Posts

November 19, 2014

+
3:06 PM | Geometric Paper Animals
Some time ago I have written about how geometry has become an inspiration to art (Geometry & Art). I still believe the same thing, and I also wanted to make a small confession: I realized how interesting, beautiful and how … Continue reading →
+
1:00 PM | Miscellaneous math notes
This web site started as static HTML files. Later I added a WordPress blog, but still wrote some things as static HTML pages for various reasons. Now I’ve moved most of those static pages to WordPress pages so that they’ll have the same style as the blog. There’s not a good way to find these […]
+
11:30 AM | What the fucking shit, Barbie?
I’m back from Haiti! It was amazing and awesome, and please stand by for more about that, with cultural observations and possibly a slide show if you’re all well behaved. Today, thanks to my math camp buddy Lenore Cowen, I am going to share with you an amazing blog post by Pamela Ribon. Her post is […]
+
2:06 AM | Wanted: Dead or Alive
I came across an interesting poster that’s been put up on a few lampposts on my street.  It rather pathetically offers a $2,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of George Welch for operating a bucket shop in New York. This got me thinking about the notion of vigilante justice and the failure of […]
+
12:44 AM | Stan hits bigtime
First Wikipedia, then the Times (featuring Yair Ghitza), now Slashdot (featuring Allen “PyStan” Riddell). Just get us on Gawker and we’ll have achieved total media saturation. Next step, backlash. Has Stan jumped the shark? Etc. (We’d love to have a “jump the shark” MCMC algorithm but I don’t know if or when we’ll get there. […] The post Stan hits bigtime appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

November 18, 2014

+
11:31 PM | Aquacopter: il "granchio a motore" per esplorazioni sottomarine
Alla Fiera Mondiale di [New York del 1964] la General Motors espone questo fantastico veicolo, chiamato acquacopter per esplorazioni sottomarine. Esso è destinato alle ricerche petrolifere sul fondo dell'oceano, in prossimità dei poli. Come si vede, è munito di pinze che prelevano materiale sul fondo e lo trasportano alla base per le necessarie analisi. Il veicolo è mosso da un motore elettrico, alimentato da batterie, che consente una velocità di 10-15 […]
+
11:14 PM | differences between Bayes factors and normalised maximum likelihoods
A recent arXival by Heck, Wagenmaker and Morey attracted my attention: Three Qualitative Differences Between Bayes Factors and Normalized Maximum Likelihood, as it provides an analysis of the differences between Bayesian analysis and Rissanen’s Optimal Estimation of Parameters that I reviewed a while ago. As detailed in this review, I had difficulties with considering the […]
+
9:27 PM | Googol and googolplex
Numericon gives the history of the words googol and googolplex: … the famous googol, 10100 (a 1 followed by 100 zeros), defined in 1929 by American mathematician Edward Kasner and named by his nine-year-old nephew, Milton Sirotta. Milton went even further and came up with the googolplex, now defined as 10googol but initially defined by […]
+
6:51 PM | how to seat guests at a wedding
SAS started an operations research blog [Link]. Matthew Galati’s first entry is how to optimally seat people at a wedding given assignment preferences. He provides a model that maximizes the total happiness of his guests. His blog post has code, data, and a pictures of a quirky family member or two. It’s a great post worth checking out. […]
+
6:15 PM | From H. pylori to Spanish colonialism: the scales of cancer.
Yesterday was the first day of the 4th Integrated Mathematical Oncology Workshop here at Moffitt. This year, it is run jointly with the Center for Infection Research in Cancer and is thus focused on the interaction of infection disease and cancer. This is a topic that I have not focused much attention on — except […]

Kodaman, N., Pazos, A., Schneider, B.G., Piazuelo, M.B., Mera, R., Sobota, R.S., Sicinschi, L.A., Shaffer, C.L., Romero-Gallo, J., de Sablet, T. & Harder, R.H. (2014). Human and Helicobacter pylori coevolution shapes the risk of gastric disease., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111 (4) 1455-60. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24474772

Citation
+
2:39 PM | There’s a new StackExchange site for History of Science and Maths
Just a little note to let you know that there’s a new StackExchange Q&A site for “History of Science and Maths”. Some of the maths questions that have already been asked include: Whose shoulders did Newton stand on? (apparently the answer is not “giants”) Were transcendental numbers considered rare, pre-Cantor? What is the history behind the... Read more »
+
2:04 PM | In which I play amateur political scientist
Mark Palko writes: I have a couple of what are probably poli sci 101 questions. The first involves the unintended (?) consequences of plans bring political power back to the common people. The two examples I have in mind are California’s ballot initiatives and parental trigger laws but I’m sure I’m missing some obvious ones. […] The post In which I play amateur political scientist appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:57 PM | Four brief reviews
Princeton University Press and No Starch Press both sent me a couple books this week. Here are a few brief words about each. The first from Princeton was The Best Writing on Mathematics 2014. My favorite chapters were The Beauty of Bounded Gaps by Jordan Ellenberg and The Lesson of Grace in Teaching by Francis Su. […]
+
1:00 PM | New business cards
Here’s my new business card. Front: Back: Designed by my friend Scott Bronstad. Scott also designed the new look of the web site. (If something doesn’t look quite right, that’s probably my doing.)
+
4:40 AM | A Proof of the Math Fact of Rolle in Short Words
This proof of the math fact of Rolle, I wrote it down; here was my goal: Use just words with one part. (So it won’t sound too smart.) Please tell me if you find a hole. The math fact of Rolle:... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:49 AM | Drowned out
Conservative blogger Glenn Reynolds is mad mad mad mad mad about .. well, I’ll let him tell it: After years of effort, the European Space Agency’s lander Philae landed on a comet 300 million miles away. At first, people were excited. Then some women noticed that one of the space scientists, Matt Taylor, was wearing a […]

November 17, 2014

+
11:16 PM | LaTeX The Phantom Menace
(Week 2 of the challenge.) LaTeX is the path to the dark side. LaTeX leads to TeX. TeX leads to DVI. DVI leads to suffering. — not Yoda. Ever since joining MathJax, MathML has been a major part of my …
+
11:14 PM | importance sampling schemes for evidence approximation [revised]
After a rather intense period of new simulations and versions, Juong Een (Kate) Lee and I have now resubmitted our paper on (some) importance sampling schemes for evidence approximation in mixture models to Bayesian Analysis. There is no fundamental change in the new version but rather a more detailed description of what those importance schemes […]
+
10:20 PM | La logica dello stato
Lì dove finisce la logica, inizia lo statoE' quello che ha detto un carabiniere a un mio studente, che ha citato la frase per commentare la situazione attuale della scuola italiana che, per esempio, ad anno scolastico in corso (dopo due mesi, ormai), ha avuto come conseguenza il cambio di almeno un paio di insegnanti.E i cambi potrebbero non essere finiti.
+
10:19 PM | What Happens as a Bubble Deflates?
Having written a couple of guest posts about bubbles possibly inflating (college tuition, high end Manhattan condos), I thought it might be interesting to consider what a deflating bubble looks like. A number of observers point to the oil markets, where the price of crude has fallen by about 30% since June of this year, […]
+
9:32 PM | Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem).
This post is by Phil Price. I’m posting it on Andrew’s blog without knowing exactly where he stands on this so it’s especially important for readers to note that this post is NOT BY ANDREW! Last week a prominent scientist, representing his entire team of researchers, appeared in widely distributed television interviews wearing a shirt […] The post Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem). appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social […]
+
5:54 PM | Christmas Presents
The Internet is full with Christmas present ideas and I believe that the lists that you can find on other people’s blog posts are extremely useful. I always take some time to look at some before I go shopping. Moreover, … Continue reading →
+
4:00 PM | This is what “power = .06” looks like. Get used to it.
I prepared the above image for this talk. The calculations come from the second column of page 6 of this article, and the psychology study that we’re referring to is discussed here. The post This is what “power = .06” looks like. Get used to it. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
2:00 PM | On deck this week
Mon: “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” Tues: In which I play amateur political scientist Wed: Retrospective clinical trials? Thurs: “If you’re not using a proper, informative prior, you’re leaving money on the table.” Fri: Hey, NYT: Former editor Bill Keller said that any editor who fails to confront a writer about an […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
+
1:28 AM | Uniformitarian or Paretoist
A uniformitarian view is that everything is equally important. For example, there are 118 elements in the periodic table, so all 118 are equally important to know about. The Pareto principle would say that importance is usually very unevenly distributed. The universe is essentially hydrogen and helium, with a few other elements sprinkled in. From […]
+
1:01 AM | Some Jokes
* * * A mathematical tragedy: two parallel lines fall in love. * * * Life is not fair, even among gadgets: the desktop misbehaves, the monitor gets smacked. * * * An amazing magic trick! Think of a number, add 5 to it, then subtract 5. The result is the number you thought of! […]

November 16, 2014

+
11:14 PM | a probabilistic proof to a quasi-Monte Carlo lemma
As I was reading in the Paris métro a new textbook on Quasi-Monte Carlo methods, Introduction to Quasi-Monte Carlo Integration and Applications, written by Gunther Leobacher and Friedrich Pillichshammer, I came upon the lemma that, given two sequences on (0,1) such that, for all i’s, and the geometric bound made me wonder if there was […]
+
9:47 PM | ICERM postdoctoral positions
I’m co-organizing the program Dimension and Dynamics at the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics in Spring 2016. (Yes, this means that I hope to participate in the program. Details to follow when they are finalized.) ICERM has several … Continue reading →
+
4:00 PM | Links for November 16
When you are listening to corn pop, are you listening to the Central Limit Theorem? 12 Scientific Sculptures: Intangible Data in Physical Form Kokichi Sugihara uses computation to make three-dimensional illusion Markov Chains vs Simulation: Flipping a Million Little Coins. … Continue reading →
+
2:02 PM | Question about data mining bias in finance
Finance professor Ravi Sastry writes: Let’s say we have N vectors of data, {y_1,y_2,…,y_N}. Each is used as the dependent variable in a series of otherwise identical OLS regressions, yielding t-statistics on some parameter of interest, theta: {t_1,t_2,…,t_N}. The maximum t-stat is denoted t_n*, and the corresponding data are y_n*. These are reported publicly, as […] The post Question about data mining bias in finance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal […]
12345678
221 Results