Posts

October 09, 2014

+
12:18 PM | Statistics slides (3)
Here is the third set of slides for my third year statistics course. Nothing out of the ordinary, but the opportunity to link statistics and simulation for students not yet exposed to Monte Carlo methods. (No ABC yet, but who knows?, I may use ABC as an entry to Bayesian statistics, following Don Rubin’s example! […]
+
12:00 PM | Don’t let your babies grow up to be culinary arts majors
From Christopher Ingraham at the Washington Post’s Wonkblog: Want to do what you love and get paid for it? Choose one of these majors, a post based on data from Payscale.com. Although I don’t have the raw data, there’s a nice scatterplot showing for each major the mid-career salary and the percentage of people saying […]
+
12:57 AM | Forced creases in Miura folding
I've posted before about the Miura fold, a subdivision of a sheet of paper into paralellograms that gives a nice smooth motion from a compact folded state (in which the parallelograms are all folded on top of each other) to an unfolded state in which the paper is nearly flat. But this pattern can have defects that interfere with its folding pattern, in which small subunits of the pattern fold the wrong way: they still have the same creases but some of them are backwards. My latest arXiv […]

October 08, 2014

+
10:14 PM | unicode in LaTeX
As I was hurriedly trying to cram several ‘Og posts into a conference paper (!), I looked around for a way of including Unicode characters straight away. And found this solution on StackExchange: which just suited me fine!Filed under: Books, Linux, Statistics, University life Tagged: blogging, LaTeX, papers, StackExchange, Unicode, UTF-8, Wordpress
+
3:39 PM | Giulia 1300 e altri miracoli
Le vicende di questo romanzo vedono protagonisti tre perfetti sconosciuti che stanno trascorrendo un periodo difficile: Diego ha appena perso il padre, Claudio si è separato dalla moglie e sta facendo fallire la ditta di famiglia, Fausto vende orologi (fasulli) in TV e rischia di essere picchiato ogni volta che qualche cliente gabbato lo riconosce.Vogliono tutti e tre cambiare un po' le cose, e rispondono ad un annuncio sulla vendita di un casale, dove si incontrano tutti e tre per la […]
+
3:11 PM | Manca un poco di blu
Illustrazione realizzata con SketchBookXUna delle prime classificazioni che si apprendono quando si inizia a studiare il comportamento della materia di fronte all'elettricità è quella tra conduttori e isolanti: un conduttore è un materiale che permette facilmente il passaggio delle cariche elettriche, un isolante, invece, lo impedisce (o lo rende difficoltoso). E' possibile caratterizzare questi due generi di materiali attraverso le caratteristiche fisiche degli atomi che […]

Holonyak N. & Bevacqua S.F. (1962). Coherent (visible) light emission from Ga(As1−xPx) junctions, Applied Physics Letters, 1 (4) 82. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1753706

Nakamura S., Mukai T. & Senoh M. (1994). Candela-class high-brightness InGaN/AlGaN double-heterostructure blue-light-emitting diodes, Applied Physics Letters, 64 (13) 1687. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.111832

Akasaki I., Amano H., Sota S., Sakai H., Tanaka T. & Koike M. (1995). Stimulated Emission by Current Injection from an AlGaN/GaN/GaInN Quantum Well Device, Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, 34 (11B) L1517. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7567/jjap.34.l1517

Citation
+
1:47 PM | Public reaction to Ebola
Ebola elicits two kinds of reactions in the US. Some think we are in imminent danger of an Ebola epidemic. Others think Ebola poses absolutely zero danger and that those who think otherwise are kooks. Nothing can be discussed rationally. Even narrow scientific questions lead to emotionally-charged political arguments. Those who have a different opinion […]
+
1:23 PM | When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements about “typical” attitudes
This story has two points: 1. There’s a tendency for scientific results to be framed in absolute terms (in psychology, this corresponds to general claims about the population) but that can be a mistake in that sometimes the most important part of the story is variation; and 2. Before getting to the comparisons, it can […] The post When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements about “typical” attitudes appeared first on Statistical […]
+
12:00 PM | Crystallographers and statisticians
If you like podcasts, and you like science, you should listen to Jim Al-Khalili‘s Life Scientific, on BBC Radio 4. (I suppose if you’re in Britain you could listen on an actual radio.). Al-Khalili, a nuclear physicist, interviews prominent (mostly British) scientists about their life and work. The most recent program was with Elspeth Garman, […]
+
8:08 AM | Maths at the Manchester Science Festival
Manchester Science Festival takes over the city from 23rd October – 2nd November this year, and it’s got a great selection of mathematical events. If you’re based locally, or thinking of heading over there for any of the time, here’s The Aperiodical’s guide to where to get your factorial fix. Dice World (Thursday 23rd October,... Read more »
+
4:30 AM | posterior predictive distributions of Bayes factors
Once a Bayes factor B(y)  is computed, one needs to assess its strength. As repeated many times here, Jeffreys’ scale has no validation whatsoever, it is simply a division of the (1,∞) range into regions of convenience. Following earlier proposals in the literature (Box, 1980; García-Donato and Chen, 2005; Geweke and Amisano, 2008), an evaluation […]

October 07, 2014

+
1:35 PM | Rational != Self-interested
I’ve said it before (along with Aaron Edlin and Noah Kaplan) and I’ll say it again. Rationality and self-interest are two dimensions of behavior. An action can be: 1. Rational and self-interested 2. Irrational and self-interested 3. Rational and altruistic 4. Irrational and altruistic. It’s easy enough to come up with examples of all of […] The post Rational != Self-interested appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:29 PM | land O links
Here are a few links for your enjoyment: Does a five year old need to learn how to code? A mathematician uses statistics to predict the next Game of Thrones death. Why academics stink at writing. An operations researcher argues that airports should screen for Ebola the same way it screens for terrorists (nice job Sheldon […]
+
12:18 PM | randomness in coin tosses and last digits of prime numbers
A rather intriguing note that was arXived last week: it is essentially one page long and it compares the power law of the frequency range for the Bernoulli experiment with the power law of the frequency range for the distribution of the last digits of the first 10,000 prime numbers to conclude that the power […]
+
12:12 PM | How rare are eighteen-inning games, really?
What’s More Improbable: An 18-Inning Playoff Game Or A 13-Inch Penis?, from Deadspin’s Regressing blog, on sports statistics. Ross Benes points out that postseason baseball games are on average 9.22 innings with a standard deviation of 0.79, so the 18-inning Nationals-Giants game is about eleven standard deviations from the mean, or as rare as the […]
+
11:21 AM | Workplace Personality Test for the NY Fed
I’ve got a list of things to write about here on mathbabe, and they include the Carmen Segarra secret tapes as well as workplace personality tests. I’ve decided to do a mash-up just for fun, imagining what Carmen had to go through to get her job. Update: you can send someone the link to this […]
+
11:17 AM | Carlo Rubbia and the discoveries of the weak bosons
http://t.co/KGVNarwZMG by @ulaulaman about #CarloRubbia #NobelPrize #physics #particlephysicsOn that day 30 years ago, I was almost certainly at school. Physics still was not my passion. Of course I started very well: when the teacher asked what is the space, I thought immediately to the universe, but the question was not referring to that "space", but in another, the geometric. But it is not about those memories that I have to indulge, but on a particular photo, in which Carlo Rubbia and […]
+
9:14 AM | Ritratti: Carlo Rubbia
Il modo migliore per aspettare il #Nobel per la #Fisica 2014In quel giorno di 30 anni fa (stiamo parlando della seconda settimana di ottobre del 1984) ero, quasi sicuramente, a scuola. Sarà stata la terza elementare e ancora la fisica non era una mia passione. Certo iniziavo bene: quando la maestra chiese cos'era lo spazio, io pensai immediatamente all'universo, ma la domanda non era riferita a quello "spazio", ma a un altro, quello di tipo geometrico. Però non è su quei […]

Glashow S.L. (1961). Partial-symmetries of weak interactions, Nuclear Physics, 22 (4) 579-588. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0029-5582(61)90469-2

Weinberg S. (1967). A Model of Leptons, Physical Review Letters, 19 (21) 1264-1266. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.19.1264

Arnison G., B. Aubert, C. Bacci, R. Bernabei, A. Bézaguet, R. Bock, M. Calvetti, P. Catz, S. Centro & F. Ceradini & (1981). Some observations on the first events seen at the CERN proton-antiproton collider, Physics Letters B, 107 (4) 320-324. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(81)90839-x

Arnison G., B. Aubert, C. Bacci, G. Bauer, A. Bézaguet, R. Böck, T.J.V. Bowcock, M. Calvetti, T. Carroll & P. Catz & (1983). Experimental observation of isolated large transverse energy electrons with associated missing energy at, Physics Letters B, 122 (1) 103-116. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)91177-2

Arnison G., B. Aubert, C. Bacci, G. Bauer, A. Bézaguet, R. Böck, T.J.V. Bowcock, M. Calvetti, P. Catz & P. Cennini & (1983). Experimental observation of lepton pairs of invariant mass around 95 GeV/c2 at the CERN SPS collider, Physics Letters B, 126 (5) 398-410. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)90188-0

Banner M., Ph. Bloch, F. Bonaudi, K. Borer, M. Borghini, J.-C. Chollet, A.G. Clark, C. Conta, P. Darriulat & L. Di Lella & (1983). Observation of single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum in events with missing transverse energy at the CERN p collider, Physics Letters B, 122 (5-6) 476-485. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)91605-2

Bagnaia P., R. Battiston, Ph. Bloch, F. Bonaudi, K. Borer, M. Borghini, J.-C. Chollet, A.G. Clark, C. Conta & P. Darriulat & (1983). Evidence for Z0→e e− at the CERN p collider, Physics Letters B, 129 (1-2) 130-140. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)90744-x

Rubbia C. (1985). Experimental observation of the intermediate vector bosons W , W-, and Z0, Reviews of Modern Physics, 57 (3) 699-722. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/revmodphys.57.699

Cline D.B., Mann A.K. & Rubbia C. (1974). The Detection of Neutral Weak Currents, Scientific American, 231 (6) 108-119. DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican1274-108

Rubbia C., McIntyre P. & Cline D. (1977). Producing Massive Neutral Intermediate Vector Bosons with Existing Accelerators, Proceedings of the International Neutrino Conference Aachen 1976, 683-687. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-322-90614-4_67

van der Meer S. (1981). Stochastic Cooling in the CERN Antiproton Accumulator, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 28 (3) 1994-1998. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tns.1981.4331574

Maki Z., Nakagawa M. & Sakata S. (1962). Remarks on the Unified Model of Elementary Particles, Progress of Theoretical Physics, 28 (5) 870-880. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1143/ptp.28.870

Rubbia, C., Antonello, M., Aprili, P., Baibussinov, B., Ceolin, M., Barzè, L., Benetti, P., Calligarich, E., Canci, N., Carbonara, F. & Cavanna, F. (2011). Underground operation of the ICARUS T600 LAr-TPC: first results, Journal of Instrumentation, 6 (07) DOI: 10.1088/1748-0221/6/07/P07011

Citation
+
3:38 AM | A trivial generalisation of Cayley’s theorem
One of the first basic theorems in group theory is Cayley’s theorem, which links abstract finite groups with concrete finite groups (otherwise known as permutation groups). Theorem 1 (Cayley’s theorem) Let be a group of some finite order . Then is isomorphic to a subgroup of the symmetric group on elements . Furthermore, this subgroup […]
+
12:00 AM | KDD panel: a data scientist’s guide to startups
A data scientist’s guide to startups, a panel including: Foster Provost, NYU Stern professor and author of Data Science for Business Geoffrey Webb, Monash University professor Ron Bekkerman of the University of Haifa Oren Etzioni of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (that’s Paul Allen, of Microsoft) Usama Fayyad, chief data officer of Barclays Bank […]

October 06, 2014

+
10:14 PM | The winds of Winter [Bayesian prediction]
A surprising entry on arXiv this morning: Richard Vale (from Christchurch, NZ) has posted a paper about the characters appearing in the yet hypothetical next volume of George R.R. Martin’s Song of ice and fire series, The winds of Winter [not even put for pre-sale on amazon!]. Using the previous five books in the series […]
+
9:26 PM | “We have used Stan to study dead dolphins”
In response to our call for references to successful research using Stan, Matthieu Authier points us to this: @article{ year={2014}, journal={Biodiversity and Conservation}, volume={23}, number={10}, doi={10.1007/s10531-014-0741-3}, title={How much are stranding records affected by variation in reporting rates? A case study of small delphinids in the Bay of Biscay}, url={http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0741-3}, keywords={Monitoring; Marine mammal; Strandings}, author={Authier, Matthieu […]
+
6:47 PM | “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.”
Love the Liberry is still going strong. The post “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
3:30 PM | On deck this week
Mon: “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” Tues: Rational != Self-interested Wed: When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements about “typical” attitudes Thurs: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
2:46 PM | Polluting Youtube once again!
Professor Christopher M Graney, Renaissance Mathematicus friend and guest blogger, has posted another of his holiday videos on Youtube, documenting parts of his visit to Nürnberg and Bamberg for the Astronomy in Franconia Conferences. In his new video “Nürnberg and … Continue reading →
+
2:14 PM | in defense of model complexity
Recently I wrote a post in defense of model simplicity. I liked a lot of things about that post, but it wasn’t the entire picture. Much of what we do in operations research deals with solving complex problems, and often we can’t settle for anything simple. Simple models can be incredibly useful, but they are generally useful […]
+
1:47 PM | Detroit’s water problem and the Koch brothers
Yesterday at the Alt Banking group we discussed the recent Koch brothers article from Rolling Stone Magazine, written by Tim Dickinson. You should read it now if you haven’t already. There are tons of issues that came up, but one of them in particular was the control of information that the Koch brothers maintain over […]
+
1:00 PM | On deck this month
Lots of good stuff in the queue: “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” Rational != Self-interested When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements […] The post On deck this month appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
12:18 PM | hypothesis testing for MCMC
A recent arXival by Benjamin Gyori and Daniel Paulin considers sequential testing based on MCMC simulation. The test is about an expectation under the target and stationary distribution of the Markov chain (i.e., the posterior in a Bayesian setting). Hence testing whether or not the posterior expectation is below a certain bound is not directly […]
+
3:45 AM | Models and metaphors we live by
George Lakoff and Mark Johnson’s Metaphors we live by is a classic, that has had a huge influence on parts of linguistics and cognitive science, and some influence — although less so, in my opinion — on philosophy. It is structured around the thought that “[m]etaphor is one of our most important tools for trying […]

Narayanan, S. (1997). Embodiment in language understanding: Sensory-motor representations for metaphoric reasoning about event descriptions., PhD Thesis (University of California, Berkeley),

Citation
3456789
259 Results