society, … Continue reading →
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11:14 PM | that the median cannot be a sufficient statistic
When reading an entry on The Chemical Statistician that a sample median could often be a choice for a sufficient statistic, it attracted my attention as I had never thought a median could be sufficient. After thinking a wee bit more about it, and even posting a question on cross validated, but getting no immediate […]
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10:27 PM | Grothendieck 1928-2014
http://www.liberation.fr/sciences/2014/11/13/alexandre-grothendieck-ou-la-mort-d-un-genie-qui-voulait-se-faire-oublier_1142614
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7:35 PM | Parametric Equations
In my last couple of months I have been fascinated by parametric curves. They are incredibly beautiful. So, I decided to show you some of my favorite ones and also a small introduction about them. Firstly, a parametric equation of a … Continue reading →
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4:00 PM | Random sums of sines and random walks
John Cook, at his Probability Fact twitter feed (@ProbFact), asked (I’ve cleaned up the notation): What is the expected amplitude for the sum of sines with random phase? i.e. sum of where Intuitively one expects something on the order of … Continue reading →
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2:09 PM | If you do an experiment with 700,000 participants, you’ll (a) have no problem with statistical significance, (b) get to call it “massive-scale,” (c) get a chance to publish it in a tabloid top journal. Cool!
David Hogg points me to this post by Thomas Lumley regarding a social experiment that was performed by randomly manipulating the content in the news feed of Facebook customers. The shiny bit about the experiment is that it involved 700,000 participants (or, as the research article, by Adam Kramera, Jamie Guillory, and Jeffrey Hancock, quaintly […] The post If you do an experiment with 700,000 participants, you’ll (a) have no problem with statistical significance, (b) get to call it […]
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2:43 AM | Cyclic fractions
Somewhere along the way you may have noticed that the digits in the decimal expansion of multiples of 1/7 are all rotations of the same digits: 1/7 = 0.142857142857… 2/7 = 0.285714285714… 3/7 = 0.428571428571… 4/7 = 0.571428571428… 5/7 = 0.714285714285… 6/7 = 0.857142857142… We can make the pattern more clear by vertically aligning the […]
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12:21 AM | My annoying neighbor (and the banality of political corruption)
Greetings! Thanks so much to Cathy for having me in to guest blog for her while she visits Haiti! While neither a math pro nor a babe, I do, on occasion confer with Cathy about her posts and contribute a few thoughts of my own about the world on Twitter at @advisoryA. And I also […]

November 12, 2014

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11:14 PM | about the strong likelihood principle
Deborah Mayo arXived a Statistical Science paper a few days ago, along with discussions by Jan Bjørnstad, Phil Dawid, Don Fraser, Michael Evans, Jan Hanning, R. Martin and C. Liu. I am very glad that this discussion paper came out and that it came out in Statistical Science, although I am rather surprised to find […]
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10:51 PM | Let us now praise Delta Airlines
I flew home from Montreal yesterday via Minneapolis.  MSP was still kind of messy, recovering from a snowstorm, and my Montreal-Minneapolis leg was delayed.  Delta told me I wasn’t going to make the last flight back to Madison, gave me a hotel voucher for Minneapolis, and rebooked me for the first flight the next morning.  But […]
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5:38 PM | “Hello world” is the hard part
Kernighan and Ritchie’s classic book The C Programming Language began with a sample C program that printed “hello world.” Since then “hello world” has come describe the first program you write with any technology, even if it doesn’t literally print “hello world.” Hello-world programs are often intimidating. People think “I must be a dufus because […]
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2:26 PM | “Patchwriting” is a Wegmanesque abomination but maybe there’s something similar that could be helpful?
Reading Thomas Basbøll’s blog I came across a concept I’d not previously heard about, “patchwriting,” which is defined as “copying from a source text and deleting some words, altering grammatical structures, or plugging in one synonym for another.” (See here for further discussion.) As Basbøll writes, this is simply a variant of plagiarism, indeed it’s […] The post “Patchwriting” is a Wegmanesque abomination but maybe […]
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2:04 PM | L’Aquila earthquake convictions overturned
You may remember a couple of years ago there was a conviction of seven men in Italy, widely reported as being for failing to predict an earthquake. Actually, there was a little more to it — the conviction related to a supposed “falsely reassuring statement” given to the public — but, still, the scientific community’s... Read more »
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11:36 AM | Mitochondrial motion in plants
Mitochondria are often likened to the power stations of the cell, producing energy that fuels life's processes. However, compared to traditional power stations, they're very dynamic: mitochondria move through the cell, and fuse together and break apart (among other things). Interestingly, their ability to move and undergo fusion and fission affects their functionality, and so has powerful implications for understanding disease and cellular energy supplies.Because of this central role, it is […]
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