Posts

February 26, 2015

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4:45 AM | Operationalizing replicator dynamics and partitioning fitness functions
As you know, dear regular reader, I have a rather uneasy relationship with reductionism, especially when doing mathematical modeling in biology. In mathematical oncology, for example, it seems that there is a hope that through our models we can bring a more rigorous mechanistic understanding of cancer, but at the same time there is the […]

Archetti, M., Ferraro, D.A. & Christofori, G. (2015). Heterogeneity for IGF-II production maintained by public goods dynamics in neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112 (6) 1833-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25624490

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February 25, 2015

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11:15 PM | Unbiased Bayes for Big Data: Path of partial posteriors
“Data complexity is sub-linear in N, no bias is introduced, variance is finite.” Heiko Strathman, Dino Sejdinovic and Mark Girolami have arXived a few weeks ago a paper on the use of a telescoping estimator to achieve an unbiased estimator of a Bayes estimator relying on the entire dataset, while using only a small proportion […]
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10:30 PM | Psych journal bans hypothesis testing
The journal Basic and Applied Social Psychology is banning the NHSTP. (That’s the “null hypothesis statistical testing procedure” you might remember from an intro stats course.) This includes banning confidence intervals, thanks to the duality between confidence intervals and hypothesis … Continue reading →
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5:00 PM | Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen
Yesterday’s is a super-tough call. I’d much rather hear Stewart Lee than Aristotle. I read one of Lee’s books, and he’s a fascinating explicator of performance. Lee gives off a charming David Owen vibe—Phil, you know what I’m saying here—he’s an everyman, nothing special, he’s just been thinking really hard lately and wants to share […] The post Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
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4:35 PM | Student Debt Strikers Take On Corinthian College
Fifteen students have refused to pay back their student debt to Everest College, owned by the now disgraced for-profit company Corinthian College. They call themselves “the Corinthian 15″. Good for them. Corinthian College is a predatory and fraudulent company which was in the business of gaming the federal loan system while making false promises to its students. […]
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2:34 PM | The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.
John Sukup writes: I came across a chart recently posted by Boston Consulting Group on LinkedIn and wondered what your take on it was. To me, it seems to fall into the “suspicious” category but thought you may have a different opinion. I replied that this one baffles me cos I don’t know what the […] The post The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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2:25 PM | Waldo e la strada verso la miniaturizzazione
Waldo E. Jones sembrava fluttuare nell'aria al centro di una stanza sferica. L'impressione derivava dal fatto che fluttuava davvero nell'aria. La sua casa era inserita in un'orbita libera, con un periodo di poco più di ventiquattro ore.(8)Waldo abita nello spazio. In orbita intorno alla Terra. Soffre di una malattia che gli impedisce di muoversi sotto l'azione della gravità terrestre. Questo impedimento, come si suol dire, gli ha aguzzato l'ingegno, permettendogli di diventare […]

Ashley S. (2001). Nanobot Construction Crews, Scientific American, 285 (3) 84-85. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0901-84

Smalley R.E. (2001). Of Chemistry, Love and Nanobots, Scientific American, 285 (3) 76-77. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0901-76

Ge J., Lei J. & Zare R.N. (2012). Protein–inorganic hybrid nanoflowers, Nature Nanotechnology, 7 (7) 428-432. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2012.80

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1:00 PM | Too easy
When people sneer at a technology for being too easy to use, it’s worth trying out. If the only criticism is that something is too easy or “OK for beginners” then maybe it’s a threat to people who invested a lot of work learning to do things the old way. The problem with the “OK […]
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7:20 AM | Clinical trial software
This week’s resource post lists some of the projects I managed or contributed to while working at MD Anderson Cancer Center. CRMSimulator is used to design CRM trials, dose-finding based only on toxicity outcomes. BMA-CRMSimulator is a variation on CRMSimulator using Bayesian model averaging. EffTox is used for dose-finding based on toxicity and efficacy outcomes. TTEConduct […]
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1:20 AM | Concepts of Sameness (Part 3)
What good is the equation x = x?

February 24, 2015

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11:15 PM | Bayesian filtering and smoothing [book review]
When in Warwick last October, I met Simo Särkkä, who told me he had published an IMS monograph on Bayesian filtering and smoothing the year before. I thought it would be an appropriate book to review for CHANCE and tried to get a copy from Oxford University Press, unsuccessfully. I thus bought my own book […]
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7:28 PM | 254A, Supplement 6: A cheap version of the theorems of Halasz and Matomaki-Radziwill (optional)
In analytic number theory, it is a well-known phenomenon that for many arithmetic functions of interest in number theory, it is significantly easier to estimate logarithmic sums such as than it is to estimate summatory functions such as (Here we are normalising to be roughly constant in size, e.g. as .) For instance, when is […]
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5:19 PM | Finding the best dose
In a dose-finding clinical trial, you have a small number of doses to test, and you hope find the one with the best response. Here “best” may mean most effective, least toxic, closest to a target toxicity, some combination of criteria, etc. Since your goal is to find the best dose, it seems natural to compare dose-finding […]
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5:00 PM | Aristotle (3) vs. Stewart Lee
Yesterday‘s winner is a tough one. Really, these two guys could’ve met in the final. Some arguments in the comments in favor of Freud: From Huw, “he has the smirks, knowing looks, and barely missed sidelong glances.” And Seth points out the statistical connection: “Some people might say that theory is getting lost in the […] The post Aristotle (3) vs. Stewart Lee appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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3:43 PM | How Big Philanthropy Undermines Democracy
I’m really looking forward to tonight’s panel on mega-foundations and democracy, organized by the Big Apple Coffee Party. I will be the moderator of the event, which takes place at 6:30 tonight at All Soul’s Church at 1157 Lexington Avenue and is open to the public. In preparation, I’m reading the article that inspired tonight’s discussion, […]
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3:31 PM | Upcoming Stan-related talks
If you’re in NYC or Sidney, there are some Stan-related talks in the next few weeks.   New York 25 February. Jonah Gabry: shinyStan: a graphical user interface for exploring Bayesian models after MCMC. Register Now: New York Open Statistical Programming Meetup. 12 March. Rob Trangucci: #5: Non-centered parameterization aka the “Matt trick.” Register Now: Stan […] The post Upcoming Stan-related talks appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
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2:49 PM | “A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . . huh?
Lee Beck writes: I’m curious if you have any thoughts on the statistical meaning of sentences like “a small but growing collection of studies suggest [X].” That exact wording comes from this piece in the New Yorker, but I think it’s the sort of expression you often see in science journalism (“small but mounting”, “small […] The post “A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . . huh? appeared first on Statistical […]
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2:43 PM | Pi Day 2015: giorno epico per la matematica
Per il quarto anno consecutivo ospiterò su DropSea il Carnevale della Matematica che coincide con il pi day. L'edizione, che è la 83 (la 82 è sul blog dei Rudi), è specialissima, come vedete dall'immagine qui sopra, che vi dice già anche quale sarà l'ora di pubblicazione della prossima edizione (esclusi i secondi che non sono in grado di programmare...). In puro stile pi day, il tema è la matematica, declinata in tutte le salse. I contributi […]
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2:39 PM | c’est reparti !
Filed under: Books, Kids, pictures, Running Tagged: Charlie Hebdo

February 23, 2015

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11:15 PM | reading classics (The End)
Today was the final session of our Reading Classics Seminar for the academic year 2014-2015. I have not reported on this seminar much so far because it has had starting problems, namely hardly any student present on the first classes and therefore several re-starts until we reached a small group of interested students. And this […]
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5:00 PM | Martin Luther King (2) vs. Sigmund Freud
We didn’t get any great comments yesterday, so I’ll have to go with PKD on the grounds that he was the presumptive favorite, and nobody made any good case otherwise. And today we have the second seed among the Religious Leaders vs. an unseeded entry in the Founders of Religions category. Truly a classic matchup. […] The post Martin Luther King (2) vs. Sigmund Freud appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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3:00 PM | “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. [My talk tomorrow in the Princeton economics department]
The talk is tomorrow, Tues 24 Feb, 2:40-4:00pm in 200 Fisher Hall: “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University Minimizing bias is the traditional first goal of econometrics. In many cases, though, the […] The post “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. [My talk tomorrow […]
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2:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. [My talk tomorrow in the Princeton economics department] Martin Luther King (2) vs. Sigmund Freud Tues: “A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . . huh? Aristotle (3) vs. Stewart Lee Wed: The axes […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:18 PM | Katedrála svatého Víta, Václava a Vojtěch
Filed under: Kids, pictures, Travel Tagged: Czech Republic, Gothic cathedral, Prague, Prague Castle, Saint Vitus cathedral
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3:31 AM | Concepts of Sameness (Part 2)
Some notes on the Gongsun Long's 'white horse paradox'.
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1:27 AM | Career advice from Einstein
“If I would be a young man again and had to decide how to make my living, I would not try to become a scientist or scholar or teacher. I would rather choose to be a plumber or a peddler, in the hope to find that modest degree of independence still available under present circumstances.” […]
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12:20 AM | Concepts of Sameness (Part 1)
Here I'll start drafting a paper on 'concepts of sameness', which will be a chapter in Elaine Landry's Categories for the Working Philosopher.

February 22, 2015

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11:15 PM | the fundamental incompatibility of HMC and data subsampling
Last week, Michael Betancourt, from Warwick,  arXived a neat wee note on the fundamental difficulties in running HMC on a subsample of the original data. The core message is that using only one fraction of the data to run an HMC with the hope that it will preserve the stationary distribution does not work. The […]
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10:21 PM | Spin and the Stern-Gerlach Experiment
Spin and the Stern-Gerlach Experiment The word “quantum” means a single share or portion. In quantum mechanics, this means that energy comes in discrete chunks, or quanta, rather than a continuous flow. But it also means that particles have other properties that are discrete in a way … Continue reading → The post Spin and the Stern-Gerlach Experiment appeared first on The Physics Mill.
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10:20 PM | Nate Silver on sports data
Nate Silver has written on what’s so great about sports data. In short: it’s rich data (not just big data), we know the rules, and feedback comes quickly. This is from ESPN The Magazine‘s “Analytics Issue”, which comes out each … Continue reading →
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