Posts

July 22, 2014

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4:00 PM | Education and Experience are Not Mutually Exclusive: Job Market Pet Peeves
While looking at positions that allow me to jump off the sinking ship of academia, I’ve seen plenty of rewarding, fun, and excitingly challenging job announcements out there. Most of them require two to five years of experience in the field, and I’ve looked at those, said ‘yep, I qualify’, and turned in the application. […]
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2:43 PM | Cascading planetary-wide ecosystem effects of the extirpation of apex predatory Krayt dragons on Tatooine
Author’s note: this post is part of the “Science of Tatooine” blog carnival. Though obviously about science fiction and not the real world, it includes real ecological theories,  and it uses some real peer-reviewed scientific papers as references. Whenever possible, I’ve linked to accessible copies of those papers and explainers of these ecological terms. Many […]
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3:28 AM | NC Shark Science in the News
The inshore shark survey got some press this week.  Reporter Josh Birch from WNCT rode along with last week’s night trip to capture some North Carolina shark science in action.  We caught a nice blacktip, and adorable baby sharpnose, and a decent-sized stingray on camera, and all three elasmobranchs got some face time during the […]

July 21, 2014

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9:00 AM | Beyond the Edge of the Plume: understanding environmental impacts of deep-sea mining
The mining of deep-sea hydrothermal vents for gold, copper, and other precious metals, is imminent. Over the last seven years I’ve worked with industry, academia, and international regulatory agencies to help craft guidelines for conducting environmental impact studies and assess the connectivity and resilience of deep-sea ecosystems. Deep-sea mining, particularly at hydrothermal vents, is a […]
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1:58 AM | Volunteers for the 2014 Shark Summit needed
Volunteers for the 2014 Shark Summit needed: savephilippineseas: Shark Summit 2014: A Roundtable...
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1:58 AM | Volunteers for the 2014 Shark Summit needed
Volunteers for the 2014 Shark Summit needed: savephilippineseas: Shark Summit 2014: A Roundtable...

July 20, 2014

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12:21 PM | Damn, That’s Some Big Kelp!
I’m not sure what it is this year, but the kelp we’re seeing in the Southern Gulf of Maine is just fracking huge. Last year, yeah, there were kelpy areas, and there were kelps that were ~1-1.5 meters long, which, … Continue reading →

July 18, 2014

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2:28 PM | Fun Science FRIEDay – Fasting Fights Cancer?
Happy Fun Science FRIEDay to everyone. FSF is back and with a new name! After a brief hiatus to sort out some legal issues regarding the title of FSF, and a trip to the World Cup, I am hopefully back into the swing of providing you with mostly weekly, fun, and interesting science facts! Up […]
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12:24 AM | Krill: The Most Abundant Animal on Earth
Or specifically, the most biomass on Earth. That would be krill, the small shrimp-like creatures like large whales love to gobble down. My name is Karl, and I am a krill. I live in Antarctic waters. What is it like to be part of a collective or large group? Well, not only am I small […]

July 17, 2014

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2:17 PM | Microbes Help Corals Pick a Home and Settle Down
[php]Bacteria are everywhere in the ocean. They live in the water, on virtually every living and non-living surface, and even inside other organisms. There are 1 million bacterial cells in every milliliter of seawater; that translates to roughly 5 million bacterial cells per teaspoon! With so many bacteria in the ocean you have to wonder—what are they doing? Thanks to new technological advances, we understand more and more about the important roles that bacteria play in the health and...
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11:54 AM | The Launch of the R/V Botryllid
Woohoo! It’s another amazing research season out here at the Shoals Marine Lab. We’re in the midst of our push to sample SML, Salem Sound, and the Boston Harbor Islands. The weather is glorious, and the water is…ok, not warm. … Continue reading →
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12:15 AM | These things are related.
Exhibit A. At Boing Boing, Maggie Koerth-Baker publishes an article talking about her disenchantment with Richard Feynman after learning that he was a gigantic womanizing creeper. Matthew Francis follows up with more information about Feyman’s inexcusable behavior. Armies of Feyman supporters rush to his defense, arguing that we should judge him as a product of […]

July 16, 2014

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1:29 PM | Runoff: How activities near and far from the ocean affect the ocean
I spent last week in the US Virgin Islands, collecting samples to reconstruct re...
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8:11 AM | Shark Weak
No summary available for this post.
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4:00 AM | Sea Cucumber Skin Up Close! Bizarre & Beautiful!
Via Wikipedia commons. Photo by Nick HobgoodCool Crowdsourced Photo time! This week..some gorgeous closeups of the neat skin textures on tropical sea cucumbers!Some of these give you an idea of how colorful and unusual the skin in sea cucumbers can be. This one is called  Thelenota rubolineata (the species name literally means "red lines"). This is an example of what the whole animal of one of the pics below looks like...What do they feel like? Sort of soft and rubbery. Firm. And yes, […]
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12:00 AM | sixpenceee: Did you know that sperm whales sleep...
sixpenceee: Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically?  SOURCE
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12:00 AM | sixpenceee: Did you know that sperm whales sleep...
sixpenceee: Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically?  SOURCE

July 15, 2014

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4:39 PM | Seabird die-offs in Iceland
Though the United States stretches across a continent between two oceans, when it comes to seabirds, we here on the east coast have a great deal more in common with our neighbors in Europe, Iceland, and Greenland than we do with our Pacific compatriots. For this reason, we always keep an eye on the goings-on […]
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3:30 PM | Why exploding whale stories just won’t die and how we can use them to help save the ocean
Exploding whales are an endless source of amusement, even when they don’t explode. When a cetacean detonation made a guest appearance on Saturday Night Live, it was clear that we had reached peak exploding whale saturation. Now that we’ve all had a few months to decompress, it’s time to take a step back and look at why […]
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12:28 PM | DNA Finds New Octopus Species Hiding in Plain Sight
Describing a new species for science is not quite as easy as it was in the days of 17th- or 18th-century naturalists. But that just means we have to look a little more closely. Such as, into an... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:00 AM | madamjellyfish666: pleatedjeans: Seal with a data-logger on...
madamjellyfish666: pleatedjeans: Seal with a data-logger on it’s head. [x] "LOOK! LOOK! I’M A NARWAL!" I’ve been laughing for about 20 minutes now
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8:00 AM | madamjellyfish666: pleatedjeans: Seal with a data-logger on...
madamjellyfish666: pleatedjeans: Seal with a data-logger on it’s head. [x] "LOOK! LOOK! I’M A NARWAL!" I’ve been laughing for about 20 minutes now
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5:59 AM | Which Sea Shell Are You?
Which Sea Shell Are You?: A fun way to find out if you’re a gastropod, cephalopod, bivalve, or...
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5:59 AM | Which Sea Shell Are You?
Which Sea Shell Are You?: A fun way to find out if you’re a gastropod, cephalopod, bivalve, or...

July 14, 2014

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6:24 PM | Female Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
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6:24 PM | Female Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
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6:24 PM | Females Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
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6:24 PM | Females Crabs Only Eat Their Own Young When They’re Hungry
For many ocean invertebrates, the first stage of life occurs as tiny larvae in the plankton.  The toughness of the planktonic larval life has caused many scientists to wax poetically, as we tend to do on subjects of invertebrates. As noted by Emery in 1973, these larvae face a “wall of mouths” ready to consume […]
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2:00 PM | The Ocean Cleanup, Part 2: Technical review of the feasibility study
INTRODUCTION This is the second of a two-part post. In the first installment, Kim presented alternatives to this project. This installment is a collaboration between Kim and Miriam. Dr. Kim Martini is a physical oceanographer who has been involved in the deployment of a variety of deep sea oceanographic moorings. Dr. Miriam Goldstein is a […]
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2:00 PM | The Ocean Cleanup, Part 2: Technical review of the feasibility study
INTRODUCTION This is the second of a two-part post. In the first installment, Kim presented alternatives to this project. This installment is a collaboration between Kim and Miriam. Dr. Kim Martini is a physical oceanographer who has been involved in the deployment of a variety of deep sea oceanographic moorings. Dr. Miriam Goldstein is a […]
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