Posts

October 27, 2014

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5:35 PM | The most epic geophysics hackathon in the world, ever
Words can't express how awesome the 2014 Geophysics Hackthon was. The spirit embodied by the participants is shared by our generous sponsors... the deliberate practice of creativity and collaboration.  We convened at Thrive, a fantastic coworking space in the hip Lower Downtown district of Denver. Their friendly staff went well beyond their duty in accommodating our group. The abundance of eateries and bars makes it perfect for an event like this, especially when the organization is a […]
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4:30 PM | Cold Winters in Europe, Asia Linked to Sea Ice Decline
Arctic sea ice decline has doubled the chances of an extreme cold winter over Europe and Asia.
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4:00 PM | Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate
Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater opens her arms to all who would learn. The plinth on which she rests sends a different message -- clues to one possible method of carbon sequestration, which could prove to be a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.
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3:33 PM | Wells on the fringes of Tucson running dry
Contra Porterville in California, where poor farmworkers with few options are running out of water, on the fringes of Tucson it’s those who chose to sprawl onto the edge of a relatively affluent community, beyond municipal utilities and dependent on a marginal aquifer, who are now seeing their wells running dry. Tony Davis: In the ...Continue reading ‘Wells on the fringes of Tucson running dry’ »
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3:24 PM | A Boulder Dam anniversary
Yesterday was the 78th anniversary of the first electric generator go into full operation at Boulder Dam. EDN has the story: Electricity from the dam’s powerhouse was originally sold pursuant to a 50-year contract, authorized by Congress in 1934, which ran from 1937 to 1987. In 1984, Congress passed a new statute which set power ...Continue reading ‘A Boulder Dam anniversary’ »
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3:18 PM | Solite Excavation: Day 11
Today’s blog is dedicated to the foreman of the quarry, Scott Traenkner. Scott has been supportive of our excavation since the start and offered his skills should we need them. On day 11 of our excavation, we were able to … Continue reading →
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2:51 PM | Rosetta NAVCAM's Shades of Grey
What do “light” and “dark” mean for an object like Comet 67P/C-G? Here are some details on how Rosetta's NAVCAM images are taken and displayed to make a wide range of surface features possible.
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2:00 PM | The Horror!
National Blog Posting Month – September 2014 – Crunch Prompt – Do you enjoy being scared such as watching horror movies or reading scary books? —— No.     Let me elaborate a little, perhaps. I don’t go out of … Continue reading →
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1:30 PM | The IAGD: making geology accessible to all
The IAGD mission is to improve access to the geosciences for individuals with disabilities and promote communities of research, instruction and student support. There is no need to wait to become a member of this organization that led its first accessible fieldtrip one week ago at GSA.
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12:46 PM | Yamnuska
Driving west from Calgary, your first evidence of entering the Canadian Rockies’ Front Ranges is the startling sheer cliff of Yamnuska, north of the Trans-Canada Highway: Yamnuska’s shape is a function of differential weathering of the two rock units that make up the mountain: Cambrian Eldon Formation limestone, and Cretaceous shales of the Brazeau Formation. The Cambrian is the uppermost of the two, which is a violation of superposition, considering …
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11:30 AM | Imaggeo on Mondays: Polygon ponds at sunset.
Thinking of the Arctic conjures up images of vast expanses of white icy landscapes punctuated by towering icebergs and a few dark rocky masses; certainly not a green landscape with a series of water pools amongst rolling hills. The image below is perhaps more reminiscent of the temperate Scottish or Welsh countryside; but don’t be […]
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11:30 AM | Supervolcano Cleared in Neanderthals' Demise
Neanderthals disappeared from Europe 40,000 years ago, about the same time as the region's biggest volcanic blast. But don't blame the volcano.
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10:47 AM | Soil wind erosion is influenced by soil inherent properties
Carlos M. Asensio Grima casensio@ual.es Department of Agronomy University of Almería, Spain Soil wind erosion is influenced by soil inherent properties, different wind characteristics and surface vegetation cover. For a better understanding of this process is necessary to explain the effect and consequences of wind erosion on the ground and especially in agricultural areas of […]
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10:15 AM | The role of the ocean in tempering global surface warming
This is a re-post of an article by Richard Allan for NOAA It is well known that the surface has warmed over the past few decades, primarily in response to rising concentrations of greenhouse gases. ENSO variability and other natural factors, have additionally contributed toward year-to-year fluctuations about this warming trend (dark red line in Figure 1). Strong El Niño events add a few tenths of a degree Celsius to the global average surface temperatures. However, there has recently […]
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9:54 AM | Images of soil erosion
Frans Kwaad, physical geographer Soil erosion is the removal of soil from cultivated land at a rate that is (much) higher than the rate that would occur under the natural vegetation at the considered site. Besides the loss of fertile topsoil, soil erosion entails the dissection of cultivated land by rills and gullies and the […]
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8:00 AM | Missing Maps – A London Event
Information about an external event that may be of interest to some of our readers: “You are warmly invited to attend the launch of the Missing Maps Project, a collaboration between the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) , the British Red Cross, the American Red Cross, and Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) . […]
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3:34 AM | Orcas Island Tectonic Zone on East Sound
Mount Constitution and East Sound on Orcas Island East Sound and fishing boatEast Sound is a fjord on the south side of Orcas Island. It consists of a deep bay with Mount Constitution rising to over 2,400 feet to the east as well as other steep slopes and cliffs much of it on private land. The small town of Eastsound (note the spelling) is located at the north, upper end of the inlet. Several major tectonic thrust fault zone structures cut across the Sound and are exposed […]
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3:29 AM | Priority administration and Arizona’s Colorado River allotment
It’s generally more complicated than I think: A member of the Inkstain brain trust points out two catches in my “why can’t Phoenix just leave its unused apportionment in Lake Mead” post last week. The first has to do with Arizona’s application of the doctrine of prior appropriation with respect to its allocation of Colorado ...Continue reading ‘Priority administration and Arizona’s Colorado River allotment’ »
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12:35 AM | By the Fire
The RocNaNo blog offers weekly “Wordless Wednesday” writing challenges. The most recent challenge was to use this photo as a jumping-off place for a story. Let’s see where I get with this… Signs of change Winter is on its way. … Continue reading →

October 26, 2014

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5:47 PM | Tell us what you think: New blog content
A lot of what we post is very serious stuff, and although it’s critically important to discuss those issues, perhaps we could introduce some new, practical content; specifically, things that could be seen as more day-to-day, “lifestyle” topics for women.
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5:13 PM | Parvamussium cristatellum
Here is a picture of a Parvamussium cristatellum (Dautzenberg & Bavay, 1912) bivalve fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the Miocene Epoch of Neogene Period. At the museum it was labeled as Amussium cristatum aka Pecten cristatum (Bavay, 1905). Image taken in June 2014. Info Sources: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?
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4:43 PM | Bedding / cleavage relations in the Stephen Formation, Yoho NP
Good afternoon! Here are a few photos, both plain and annotated, showing the relationship between primary sedimentary bedding and tectonic cleavage in the “tectonised Stephen” Formation atop the Cathedral Escarpment (in Yoho National Park), just northeast of the Walcott Quarry where the (thicker, basinward) Stephen Formation hosts the Burgess Shale. Weathering exploits both these planes of weakness… Here, the cleavage is more planar at the bottom of the sample, and …
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4:28 PM | AZGS geologists will lead field trip to Sabino Canyon debris flows
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3:51 PM | Conflict sells
Here is Maria Gibson, the groundwater geek: Although research shows, on an international level, collaboration rather than conflict is the norm, most would agree “water collaboration” is far less exciting than “water wars”…. Via the always helpful Michael Campana, and more Gibson here.
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3:18 PM | Taking a short break--no post this week
I'm taking a short break. I expect to post again on Sunday, November 2.
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11:59 AM | After a busy summer, we have returned to the blogosphere…
Well, it has been a while since either of us has produced a GeologyJenga post, so first of all apologies on this front. We both have the same excuse – finishing our PhD theses! Our mutual deadline was 30 September 2014, and thankfully we both made it. The last few months were challenging at times […]
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11:48 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #43
SkS Highlights John Abraham's Another global warming contrarian paper found to be unrealistic and inaccurate garnered the most comments of the srticles posted on SkS during the past week. If you have not already checked it out, you will want to do so. Dr. John Abraham is a Professor of Thermal Sciences where he researches in climate monitoring and renewable energy generation for the developing world. His energy development work has extended to Africa, South America, and Asia. He […]
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7:19 AM | The Blind Men and the Elephant, as Told by Geologists: The Channeled Scablands of Washington
A dry channel in basalt on the Columbia Plateau in central Washington (photo by Mrs. Geotripper)I'm sure most are familiar with the parable of the blind men and the elephant. Several men investigate an elephant, but each touches a different part, so one describes it as being like a snake (the trunk), and others as a wall (the body), a rope (the tail), a fan (the ear), or a tree (the leg). The story of the Spokane Floods and Channeled Scablands of Washington is pretty much the Blind Men and […]
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4:14 AM | Adaptive capacity to the California drought
It’s often argued, and generally true, that municipal water use is less vulnerable to drought because cities can afford to pay more for water than farmers. But as U.C. Davis water researcher Amanda Fencl points out, the arrow of adaptive capacity doesn’t always point in that direction:   Key point about adaptive capacity to #cadrought- ...Continue reading ‘Adaptive capacity to the California drought’ »
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1:30 AM | Constellaria Bryozoan Fossil
Here is a picture of a Constellaria bryozoan fossil. It is known for its star like patterns on the fossil surface. Recently, it was found in Maysville, Kentucky, USA. The Upper Ordovician Period formations found at that location are Grant Lake (Maysvillian) and Bull Fork (Richmondian). Thanks to Kenny for the image. Past related blog posts: http://louisvillefossils.blogspot.com/2012/09/
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