Posts

September 16, 2014

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10:00 PM | Soils at Imaggeo: field in late summer after rain
Konstantinos Kourtidis Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi, Greece About Imaggeo Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and […]
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9:55 PM | Geology Through Literature - The Way of All Flesh
The next story up in the Geology Though Literature thread is The Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler.Not much in the way of geology in this book, however I did find a couple of passages interesting. The book mainly is about Christianity taking place in the 1800's and a couple of passages mention some recent works that were released:"It must be remembered that the year 1858 was the last of a term during which the peace of the Church of England was singularly unbroken...I need […]
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9:04 PM | Independent Scotland doesn’t seem like a good idea to me
Yes, Stoat, the pundit you’ve all been waiting for. Well, at least one person asked. Coming back from hols I misread a headline on my phone (I don’t have data roaming so gloriously missed everything while I was away) that suggested that Scotland had voted for independence. “Good for them” I thought, though I was…
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8:14 PM | The Matter of Habit, Cleavage, and Fracture in Minerals
This is a confusing one for students. It can sometimes be a challenge for folks who already have their PhD’s in geology. How do you distinguish among crystal habit, cleavage, and fracture in minerals? I talk a bit about cleavage … Continue reading →
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7:55 PM | The Summer of Flumes
We’ve had an exciting summer at LRRD. After six years of development, the Emflume1 is now on three continents, and we seem to be busier than ever. Back in May, Emflume1 users at the University of Adelaide Australian School of Petroleum sent us several photos, and we've shared a few here.Geologist and Ph.D. Candidate Jess Trainor, Lecturer in Sedimentology Kathryn Amos, and Geologist and Ph.D. Candidate John Counts pose for a photo with their new Emflume1.Jess studies the Emriver […]
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7:50 PM | Geo 730: September 16, Day 624: Yaquina Head, Redux
Back in July, Dana and her friend B. made a whirlwind visit, and we headed over to the coast for cooler weather. Many of the spots on this trip were ones I've covered before in the Geo series, but the photos are different. In particular, looking through the folder, this trip happened to be at near high tide, so there are some distinct differences, emphasizing the importance of considering tidal variations when planning coastal geology trips. Here, we're looking north from Yaquina Head, over a […]
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7:26 PM | Grande Ronde Basalts at the Grand Ronde
The southeast corner of Washington State provides an opportunity to see the source area of some of the great flood basalt flows that cover much of eastern Washington. While there are plenty of impressive basalt cliffs and canyons in Washington State, the canyon land topography of the Hells Canyon and Grande Ronde River Canyons as well as tributaries gives an even better impression of  thickness of the basalt flows.View down Rattlesnake Creek to the Grande Ronde River.Basalt lined slopes of […]
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7:17 PM | Tales of the Finger – Oh, for a Main Gauche!
Crazy things happen when you’re out in the field. I carry lots of equipment for working with rocks, but nothing to ward off invaders. On this day, I was merely trying to have lunch and I found myself wishing I … Continue reading →
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6:24 PM | Guest post: the genesis of Davide Bonadonna’s Spinosaurus painting
In the last post I pointed out some similarities between Davide Bonadonna’s new Spinosaurus painting and Brian Engh’s Spinosaurus painting from 2010. I also suggested that Davide might have borrowed from Brian and might have crossed a line in doing so. I was mistaken about that, as this post will show, and I’m sorry.  I woke up this […]
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6:12 PM | Mars Orbiter Mission prepares for Mars arrival
The countdown for the crucial and nerve-wracking Mars orbit insertion of India's Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) on September 24 has kicked off. At ISRO's telemetry, tracking and command network (ISTRAC) in Bangalore, the mood among the scientists is right now a mixture of optimism, excitement, and nervous apprehension.
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6:11 PM | Mars Orbiter Mission arrival timeline
Mars Orbiter Mission's fated arrival day is approaching fast! Here is the timeline of orbit insertion events, converted from India Standard Time to Universal, European, and Pacific time zones, and corrected for the 12.5 minutes it will take signals to reach Earth from Mars.
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6:00 PM | Dino-Killing Meteorite Gave Way to Leafy Forests
The meteorite that killed off the dinosaurs 66 million years took a toll on evergreen trees.
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5:52 PM | Is the Highest Climb Sustainable, and Who Pays the Price?
The Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest is perhaps the most well-known and notoriously dangerous glacial feature on the planet. In a fresh post on the Glacier Hub blog, the Earth Institute’s Ben Orlove, writing with anthropologist Pasang Yangjee Sherpa of Penn State, recounts a recent workshop held in Kathmandu to address the issues raised by the tragic deaths last spring of 16 Nepalese guides who were preparing the trail for this year’s climbing expeditions.
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5:45 PM | 2014 10-Day Geology Themed Rafting Trip in Grand Canyon
My Grand Canyon 10-Day rafting trip this year was extra special. We had 13 excited participants ready to learn a little geology and take some hikes to Grand Canyons' great places. But also, there were two special family member's along, my wife Helen and her dad Joel. This posting features photographs 100% from Helen who is becoming a sensational photographer before our eyes. Enjoy the canyon through Helen's lens!By the way, these are photo's taken with her iPhone. A nicer camera is on its way […]
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4:36 PM | MPA ESP Alumni Discuss Success After Graduation
As the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy Class of 2015 starts their second semester of courses, we invite you to learn more about the 682 alumni of the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program.
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3:50 PM | Cool! 3D Printing In The Geosciences
Geological  Fabrication Laboratory!.. Yes.. the future is already here.and it is run by Franciszek Hasiuk of Iowa State University. He explains in a short note in GSA Today just why 3 dimensional  printing is so useful especially in the geosciences:In the geosciences, we struggle with a fundamental problem—we love nature, but its aspects can be truly enormous or fantastically miniscule, very far away or exceedingly rare. Our burden is to overcome these conditions and communicate […]
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2:51 PM | Mayon and Bardarbunga volcanoes.
Mayon volcano, copyright Tom Tam shot fromLingnon hill in Daraga Town near the volcano and his homeMayon, a stratovolcano of nearly perfect symmetry, in the Philippines is again active. It is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. It has erupted 49 times in the past 400 years.  Coincidentally, the most destructive eruption was in 1814, a year before Mount Tambora erupted, with the emission of ash that led to the "Year without a summer" in 1816.  New reports today are that […]
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2:40 PM | First results from Rosetta landing expected to be unveiled at AGU Fall Meeting
Scientists expect to present preliminary results from the first spacecraft to land on a comet at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting in December. That’s assuming, of course, that they first succeed at dropping a lander from thousands of meters away onto a tiny comet – a feat never tried before. The Rosetta mission is the first designed to orbit and land on a comet, according to the European Space Agency. The mission’s Philae lander will touch down at […]
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2:37 PM | How drought shaped Southern California
From the Orange County (Calif.) Weekly, a story about how drought shaped Southern California: Orange County as we know it exists because of the Great Drought of 1864. It wrecked Southern California’s cattle industry, then one of the largest in the world and the heart of the area’s economy, and forced ranchers to unload their ...Continue reading ‘How drought shaped Southern California’ »
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1:47 PM | Daily Bárðarbunga update on 16-September-2014
This is the current status of Bárðarbunga volcano. This information might get outdated quickly if anything major happens. They are good now. Currant status of Bárðarbunga volcano at 13:47 UTC There is now one month since activity started … Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | Update from the Lake: Tracks and Things...
...on the beach at Butt Valley Reservoir, also seen here and here.Probably dog.Deer?Sasquatch — I mean, human.Crawdad.Small crawdad pinchers. Finger is red from blackberries.Corbicula fluminea or Asian clam, not zebra mussel.Jelly blob, probably Pectinatella magnifica, a type of freshwater bryozoan.Enlargement of the same photo. This is a colony, and each of the circular to star-shaped indentations or rosettes supposedly consist of several individual organisms.Shaly beach sand. […]
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12:00 PM | Update from the Lake: Tracks and Things...
...on the beach at Butt Valley Reservoir, also seen here and here.Probably dog.Deer?Sasquatch — I mean, human.Crawdad.Small crawdad pinchers. Finger is red from blackberries.Corbicula fluminea or Asian clam, not zebra mussel.Jelly blob, probably Pectinatella magnifica, a type of freshwater bryozoan.Enlargement of the same photo. This is a colony, and each of the circular to star-shaped indentations or rosettes supposedly consist of several individual organisms.Shaly beach sand. […]
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7:00 AM | Philippine Volcano Forces Thousands to Flee
Thousands living near the Philippines' most active volcano began leaving their homes on Tuesday as lava trickled down its slopes.
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5:49 AM | Certain Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they release
This is a re-post of an NSF press release New research, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), counters a widely-held scientific view that thawing permafrost uniformly accelerates atmospheric warming, indicating instead that certain Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they emit into the atmosphere. The study, published this week in the journal Nature, focuses on thermokarst lakes, which occur as permafrost thaws and creates surface depressions that fill with melted fresh […]
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1:30 AM | Polygnathus Conodont Fossil
Here is a picture of a recently found conodont fossil fragment. It appears to be a Polygnathus sp. The fossil was found in the Jacobs Chapel Shale of Clark County, Indiana, USA which dates to the Mississippian Period. Thanks to Kenny for the picture.
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12:46 AM | Wordless Wednesday Writing Challenge – Reborn
The RocNaNo Blog offers Wordless Wednesday writing prompts. This is my response to this week’s challenge, based upon this photo: Reborn K’eel sat back on her hocks and stared at the tiny, fluffy mass of down. “We made this,” whispered … Continue reading →

September 15, 2014

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10:29 PM | The how to, and how not to, guide to interviewing for the Australian Public Service (2)
By Kelly Last week I started talking through the process of applying for positions in the Australian Public Service Graduate Programs. To recap, I covered some considerations for addressing the selection criteria. I applied to three departments; Department of A, Department … Continue reading →
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9:53 PM | A landing site for Philae, but it's not going to be easy
This morning, the European Space Agency announced the selection of a landing site for little Philae on the head of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Although a primary site has been selected, landing Philae successfully is going to be tough, and the mission is now working to manage people's expectations.
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9:38 PM | Geo 730: September 15, Day 623: Cheshire Cat
I've already posted a number of items about the Cheshire Cat Quarry in the Quartzville area; more on that in a moment. But when I was up there earlier this summer, I wanted to get a photo of the contact with something for scale. Unfortunately, the light wasn't good, and I didn't notice at the time, but the photo is poorly focused as well. However, the contact between the hackley-jointed basalt and the underlying buried soil (paleosol) is evident to Bobby's left- your right. That soil sits atop […]
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9:04 PM | Spinosaurus fishiness, part n
Scott Hartman has already explained–twice–that the super-short-legged, “Ambulocetus-grade” Spinosaurus from the new Ibrahim et al. (2014) paper has some major problems. Those are both good, careful, thought-provoking posts and you should go read them. I’m writing about something else fishy with the “new” Spinosaurus and, in particular, National Geographic’s media push. Let’s check out this […]
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