Posts

October 05, 2014

+
12:46 PM | John Napier
Julian Havil has written a new book John Napier: Life, Logarithms, and Legacy. I haven’t read more than the introduction yet — a review copy arrived just yesterday — but I imagine it’s good judging by who wrote it. Havil’s book Gamma is my favorite popular math book. (Maybe I should say “semi-popular.” Havil’s books […]
+
12:20 PM | The Atoms of the Module World
The one-to-one correspondence between simple and projective indecomposable modules.
+
12:18 PM | misty dawn
Filed under: pictures, Running Tagged: dawn, France, mist, Parc de Sceaux, Sceaux, sunrise

October 04, 2014

+
10:14 PM | Argentan half-marathon [1 25' 02" - 29/503 - V2: 3/104 - 19°C]
A rather comparable race in Argentan with last year, with exactly the same time, a similar weather (a bit too hot and too windy), and a lack of pack for half of the race that again saw me running by myself the whole second half. I started a bit more slowly than last year, wary […]
+
1:49 PM | A few links to recent stories on Bayesian statistics
A few links to recent stories on Bayesian statistics: The Odds, Continually Updated (NYT) by Faye Flam (it’s the first of the month, so you might be able to read it without paying!), on the differences between frequentist and Bayesian statistics. The big examples here are the search for the fisherman John Aldridge, an (unpublished?) […]
+
1:19 PM | Carrie McLaren was way out in front of the anti-Gladwell bandwagon
Here she was back in 2005, way before Gladwell-bashing became cool. The post Carrie McLaren was way out in front of the anti-Gladwell bandwagon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:06 PM | INPS, precari e coccodé
La vicenda ha un che di assurdo, ma, come scrive Valentina Santarpia sul Corriere, ha scoperchiato un vaso di Pandora.Contesto: in questi decenni sia l'università sia la scuola si sono avvalsi e continuano ad avvalersi di una folta schiera di precari. Alcuni sono più o meno regolamentati, soprattutto nella scuola, con le fasce di docenza, di cui quella trattata peggio è la terza fascia (mia madre, commerciante, si è lamentata quest'estate che pago quasi più […]
+
12:33 PM | Aunt Pythia’s advice
Has Aunt Pythia mentioned recently how much she loves you people?! Well, if not, then let it be known: Aunt Pythia loves you people. Aunt Pythia asked for new questions last week, and you guys fucking delivered. Outstanding. I counted 21 questions when I started today’s column, which is a good 18 more questions than […]

October 03, 2014

+
10:55 PM | September Favorites
So, it is time for September Favorites (or maybe kind of late of it in a way). As you probably know I had a long September, and also the university just started a couple of weeks and it was a … Continue reading →
+
10:51 PM | Temperature Misconception: Heat is Not How it Feels
In the last FIFA football world cup, many players complain about Manaus' unbearable heat condition. Yet, the thermometer only went up to 30°C (86°F). Why is that? Well, as it turns out, how you feel is not really the outside temperature. This article unveils many of our deep misconceptions about heat.
+
10:14 PM | Rogue Male [book review]
When I was about to leave a library in Birmingham, I spotted a “buy one get one half-price” book on a pile next to the cashier. Despite a rather weird title, Geoffrey Household’s Rogue Male looked classic enough to rank with Graham Green’s Confidential Agent or Erskine Childers’ Riddle of the Sands or yet John […]
+
5:44 PM | The unfortunate backlash in the historiography of Islamic science
Anybody with a basic knowledge of the history of Western science will know that there is a standard narrative of its development that goes something like this. Its roots are firmly planted in the cultures of ancient Egypt and Babylon … Continue reading →
+
1:32 PM | 65% of principals say that at least 30% of students . . . wha??
Alan Sloane writes: The OECD put out a report drawing on their PISA and TALIS data: http://oecdeducationtoday.blogspot.ie/2014/07/poverty-and-perception-of-poverty-how.html I notice that it’s already attracted a NY Times op-ed by David Leonhart: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/23/upshot/principals-in-us-are-more-likely-to-consider-their-students-poor.html There are a number of things I find strange in its analysis and interpretation but, for starters, there’s the horizontal axis in […]
+
12:18 PM | echo vulnerable
Even though most people are now aware of the Shellshock security problem on the bash shell, here is a test to check whether your Unix system is at risk: if the prompt returns vulnerable, it means the system is vulnerable and needs to be upgraded with the proper security patch… For instance running for Debian/Ubuntu […]
+
12:17 PM | Ello, Enron, and the future of data privacy
If you think Ello is the newest safest social media platform, you might want to think again. Or at the very least, go ahead and read this piece by my data journalist buddy Meredith Broussard, entitled ‘Ello, social media newcomer! Goodbye, data security fears?. Meredith has read the fine print in Ello’s security policy, and it’s not […]
+
11:49 AM | Olimpiadi dell'Astronomia 2015: si parte!
L'edizione per l'anno scolastico 2014-15 è pronta. C'è il bando. C'è il dossier (quest'anno il tema è la luce). Quindi cosa aspettate ragazzi? Partecipate! Cosa aspettate, professori? Segnalate ai vostri studenti! video via Media Inaf
+
1:32 AM | Huge cardinals are huge!
In a previous post, I gave a humorous classification of large cardinals, dividing them to large large cardinals and small large cardinals, and so on. In particular huge cardinals were classified as large large large large large cardinals. But how large are they? Not surprisingly, very large. In case you forgot, $\kappa$ is a huge […]

October 02, 2014

+
11:07 PM | Rss move
Our RSS feed is now directly accessible via andrewgelman.com/feed – no need to go through feedburner. You need to resubscribe to the feed. The post Rss move appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
10:14 PM | Kirchen in Wien
Filed under: pictures, Running, Statistics, Travel Tagged: Austria, churches, Vienna
+
4:10 PM | Poem for the ALDS
These are the names that are freaking me out, Verlander, Scherzer, and Price, Plaguing my Oriole fandom with doubt, Verlander, Scherzer and Price. A trio of felines, bringing the heat, Verlander, Scherzer, and Price, Are these guys that a team writing “Ryan Flaherty” and “Jonathan Schoop” on the lineup card every day actually has a […]
+
1:43 PM | Insegnamento di massa a distanza
Il successo dei MOOC, massive open online course, corsi on line di massa aperti (più o meno), sta spingendo la ricerca sull'insegnamento a distanza verso la comparazione tra studenti on-line e studenti off-line, per così dire. Lo studio si è concentrato sugli studenti universitari, però alcune osservazioni, anche tratte dall'articolo di VentureBeat che ha diffuso la ricerca, mi sembrano interessanti e abbastanza generali: Nonostante l'istruzione ulteriore che gli […]
+
1:15 PM | International Journal of Epidemiology versus Hivemind and the Datagoround
The Hivemind wins (see the comment thread here, which is full of detective work from various commenters). As I wrote as a postscript to that earlier post, maybe we should call this the “stone soup” or “Bem” phenomenon, when a highly flawed work stimulates interesting, thoughtful discussion. The post International Journal of Epidemiology versus Hivemind and the Datagoround appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
12:54 PM | Taking responsibility for the mistakes of others
The version of Windows following 8.1 will be Windows 10, not Windows 9. Apparently this is because Microsoft knows that a lot of software naively looks at the first digit of the version number, concluding that it must be Windows 95 or Windows 98 if it starts with 9. Many think this is stupid. They […]
+
12:32 PM | StemFeminist
I found the website StemFeminist.com via Jordan Ellenberg this morning and I honestly can’t stop reading it. It consists of a bunch of anonymously contributed stories, most but not all by women, about everyday sexism that happens in the STEM fields. Many of them resonate either with stuff I’ve lived through or stuff my friends […]
+
11:28 AM | plenty of new arXivals!
Here are some entries I spotted in the past days as of potential interest, for which I will have not enough time to comment: arXiv:1410.0163: Instrumental Variables: An Econometrician’s Perspective by Guido Imbens arXiv:1410.0123: Deep Tempering by Guillaume Desjardins, Heng Luo, Aaron Courville, Yoshua Bengio arXiv:1410.0255: Variance reduction for irreversible Langevin samplers and diffusion on […]
+
12:00 AM | Clustering of bigram frequencies
Rick Wicklin at the SAS blog writes on the frequency of bigrams in an English corpus. In English: how often does a pair of letters, such as “TH” or “QZ”, appear in English text? This is a follow-up to a previous post on the frequency of letters in an English corpus and builds on an […]

October 01, 2014

+
10:14 PM | Approximate Bayesian Computation in state space models
While it took quite a while (!), with several visits by three of us to our respective antipodes, incl. my exciting trip to Melbourne and Monash University two years ago, our paper on ABC for state space models was arXived yesterday! Thanks to my coauthors, Gael Martin, Brendan McCabe, and  Worapree Maneesoonthorn,  I am very […]
+
9:55 PM | La tavola delle coniche
da Cyclopaedia, 1728
+
2:06 PM | In defense of stories and classroom activities, from a resubmission letter from 1999
I was going through my files looking for some old data (which I still haven’t found!) and came across a letter from 1999 accompanying the submission of a revision of this article with Glickman. Here’s a part of the letter, a response to some questions of one of the reviewers: With regard to the comment […] The post In defense of stories and classroom activities, from a resubmission letter from 1999 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:30 PM | Can anyone guess what went wrong here?
OK, here’s a puzzle for all of you. I received the following email: Dear Professor Gelman: The editor of ** asked me to write to see if you would be willing to review MS ** entitled ** We are hoping for a review within the next 2-3 weeks if possible. I would appreciate if you […] The post Can anyone guess what went wrong here? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
456789
248 Results