Posts

October 12, 2014

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2:55 PM | Stunning Mosaic Floor Uncovered in Greece's Mystery Tomb
The central theme depicts a chariot in motion driven by Hermes, who is most likely escorting King Philip II to the Underworld. Continue reading →
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2:45 PM | Greek God Hermes Featured in Ancient Mosaic: Photos
A mosaic floor made from small white, black, gray, blue, red and yellow pebbles emerged during a dig.

October 11, 2014

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9:33 AM | Physics Week in Review (Nobel ’14 Edition): October 11, 2014
It was the Nobel Prize announcement that launched a thousand “How many physicists does it take to change a light bulb?” jokes on twitter. (I know, we all thought we were being totes... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:17 AM | 'Ese punto azul pálido' supera el millón de visitas [Sorteo de un libro para celebrarlo]
Pues así parece que ha sido, queridos amigos y mejores lectores. Según las estadísticas de Blogger este espacio personal que nació hace cuatro años y medio con esta entrada (un tanto simple y cutrecilla pero que continúa siendo el espíritu del blog) ha superado el... ¡tachán! MILLÓN DE VISITAS. ¡Muchas gracias a todos por hacerlo posible!Y lo mejor que se me ha ocurrido para celebrarlo es regalaros un libro. […]

October 10, 2014

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8:37 PM | 'Titanic of the Ancient World' Reveals Treasure Trove
An international expedition recovers antiquities from one of the richest shipwrecks of antiquity, with more to come. Continue reading →
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6:55 PM | Sex and Eugenics Sterilization
In looking through Johanna Schoen’s 2005 book, Choice & Coercion: Birth Control, Sterilization, and Abortion in Public Health and Welfare, it appears that, although eugenics-based sterilization procedures in the early-to-mid twentieth century appear to have targeted women more than men, men were also sterilized through these programs. Rationally, it should be unsurprising that men were targeted as...Read more → Sex and Eugenics Sterilization from in propria persona […]
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6:27 PM | Answers to questions posed by cosmology to philosophy
Tough questions about the philosophy of cosmology have answers; they just might not be right.
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6:26 PM | Answers to questions posed by cosmology to philosophy
ContextCosmology BY Tom Siegfried 2:27pm, October 10, 2014 Observations by the Hubble Space Telescope — like the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which looks back to within a few hundred million years of the Big Bang — have helped to put cosmology on sound observational footing.NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. […]
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3:14 PM | Ebola Before The Outbreak
With the unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa this year, it is important to put the disease in historical perspective. The first major outbreak of Ebola occurred in the 1970s in Sudan and Zaire near the Ebola River, from which the virus gets its name. Doctors were shocked by symptoms that mirrored the flu at first but quickly escalated to vomiting, diarrhea, and internal hemorrhaging within a matter of days. Compounding the danger, these fluids had the potential to transmit the […]
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3:14 PM | Ebola Before The Outbreak
With the unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa this year, it is important to put the disease in historical perspective. The first major outbreak of Ebola occurred in the 1970s in Sudan and Zaire near the Ebola River, from which the virus gets its name. Doctors were shocked by symptoms that mirrored the flu at first but quickly escalated to vomiting, diarrhea, and internal hemorrhaging within a matter of days. Compounding the danger, these fluids had the potential to transmit the […]
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10:00 AM | Remains of Alexander the Great's Father Confirmed Found
King Philip II's bones are buried in a tomb along with a mysterious woman-warrior.

October 09, 2014

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8:39 PM | Así ponía los exámenes Carl Sagan
Fuente de la imagen: SmithsonianYa sabéis que desde que descubrí hace unos meses este filón me suelo pasar de vez en cuando en busca de nuevo material. Esta tarde he encontrado un documento bastante interesante. Se trata de un examen que puso Carl Sagan a sus alumnos de la universidad de Cornell; una universidad, por cierto, muy de actualidad en estos momentos porque dos de sus antiguos alumnos han recibido el Premio Nobel de Química este año. Pero […]
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7:42 PM | Paris: City of lights and cosmic rays
This post of mine originally appeared on the Scientific American guest blog some time ago.  Considering it has been three years, and it’s always been one of my favorite pieces of writing, I thought it was time to “bring it … Continue reading →
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12:50 PM | How the Violin Got Its Shape
The elegant shape of the violin evolved over a period of 400 years, largely due to the influence of four prominent families of instrument makers, a new study finds.
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2:59 AM | Kitchen Science Lab for Kids, by Liz Heinecke
Though I spent a lot of time thinking about how to properly explain science in a way that is comprehensible to non-scientists, my biggest Achilles heel is my lack of experience in explaining things at a level that kids can … Continue reading →

October 08, 2014

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9:00 PM | First-Known Painting Depicts Rare, Hefty Animal
Ice Age art in Indonesia includes the oldest known figurative cave painting, challenging the view that Europe was the birthplace of art.
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4:26 PM | What do fossilized whales and beer have in common? According to...
What do fossilized whales and beer have in common? According to an article and a video by NPR, they both contain yeast. Amateur paleontologist Jason Osbourne scraped a living subspecies of yeast from whale bones he found in a Virginia swamp with the help of microbiologist Jasper Ackerbloom. They used the yeast to brew what they call Bone Dusters Paleo Ale. The yeast itself probably came from the swamp and is not as ancient as the 35-million year old fossilized proto-whale. You might remember […]
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4:26 PM | What do fossilized whales and beer have in common? According to...
What do fossilized whales and beer have in common? According to an article and a video by NPR, they both contain yeast. Amateur paleontologist Jason Osbourne scraped a living subspecies of yeast from whale bones he found in a Virginia swamp with the help of microbiologist Jasper Ackerbloom. They used the yeast to brew what they call Bone Dusters Paleo Ale. The yeast itself probably came from the swamp and is not as ancient as the 35-million year old fossilized proto-whale. You might remember […]
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4:19 PM | Nobel Prize roundup: It’s all about the optics!
This week, the Nobel Prizes for Physics and Chemistry were announced, and it was a photonics two-fer!  The physics prize went to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and Shuji Nakamura “for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white … Continue reading →
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1:06 PM | Explainer: Why is Turkey Reluctant to Fight ISIS?
ISIS control has expanded rapidly across Syrian and Iraqi territories, prompting the United States and other nations to take immediate military action. Turkey shares a border with both war-torn countries, so why are they hesitant to join the fight?

October 07, 2014

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4:44 PM | DNews: How Powerful Is North Korea?
When the most isolated country in the world threatens a nuclear attack, there’s good reason for concern. North Korea may be off-the-grid globally, but their military manpower under Kim Jong-un is surprisingly strong.
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4:25 PM | Vertige : le nouveau plancher de verre de la tour Eiffel en images
“Je n’ai pas le vertige, mais…” Après deux ans de travaux, la rénovation du 1er étage de la tour Eiffel a donné lieu à l’inauguration, lundi 6 octobre, d’un nouveau plancher de verre. Sur les angles du puit central, les visiteurs peuvent désormais faire quelques pas au-dessus d’une soixantaine de mètres de vide, … et des têtes de celles et ceux qui attendent encore de pouvoir se ruer dans […]
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4:00 PM | The Damned Dromaeosaurs of Stock Image Island
If you have not read Witton, Naish, and Conway's State of the Palaeoart, make a point of doing so. The article is the culmination of a discussion that seems to have begun in earnest back in the spring of 2011, when the Dinosaur Mailing List played host to complaints from Gregory S. Paul about other artists copying his famous mid-stride skeletal pose. Though GSP kicked off a righteous ruckus with his assertion that he owned that pose, the argument was also a chance for people to air their […]
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3:46 PM | Reproducing experiments is more complicated than it seems
Statisticians have devised a new way to measure the evidence that an experimental result has really been reproduced.
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1:02 PM | Reproducing experiments is more complicated than it seems
ContextNumbers BY Tom Siegfried 11:46am, October 7, 2014 Seventeeth-century physicist and inventor Robert Boyle made a point to communicate the details of his experiments creating a vacuum with an air pump (his first and third attempts are illustrated here) so others could reproduce his results. Statisticians […]

October 06, 2014

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8:00 PM | Skeleton of Possible 'Witch Girl' Found
The skeleton of a girl buried face down, meant as a punishment in the afterlife, is found by archaeologists in Italy.
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2:46 PM | Polluting Youtube once again!
Professor Christopher M Graney, Renaissance Mathematicus friend and guest blogger, has posted another of his holiday videos on Youtube, documenting parts of his visit to Nürnberg and Bamberg for the Astronomy in Franconia Conferences. In his new video “Nürnberg and … Continue reading →
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2:14 PM | “Count Like an Egyptian” over at The Finch & Pea!
For those who just can’t get enough of my writing (anyone?), I wrote a guest post over at The Finch & Pea about the book Count Like an Egyptian by David Reimer. Check it out! Not only do I discuss … Continue reading →
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1:26 AM | Coming soon: The Complete Guide to Science Blogging!
It’s finally been officially announced, and I’m delighted to share the news here: in early 2015, The Complete Guide to Science Blogging will be published!  Edited by amazing science communicators Christie Wilcox, Jason G. Goldman and Bethany Brookshire, this book will … Continue reading →

October 05, 2014

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8:45 PM | Our Lady of Pain, by John Blackburn
(Over the next couple of days, I’m going to catch up on a few book posts.  More detailed science posts in the works!) I’m happy to report that one of John Blackburn’s best books, Our Lady of Pain (1974), is … Continue reading →
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