Posts

September 10, 2014

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10:55 AM | Soils at Imaggeo: fall into litter
Antonio Jordán University of Seville, Spain Description Wet forest soil surface after a rainfall simulation experiment in Los Alcornocales Natural Park, southern Spain. When pores are saturated with water, rainfall does not infiltrate, but a dense litter layer may inhibit runoff for some time. About Imaggeo Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. […]
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9:05 AM | Finally! The Perfect Book for Geology-Loving Comic Book Fans!
Have you dreamt of a richly-illustrated, geology-themed superhero comic for kids? One that not only gets the science right, but encourages great study habits, turns ordinary encounters into... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:00 AM | Conference Highlights (Part 1)
Over on our Facebook page, we’ve recently been publishing a series of images showing some of the likely highlights of our annual conference next week (Friday 19th September, tickets still available). Here are the first batch… we’ll be posting more over the next week!
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5:51 AM | Invertebrate of the Week #9 – Bigfin Squid (Magnapinnidae)
On November 7, 2007 a Shell Oil Company ROV team was working to retrieve drilling equipment on the seabed near the Perdido project in the Gulf of Mexico.  The project […]
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5:51 AM | In the Years of Living Dangerously, Part 3
In this last post about the Years of Living Dangerously series, I focus on episode 8 (A Dangerous Future). This episode follows Matt Damon, Thomas Friedman and Michael Hall as they all become investigative journalists in different parts of the world. Each story is individually, is impactful but when they are juxtaposed, the connections between climate change and human welfare are obvious. We meet Michael Hall as he disembarks in Bangladesh on a mission to find impacts of climate change on […]
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4:30 AM | NASA Creating 3-D Map of Earth's Forests
NASA is creating a 3-D image of Earth's forests, in order to measure how trees scrub carbon from the atmosphere.
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4:26 AM | Andy Revkin in Audubon Is Well Worth A Read
The Audubon Society has released a well done report about climate change. Part of their report is a great piece by NY Times Dot Earth blogger Andy Revkin (Click the image below to read it). One thing worth noting however, and that is that you might be the idea from it that we can continue as we are for 49 years and still be ok. We almost certainly cannot, because …
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1:48 AM | Arctic ground squirrel videos
Arctic Ground Squirrel Videos The extraordinary life of the Arctic ground squirrel is described by dedicated scientists who study the handsome creatures. In videos The Perfect Yuppie Pet, In the Field, In the Lab, And the Circadian Clock, the scientists reflect on questions about the Arctic ground squirrel and its unusual lifestyle. Discover what makes these animals so unique by hearing the scientists' newfound insights. In these videos Professor Loren Buck of University Alaska Anchorage, […]
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1:20 AM | The road to Modelr: my EuroSciPy poster
At EuroSciPy recently, I gave a poster-ized version of the talk I did at SciPy. Unlike most of the other presentations at EuroSciPy, my poster didn't cover a lot of the science (which is well understood), or the code (which is esoteric). Instead it focused on the advantages of spreading software via web applications, rather than only via source code, and on the challenges that we overcame — well, that we're still overcoming — to get our Modelr tool out there. I wanted other […]
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1:00 AM | Subptychoceras yubarensis and Gaudryceras Ammonite Fossils
Here is a picture of two ammonite fossils Subptychoceras yubarensis and Gaudryceras sp. at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed at the time of the upper/late Cretaceous Period (ICS geological timescale: Santonian). Fossil was found in Japan. Image taken in June 2014.
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12:26 AM | TDB Today: An election looms: do I feel lucky?
A word to the wise: there’s an election about to happen. Not much sign of climate policy coverage in the newspapers or on television, so in my Daily Blog post this week — An election looms: do I feel lucky? — I provide an entirely superficial but 100% accurate overview of the climate policies of […]

September 09, 2014

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10:00 PM | Soils at Imaggeo: Soil erosion-desertfication, Iceland
Picture by Ragnar Sigurdsson / Artic Images.com. Soil banks show the former appearance of areas with dwindling vegetation and soil cover. Higher resolution images available from rth@arctic-images.com (there is a licensing fee depending on the use). Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union.
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9:45 PM | Planetary Science Gets Its Day in Congress
Watch Planetary Society President Jim Bell testify before a congressional subcommittee on Wednesday, September 10th.
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9:40 PM | Geo 730: September 9, Day 617: In the Same Vein...
No, wait, actually, this is a different quartz vein, down at road level (no climbing!), and maybe 75 yards farther along the (blocked) logging road. The crystals here are nothing to look at, but the context is perhaps somewhat clearer than at the big vein up on the hillside, which has been stripped of the surrounding host rock. This one tapers off as it rises from beside Dana's left foot, up along her side, then appears to thicken again a few feet over her head. Notice that the rock on either […]
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9:10 PM | Greenhouse Gases in Atmosphere Are the Highest Ever
Greenhouse emissions are being pumped into the atmosphere at a drastically higher rate than in the past. Continue reading →
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7:19 PM | How Can Federal and City Governments Cooperate? The Case of Green Infrastructure
With support from the Earth Institute, writers Caswell Holloway, Carter Strickland, Michael Gerrard, and Daniel Firger recently published "Solving the CSO Conundrum: Green Infrastructure and the Unfulfilled Promise of Federal-Municipal Cooperation" in Harvard Environmental Law Review. The authors propose regulatory and policy reform to develop comprehensive, locally led infrastructure and sustainability initiatives that improve public health and the environment. They look specifically at the […]
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5:46 PM | Give a talk that holds attention!
I am just back from SVPCA, where I saw fifty 20-minute talks in three days. (I try to avoid missing any talks at all if I can avoid it, and this year I did.) As always, there was lots of fascinating stuff, and much of it not about the topics that I would necessarily have […]
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5:32 PM | Update on Bárðarbunga eruption at 17:32 UTC
This information is going to get outdated quickly. A short notice: While I know a lot about volcanoes, earthquakes and such things. I do not know everything. I have read many science papers on the subject. But I … Continue reading →
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5:09 PM | Global food trade may not meet all future demand, new study indicates
As the world population continues to grow, by about 1 billion people every 12 to 14 years since the 1960s, the global food supply may not meet escalating demand – particularly for agriculturally poor countries in arid to semi-arid regions, such as Africa’s Sahel, that already depend on imports for much of their food supply. A new study, published online in the American Geophysical Union journal, Earth’s Future, examines global food security and the patterns of food trade […]
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4:45 PM | The Lion – Tales of the Finger
Sometimes, an injury is totally worth it. If you’re gonna get hurt, may as well do it in a real cool way. People keep asking me what I did to hurt my finger – that annoying injury that’s been driving … Continue reading →
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3:27 PM | SESE Planetary Science Faculty search
Assistant Professor (JOB #10878) Arizona State University School of Earth and Space Exploration The School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE) at Arizona State University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Planetary Science to begin August 2015. Preference will be given to candidates whose research focus is on Solar System planetary science, and […]
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2:02 PM | So Close and Yet So Far: Why isn't Siding Spring going to sandblast Mars?
Comet Siding Spring is going to make a very close approach to Mars in October. Any comet dust that reaches Mars has the potential to inflict significant damage on the spacecraft orbiting the planet. As it turns out, however, Mars and its orbiters are likely to see very few, if any, impacts. Why?
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12:19 PM | Please welcome Rukwatitan (over on Mark Witton’s blog)
I just read Mark Witton’s piece on the new new titanosaur Rukwatitan (as opposed to the old new titanosaur Dreadnaughtus). I was going to write something about it, but I realised that Mark has already said everything I would have, but better. So get yourselves over to his piece and enjoy the titanosaurianness of it […]
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11:00 AM | Warming Paradoxically Could Cause More Cold Snaps
Shrinking sea ice, which allows more energy to transfer from the ocean to the atmosphere, could cause more brutal winter weather events. Continue reading →
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10:02 AM | Remotely India # 7: Mesozoic Domes Of The Kachchh Basin
Remotely India # 7A recent paper in Current Science (open access) on the geomorphology and tectonics of domal structures in Mesozoic strata prompted me to resurrect this old series titled Remotely India. In these posts I put up a satellite image(s) of an interesting geological feature somewhere in India followed by a brief explanation.Today's post is on the Kachchh basin in western India. In Mesozoic times this region was a long lasting marine basin in which hundred's of feet of sediments […]
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5:51 AM | Cutting Emissions Pays for Itself
This is a re-post from Audrey Resutek at the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change  Study finds that savings from healthier air can make up for some or all of the cost of carbon reduction policies.  Lower rates of asthma and other health problems are frequently cited as benefits of policies aimed at cutting carbon emissions from sources like power plants and vehicles, because these policies also lead to reductions in other harmful types of air pollution. […]
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4:31 AM | Boxall on the modesty of California’s approach to groundwater regulation
Bettina Boxall: California is finally about to join the rest of the West in regulating groundwater supplies. But the package of bills awaiting Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature is not an instant fix for the state’s shrinking, over-pumped aquifers. It could be decades, experts say, before the most depleted groundwater basins recover under the legislation, which ...Continue reading ‘Boxall on the modesty of California’s approach to groundwater regulation’ »
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4:24 AM | Growth. Peak. Collapse. Planetary exploration from 1959 - 1989
The first three decades of planetary exploration tell a story that sounds all-too-familiar to modern day space advocates. Growth, peak, and then collapse of hard-earned capability. This is the story of planetary science for the first half of its existence.
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4:00 AM | Permits issued for helium exploration
The Arizona Oil & Gas Conservation Commission has approved permits for two new wells in the Holbrook area, reportedly to evaluate helium potential.  State permits #1194 and #1195 are posted on the AZOGCC website.    The permits were issued to Ranger Development LLC, based in Ft. Worth, Texas.The well proposed in Sec. 33-20n-26e is located in the old Pinta Dome helium field [right, from AZGS report "Oil, Gas and Helium in Arizona: Its Occurrence and Potential," 1961]. The […]
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3:35 AM | A day of flooding across Arizona
We sent AZGS employees home a little early today after the City of Tucson sent their non-essential staff home at 3 p.m. News reports said the city had closed or was closing bridges across the Santa Cruz River, which lies only a block west of our offices.  There were fears that the high waters might undermine the river banks and threaten the structural integrity of the bridges.   I left at 5 p.m. worried that I would not be be able to get over the river to get to our home in the […]
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