Posts

December 03, 2014

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12:11 AM | On the nth day of Christmas…
Today PNC Wealth Management announced its Christmas Price Index. This is the cost of buying all the gifts in the song The Twelve Days of Christmas. All 364 of them. Where’d that number come from? Well, there is one on … Continue reading →

December 02, 2014

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11:14 PM | the Grumble distribution and an ODE
As ‘Og’s readers may have noticed, I paid some recent visits to Cross Validated (although I find this too addictive to be sustainable on a long term basis!, and as already reported a few years ago frustrating at several levels from questions asked without any preliminary personal effort, to a lack of background material to […]
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10:45 PM | November Favorites
November just ended, and it feels like time is flying incredibly fast. Probably it is just my feeling because I am close to my exams, and I had tons of things to do for university. A huge change that you … Continue reading →
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7:03 PM | Thinking about grading
Thinking about specifications grading involves rethinking some basic assumptions about assessment and grading, even teaching in general. Here are four things that came clear to me as I read Linda Nilson's recent book on specs grading.
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2:43 PM | Educational feedback loops in China and the U.S.
Today I want to discuss a recent review in New York Review of Books, on a new book entitled Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon? Why China Has the Best (and Worst) Education System in the World by Yong Zhao (hat tip Alex). The review was written by Diane Ravitch, an outspoken critic of No Child Left Behind, Race To The Top, […]
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2:43 PM | How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write.
It all started when I was reading Chris Blattman’s blog and noticed this: One of the most provocative and interesting field experiments I [Blattman] have seen in this year: Poor people often do not make investments, even when returns are high. One possible explanation is that they have low aspirations and form mental models of […] The post How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and […]
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8:35 AM | On reading and writing and silence
[week 4 of the challenge. It’s time for a quick post to catch up after last week’s delay.] As you know, this blogging challenge of mine is based on the observation that I would like to write more. And then …
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3:52 AM | Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning
[This post is by Aki] This is my first blog posting. Arthur Poropat at Griffith University has a great posting Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning about two recent studies which came to the same conclusion: university students evaluate their teachers more positively when they learn less. My favorite part is That is why many […] The post Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning appeared first on Statistical Modeling, […]

December 01, 2014

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11:14 PM | another instance of ABC?
“These characteristics are (1) likelihood is not available; (2) prior information is available; (3) a portion of the prior information is expressed in terms of functionals of the model that cannot be converted into an analytic prior on model parameters; (4) the model can be simulated. Our approach depends on an assumption that (5) an […]
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5:37 PM | Stan hack session at Columbia on Saturday
[this post is by Daniel] For those of you in NYC this Saturday, we’re having a Stan hack session from 11 am – 5 pm. A lot of the Stan developers will be around. It’s free, but registration required. See link below. Bring a laptop, some data, and a model you want to fit. Or […] The post Stan hack session at Columbia on Saturday appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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4:50 PM | Quick tips on giving research presentations
Hi, I’m writing this so I can refer to it when covering “giving a presentation” in my statistical communication class. The general idea is for me to spend less time in class talking and more time helping out students with their ideas. So, if I have any general advice on presentations, let me give it […] The post Quick tips on giving research presentations appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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3:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: Quick tips on giving research presentations Tues: How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write. Wed: If observational studies are outlawed, then only outlaws will do observational studies Thurs: Designing a study to see if “the 10x programmer” is a real thing Fri: The persistence of the “schools are […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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2:00 PM | On deck this month
Here goes: Quick tips on giving research presentations How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write. If observational studies are outlawed, then only outlaws will do observational studies Designing a study to see if “the 10x programmer” is a real thing The persistence of the “schools are failing” story line […] The post On deck this month appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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11:43 AM | The re-emergence of debtors’ prisons
Yesterday at my weekly Occupy meeting we watched videos called To Prison For Poverty by Brave New Films (Part I and Part II) before discussing them. Take a look, they are well done:   It’s not the first time this issue has come up recently; the NPR investigations into court fees from last May, called Guilty […]
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7:00 AM | Is cancer really a game?
A couple of weeks ago a post here on TheEGG, which was about evolutionary game theory (EGT) and cancer, sparked a debate on Twitter between proponents and opponents of the idea of using EGT to study cancer. Mainly due to the limitations inherent to Twitter the dialogue fizzled. Instead, here we are expanding ideas in […]

Marusyk, A., Tabassum, D.P., Altrock, P.M., Almendro, V., Michor, F. & Polyak, K. (2014). Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity., Nature, 514 (7520) 54-8. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25079331

Citation
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5:16 AM | Integral Octonions (Part 10)
How is the Leech lattice related to the exceptional Jordan algebra?
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4:00 AM | The Saddest Thing I Know about the Integers
The integers are a unique factorization domain, so we can’t tune pianos. That is the saddest thing I know about the integers. I talked to a Girl Scout troop about math earlier this month, and one of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Editor's Pick
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2:35 AM | After a coin comes up heads 10 times
Suppose you’ve seen a coin come up heads 10 times in a row. What do you believe is likely to happen next? Three common responses: Heads Tails Equal probability of heads or tails. Each is reasonable in its own context. The last answer is correct assuming the flips are independent and heads and tails are […]
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2:20 AM | Linkage for the end of November
Gamergate's attackers move on from (female) indie game developers to (female) game researchers (G+)Scammy publisher uses your name as the author of fake papers (G+)Escher-like impossible figures by Regalo Bizzi based on a triangular grid (G+)James Turrell installation in Las Vegas (G+)Waiting for Godot: The Game (by Zoe Quinn; G+)Fedorov's Five Parallelohedra, a complete classification of the shapes that can tile space by translation (G+)On the high variance in journalistic standards for […]
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2:11 AM | So you think you can shop
CJ and I, on the plane back from Thanksgiving today, had a good idea for a reality show:  somebody has to buy every item in the Skymall catalogue and then make use of all of them in one day’s time.  

November 30, 2014

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11:14 PM | reflections on the probability space induced by moment conditions with implications for Bayesian Inference [discussion]
[Following my earlier reflections on Ron Gallant’s paper, here is a more condensed set of questions towards my discussion of next Friday.] “If one specifies a set of moment functions collected together into a vector m(x,θ) of dimension M, regards θ as random and asserts that some transformation Z(x,θ) has distribution ψ then what is […]
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10:00 PM | Links for November 30
Stian Haklev on Starting data analysis/wrangling with R: Things I wish I’d been told. Zulko on Things you can do with Python and POV-Ray (a raytracing engine). Sanjoy Mahajan has a new book out, The Art of Insight in Science … Continue reading →
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8:20 PM | Parents strongly cautioned for advanced math
From A. O. Scott’s review of The Imitation Game, the new Alan Turing biopic: “The Imitation Game” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned). Illicit sex, cataclysmic violence and advanced math, most of it mentioned rather than shown. First, advanced math … Continue reading →
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4:31 PM | Christmas Gifts for children
Sometime it is extremely easy to buy gifts for children because in the end they tell you what they want, or you know what is their favorite movie or character or something. They tell you what they want in the … Continue reading →
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2:54 PM | A question about varying-intercept, varying-slope multilevel models for cross-national analysis
Sean de Hoon writes: In many cross-national comparative studies, mixed effects models are being used in which a number of slopes are fixed and the slopes of one or two variables of interested are allowed to vary across countries. The aim is often then to explain the varying slopes by referring to some country-level characteristic. […] The post A question about varying-intercept, varying-slope multilevel models for cross-national analysis appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
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1:00 PM | Realism and interfaces in philosophy of mind and metaphysics
In an earlier post, I discussed three theories of perception: naive realism, critical realism, and interfaces. To remind you of the terminology: naive realism is the stance that the world is exactly as we perceive it and critical realism is that perception resembles reality, but doesn’t capture all of it. Borrowing an image from Kevin […]
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8:48 AM | Il (non) carnevale della fisica #3
Siamo arrivati alla 3.a edizione del (non) carnevale della fisica, iniziativa nata per riempire il vuoto lasciato dal carnevale della fisica, che faceva il suo esordio esattamente cinque anni fa. A differenza di quel carnevale, qui non si assegnano premi a nessuno perché ha scritto l'articolo migliore, ma invece è la presenza all'interno del post che, si spera, venga considerata il vero premio, perché semplicemente il blogger che ospita l'edizione ha ritenuto valido quanto […]

November 29, 2014

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11:14 PM | high spirits
Filed under: Books, pictures, Wines Tagged: alcohol, diffraction, Ernie Button, Glenlivet, single malt, The New York Times, whisky
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4:02 PM | Anteprima: recensione di OraMai
Anteprima (realizzata con una serie di screenshot) della mia recensione (che uscirà su LSB) di OraMai di Tuono Pettinato, albo presentato al Festival della Scienza di Genova e a Lucca Comics & Science tra fine ottobre e primi di novembre. Un ringraziamento a Mattia Di Bernardo, Roberto Natalini e Andrea Plazzi:
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2:46 PM | Unstrooping names
Baptiste Coulmont writes: Following your recent blog post on stroopy names, I do not resist the temptation to send you a recent article on first name changes in France. The point of the article is simple: people who change their first names often explicitly speak about national identity changes in their request for a new […] The post Unstrooping names appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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