Posts

October 07, 2014

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9:14 AM | Ritratti: Carlo Rubbia
Il modo migliore per aspettare il #Nobel per la #Fisica 2014In quel giorno di 30 anni fa (stiamo parlando della seconda settimana di ottobre del 1984) ero, quasi sicuramente, a scuola. Sarà stata la terza elementare e ancora la fisica non era una mia passione. Certo iniziavo bene: quando la maestra chiese cos'era lo spazio, io pensai immediatamente all'universo, ma la domanda non era riferita a quello "spazio", ma a un altro, quello di tipo geometrico. Però non è su quei […]

Glashow S.L. (1961). Partial-symmetries of weak interactions, Nuclear Physics, 22 (4) 579-588. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0029-5582(61)90469-2

Weinberg S. (1967). A Model of Leptons, Physical Review Letters, 19 (21) 1264-1266. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.19.1264

Arnison G., B. Aubert, C. Bacci, R. Bernabei, A. Bézaguet, R. Bock, M. Calvetti, P. Catz, S. Centro & F. Ceradini & (1981). Some observations on the first events seen at the CERN proton-antiproton collider, Physics Letters B, 107 (4) 320-324. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(81)90839-x

Arnison G., B. Aubert, C. Bacci, G. Bauer, A. Bézaguet, R. Böck, T.J.V. Bowcock, M. Calvetti, T. Carroll & P. Catz & (1983). Experimental observation of isolated large transverse energy electrons with associated missing energy at, Physics Letters B, 122 (1) 103-116. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)91177-2

Arnison G., B. Aubert, C. Bacci, G. Bauer, A. Bézaguet, R. Böck, T.J.V. Bowcock, M. Calvetti, P. Catz & P. Cennini & (1983). Experimental observation of lepton pairs of invariant mass around 95 GeV/c2 at the CERN SPS collider, Physics Letters B, 126 (5) 398-410. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)90188-0

Banner M., Ph. Bloch, F. Bonaudi, K. Borer, M. Borghini, J.-C. Chollet, A.G. Clark, C. Conta, P. Darriulat & L. Di Lella & (1983). Observation of single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum in events with missing transverse energy at the CERN p collider, Physics Letters B, 122 (5-6) 476-485. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)91605-2

Bagnaia P., R. Battiston, Ph. Bloch, F. Bonaudi, K. Borer, M. Borghini, J.-C. Chollet, A.G. Clark, C. Conta & P. Darriulat & (1983). Evidence for Z0→e e− at the CERN p collider, Physics Letters B, 129 (1-2) 130-140. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0370-2693(83)90744-x

Rubbia C. (1985). Experimental observation of the intermediate vector bosons W , W-, and Z0, Reviews of Modern Physics, 57 (3) 699-722. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/revmodphys.57.699

Cline D.B., Mann A.K. & Rubbia C. (1974). The Detection of Neutral Weak Currents, Scientific American, 231 (6) 108-119. DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican1274-108

Rubbia C., McIntyre P. & Cline D. (1977). Producing Massive Neutral Intermediate Vector Bosons with Existing Accelerators, Proceedings of the International Neutrino Conference Aachen 1976, 683-687. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-322-90614-4_67

van der Meer S. (1981). Stochastic Cooling in the CERN Antiproton Accumulator, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, 28 (3) 1994-1998. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tns.1981.4331574

Maki Z., Nakagawa M. & Sakata S. (1962). Remarks on the Unified Model of Elementary Particles, Progress of Theoretical Physics, 28 (5) 870-880. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1143/ptp.28.870

Rubbia, C., Antonello, M., Aprili, P., Baibussinov, B., Ceolin, M., Barzè, L., Benetti, P., Calligarich, E., Canci, N., Carbonara, F. & Cavanna, F. (2011). Underground operation of the ICARUS T600 LAr-TPC: first results, Journal of Instrumentation, 6 (07) DOI: 10.1088/1748-0221/6/07/P07011

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3:38 AM | A trivial generalisation of Cayley’s theorem
One of the first basic theorems in group theory is Cayley’s theorem, which links abstract finite groups with concrete finite groups (otherwise known as permutation groups). Theorem 1 (Cayley’s theorem) Let be a group of some finite order . Then is isomorphic to a subgroup of the symmetric group on elements . Furthermore, this subgroup […]
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12:00 AM | KDD panel: a data scientist’s guide to startups
A data scientist’s guide to startups, a panel including: Foster Provost, NYU Stern professor and author of Data Science for Business Geoffrey Webb, Monash University professor Ron Bekkerman of the University of Haifa Oren Etzioni of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (that’s Paul Allen, of Microsoft) Usama Fayyad, chief data officer of Barclays Bank […]

October 06, 2014

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10:14 PM | The winds of Winter [Bayesian prediction]
A surprising entry on arXiv this morning: Richard Vale (from Christchurch, NZ) has posted a paper about the characters appearing in the yet hypothetical next volume of George R.R. Martin’s Song of ice and fire series, The winds of Winter [not even put for pre-sale on amazon!]. Using the previous five books in the series […]
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9:26 PM | “We have used Stan to study dead dolphins”
In response to our call for references to successful research using Stan, Matthieu Authier points us to this: @article{ year={2014}, journal={Biodiversity and Conservation}, volume={23}, number={10}, doi={10.1007/s10531-014-0741-3}, title={How much are stranding records affected by variation in reporting rates? A case study of small delphinids in the Bay of Biscay}, url={http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0741-3}, keywords={Monitoring; Marine mammal; Strandings}, author={Authier, Matthieu […]
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6:47 PM | “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.”
Love the Liberry is still going strong. The post “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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3:30 PM | On deck this week
Mon: “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” Tues: Rational != Self-interested Wed: When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements about “typical” attitudes Thurs: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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2:46 PM | Polluting Youtube once again!
Professor Christopher M Graney, Renaissance Mathematicus friend and guest blogger, has posted another of his holiday videos on Youtube, documenting parts of his visit to Nürnberg and Bamberg for the Astronomy in Franconia Conferences. In his new video “Nürnberg and … Continue reading →
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2:14 PM | in defense of model complexity
Recently I wrote a post in defense of model simplicity. I liked a lot of things about that post, but it wasn’t the entire picture. Much of what we do in operations research deals with solving complex problems, and often we can’t settle for anything simple. Simple models can be incredibly useful, but they are generally useful […]
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1:47 PM | Detroit’s water problem and the Koch brothers
Yesterday at the Alt Banking group we discussed the recent Koch brothers article from Rolling Stone Magazine, written by Tim Dickinson. You should read it now if you haven’t already. There are tons of issues that came up, but one of them in particular was the control of information that the Koch brothers maintain over […]
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1:00 PM | On deck this month
Lots of good stuff in the queue: “Regular Customer: It was so much easier when I was a bum. I didn’t have to wake up at 4am to go to work, didn’t have all these bills and girlfriends.” Rational != Self-interested When there’s a lot of variation, it can be a mistake to make statements […] The post On deck this month appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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12:18 PM | hypothesis testing for MCMC
A recent arXival by Benjamin Gyori and Daniel Paulin considers sequential testing based on MCMC simulation. The test is about an expectation under the target and stationary distribution of the Markov chain (i.e., the posterior in a Bayesian setting). Hence testing whether or not the posterior expectation is below a certain bound is not directly […]
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3:45 AM | Models and metaphors we live by
George Lakoff and Mark Johnson’s Metaphors we live by is a classic, that has had a huge influence on parts of linguistics and cognitive science, and some influence — although less so, in my opinion — on philosophy. It is structured around the thought that “[m]etaphor is one of our most important tools for trying […]

Narayanan, S. (1997). Embodiment in language understanding: Sensory-motor representations for metaphoric reasoning about event descriptions., PhD Thesis (University of California, Berkeley),

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October 05, 2014

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10:25 PM | M-theory, Octonions and Tricategories
John Huerta has completed the fourth of a series of papers on supersymmetry and division algebras.
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10:14 PM | Monte Carlo simulation and resampling methods for social science [book review]
Monte Carlo simulation and resampling methods for social science is a short paperback written by Thomas Carsey and Jeffrey Harden on the use of Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the adequacy of a model and the impact of assumptions behind this model. I picked it in the library the other day and browse through the […]
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9:53 PM | Links for October 5
Allen Downey on when we will see a two-hour marathon. (Basically, extrapolate the current world record progression linearly, but there are good theoretical reasons to expect this to make sense. Robert Smallshire (of the Norway-based Sixty North) on Predictive Models of Development Teams and the Systems They Build Todd Schneider on How Many Paths are […]
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6:24 PM | To Colloops a cardinal
This is nothing new, but it’s a choice-y way of thinking about it. Which is really what I enjoy doing. Definition. Let $V$ be a model of $\ZFC$, and $\PP\in V$ be a notion of forcing. We say that a cardinal $\kappa$ is “colloopsed” by $\PP$ (to $\mu$) if every $V$-generic filter $G$ adds a […]
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3:41 PM | Sudoku clues
http://t.co/zk3P3rPjFZ #sudoku #mathematics #arXiv #abstract The arXiv's paper is published two years ago, but I think that every time is a good time to play sudoku! The sudoku minimum number of clues problem is the following question: what is the smallest number of clues that a sudoku puzzle can have? For several years it had been conjectured that the answer is 17. We have performed an exhaustive computer search for 16-clue sudoku puzzles, and did not find any, thus proving that the answer is […]
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1:45 PM | Celebrate Mathematicians part 1
As you already know from my post 100 Followers I am organizing an event about the mathematicians born in October. As a small reminder you can find this event on: Google+ , Facebook and also you can use #CelebratewithLThMath on Tumblr , Twitter or Instagram. With it I just to show … Continue reading →
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1:20 PM | Professori
Ci sono vari tipi di professori. C'è il professore tifoso Il professore assassino Il professore supereroe E poi ci sono i professori blogger. Qui sotto ce ne sono alcuni. Ve li consiglio. Hanno un ricco archivio in cui cercare. Cose belle e preziose, per lo più.Buone letture con:Annarita RubertoMarco Fulvio BarozziRoberto ZanasiRosalba CoccoChristofaro SorrentinoCristina SperlariQuesti sono solo alcuni. Ce ne sono molti altri, che ho sicuramente dimenticato, ma in ogni caso a […]
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1:04 PM | Anova is great—if you interpret it as a way of structuring a model, not if you focus on F tests
Shravan Vasishth writes: I saw on your blog post that you listed aggregation as one of the desirable things to do. Do you agree with the following argument? I want to point out a problem with repeated measures ANOVA in talk: In a planned experiment, say a 2×2 design, when we do a repeated measures […] The post Anova is great—if you interpret it as a way of structuring a model, not if you focus on F tests appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]
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12:46 PM | John Napier
Julian Havil has written a new book John Napier: Life, Logarithms, and Legacy. I haven’t read more than the introduction yet — a review copy arrived just yesterday — but I imagine it’s good judging by who wrote it. Havil’s book Gamma is my favorite popular math book. (Maybe I should say “semi-popular.” Havil’s books […]
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12:20 PM | The Atoms of the Module World
The one-to-one correspondence between simple and projective indecomposable modules.
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12:18 PM | misty dawn
Filed under: pictures, Running Tagged: dawn, France, mist, Parc de Sceaux, Sceaux, sunrise

October 04, 2014

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10:14 PM | Argentan half-marathon [1 25' 02" - 29/503 - V2: 3/104 - 19°C]
A rather comparable race in Argentan with last year, with exactly the same time, a similar weather (a bit too hot and too windy), and a lack of pack for half of the race that again saw me running by myself the whole second half. I started a bit more slowly than last year, wary […]
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1:49 PM | A few links to recent stories on Bayesian statistics
A few links to recent stories on Bayesian statistics: The Odds, Continually Updated (NYT) by Faye Flam (it’s the first of the month, so you might be able to read it without paying!), on the differences between frequentist and Bayesian statistics. The big examples here are the search for the fisherman John Aldridge, an (unpublished?) […]
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1:19 PM | Carrie McLaren was way out in front of the anti-Gladwell bandwagon
Here she was back in 2005, way before Gladwell-bashing became cool. The post Carrie McLaren was way out in front of the anti-Gladwell bandwagon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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1:06 PM | INPS, precari e coccodé
La vicenda ha un che di assurdo, ma, come scrive Valentina Santarpia sul Corriere, ha scoperchiato un vaso di Pandora.Contesto: in questi decenni sia l'università sia la scuola si sono avvalsi e continuano ad avvalersi di una folta schiera di precari. Alcuni sono più o meno regolamentati, soprattutto nella scuola, con le fasce di docenza, di cui quella trattata peggio è la terza fascia (mia madre, commerciante, si è lamentata quest'estate che pago quasi più […]
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12:33 PM | Aunt Pythia’s advice
Has Aunt Pythia mentioned recently how much she loves you people?! Well, if not, then let it be known: Aunt Pythia loves you people. Aunt Pythia asked for new questions last week, and you guys fucking delivered. Outstanding. I counted 21 questions when I started today’s column, which is a good 18 more questions than […]

October 03, 2014

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10:55 PM | September Favorites
So, it is time for September Favorites (or maybe kind of late of it in a way). As you probably know I had a long September, and also the university just started a couple of weeks and it was a … Continue reading →
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