Posts

November 11, 2014

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6:43 PM | 'Ese punto azul pálido' ha quedado cuarto en los X Premios Bitácoras
Al menos él tiene una estatuilla :-(No ha podido ser. Después de luchar durante varias semanas y estar en tercera posición a pocas horas del final de las votaciones, EPAP ha quedado definitivamente apartado de la final de los X Premios Bitácoras. :-(Lo siento. Lo siento mucho por todos los que me habéis animado, apoyado y votado. Nunca hubiera llegado tan lejos (si lo miramos con perspectiva es un buen resultado) sin vuestra incondicional ayuda. De todo […]
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4:29 PM | Veteran's Day: History of the Salute
The salute probably developed as an alternative to raising a hat. Continue reading →
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4:23 PM | Explainer: Life as a Boko Haram Captive
Boko Haram has kidnapped an estimated 500 people since 2009, a majority of them women. A fortunate few have escaped and been able to offer a frightening picture of life as one of the group's captives.
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1:00 PM | Bronze Bell from Long-Lost Arctic Shipwreck Revealed
Divers recovered a bronze bell from the wreck of the HMS Erebus, a British ship that was missing for nearly 170 years after an ill-fated expedition to the Canadian Arctic.
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10:03 AM | The Renaissance Road Show – November 2014
If you happen to be in Nürnberg tomorrow evening (Wed 12 Nov) I shall be babbling on about Christoph Clavius in the Nicolaus Copernicus Planetarium (in German) at 7:00pm MET. This is an updated version of the lecture I held … Continue reading →
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6:37 AM | Gastronomía en el límite (IV): Comida basura
[Esta entrada participa en la I edición del Carnaval de Neurociencias]Cuando me refiero a «basura» lo hago con toda la cautela del mundo porque el término «comida basura» no me gusta especialmente, exige matices y es demasiado amplio y confuso. Pero para que nos entendamos, la comida basura es aquella que aporta cantidades desmesuradas de azúcares, grasas y sal.Comenzamos como venimos haciendo con esta serie. De forma audiovisual. En esta […]
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12:26 AM | Nobel Vintage: Fundamental Physics Prize Co-Winner Sells No Wine Before Its Time
Last night the winners of the 2015 Breakthrough Prizes were announced, including the $3 million Fundamental Physics Prize — likely the most lucrative such honor in science. And while prior... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

November 10, 2014

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9:30 PM | All Falls Down
The latest (and last) issue of Chemical Heritage is out. In the new issue we observe the grim centennial of World War I’s opening. We look at the war’s effects on scientists and the effects of their creations on the rest of us. (We’ll explore themes of the science behind World War I in even greater depth in the first issue of Distillations Magazine, Chemical Heritage’s successor, due out in March.) With so much misery on our mind we greet a cheerier anniversary […]
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9:30 PM | All Falls Down
The latest (and last) issue of Chemical Heritage is out. In the new issue we observe the grim centennial of World War I’s opening. We look at the war’s effects on scientists and the effects of their creations on the rest of us. (We’ll explore themes of the science behind World War I in even greater depth in the first issue of Distillations Magazine, Chemical Heritage’s successor, due out in March.) With so much misery on our mind we greet a cheerier anniversary […]
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5:17 PM | Mesozoic Miscellany 68
The Big NewsVintana sertichi is a new Gondwanatherian mammal from Madagascar, and in expanding our knowledge of the clade beyond assorted jaw-y and tooth-y bits, it's a pretty significant discovery. It's one of the largest mesozoic mammals discovered, coming in second to the mighty Repenomamus. More on V. sertichi from the New York Times, NSF, National Geographic, Palaeoblog, and the Guardian. Kulindadromeus on Twitter claims that the reconstructions we've seen are way off, however. Supposedly, […]
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4:49 PM | Explainer: Origins of the Conflict Between India and Pakistan
Tensions have been set to high between India and Pakistan for what seems like forever. How did the two countries end up at such constant odds with each other? Tara explains.
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11:17 AM | [Twitter Studies] Rewriting history in 140 characters
What is the role of historians on Twitter? To share historical content on social media has become common, exacerbated this year by the commemorations of the First World War. But strategy and rigor (and therefore the quality of cultural mediation) are highly variable. The analysis proposed here offers some remarks on “best practices”, developed in three typologies: Engagement typology: a measure is already a classification Content typology: what do we put in […] The […]

November 09, 2014

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6:15 PM | 'Dreams Can Come True': Berlin Wall Fell 25 Years Ago
German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Sunday that the fall of the Berlin Wall 25 years ago was a message to a conflict-torn world that 'dreams can come true'.

November 08, 2014

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10:09 AM | Physics Week in Review: November 8, 2014
It was a big week for physics in the movies, with the premiere of Interstellar, and the Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything. That translates into lots of pixels commenting on the science... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

November 07, 2014

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7:03 PM | Your family tree just got a little bit more complicated....
Your family tree just got a little bit more complicated. Scientists recently confirmed that the DNA found in the fossil of a 45,000-year-old human contains traces of Neanderthal DNA. The fossilized bones were discovered near the Irtysh River in Siberia in 2008. Based on the amount of Neanderthal genetic material in the fossil, researchers believe that humans interbred with Neanderthals between 60,000 and 50,000 years ago. The difficulty of sequencing ancient DNA cannot be […]
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7:03 PM | Your family tree just got a little bit more complicated....
Your family tree just got a little bit more complicated. Scientists recently confirmed that the DNA found in the fossil of a 45,000-year-old human contains traces of Neanderthal DNA. The fossilized bones were discovered near the Irtysh River in Siberia in 2008. Based on the amount of Neanderthal genetic material in the fossil, researchers believe that humans interbred with Neanderthals between 60,000 and 50,000 years ago. The difficulty of sequencing ancient DNA cannot be […]
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4:38 PM | Explainer: Weapons Banned by International Treaties
It may sound oxymoronic, but there are actually some weapons nobody's supposed to use while they're otherwise busy killing each other in a war. Which weapons do international agreements prohibit, and does anybody play by the rules?
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2:30 PM | Top 10 science popularizers of all time
Since antiquity, some notable thinkers have served society by translating science into popular form.
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12:10 PM | Top 10 science popularizers of all time
Since antiquity, some people have served society by translating science into popular form ContextHistory of Science,Science & Society by Tom Siegfried 9:30am, November 7, 2014 Carl Sagan's style and flair for communicating science is unmatched, and nobody articulates the phrase “billions and billions” better, though many have tried.Jet Propulsion […]

November 06, 2014

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4:30 PM | Explainer: U.S. Support of Israel
Trace examines some of the historical reasons for the United States' support for Israel, starting after World War II.
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2:30 PM | 'Witch Marks' Carved Into 17th-Century Estate
The marks date to early 1606 and the reign of King James I, a period when superstition and paranoia gripped England.
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1:35 PM | 'Demon Traps' Found in 17th-Century English House
The carvings included interlocking V shapes to invoke the protection of the Virgin Mary.
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6:26 AM | Gastronomía en el límite (III): Picante extremo
De nuevo comenzamos con un vídeo que nos sirve de introducción para esta nueva entrega de la serie sobre experiencias gastronómicas en el límite.Como acabáis de ver, el conocido chef Gordon Ramsay se va a la India y se atreve a probar un cachito de Bhut Jolokia, uno de los pimientos más picantes del mundo. Y lo hace en el marco de un concurso que consiste en ver quién se come más pimientos en menos tiempo. Y él, como casi […]
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2:57 AM | No Songs for the Stars, by Mary SanGiovanni
I’m rather intrigued these days by the concept of chapbooks, short typically inexpensive books that first became popularized in the 17th and 18th centuries.  I guess they never really went away, but recently I’ve been seeing — or noticing — … Continue reading →

November 05, 2014

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11:33 PM | Why the Pope Shuns Creationism But Supports Exorcism
Pope Francis disses creationism but embraces exorcism. Here's why. Continue reading →
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10:35 PM | Preserving Jeffersonian ideals through government regulation
In the contentious years of Gilded Age America -- 1870-1900 -- the general consensus has been than the United States, laissez-faire capitalism and "liberty of contract." Reality, unsurprisingly, was more complex.Preserving Jeffersonian ideals through government regulation from in propria persona © 2005 - 2013 by Kristopher Nelson. Want to republish? Get permission. Want to quote? That's fair use.
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7:26 PM | Telling True Stories That People Will Want to Read
How do you tell a good story about a fish that’s too boring to eat? And why would you even want to try? I found out why you’d want to cook this fish up into a story when I attended a workshop this week called “How to Write Good Stories about Science and Society.” One of the high points was listening to David Schleifer, a sociologist who partnered with writer Alison Fairbrother to tell the story of menhaden, a fish critical to the Atlantic’s ecosystem. Sounds like […]
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7:26 PM | Telling True Stories That People Will Want to Read
How do you tell a good story about a fish that’s too boring to eat? And why would you even want to try? I found out why you’d want to cook this fish up into a story when I attended a workshop this week called “How to Write Good Stories about Science and Society.” One of the high points was listening to David Schleifer, a sociologist who partnered with writer Alison Fairbrother to tell the story of menhaden, a fish critical to the Atlantic’s ecosystem. Sounds like […]
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4:27 PM | Carl Sagan y Hermann Muller
Hermann J. Muller | FuenteHermann J. Muller (1890-1967) fue un destacado biólogo y experto en genética que ha pasado a la posteridad por sus trabajos sobre los efectos fisiológicos y genéticos de la radiación ionizante (mutagénesis por aplicación de rayos X). Estudió en la Universidad de Columbia, donde tuvo como mentor a Thomas H. Morgan, impartió clases en la Universidad de Texas hasta mediados de los años 30 como […]
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3:15 PM | Illegal Dig Unearths Ancient Egyptian Temple
Seven men have been arrested in Egypt after digging up an ancient temple under a house in Giza, just outside Cairo.
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