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Posts

April 18, 2014

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12:00 PM | “P” is for Perfex
“P” is for Perfex, by the Camera Corporation of America. The Camera Corporation of America existed for a little over ten years, from 1938 to 1949. It’s known primarily for it’s Perfex line of cameras. The Forty-Four frequently is missing … Continue reading →
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11:30 AM | The biotech industry with Rob Carlson
In this interview, I speak to Dr. Rob Carlson, a Principal at Biodesic, an engineering and strategic consulting firm in Seattle that provides services to governments and corporations around the globe. At the broadest level, Dr. Carlson is interested in the future role of biology as a human technology. He is the author of the book Biology is Technology: The Promise, Peril, and New Business of Engineering Life, published in 2010 by Harvard University Press; it received the […]
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11:09 AM | Friday fold: Sideling Hill
Here’s what the Sideling Hill road cut looked like last month: It’s a terrific example of a syncline. Usually I show folds in profile view, but here, the view is essentially perpendicular (not parallel) to the axis of the fold: Sideling Hill’s rocks are early Mississippian in age, made of debris shed off the late Devonian Acadian Orogeny, and they were folded during Alleghanian deformation in the Pennsylvanian-Permian.
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11:00 AM | What’s on for young scientists at the Assembly?
This year, there’s a great line-up of young scientist sessions at the General Assembly. Not only that, but there are opportunities to meet those that represent you in the Union, get to know other young scientists in your field, and make the most of both the scientific and social sides of the conference… First up for young […]
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10:00 AM | Two talks on climate change and resilience
Climate change poses seemingly insurmountable obstacles for the human species, not to mention all other species on the planet. It is not the only environmental pressure that humans are putting on planet Earth, but seems to be intricately tied to all others including the shrinking availability of natural resources necessary for survival. Whatever you may […]
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9:00 AM | Friday Photo (124) – Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala
Pacaya Lava Flow Tourists and guides ignore the official closing of the National Park around Pacaya Volcano to visit the lava flow that originated that afternoon. Credit: Joel Gill, 2014
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8:58 AM | Global warming can't be blamed on CFCs – another one bites the dust
A paper published in the International Journal of Modern Physics B by the University of Waterloo's Qing-Bin Lu last year claimed that solar activity and human chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) emissions, not carbon emissions, could explain the observed global warming over the past century.  The journal has now published a rebuttal of that paper by Skeptical Science team members Dana Nuccitelli, Kevin Cowtan, Peter Jacobs, Mark Richardson, Robert Way, Anne-Marie Blackburn, Martin Stolpe, and […]
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8:15 AM | Pathe news – historic landslide films
In the last week Pathe News has uploaded 88,000 archive news films from 1910 to 1970. Some of these films feature the aftermath of landslides.
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6:42 AM | Makings of the Deadly Everest Ice Avalanche
The Khumbu Icefall is a chaotic jumble of house-sized ice boulders set with a hair trigger that must be traversed to climb the world's highest mountain.
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5:30 AM | Dolatocrinus triangulatus? Crinoid Calyx Fossil
This appears to be a Dolatocrinus triangulatus? crinoid calyx fossil. It was found in the Thunder Bay Formation of Alpena Michigan, USA. It dates to the Middle Devonian Period (Erian).Learn more at the michiganbasinfossils.org web site.Thanks to Mary Ann for letting me take some pictures of this fine specimen.
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4:46 AM | Do Not Spray
Related posts:abandoned citrus electricity and beer Watering the desert, circa 1937
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4:44 AM | When the Clock Strikes Twelve!
When the hand reaches 12 noon it is time for the ‘day shift’ scientists to start work. read more
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3:59 AM | The Bottleneck Years by H.E.Taylo – Chapter 88
The Bottleneck Years by H.E. Taylor Chapter 87 Table of Contents Chapter 89 Chapter 88 Going North, June 15, 2060 I was worried about going North and leaving Edie alone while she was pregnant. She had another opinion. “Don’t be silly. I’m a big girl, Luc.” She took my hand and held it to her…
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3:02 AM | Guerrilla Drill-a: an ambush of drilling terms!
(teaser photo of our tool pusher, Bubba, with an XCB and RCB drill bits- by Cedric Hamelin) read more
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1:54 AM | promotional items
I've collected a vast array of promotional items from conferences, subcontractors, and "technical lunches" where a vendor is trying to sell something and we're trying to score free food. So here's the Short Geologist's guide to common promotional gear, from least to most useful.1. baseball cap: If I'm outside, I'm wearing either a hard hat or a wide-brimmed sunhat. A baseball cap is useless to me. And even if I were a baseball cap-wearer, how many caps could I possibly need? Or if a baseball […]
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1:37 AM | Great Lakes Ice Unprecedented? Hardly.
The headline above is on the Huffington Posts front page this evening, and it’s rather misleading. Yes, it’s been a rather cold winter around the Great Lakes and a cold spring has slowed the ice melt as well. It’s really not  that big of a deal however, and the claim that this will affect the environment for years is more than dubious. The ice was worse in the cold winters …
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12:32 AM | It's Frisco Quake Day
It was 18 April 1906, 5:12 local time when the rumbling began. (Today that hour would be 6:12, a quarter-hour before sunup.) More than a full minute later, the shaking was still going on, and hundreds, maybe thousands of San Francisco's buildings had fallen, broken or caught fire. With the water supply rendered useless, fire raged over the city for three days and left half its people homeless. And that was only the beginning of the story of the great San Francisco earthquake, 108 years ago […]

April 17, 2014

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8:43 PM | Science snap (#23): Pacaya Volcano
Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala, is almost continuously erupting, making it one of Guatemala’s most active volcanoes and a popular tourist destination. The volcano last erupted on March 2, 2014, shown in the image here taken by the MODIS instrument on the Terra satellite. Although the volcano has been kicking off since January, in March Pacaya erupted […]
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8:37 PM | The Confidence Gap – Excellent Summary
In the last few years the number of research articles/books/popular articles about women in traditionally male dominated fields (science, leadership in large companies, etc.) has been on the rise – it has become a hot topic! Every journal and magazine seems to want to publish on this topic.  Some pieces are more sensational or more anecdotal than […]
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7:33 PM | Geo 730: April 17, Day 473: Whale Cove Sandstone
Looking more or less north from the southern end of the city of Depoe Bay, in the foreground we see the basalt of Depoe Bay. The buff cliffs under the buildings in the distance are composed of sandstone, referred to as the sandstone of Whale Cove (a small cove just to the south), and the darker rocks out on the point are made of Cape Foulweather basalt. Overall, this represents a pair of Columbia River Basalt flows separated by an interval of sedimentation. It wouldn't surprise me to find that […]
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7:31 PM | A Visit To The Science Museum
Last Friday, budding paleontologist O, his mother and I visited the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Its paleo hall walks you through geologic time and is one of the best in the world! The gems and minerals exhibit isn’t bad either, but can use a larger variety of minerals and better labels. Speaking of labels, take some […]
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7:31 PM | A Visit To The Science Museum
Last Friday, budding paleontologist O, his mother and I visited the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Its paleo hall walks you through geologic time and is one of the best in the world! The gems and minerals exhibit isn’t bad either, but can use a larger variety of minerals and better labels. Speaking of labels, take some […]
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2:36 PM | When the Clock Strikes Twelve
When the hand reaches 12 noon it is time for the ‘day shift’ scientists to start work. read more
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2:11 PM | Mountainous Fib: Andes Lie About Their Age
New research into the height of a very remote Andean plateau reveals just the latest surprise from the Earth's second-greatest mountain belt.
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1:52 PM | Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface
Leonardo da Vinci studied rocks and landscapes not only to improve the realism of his paintings, but also in an attempt to understand how the earth works. Leonardo was obsessed with water, which he considered a vector to erode ancient rocks and to deposit new sedimentary rocks, reshaping so over time the “living” earth. The running water is for earth what blood is for the human body – it flows from the mountains to the sea, then – so Leonardo – in […]
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1:36 PM | Tipping Points Annual Report 2013-14
IHRR’s Tipping Points project has now published its fourth annual report. It provides recent updates on the multiple strands of its research that combines different fields in the physical and social sciences, and arts and humanities. The project has generated a tremendous amount of academic research investigating the many different kinds of tipping points in […]
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1:17 PM | $1.5 Mln World Record Gold Crystal Verified
The 217.78 gram (7.68 oz.) nugget is a single, intact gold crystal.
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1:04 PM | The Code of Hammering
As field season returns in my part of the world, I'm gearing up for some nice outings. So it's time again to present my code of hammering. There are guidebooks that touch on matters of professional practice, and every rockhound group teaches its members hammer safety. But as an amateur geologist I practice a game between that of the professional and the rockhound. It incorporates a respect for the rock as something with its own aesthetics and right to exist as nature made it. See if you […]
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1:00 PM | Thirsty Thursday: Porter Ahoy!
OK. I actually started this brew more than a week ago. But then suddenly… time passed, and I didn’t blog about it. What’s up with that? So I started a porter two Sundays ago. A honey porter. This weekend, it’s … Continue reading →
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12:17 PM | Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface
In the Renaissance (1450-1600) architecture and pictorial arts, but also scientific disciplines like astronomy, physics and medicine, experienced a rebirth and important improvements – but what about geology? There were some lone geniuses in the earth sciences – Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci (born April 15, 1452-1519) recognized fossils as petrified remains of former living [...]
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