Posts

July 18, 2014

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5:00 PM | Random Review – Mi Ranchito, Sidney, Nebraska
Sidney Nebraska is known for being the world headquarters for Cabela’s. There’s a massive store there that is frequented by geologists and students who find themselves within driving distance. Over the many years that I’ve driven through there for various … Continue reading →
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4:21 PM | Ah, the Life of the Mariner! Well, Maybe...
Ah, the open sea! The adventures of the water world of planet Earth! The mysteries of the deep! Yes, it's the mariner's life for me. Well maybe, maybe not. It's hard to develop a real opinion on the basis of a single ferry ride across the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It sure was pretty, in any case. The Port Angeles-Victoria ferry crosses the Juan de Fuca Strait that separates the Olympic Peninsula from Vancouver Island on the the Pacific Coast between the United States and Canada. Although the […]
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4:17 PM | Mount Rainier Magma Plume
McGary and others (2014) (nature.com/nature/journal) used electric and seismic sensors to produce an image of the subduction slab and magma plume associated with Mount Rainier.  Colors are resistivity which reflects the plume nicely as well as the cold blue ocean crust subduction slab. The red dots are recorded seismic events   The Nature article requires subscription, but Utah State has a news release that provides some good information about the […]
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3:00 PM | Cloud Covered Mountains
Here is some pretty cool cloud coverage of the Wasatch Mountains (UT) on my drive in to work the other day. Click on it to get the enlarged version.
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2:45 PM | Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (July 18)
See how climate change is causing tropical fish to devour undersea forests and the migration of birds. Plus more of our favorite recent Earth shots.
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2:00 PM | Tale of a Carbon Atom
I am a wild carbon atom, To others I've sometimes been bound, Not locked in some hard, rocky stratum, I'm telling you: I get around!
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12:58 PM | Six books about seismic analysis
Last year, I did a round-up of six books about seismic interpretation. A raft of new geophysics books recently, mostly from Cambridge, prompts this look at six volumes on seismic analysis — the more quantitative side of interpretation. We seem to be a bit hopeless at full-blown book reviews, and I certainly haven't read all of these books from cover to cover, but I thought I could at least mention them, and give you my first impressions. If you have read any of these books, I'd love to […]
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11:00 AM | Geosciences Column: From the desolate to the diverse, a story of volcanic succession
When a volcano erupts and spews lava onto the surrounding terrain, it is merciless in its destruction. All that is green on the land is engulfed in flame, or buried by an insurmountable mass of molten rock. Whatever charred remains of what lies beneath it will not see the light of day once the lava […]
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8:46 AM | GfGD Social Event
No summary available for this post.
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8:34 AM | Climate data from air, land, sea and ice in 2013 reflect trends of a warming planet
This article is a reprint of a news release posted by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on July 17, 2014. Increases in temperature, sea level and CO2 observed; Southern Hemisphere warmth and Super Typhoon Haiyan among year’s most notable events In 2013, the vast majority of worldwide climate indicators—greenhouse gases, sea levels, global temperatures, etc.—continued to reflect trends of a warmer planet, according to the indicators assessed […]
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4:12 AM | HudBay Minerals acquires 92% of Augusta Resources stock; management changes coming
HudBay Minerals announced today that stockholders tendered 92% of Augusta Resources stock to the company. August is the parent of Rosemont Copper which is permitting a large open pit copper mine in the Santa Rita Mountains in southern Arizona, that could produce 5% of US copper for 40 years. [Right, proposed mine site.  Credit, Rosemont Copper]HudBay Minerals Inc. and Augusta Resource Corporation announced today that Hudbay has taken up 116,233,761 common shares ("Augusta Shares") of […]
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3:50 AM | Slide wildfire video describes firefighting strategy
The Southwest Fire Science Consortium posted a video report on the Slide wildfire on Vimeo.   They described it: The Slide Fire ignited on May 20, 2014, 2014 in Oak Creek Canyon between Flagstaff and Sedona, Arizona. Firefighters first raced to keep the fire from destroying over 300 homes and cabins in the canyon, and later prevented the fire from moving into residential areas outside of Flagstaff. While the strategy chosen to manage the Slide Fire using large, low-intensity burnouts on […]
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3:24 AM | Border arbitrage
I’m not positive, but I’m reasonably certain the guy with the bedroll in this picture is performing arbitrage. He was sleeping out the midday sun under the San Luis Bridge on the Sonora-Baja-Arizona border before I saw him pick up and head toward those bushes on the Colorado River’s east bank. Just beyond that array ...Continue reading ‘Border arbitrage’ »
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12:11 AM | Field work travelog – Day 6, ammonites
A note: I’m having problems uploading images from my phones so posts may be photo-less. Today we took a grand tour of the Hanna Basin field area, and got distracted by the Cretaceous. We found a bunch of ammonites in … Continue reading →
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12:11 AM | Field work travelog – Day 5, In the Hanna Basin
It was really rainy this morning. I was convinced that we wouldn’t make it into our camp in the Hanna Basin. We plunged ahead anyway. On the way, we stopped at the famous ‘Bone Cabin,’ located next to the equally … Continue reading →
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12:09 AM | Field work travelog – Day 6, ammonites
A note: I’m having problems uploading images from my phones so posts may be photo-less. Today we took a grand tour of the Hanna Basin field area, and got distracted by the Cretaceous. We found a bunch of ammonites in … Continue reading →
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12:02 AM | Field work travelog – Day 5, In the Hanna Basin
It was really rainy this morning. I was convinced that we wouldn’t make it into our camp in the Hanna Basin. We plunged ahead anyway. On the way, we stopped at the famous ‘Bone Cabin,’ located next to the equally … Continue reading →

July 17, 2014

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11:54 PM | business cards
Ask a manager has a recent post up regarding business cards, and the discussion reminded me of my own business cards.I have always received business cards in giant packs of 500 or so. And I've been known to use that many cards. I treat them just like I treat headache pills and feminine products: you never know when they'll come in handy, and they're easy to add, so I have a few tucked into my field bag, my purse, my laptop bag, the center console in my car...I use business cards for […]
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10:36 PM | Geo 730: July 17, Day 563: Amygdaloidal Basalt
I'm pretty sure most of the mineral grains filling the vesicles (gas bubbles in igneous rocks) here are calcite. This rock has undergone quite a bit of weathering, so whether the voids were originally full of calcite is impossible to say. They may have been, and the mineral simply dissolved out. This is just behind the Green Peter Dam, and is a nice stop to look for zeolites and calcite. I don't have an off-the-cuff list of all the varieties of zeolite I've found here, but it would be pretty […]
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10:29 PM | Gatsby and the Colorado River
In December of 2002, an effort to sort out the problems of the Colorado River appeared as though it was about to blow up. California had long been living beyond its means (using more than the 4.4 million acre feet minimum guaranteed under the Law of the River). The deal would have given California time ...Continue reading ‘Gatsby and the Colorado River’ »
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9:46 PM | ‘Thumbs Up’ for Travel to Kullorsuaq
At the small airport a smiling woman approaches us asking our plans in one word “Kullorsuaq?” We smile and nod and she grins broadly motioning that she and her daughter are going there too – it is their home she manages to convey.
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9:30 PM | Mt. Rainer's Volcanic Pipes Revealed in Detail
The volcano's supply of semi-molten rock, or magma, starts 50 miles below the Earth. Continue reading →
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8:50 PM | USGS Updates Earthquake Map, 16 States at High Risk
Report's maps show geologists' predictions of where and how often future earthquakes may occur and how strongly they may shake the ground.
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8:26 PM | Experimentieren mit Kindern
Kinder sind von Natur aus neugierig. Das ist eine Eigenschaft, die man eigentlich unterstützen sollte (aber viel zu oft nicht tut, aber lassen wir das). Und dabei muss es nicht immer teures  und möglichst pädagogisch wertvolles Spielzeug sein. Man kann auch mit Hausmitteln viel Spaß haben und dabei etwas über unsere Welt lernen. Einige nette Ideen dazu liefert die Royal Institution in ihren kurzen Videos.   Sei es, dass man mit Gummibandkanonen (erstes Video) […]
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6:52 PM | Geo 730: July 16, Day 562: Wood, Ancient and Modern
A final shot of the petrified (permineralized, to be technically correct) tree stump closest to the intersection at the Sweet Home Community Museum. On the left side is an example of much younger wood, holding up the protective roof sheltering the stump. Other than the petrified wood itself, there are two features of interest to me.In the lower right portion of this crop, some of the surrounding rock matrix can be seen, still clinging to the outside of the stump. It's angular, suggesting it […]
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5:00 PM | Random Review – Shanghai Chinese Restaurant, Milan, Illinois
We found ourselves craving Chinese food the second night of our unplanned stay in Milan, Illinois. We decided to check out Shanghai Chinese Restaurant, as we had passed it numerous times on our strolls. I admit, at first I was … Continue reading →
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4:15 PM | Geo 730: July 15, Day 561: Squarshed Charcoal
As I described in the previous post, we see in this photo that the summer wood has collapsed, in this case, consistently to the right, and the winter wood is undeformed. The photo is a shot from the publication "Field Guide to Geologic Processes in Cascadia." This sample is not from the stumps in the five previous posts, but is a thin section of the permineralized charcoal from the Quartzville trip. The field location of the rock is reflected in the FlashEarth location, but the photo was […]
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3:59 PM | New watch, old watch, not the same
A break from The Deep. In New watch, old watch, still the same I described the truely fascinating tale of me buying a replacement Garmin Forerunner 110. A few weeks ago I was faced with the replacement having the strap broken in a second place, and the glass having cracked when I incautiously thrutched a…
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1:32 PM | Mars comes to Stevenage
Stevenage: for readers outside of the UK it may not ring much of a bell, and indeed, with no disrespect to Stevenagians, for most UK readers it is not one of our most famous and glamorous metropolitan areas. Located around...
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9:10 AM | Grown in Hot Rock Depths: The Geology of the Seahawks Super Bowl Rings Part I
The 184 diamonds in the Seahawks Super Bowl Championship rings can tell us a thing or three about Earth’s inner self. We’re still interrogating those valuable, shiny rocks (which... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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