Posts

October 28, 2014

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9:00 PM | ANU Climate Café
By Liane Free coffee and snacks at Vivaldi’s Café (Union Court), on the first Wednesday of every month from 3:30 – 5:00 PM. Well that got your attention, didn’t it? A group of diverse PhD students are interested in overcoming … Continue reading →
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8:39 PM | Tea Tastes Worse When It Rains Too Much
Too much rain can reduce the concentration of chemicals in tea that make it taste good, scientists have discovered.
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8:22 PM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #44A
A chronicler of warnings denied Arctic Ice Melt Seen Doubling Risk of Harsh Winter in EU Building for the next big storm Carbon trading edges closer as UN brokers deal Five things to know about 2014 global temperatures Great Barrier Reef protection plan 'ignores the threat of climate change' Maybe you can change people’s minds about climate change after all New study strengthens link between Arctic sea-ice loss and extreme winters Our planet's primal scream — Is anyone […]
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6:56 PM | Lair Bahn
National Blog Posting Month – September 2014 – Crunch Prompt – Tell us a ghost story. —— Hanna shuddered in the damp darkness. Wind whispered through the fallen leaves, shuffling them on the forest floor. Mist sprayed lightly on her … Continue reading →
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6:27 PM | Big imaging, little imaging, and telescopes
I caught three lovely talks at the special session yesterday afternoon, Recent Advances and the Road Ahead. Here are my notes... The neglected workhorse If you were to count up all the presentations at this convention on seismic migration, only 6% of them are on time migration. Even though it is the workhorse of seismic data processing, it is the most neglected topic in migration. It's old technology, it's a commodity. Who needs to do research on time migration anymore? Sergey does. Speaking as […]
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5:45 PM | Australia's Plan Won't Save Great Barrier Reef: Scientists
The government's plans to protect the Great Barrier Reef can't prevent its decline, the country's pre-eminent grouping of natural scientists said Tuesday.
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5:12 PM | New Planetary Deep Drill Project
The Planetary Society has a futuristic new project: the Planetary Deep Drill with Honeybee Robotics to develop a prototype of a drill that could allow drilling hundreds of meters to even kilometers through planetary ices.
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4:15 PM | Chang'e 5 T1 rounds the lunar farside, returns lovely photo of Earth and the Moon together
The Chang'e 5 test vehicle's short mission is more than half over. It has rounded the far side of the Moon and is on its way back to Earth for a planned October 31 test of lunar sample return technology. It's not a science mission -- it's an engineering mission -- but it has managed to return an absolutely iconic photo of its distant home, seen across the very unfamiliar far side of the Moon.
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3:50 PM | Oil From BP Spill Coats Miles of Gulf Seafloor
A significant chunk of the missing oil from 2010's Deepwater Horizon oil spill has been discovered sitting on the seafloor at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico.
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3:35 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: septic systems and groundwater contamination
I am endlessly fascinated (and frustrated) by the mess that is societal risk perception. Here (behind a Google survey wall), a look at efforts to regulate septic systems in Bernalillo County, primarily on the kind-of-rural fringes of the Albuquerque metro area: As groundwater contamination problems go, the stuff leaking from septic systems isn’t terribly sexy. ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: septic systems and groundwater contamination’ »
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3:03 PM | Dry start to southwestern U.S. 2014-15 water year
Most of the way through October, it’s been a dry start to the 2014-15 “water year”, the season in which we build the snowpack to feed the rivers of the southwestern United States. As Jonathan Overpeck says: + @jfleck if there ever was a water year/ winter when we needed snow in our SW headwaters, ...Continue reading ‘Dry start to southwestern U.S. 2014-15 water year’ »
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2:33 PM | I want one of these!
Via Geoff Manaugh at BLDBLOG and the US Military, a spectacular digital/analog sandbox! Yes, it's developed for war games and military planning and operations, but wow, does it look like fun. The digital dimensions are powered by Microsoft's X-box Kinect...
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1:41 PM | Geosonnet 16
The strontium which weathers from the land Is held by teeth and shells beneath the waves Their creatures live, then die, interred in sand with isotopes in stratigraphic graves. The greatest dying Earth has ever seen Initiated the Triassic time Before the ants evolved, rock weathering Was temperature dependent, leaching lime. Warm mud in post-apocalyptic waste Bereft of vegetation,
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12:38 PM | When Nixon Stopped Human Exploration
Society Board Member John Logsdon describes how the decisions made by Richard Nixon in late 1969 and early 1970 effectively ended human exploration beyond Earth orbit for the indefinite future.
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11:53 AM | Glacial striations
Today, I thought I would share some images of lovely “textbook” glacial striations from rocks I saw in the Canadian Rockies this summer…
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8:58 AM | Bank [of England] prods insurers about climate plans?
Says the FT (Oct 27, 2014 : The Bank of England has written to insurance companies to assess the risk climate change poses to their solvency and earnings. FT environment correspondent Pilita Clark and City editor Jonathan Guthrie discuss the move and regulators’ concern about global warming). Alas its a video, but worth listening to.…
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8:53 AM | Publishers, where is the added value?
It’s nearly two years since Alexander Brown wrote Open access: why academic publishers still add value for the Guardian, in which he listed ways that he feels publishers make a contribution. I wrote a lengthy comment in response — long enough that it got truncated at 5000 characters and I had to post a second comment with the […]
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5:54 AM | Republican politicians aren't climate scientists or responsible leaders
Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is hoping to become the Senate Majority Leader after the forthcoming election on November 4th, although despite hailing from conservative Kentucky, McConnell is in a very tight race. The Cincinnati Enquirer editorial board recently had a long discussion with McConnell and tried to pin him down on the subject of global warming. McConnell wouldn’t directly answer whether he believes in climate change. Enquirer’s editorial board […]
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2:22 AM | A feast of comet features from Rosetta at Churyumov-Gerasimenko
I have been horribly behind in posting images from Rosetta's exploration of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and that's a shame, because the spacecraft has lately been exploring the comet from a range of only 10 kilometers. From that range, the NavCam gets sub-meter resolution, and we're seeing a menagerie of odd surface features
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1:30 AM | Hippurites Bivalve Fossil
This image shows a Hippurites (Lamarck, 1801) marine bivalve mollusk fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in Late Cretaceous oceans. Images taken in June 2014. Info Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippurites
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1:27 AM | Sound Science Battles Hysteria- Sagan Got It Right
Some politicians (Mainly the governors of NY and NJ) are taking it on the chin this Monday night for locking up a nurse returning from West Africa who was helping patients with Ebola. The treatment of Kaci Hickox has been called a hysterical over-reaction by several of this country’s top health experts, and fortunately they seem to be backing down.  When they locked up a healthy nurse who was helping …
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1:22 AM | Higashi for the Anthropocene
Higashi for the Anthropocene and seasonal higashi, in collaboration with Kagizen Yoshifusa (Kyoto) and Wagashi Asobi (Tokyo), smudge studio 2014 The project had humble beginnings. Our primary intention was to invite a small group of hybrid artist/practitioner colleagues into an experimental context.  They would be colleagues whose work we respected for how it addressed the challenges of the […]
Editor's Pick
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12:36 AM | Bárðarbunga volcano update for 27-October-2014
During the weekend activity in Bárðarbunga volcano was in the same manner as it has been for the past two months. Largest earthquakes during the weekend had the magnitude of 5,2 and 5,3. Pollution was a big problem … Continue reading →

October 27, 2014

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10:30 PM | Hawaii Volcano Lava Wave Nears Homes
Lava from a slow-erupting volcano has reached within yards (several meters) of homes on Hawaii's Big Island.
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10:11 PM | Minor earthquake swarm on the Reykjanes ridge
Last night (27-October-2014) a minor earthquake swarm took place on the Reykjanes Ridge. Around 10 earthquakes where recorded and the largest one had the magnitude of 3,7. The earthquake swarm on the Reykjanes Ridge. Copyright of this image … Continue reading →
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10:00 PM | Droughts and fish highways
"I grew up on the shores of Connecticut looking into tidal pools and wondering about the plants and animals living there: where they move to when the tide goes out, and from when the tide comes in, and why. Once I even tracked my cat out my 3rd floor window and onto the roof to see how she accessed my bedroom at night. So I’ve always been curious about movement patterns in nature. The whys and hows of nature are... Read more
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9:42 PM | Visiting the Cooper Center
Last Thursday I had my first opportunity to visit The Cooper Center, Orange County’s primary repository for paleontological and archaeological remains (WSC performs a similar role for Riverside County). The Cooper Center recently hosted the Prehistoric OC festival, but things … Continue reading →
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8:28 PM | 3-D Printed Gardens Can Grow in Any Shape
A Japanese scientist has invented a way to design, print and grow herb and flower gardens in nearly any shape. Continue reading →
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6:00 PM | Telltale Signs of Life Could Be Deepest Yet
Telltale signs of life have been discovered in rocks that were once 12 miles (20 kilometers) below the surface — some of the deepest chemical evidence for life ever found.
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5:43 PM | Faculty Profile: Sara Tjossem
For Sara Tjossem, a Senior Lecturer at the School of International and Public Affairs, the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program is an exciting opportunity for her to engage with tomorrow's environmental leaders. Tjossem says one of her favorite parts of the program is watching students form professional and personal connections they may not have otherwise made.
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