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Posts

April 01, 2014

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1:41 AM | The Curse of “Asshole Ra”
Twitter is a great place to waste time, but it is also a great place to get inspired with really ridiculous ideas.  After I pointed out that a sequel to the movie Prometheus is in the works, PZ Myers of … Continue reading →
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1:10 AM | A 1711 treatise on venereal disease (Part V: Miscellany and Mercury)
With the end of the month of March, we end our series of posts on Dr. John Marten’s 1711 Treatise of the Venereal Disease. In previous volumes, we’ve gone through as many lengthy, out-of-context quoted passages as anyone can stand. See Part II: Human Anatomy (“These Ova, or Eggs are not only found in the […]

March 31, 2014

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9:30 PM | Crowds Flock to Basilica After Holy Grail Claim
An ancient goblet is the mythical chalice from which Christ sipped at the last supper, argue two historians. The goblet has been lying for nearly a millennium in a basilica in the northwestern Spanish city of Leon.
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6:23 PM | Upcoming Live Webcast: “Alchemy’s Rainbow: Pigment Science and the Art of Conservation”
On April 16 the Chemical Heritage Foundation will present a live webcast exploring the colorful (and sometimes risk-filled) history of pigments and painters, and the conservationists who save paintings from the ravages of time and accidental chemistry. “Alchemy’s Rainbow: Pigment Science and the Art of Conservation” will feature art conservator Mark F. Bockrath and art historian Elisabeth Berry Drago. Our guests will discuss (and show) the messy and occasionally […]
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3:23 PM | Brown Bag Lecture: “Dyeing for Change:  A Historical Perspective on Tress-Altering Chemicals” | Chemical Heritage Foundation
Brown Bag Lecture: “Dyeing for Change:  A Historical Perspective on Tress-Altering Chemicals” | Chemical Heritage Foundation: Looking forward to this Brown Bag talk at CHF featuring Rebecca Guenard (@atomic-o-licious on Tumblr) about our cultural relationship with hair dyes
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2:30 PM | 3,300-Year-Old Tomb with Pyramid Entrance Discovered in Egypt
A tomb newly excavated at an ancient cemetery in Egypt would have boasted a pyramid 23 feet high at its entrance.
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11:00 AM | Distraction in Google Newspaper Archives: Kondon’s Catarrhal Jelly
I love the fact while I go through newspaper archives dating from 1900-1930s, I find the most amazing things that makes me pause in my research and pursue the new find. Case in point: this weekend, I came across this … Continue reading →
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10:42 AM | Did Edmond tells Robert to, “sling his hooke!”?
The circumstances surrounding the genesis and publication of Newton’s magnum opus, Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, and the priority dispute concerning the origins of the concept of universal gravity are amongst the best documented in the history of science. Two of … Continue reading →

March 30, 2014

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2:10 PM | Episode 1: Bonus Clip Two (Wilhelm Röntgen)
The turn of the last century was the place to be if you wanted to be shot at, stabbed or blown up by anarchists. They were angry, they were everywhere, and most surprisingly of all, they were organised. On the 6th of September … Continue reading →

March 29, 2014

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8:07 PM | A Concise History of Geological Maps: Beneath this Map, there is an Igneous Idea
In the 18th century the geological significance of volcanoes was (literally) a hot topic for naturalists – many considered volcanoes only as a local phenomenon, the visible fire feed by underground sulfur veins and the rocks found around them being the ashes of this combustion. Some naturalists considered volcanoes as natural valves of a large [...]
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8:07 PM | A Concise History of Geological Maps: Beneath this Map, there is an Igneous Idea
In the 18th century the geological significance of volcanoes was (literally) a hot topic for naturalists – many considered volcanoes only as a local phenomenon, the visible fire feed by... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:01 AM | Physics Week in Review: March 29, 2014
This week there continued to be Ripples From the Big Bang. Sean Carroll discussed When Nature Looks Unnatural: “Ultimately it’s nature, not us, that decides what’s natural.” And Matt... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

March 28, 2014

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2:29 PM | Beaulieu : que la ville devienne ville
Emile Zola et Guy de Maupassant s’étaient indignés devant le projet de tour Eiffel, Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz décriait la tour Bel-Air, mais à voir les oppositions au projet de tour de Beaulieu, la littérature semble à la peine ! Au-delà du gag sur la position symptomatique de ces quelques grands intellectuels à propos de la modernisation de leur environnement, notons que l’urbanisation est un phénomène qui catalyse […]
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7:00 AM | Green Light: The Black Box
III: The Black Box.   This is the fourth instalment of my autobiographical series on my experiences with hearing loss. You can view earlier posts: Prologue; Chapter 1: Seeing Sounds; Chapter 2: Fearless Leader. Posts appear every other Friday.  The … Continue reading →
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3:00 AM | Green Light: The Black Box
III: The Black Box.   This is the fourth installment of my autobiographical series on my experiences with hearing loss. You can view earlier posts: Prologue; Chapter 1: Seeing Sounds; Chapter 2: Fearless Leader. Posts appear every other Friday.  The … Continue reading →

March 27, 2014

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1:50 PM | Sex Strikes and Other Provocative Protests
'Sex sells' is a well-known axiom when it comes to product advertising, but does it also apply when marketing a movement?
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12:50 PM | Roman Emperor Dressed as Pharaoh in Newfound Carving
An ancient stone carving on the walls of an Egyptian temple depicts the Roman emperor Claudius dressed as an Egyptian pharaoh, wearing an elaborate crown.
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12:15 PM | Hydra meets Handel
They have been the many-headed creatures of myth and the arch-enemies of those doughty Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.  But real hydra,...

March 26, 2014

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3:45 PM | 1,300-Year-Old Egyptian Mummy Had Biblical Tattoo
A mummy of an Egyptian woman dating back to 700 A.D. has been scanned and stripped to reveal a tattoo on her thigh that displays the name of the biblical archangel Michael.
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2:54 PM | SHOCK! HORROR! OUTRAGE! RELIGION HINDERS PROGRESS OF SCIENCE!
The title is supposed to make you think of a typical article in the Daily Fail, Britain’s most obnoxious representative of the gutter press. It represents one of the dominant reactions by members of the Gnu Model ArmyTM to the … Continue reading →
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2:18 PM | 16th-Century Masterpiece Reveals Cheese Glue Recipe
Sticky cheese might be the secret behind one of the most intriguing Mannerist paintings. Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Painting Restoration Reveals Glue, Hidden Images: Photos
As restorers work to revitalize a painting by 16th-century Mannerist Jacopo Pontormo, surprising details emerge.
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12:00 AM | Secrets of the Viking Sun-Compass -- After Dark
A clever combination of Viking sunstones and a specialized sundial might have enabled Vikings to navigate after sunset.

March 25, 2014

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7:00 PM | The Time-Travelling, Vote-Gathering, Miraculous Acousticon
An 1922 advertisement in The Illustrated London News caught my eye: Look at the flapper! Is she being coy? Ignoring the gentleman who’s obviously flirting with her? Or is she deaf to his fancy words? This was the first half … Continue reading →
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4:57 PM | From the Fact Checker: Whales in Space
By Jacob Roberts Sometimes the research and fact checking behind a story is just as interesting as the end result. This story is about whales (or bits of them) in space. Michal Meyer, editor of Chemical Heritage gave me the idea for Whales in Space . Some time ago, she met a representative of Nye Lubricants at a social gathering. Nye is a company that used to process whale oil for use in everything from car transmissions to watch gears, but switched to synthetic lubricants after whale hunting […]
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2:43 PM | Curves… in… spaaaace! (1890)
One of the tragedies of STEM education is the seemingly eternal perception by the general public that mathematics is boring and repetitive.  Most people, of course, end their math education with algebra at most, though some work their way through … Continue reading →
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5:10 AM | So you want to be an industrial glassblower
So, you’re interested in a job as a glassblower. That’s no surprise. For 50 years glassblowing has been a good way for a skilled industrial laborer to earn a comfortable living, and today as we enter the 1920s, demand for these workmen shows no signs of lessening. But what are the risks? Since there are […]
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4:14 AM | Episode 2: Bonus Clip One (Dennis Gabor)
In 1973, two of the most iconic and unconventional figures in the artistic world met at the St. Regis hotel in New York to discuss a potential collaboration. One was the aging Surrealist artist Salvador Dali, and the other was the … Continue reading →

March 24, 2014

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9:31 PM | Vintage Dinosaur Art: All About Dinosaurs
While it's exciting enough to get my mits on a book as genuinely vintage as All About Dinosaurs (1953), that this book was written by the legendary Roy Chapman Andrews is an extra special treat. This is a book that's part palaeontology lesson, part autobiography, with Andrews unable to resist relaying a few tales of derring-do. Illustrations are provided by Thomas W Voter, and essentially live up to expectation - these are the tail-dragging, slothful, reptilian flesh-barges of old, the 'great […]
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2:35 PM | A Reptile Dysfunction: Unlikely Sources of Salmonella
Salmonella may well be one of the most disreputable microbes in Western society. It’s infamous for its food-poisoning capabilities and has a well known history of wrecking the bonhomous vibe following a good summer barbecue, not to mention its singular ability to cast a sickly shadow over the breathtaking bounty of an all-you-can-eat buffet. While […]The post A Reptile Dysfunction: Unlikely Sources of Salmonella appeared first on Body Horrors.
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