Posts

February 25, 2015

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4:16 PM | Bárðarbunga volcano weekly update for 25-February-2015
There hasn’t been a lot of new information about the eruption in Holuhraun this week. Earthquake activity continues in Bárðarbunga volcano as before, but at slower rate and earthquake with magnitude 3,0 and larger have almost stopped at … Continue reading →
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2:33 PM | Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate Kick-Off
This week marks the launch of the new Columbia Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate, a cross-disciplinary collaboration between a variety of centers, research groups and individuals from across Columbia University. The Initiative, led by Adam Sobel, kicked off on Monday evening with a World Leaders Forum panel event in Low Library. Panelists discussed a wide range of science and policy topics related to extreme weather, showing the interdisciplinary nature of the new Initiative.
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1:51 PM | Strategic edtech planning with the 2015 NMC Horizon Report
This 12th edition of the NMC Horizon Project identifies and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education across the disciplines
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12:00 PM | Photos Capture Some of the Oldest Trees on Earth
Photographer Beth Moon spent 14 years shooting to create this photo collection of ancient trees.
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9:44 AM | Dinosaur National Monument quarry map
The Carnegie Quarry, at Dinosaur National Monument, near Jensen, Utah, is arguably the most impressive dinosaur-fossil exhibit anywhere in the world — a covered, semi-excavated quarry that’s absolutely packed with big dinosaur fossils. It’s also notoriously difficult to photograph: too big to fit into a single photo, and with poor contrast between the bones and […]
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9:00 AM | GfGD at EGU 2015 (1) – Events and Information
No summary available for this post.
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8:00 AM | Soils at Imaggeo: Fly ash dyke or landfill or pond
Kripal Singh, CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow, India Description Fly ash, generated during coal combustion for thermal power generation, is dumped in man made ponds is a big problem to manage in several countries. In this picture, natural grasses are growing on a fly ash pond on National Thermal Power Plant, Unchahar, Uttar Pradesh, India. About Imaggeo Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and […]
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6:36 AM | With climate change, US presidents matter
Yesterday, President Barack Obama became the first president who has taken a stand to stop climate change. Actually, that isn’t quite true. President Obama took that stand from his first step into the White House. He has put into place a series of initiatives that actually give us a chance at stopping the most serious consequences of climate change. Much of his actions have gone with little public notice. That changed yesterday with his veto of the ill-proposed Keystone XL […]
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5:34 AM | Drilling into the Depths of the Bengal Fan
Preparations are underway at our third and deepest site. Our target depth is 1500 meters below the seafloor, which is made even more challenging by the fact that the seafloor is 3600 meters below the ship! read more
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5:06 AM | Ask Me Anything (on reddit) About NASA's Budget
Starting at 11am PST/2pm EST on Wednesday, the space policy team at the Society will hold an AMA (Ask Me Anything) about NASA's new budget and the process of space exploration.
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1:49 AM | 2015 SkS News Bulletin #1: Adjusting Temperature Records
This bulletin inventories rebuttals to two recent articles by Christopher Booker published in the UK's Daily Telegraph claiming that climate scientists have nefariously manipulated temperature data in order to propagate the "myth of manmade climate change". This bulletin also functions as a supplemenatry reading list to two recently posted SkS articles rebutting Booker's false claims and innuendos, i.e.,  Fiddling with global warming conspiracy theories while Rome burns Telegraph wrong […]

February 24, 2015

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11:02 PM | Geo 1095: February 23, Day 784: Intrusive Aquaclude
"Aquaclude" may be an obsolete term; I seem to remember reading somewhere that there is another term that's preferred now, but I don't remeber what it is. Basically, as I learned it 30-some years ago, an aquaclude is an impermeable layer, through which ground water travels poorly, or not at all. In the photo, that darker streak is a dike that appears to have confined groundwater seepage to the lower right. Note that in the upper left, there are no stalactites or flowstone. The nature of the […]
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10:00 PM | Hilarity ensues – Part I
Or: Why you should do fieldwork By Tanja Just under a week ago I came back from a two-week long fieldwork in the bush area of Western Australia. Not sure if that area really counts as the outback as the … Continue reading →
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9:29 PM | rigorously eschewing the unfortunate ad hominem arguments that too often characterize public “debate” about human-caused climate change
My title comes from a lying “letter of recommendation” for Soon, which says in part: …Willie is scrupulous in attending to the basic scientific veracity of everything that he presents in public about scientific matters. He is careful not only in that regard, but also in the attention he pays to drawing reasonable and balanced…
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9:15 PM | Obama's Keystone XL Veto Not a Death Blow to Pipeline
President Obama's Keystone XL veto on Tuesday kills only a bill, not the pipeline itself. Continue reading →
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8:55 PM | The “Abel” mountains of Tasmania
Intro: There is something special about mountains when you are a geologist (i.e. a person who spends a good chunk of the time thinking about rocks). Their prominent peaks seem to allure and beg to be reached. From growing up in Canada I’m used to being surrounding by gorgeous glacier-caped mountain, sadly, these are missing in Australia. … Continue reading →
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6:20 PM | Dozens of Mysterious New Craters Found in Siberia
Russian scientists discover 20 small sinkholes surrounding a larger crater in Siberia.
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6:00 PM | Non Washington Post: Unconformity in the Mecca Hills
I took a trip to visit friends and they joined me on a little geology adventure to the Mecca Hills. The Mecca Hills are a low range of hills on the southern end of the San Andreas Fault zone. The southwest side of the hills has the main trace of the fault and a second fault is located along the northeast side of the hills. The landscape along and between these fault strands is spectacularly contorted. Sylvester and Smith (1987) describe the unique structures that […]
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5:33 PM | DNews: How Earth Gets Its High and Low Tides
When the moon hits our eye it's less a pizza pie than a big, shiny tidal engine, tugging Earth enough to create the tides we see rolling on and off our beaches. Are other factors at play in Earth's tides? You might be surprised.
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4:12 PM | A word of caution about what “Upper Colorado” means
People monitoring snowpack and planning for the coming water year use two quite different definitions for the “Upper Colorado” basin/headwaters/watershed. One definition involves the watershed above Glenwood Springs, within the state of Colorado, where the branch of the big river once known as the “Grand” and then renamed the “Colorado” begins. As of this morning, ...Continue reading ‘A word of caution about what “Upper Colorado” […]
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3:02 PM | Saharan dust feeds Amazon rainforest just enough to replace lost nutrient
The Sahara Desert is a near-uninterrupted brown band of sand and scrub across the northern third of Africa. The Amazon rainforest is a dense green mass of humid jungle that covers northeast South America. But after strong winds sweep across the Sahara, a tan cloud rises in the air, stretches between the continents, and ties together the desert and the jungle. It’s dust. And lots of it. Scientists have not only used a satellite to measure the volume of dust that makes this […]
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1:20 PM | Rare snowmelt estimation (GB)
I read Hough and Hollis’ 1997 paper recently which uses Met Office synoptic stations to estimate a magnitude – recurrence relationship for snowmelt in the UK. i.e. how often do we get how… Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Plastic-Eating Corals in Australia Reef Raise Concerns
Scientists found plastic deep inside the coral and worried the substance could hurt the creature's ability to digest normal food.
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12:14 PM | New macro GigaPans for exploration
My student Robin has been busy cranking out great new macro GigaPans. Check out a few of these new examples: link link link link link link link link
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8:00 AM | Sure can smell the rain
Fly, thought, on golden wings, go alight on the cliffs, on the hills, where the sweet airs of our native soil smell soft and mild! Chorus of the Hebrew slaves, Nabucco Giuseppe Verdi   Have you ever noticed the smell of rain? Why does wet soil smell so good? The smell of wet soil plants oils released into the soil during dry periods is due. These substances accumulate in the soil and mix with geosmin, produced and released by several groups of bacteria, including actinobacteria (eg, […]
Editor's Pick
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7:33 AM | I’m a terrorist
Or at least, that follows clearly from the latest nonsense from Wattie-land. Greenpeace enlists Justin Gillis &John Schwartz of the NY Times in Journalistic Terrorist Attack on Willie Soon – Miss Target, Hit Smithsonian Instead. If the NYT is “terrorist” then so am I. Of course, the Smithsonian is investigating Soon, so perhaps they’re terrorists…
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6:21 AM | The Future of Weather Forecasting May Be in Your Backyard or Your Smart Phone
I did a piece about the growing number of backyard weather stations that aired on Monday, and I thought I would share it with you. I also talk about the growing number of weather apps and smart phone sensors, that I’ve mentioned here before. You can find out how to set up a home weather station and put the data online for the world to see in a post I wrote …
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2:42 AM | Bathtub Ring, and yet more thoughts on why Lake Mead is dropping
Here’s my obligatory picture of Lake Mead’s bathtub ring, as seen this afternoon from Hoover Dam: The surface elevation this afternoon was 1,088.97 feet above sea level, the lowest it’s been at this time of year since 1956. It has dropped 20 feet since this time a year ago, which is among the biggest one-year ...Continue reading ‘Bathtub Ring, and yet more thoughts on why Lake Mead is dropping’ »
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12:35 AM | Geo 1095: February 22, Day 783: Stalagmite Moonlets
Another "splash" photo, this one is a bit more subtle. If you look in the neighborhood of the upper portion of this stalagmite, you should be able to spot some small transparent spheres, which are droplets of water splashing back from a larger drop that fell from the ceiling. It looks like a contingent of little moonlets orbiting the peak.Photo unmodified. May 9, 2013. FlashEarth Location. (Since we're underground, I have only a vague idea where this is with respect to the surface.)
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12:18 AM | Index of Arizona geologic maps published for 1925-2015
The Arizona Geological Survey just released a geologic map index by staff geologists Jon Spencer and Steve Richard comprising maps that are available from the AZGS’ online Document Repository. The index includes the citation, location and map scale data for approximately 720 maps of areas within Arizona derived from approximately 500 publications published by AZGS. The Geologic Map of Arizona (2000) is used as background to the map indexes, identifying regional maps with scale ranging […]
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