Posts

October 19, 2014

+
4:48 PM | Fibrous Calcite from Illinois
Back in 2010 I found a Devonian brachiopod fossil with a fibrous or needlelike mineral growth in it. I was trying to determine what this was. Last week while touring the Gallery of Natural History section of the Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park (1300 N. College Ave, Tempe Arizona 85281) I saw a calcite specimen (AHS-NH#11396) from Cave in the Rock, Hardin County Illinois,
+
4:17 PM | Oil decline: Price makes the story
So oft in theologic wars,The disputants, I ween,Rail on in utter ignoranceOf what each other mean,And prate about an ElephantNot one of them has seen!--The Blind Men and The Elephant by John Godfrey SaxeWhen the world's business editors sent their reporters canvassing to find out what is behind the recent plunge in the world oil price, they were doing what they do almost every day for every type of market: stocks, bonds, currencies, commodities and real estate.In financial journalism more often […]
+
11:43 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #42
SkS Highlights Another "lightening rod" article by Dana, Dinner with global warming contrarians, disaster for dessert, drew the highest number of comments of the articles posted on SkS during the past week. If you have not already done so, be sure to check out Rob Paining's original SkS article, Ocean Warming has been Greatly Underestimated. It's a real "eye opener". Toon of the Week   h/t to I Heart Climate Scientists Quote of the Week Increasingly, arguments against climate […]
+
8:33 AM | Beautiful new Oligocene dolphin in the prep lab
 A couple of months ago the Haugh's quarry triage project started - we had dozens of unopened plaster jackets from Haugh's Quarry in South Canterbury. About a dozen medium to large size jackets were prepped out, including this one, which was found to have a beautifully preserved odontocete skull, mandible, and partial postcranial skeleton from the upper Oligocene Otekaike Limestone.Here's a view of the skull and mandible; the gray pieces at the upper right are parts of a large echinoid.And […]
+
3:10 AM | California water for kids, circa 1961
The Los Angeles area, with its large population, requires a great supply of water. To meet its needs, water is brought in by pipe lines from a long distance. Little moisture falls on the Central Valley in the dry season. During the season of rainfall, water is dammed and stored. It is released through canals ...Continue reading ‘California water for kids, circa 1961’ »
+
1:17 AM | Phoenix, Lake Mead and “the anticommons”
Here’s a good example of why fixing the west’s water problems is going to be so difficult. Phoenix wants to do something really simple. It currently has more Colorado River water than it needs, and it would like to just leave its unused apportionment in Lake Mead. This seems like a no-brainer – Phoenix gets ...Continue reading ‘Phoenix, Lake Mead and “the anticommons”’ »

October 18, 2014

+
9:04 PM | Notes From Detroit
I have been traveling and I am still digesting my time in Detroit. I am not unused to seeing areas that are a bit on the downside. But the scale and the demographic and economic realities of Detroit are still taking awhile to settle in. The thing to keep in mind about Detroit is that its population has declined to approximately 36% of its peak population of 1.8 million in 1950 to less than 700,000 today with a drop of over 200,000 since 2009. So some notes mostly in pictures. […]
+
9:00 PM | Pyrites of the Caribbean
This is an announcement by the RSES Bureau for Football Propaganda Reporting A team of students from the Research School of Earth Sciences is competing in the ANU`s 2014 Mixed Summer 9s Soccer Football Competition. The team (“Pyrites of the … Continue reading →
+
8:13 PM | Geo 730: October 18, Day 656: Stonecrop
Poking around on the roadcut across from the pullout, many of the joints were inhabited by these pretty little succulents. I don't know plants terribly well, but I'm guessing this is some kind of Sedum, a very diverse genus of plants also known as stonecrops. They seem, in my experience, to be good pioneers, and are some of the earliest colonizers of fresh rock exposures before soil development has progressed very far.Photo unmodified. July 15, 2014. FlashEarth Location.
+
1:36 PM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #42B
As deaths mount in Nepal disasters, questions about climate change raised Churches go Green by shedding fossil fuel holdings Climate change: it’s only human to exaggerate, but science itself does not Cutting global warming pollution just business as usual at some major companies Does the Anthropocene, the Age of Humans, deserve a golden spike? Fossil fuel industry sustained by ‘toxic triangle’ that puts 400 million at risk From Apple to Wal-Mart, companies make bets on […]
+
12:35 AM | siblings? cousins?
If you're on a long-term field project that requires staying overnight, and it's just two or three of you out there, you tend to get a little close. You work 10, 11, 12 hour days together, then you go back to the same hotel (or hotel room, if you're unlucky). You may be sharing a ride. Even if you split for dinner, you can't really escape them.Regardless of whether you like or dislike the other field staff, you start developing your own vocabulary, in-jokes, nicknames, stories you've heard a […]

October 17, 2014

+
11:03 PM | Loma Prieta plus 25
Yesterday I attended the Loma Prieta 25 Symposium at the Kaiser Center. It was a quake geek’s Woodstock, where a motley host of experts got together to schmooze, celebrate 25 years of progress since the 1989 earthquake, and look ahead. At 10:16 a.m., along with 27 million other people around the world, we participated in […]
+
10:07 PM | Gender representation in Geology
A week and a half ago, I pointed out the gender imbalance apparent in the September issue of Geology.  My particular gripe was that it would be hard to achieve gender balance in my ongoing geopoetry series if issues (like the September one) had three or fewer papers by women authors.  With encouragements from commenters and the geotwitter rock stars, I had a slightly deeper look into what is
+
9:39 PM | Friday update for Bárðarbunga volcano on 17-October-2014
Bárðarbunga volcano eruption in Holuhraun did reach one big milestone today (17-October-2014). It is now the largest eruption in Iceland since the eruption in Laki (Skaftáreldar) in 1783 – 1784 eruption. By volume the lava field in Holuhraun … Continue reading →
+
9:11 PM | Watching Siding Spring's encounter with Mars
The nucleus of comet Siding Spring passes close by Mars on Sunday, October 19, at 18:32 UTC. Here are links to webcasts and websites that should have updates throughout the encounter.
+
7:11 PM | Geo 730: October 17, Day 655: Otter Crest Rockfall
This was just a random stop- "Oh, look. A pullout. Let's see what we can see." And as you can see from yesterday's post, there's a nice view overall. But there's also a very nice example of a coastal rockfall. The pounding surf undercut and weakened the headland. Ultimately unable to support itself, a large chunk collapsed into the ocean, leaving an impressive pile of boulders. Coastal landforms, even this resistant block of Columbia River Basalt, are short-lived in such an energetic […]
+
5:53 PM | Curiosity update, sols 764-781: Work complete at Confidence Hills; puzzling arm issues
Curiosity spent a total of four weeks at Confidence Hills, feeding samples to SAM and CheMin several times. On two weekends during this period, the rover's activities were interrupted by faults with the robotic arm. Curiosity drove away from Confidence Hills on sol 780, and is ready to observe comet Siding Spring over the weekend.
+
4:41 PM | M.S. Professor Looks to Past for Future Drought Mitigation
M.S. in Sustainability Management professor Ben Cook often tells his students that the past can provide critical lessons for how we manage sustainability challenges now and in the future. Thus, it is not surprising that Cook, whose research at the Earth Institute’s Lamont-Dougherty Earth Observatory focuses on drought, hydroclimate, and interactions between the land surface and climate system, recently found that the drought of 1934 was caused in part by an atmospheric phenomenon that may […]
+
4:30 PM | MPA Program Announces Full Fellowship Opportunity- Apply Now!
The Master of Public Administration (MPA) in Environmental Science and Policy is pleased to announce the creation of the Dean’s Environmental Science and Policy Fellowship – the first full tuition grant made in the program’s 12-year history. All prospective students who apply to the program by January 15, 2015 will be eligible for the Fellowship, valued at approximately $72,000.
+
4:24 PM | Increased risk of eruption in Tungafellsjökull volcano
There is now an increased risk of eruption in Tungafellsjökull volcano (this is my opinion only). This volcano is different than Bárðarbunga volcano and is not connected to it on crustal levels (46 km top layer of the … Continue reading →
+
4:11 PM | Geo 730: October 16, Day 654: Otter Crest and Otter Rock
I'm still not convinced I have the place names down correctly for this area, but I think the headland is Otter Crest, while the island farther out and to the south is Otter Rock. And of course, currently, there are no native otters in Oregon. There is a Washington population, and a California population, and occasionally one or a few will come into our state. But other than otters in captivity at the Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport, and (I think) at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, we have none […]
+
4:05 PM | “Chopper” responds
Yay, more fallout. Need I say more? Oh go on then: This is a complete fabrication…. I dispute the description “abuse”, and suggest “use” as replacement… Prof Wadhams is apparently not content with people commenting on, or indeed even reporting, his work… This is ridiculous… This is an attempt to spuriously link the complaint to…
+
3:30 PM | California Drought Resembles Worst in Millennium
The 1934 drought is the worst on record for North America in the past 1,000 years, and had similar conditions to the current California drought.
+
3:00 PM | Fossil Friday – Harlan’s ground sloth jaw
For this week’s Fossil Friday we have a partial lower jaw of Harlan’s ground sloth, Paramylodon harlani, collected near the eastern end of Diamond Valley not far from the museum’s current location. This particular fragment is the back half of … Continue reading →
+
3:00 PM | Sun-gazing
By Galileo’s careful hand, sunspot details are exquisite, Through eye of forehead, eye of mind beholds what body can not visit. If only he could see the sights now rendered from Earth’s outer space, Ultraviolet sunscapes – Oh, to see his raptured face!
+
2:00 PM | Bonfire!
National Blog Posting Month – September 2014 – Crunch Prompt – When was the last time you went to a campfire/bonfire? Tell us about it. —— One would think based upon the month and months of camping I have done … Continue reading →
+
2:00 PM | Friday Headlines: 10-17-14
Friday Headlines, October 17, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Massive landslides in Italy Strutting kangaroos   Massive Landslide in Italy Caught on Video This is actually kind of ‘old’ news, as this happened back in 2010. … Continue reading →
+
12:55 PM | A brief word on Earthquakes and fracking.
Since the Keranen et al. paper a few months ago, there has been much discussion on the relationship between earthquakes and wastewater disposal wells from unconventional hydrocarbon extraction (a.k.a. fracking). Most of this discussion related to earthquake swarms on Oklahoma, where seismicity has dramatically increased in recent years.   However, it is worth pointing out that Oklahoma is by
+
12:07 PM | October linkfest
The linkfest has come early this month, to accommodate the blogging blitz that always accompanies the SEG Annual Meeting. If you're looking forward to hearing all about it, you can make sure you don't miss a thing by getting our posts in your email inbox. Guaranteed no spam, only bacn. If you're reading this on the website, just use the box on the right → Open geoscience goodness I've been alerted to a few new things in the open geoscience category in the last few days: Dave Hale released […]
+
11:36 AM | Science Snap (#33): Earth Science Week
James Hickey is a PhD student in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol. A geophysicist and volcanologist by trade, his PhD project is focussed on attempting to place constraints on volcanic unrest using integrated geodetic modelling. Earth Science Week is an international initiative to promote the great work that goes on in […]
123456789
611 Results