Posts

August 31, 2014

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6:59 AM | Tea drinking temperature
No summary available for this post.
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3:44 AM | Testing Hoover Dam’s outflow jets
The San Diego Air And Space Museum posted some wonderful old aerial pictures of Hoover Dam on Flickr, and I’m hoping someone in the Inkstain posse can help me sort out the history. This image was taken by Colonel Orie W. Coyle, and appears to be a test of Hoover Dam’s outlet jets that I’m thinking ...Continue reading ‘Testing Hoover Dam’s outflow jets’ »
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3:38 AM | Portable seismometers pulled from Duncan, heading to Napa
AZGS geologists Jeri Young and Phil Pearthree pulled out four of the seven portable seismometers deployed in the area around June's M5.2 earthquake near Duncan, Arizona.  The portable instruments were installed in July to monitor the aftershocks from the June 28 event, detect small events, and provide accurate locations for all of the aftershocks.However, the PASSCAL facility that owns the instruments needs to redeploy them in the Napa California area to monitor the aftershocks from last […]
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3:29 AM | Pecan Lane
The pecan trees of Pecan Lane have seen better days.
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3:00 AM | Unidentified Insect Fossil - Miocene
Here is a picture of an unidentified insect fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the Miocene Epoch of Neogene Period. Image taken in June 2014.

August 30, 2014

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11:48 PM | Northern Convergence: The Sea to the Sky Highway in British Columbia (the Sky wins)
Porteau Cove Provincial ParkWe are continuing our "Northern Convergence" journey through Canada and the Pacific Northwest. Our last post saw us observing the geology in and around Vancouver Island and Goldstream Provincial Park, and having a look at the story poles (totem poles) of the First Nations people. That evening we caught the ferry to North Vancouver. The new day would see us heading into the mainland interior along the Sea to the Sky Highway to Whistler, British Columbia. Of all the […]
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10:19 PM | The mysterious "sailing stones" of Death Valley
Credits as above. Picture grabbed from ScienceDaily.com.How can a rock weight several hundred pounds move hundreds of meters across a "dry lake"?  And, why do they move in tandem? One of the early pioneers in solving this mystery was Robert Sharp* of Caltech, and many others have speculated about this problem. Sharp monitored stones over a period of seven years stretching from 1968-1974, and concluded that movement was related to wet stormy weather. Sharp and Carey documented a greatest […]
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6:45 PM | Rig Floor Reflections
One of the best things about being an Expedition 352 Education and Outreach Officer is the opportunity to learn about all parts of the drilling process.  From the geology of the drill sites to the roles of each individual on the JR, everything is fair game; no question is too basic or trivial as everyone takes up the task of helping me learn. read more
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5:49 PM | Update on Askja and Bárðarbunga volcanoes at 17:49 UTC
This information is going to get outdated quickly. This is the weekend edition of my regular updates on activity in Bárðarbunga and Askja volcano. They are shorter and might not contain all the information on what is going … Continue reading →
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5:07 PM | New Geologic Map of Black Peak and Bobs Well 7.5" quadrangles released
AZGS has published a new geologic map of the Black Peak and Bobs Well 7.5" quadrangles as a digital map.  It is available at our online repository for free viewing and downloading.Most of the map area is covered by sand dunes and related features of Cactus Plain. The dune field of Cactus Plain is on a low plateau formed primarily on older eroded sediments, with minor bedrock hills protruding from the plain locally. The oldest late Cenozoic deposits in Cactus Plain are undeformed fan […]
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4:52 PM | Geo 730: August 30, Day 607: Dana Being Cool
In the very left bottom of the topo map below, you can see a three-way intersection, with one road following Quartzville Creek off the bottom, one following Canal Creek ~north, and one running diagonally up the hill between the other two, and toward the center of the map.After leaving Yellowbottom, head up Quartzville road to that three-way intersection and take the middle gravel road (the other two are paved) up the hill.The spot near the center marked "Gravel Pit" is the location for the […]
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1:50 PM | Radical Materialism: Making the World Matter
Mabe Bethônico, Museum of Public Concerns, poster, video, and text, 2014, via World of Matter On September 10th we will be presenting our work at the CUNY Graduate Center’s The Center for the Humanities conference entitled, Radical Materialism: Making the World Matter. The conference begins at 9:30am and runs until 6pm (in The Skylight Room, 9100 at […]
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11:41 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #35B
Antarctic riddle: How much will the South Pole melt? As Louisiana sinks and sea levels rise, the State is drowning. Fast. Climate change's health toll: 'We can save millions of lives, even now' Climate change ups odds of a megadrought in Southwest U.S. Climate policy goes hand-in-hand with water policy Does Antarctic sea ice growth negate climate change? Full extent of global coal 'binge' is hidden, say researchers No economic reason to delay climate action - global commission The time for […]
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2:42 AM | Coal and Drinking Water
Coal has been a bit of a topic in Washington State and Oregon as well with several coal export terminal schemes proposed. Coal has been portrayed as a toxic substance by some opponents to coal export terminals. But there is a lot of variability in coal toxicity and quality. Powder River coal, the primary coal that is being railroaded across Washington State is low in sulfur relative to most other coal, but is not particularly high in energy content. That low sulfur content makes it an […]
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2:00 AM | Blatta indeterminata Insect Fossil
Here is a picture of a Blatta indeterminata insect fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed at the time of the upper/late Cretaceous Period (ICS geological timescale: Cenomanian). Fossil was found in Cearà, Brazil. Image taken in June 2014.

August 29, 2014

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10:30 PM | Volcano Erupts in Papua New Guinea
Mount Tavurvur erupted to 60,000 feet Friday, forcing planes to re-route from Australia and evacuations of local communities.
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7:53 PM | It’s not how much water you get, it’s what you do with it – Indiana edition
Indiana, where nine out of the past ten years have been wetter than the long term average, is talking about water shortages: Water shortages are coming to Indiana unless the state implements policy changes, according to a recent prediction by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Data courtesy NCDC.
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7:29 PM | Geo 730: August 29, Day 606: Deleted Dike
Photo by Dana Hunter.This is a photo Dana shot of Aaron Barth and me poking through one of several channels cut through the diorite mass, where dikes of basalt have been preferentially eroded out by floods. During high water, these rocks are entirely submerged, a fact that's difficult to grasp during the dry season when one is more likely to visit. But after the great flood of winter 1996, there were some substantial logs, 2-3 feet in diameter, stranded on the high points of these rocks, which […]
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7:09 PM | The Pivotal Discovery You’ve Probably Never Heard Of
Karl Battams highlights the historic discovery, by an Air Force satellite, of a sungrazing comet.
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7:06 PM | The Rise and Fall (and Rise and Fall) of Planetary Exploration Funding
NASA has explored the solar system since the 1960s, but it has rarely been the top priority for the space agency. Jason Callahan breaks down how planetary science has been funded over the years within NASA's larger budget.
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6:35 PM | Status update on Askja and Bárðarbunga at 18:35 UTC
This information is going to get outdated quickly. For the media please note! I am not a professional geologist. I got all the same knowledge as they do, but I am not a professional geologist. For professional view … Continue reading →
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5:29 PM | The Birth of the Modern Universe
Amir Alexander reviews Alan Hirshfeld's newest book, "Starlight Detectives: How Astronomers, Inventors, and Eccentrics Discovered the Modern Universe."
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4:30 PM | 20 Corals Added to Endangered Species List
A tenfold increase in protected coral species was announced Aug. 27, with 20 new corals added to the threatened species list.
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3:55 PM | Faculty Profile: Robert Cook
For MPA in Environmental Science professor, Dr. Robert Cook, the MPA-ESP program allows him to share his unique experiences in veterinary medicine and conservation research with students as they delve into various pieces of public policy legislation in the Workshop in Applied Earth Systems Management.
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3:15 PM | Viruses Hitch Rides on Imported Garlic
Next time you plant the garlic that's sprouted in your kitchen cupboard you could be contributing to the spread of exotic viruses.
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3:02 PM | Friday Headlines: 8-29-14
Friday Headlines, August 29, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Shaking in Napa Valley Iceland’s Volcano about to Blow … Updated: It’s Erupting now. The Mystery of Death Valley’s Racetrack Playa Rocks is Solved!   Geology of … Continue reading →
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2:48 PM | Flagstaff's Wayne Ranney leading world tour of northern locales
Today's mail brought a slick brochure from Smithsonian Journeys offering a private jet tour next June around the world of northern locales hopping from Seattle to, among others, Mongolia to Siberia to Svalbard, Greenland, and Iceland before returning home 22 days later. The Boeing 757 private jet seats up to 78 passengers in "two-by-two, VIP-style leather seats." And it's being led by Flagstaff-based geologist and fellow geo-blogger, Wayne Ranney [photo credit Smithsonian Journeys]    […]
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2:41 PM | Resilience to drought, California tomato crop edition
From the USDA (pdf): Contracted production of California processing tomatoes is forecast at a record high 14.0 million tons, averaging 48.61 tons per acre, according to a survey conducted by the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The current forecasted production is 17.6 percent above the 2013 crop. Drought has been an issue for some crops, but apparently ...Continue reading ‘Resilience to drought, California tomato crop edition’ »
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2:28 PM | Small quake northeast of Kingman
There was a magnitude 1.7 earthquake just after 3a.m. local time this morning, about 27 miles northeast of Kingman, Arizona. [Right, orange star marks the epicenter. Credit, USGS]An area 40 miles east of Kingman was hit with a cluster of quakes in the magnitude 3+ range two weeks ago.
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2:12 PM | How Much Arsenic is Too Little?
Five hundred utilities in the United States currently provide drinking water with unsafe levels of arsenic, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. But determining the actual number of people who are getting too much arsenic in their water is much less clear, according to a study conducted in part by the Columbia Water Center and recently published in the American Water Works Association.
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