Posts

October 08, 2014

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10:22 PM | billable lunch?
When I first started doing fieldwork, I had to eat lunch. I was ravenous.Now that my metabolism has slowed down, I either have something small/snacky (a granola bar or handful of nuts) or go without lunch altogether. It depends on whether or not I cobbled together a good breakfast and how busy I am - if I'm running around like a crazy person, I may forget about eating altogether.If I don't eat lunch, and I'm going, going, going all day, then clearly the entire day is billable to the […]
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8:48 PM | Geo 730: October 8, Day 646: Pitfalls of Fieldwork
Here's another example of hazards on the other side of the fence. I suspect a sea cave has been eroded along a fault and/or a sedimentary contact into the cliff face, and the ceiling has collapsed, leaving this sinkhole. However, despite the hazards, it was frustrating to see all the interesting rocks just right over there, and not be able to get a closer look. Is that jumbled rock around the pit breccia or re-worked conglomerate? I can't say.Photo unmodified. July 15, 2014. FlashEarth Location.
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8:34 PM | Scientists and Reporters Just Want to Get to the Bottom of It All
After just a few short months, my desk at the Los Angeles Times had succumbed to the same peculiar malady as my desk at Oregon State University, where I did my Ph.D. in paleoclimatology: It seemed to have sprouted a thin coat of fluorescent sticky notes. Each tiny square bore a fact that merited remembering or a question that demanded answering, and, every day, they multiplied.
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8:04 PM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #41A
2014 extreme weather: Looking for climate ties California just entered 4th year of severe drought Different depths reveal ocean warming trends Drought dries up California hydropower Fish failing to adapt to rising carbon dioxide levels in ocean Getting beyond the 2-degree threshold on global warming How to lie with data (or, “Melting Away Global Warming”) In Nobel season, Laureates fret for sickly Earth In the Age of Extinction, which species can we least afford to lose? Mystery of […]
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7:30 PM | Climate Change Has Raised Ocean Acidity by a Quarter
Ocean acidification has risen by a quarter since pre-industrial times as a result of rising carbon emissions, casting a shadow over the seas as a future source of food.
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6:55 PM | How rain falls – not just how much – may alter landslide risk
New research finds that it’s not just the amount of rain that falls on a hillside, but the pattern of rainfall that matters when trying to determine how likely a slope is to give way. This new information could improve forecasts of landslides, which are typically hard to predict, said the scientists conducting the research. Different rainfall patterns—a short, heavy deluge, a light, steady downpour, or sporadic showers—will trigger different numbers of landslides with varying […]
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6:42 PM | Listen to Chris talk about his life in science
I was recently interviewed by Dr. Marie McNeely, host of the ‘People Behind the Science’ podcast – a show that lets scientists talk about their lives and experiences to provide a more rounded view of what scientists actually do in … Continue reading →
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5:49 PM | Potential traces everywhere
I haven’t had a lot of free time over this summer, what with moving across the country and starting a new job. Even so, I’ve been slowly working my way through an excellent book on traces and trace fossils, “Life … Continue reading →
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4:53 PM | Titanen des Erdreichs
Wir alle kennen sie als domestizierte Arbeitstiere, die tagtäglich auf unseren Baustellen für uns schuften. Aber wie leben frei lebende, wilde Raupenbagger eigentlich? Wie vermehren sie sich? Dieser Dokumentarfilm zeigt bisher nie gesehene Szenen aus dem Familienleben frei lebender skandinavischer Raupenbagger. Ich hab nie gewusst, wie sozial diese possierlichen Wesen verhalten.   Via Brüllmaus und Dank an Ulf Hundeiker für den Hinweis
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4:08 PM | Living with the Kosi River floods: Interview with geoscientist Prof Rajiv Sinha
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Professor Rajiv Sinha from the Department of Civil Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur visited IHRR and the Department of Geography as a COFUND Senior Research Fellow based at St Aidan’s College. He is one of the most [...] The post Living with the Kosi River floods: Interview with geoscientist Prof Rajiv Sinha appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and […]
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4:00 PM | Bowen’s Reaction Series Haikus
Sometimes, it takes a little poetry to make scientific information stick. Bowen’s Reaction Series is one of those concepts in geology that can make life a whole lot easier for students of the science. But there’s a lot there to … Continue reading →
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3:17 PM | Send us your science-themed Halloween costumes
Whether they’re from the department party last year or your childhood obsession with Marie Curie, we want to see your science on display.
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3:00 PM | Wordless Wednesday – Surveying the Scene
No summary available for this post.
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2:00 PM | Mmmm. Pie.
National Blog Posting Month – September 2014 – Crunch Prompt – Which pie wins your heart as the classic autumnal pie: apple or pumpkin?. —— Apple pie. Pumpkin pie. Pie. Mmmm. Pie. Alas, both types of pie are potentially booby-trapped. … Continue reading →
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1:42 PM | Tachiraptor admirabilis and the Early Dispersal of Dinosaurs after the end-Triassic Extinction
Langer, M. C., Rincón, A. D., Ramezani, J., Solórzano, A., and O. W. M. Rauhut. 2014. New dinosaur (Theropoda, stem-Averostra) from the earliest Jurassic of the La Quinta Formation,Venezuelan Andes. Royal Society Open Science 1: 140184.http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.140184Abstract - Dinosaur skeletal remains are almost unknown from northern South America. One of the few exceptions comes from a small outcrop in the northernmost extension of the Andes, along […]
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1:08 PM | Symphony of the Soil is a Beautiful Film Documentary
I can’t say enough about this film made by Deborah Garcia. Symphony of the Soil is available here through October 10 for free viewing. The film has wonderful macro and micro videography and a tremendous sound track. The passion these scientists providing narrative have for their subject comes through loud and clear. I try to stay away from superlatives, but can’t help it with this documentary. Watch the film. If …
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12:20 PM | The Riverine Bull Sharks of Iran and Iraq: A Brief Modern History
Acknowledgment: Massive thanks to Yolande Ferreira and the NHM Image Resources team for their efforts in securing the bull shark (C. leucas) specimen photographs used in this post. Bull sharks probably aren’t […]
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12:06 PM | Lunar Eclipse of October 8: The "Blood Moon"
Somehow I woke up, managed to remember that a lunar eclipse was happening, and staggered outside to snap a large number of badly focused pictures, and caught just a few of this morning's lunar eclipse. This eclipse is described as a "Blood Moon" because a bit of the red from sunrises around the Earth are refracting onto the Moon's surface. This particular lunar eclipse is unusual in that it may possibly be seen by observers in the eastern United States at the same moment that the sun is rising. […]
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12:06 PM | Total eclipse of the train
Tokyo is a busy city.  Thirty-six million people go call the region home, and go about their industrious, detailed lives with an energy and rigor unique on this planet. It is hard to know exactly what they are thinking; Japanese culture creates an aura or privacy and personal space that the geography tries to deny.  And for an outsider accustomed to wide open spaces, the locals here can
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12:00 PM | EarthCaching – and where geoscientists can help
You may be familiar with the outdoor sport called “geocaching,” defined by Geocaching.com as “a real-world, outdoor treasure hunting game using GPS-enabled devices. Participants navigate to a specific set of GPS coordinates and then attempt to find the geocache (container) hidden at that location.”  There are several different types of caches available, and it is not uncommon for geoscientists to specifically search for the ones classified as EarthCaches.  […]
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11:07 AM | Lunar eclipse images from the past 2 hours
A selection of "moon shots" from this morning's lunar eclipse is presented.
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11:00 AM | GeoCinema Online: What a difference technology can make.
Advances in technology mean research that was unthinkable some years ago is now possible. For instance, geographically remote areas which were once out of reach have become more accessible through better (not always easier) transportation, so what we understand by ‘remote areas’ has changed significantly over time. The films in this edition of GeoCinema online […]
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9:00 AM | Landscapes of Ladakh (1)
  Recently we undertook some work in Ladakh (India), amongst some beautiful landscapes. To see and learn more – why not come to this event at The Geological Society. Photos: Geology for Global Development (2014)
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7:07 AM | Six Snubbed Women in Science
Someone (if only I could remember who!) recently linked this 2013 NatGeo article: 6 Women Scientists Who Were Snubbed Due to Sexism. Rosalind Franklin is there, of course, but there are also women... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:50 AM | The current state of the Sunkoshi landslide in Nepal
Two German motorcyclists, undertaking a round the world tour, have posted a set of images of the current state of the Sunkoshi landslide in Nepal
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5:42 AM | GWPF funder Lord Leach – relying on unreliable sources of global warming information
DeSmog UK has found that libertarian banker Lord Leach is a likely funder of the anti-climate political advocacy group Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF). In May of 2009, Lord Leach gave a long speech in Parliament detailing his beliefs about global warming. The speech was full of inaccuracies, myths, and misinformation. Known as a Gish Gallop, the sheer number of false claims in the speech would require tremendous effort to debunk. Most telling were the sources that Lord Leach relied upon […]
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2:55 AM | Tachiraptor admirabilis, a New Theropod Dinosaur from the Earliest Jurassic of Venezuela
     MAURÍLIO OLIVEIRAThe paper will be out on October 8th, but Science's website already has a news article up about the find. It is from the same locality as the early ornithischian dinosaur Laquintasaura, which was described earlier this year.
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1:30 AM | Iereopsis Sponge Fossil with Bioclaustration?
The picture displayed is of an Iereopsis polystoma sponge fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed at the time of the Upper Cretaceous Period (Campanian). The fossil was found in Misburg, Hannover, Germany. There appears to be a trace fossil on this sponge that I have seen something like before. We find these marks sometimes on
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1:06 AM | Challenge Accepted – Save Happiness
Two weeks ago I found a bunch of magnetic words and made some goofy poems and sayings in one of the classrooms. I wrote about them here. I left the magnets on the board, and invited students to write their … Continue reading →
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12:29 AM | Semi Dry Tomatoes
The warm summer and continued warm fall has led to perhaps our biggest bumper crop of tomatoes. I have a good spot to grow them above the rock retaining wall above the alley. Growing tomatoes in the cool of western Washington is a challenge, and a bit extra so in Bellingham - a bit cooler than most other locales. Some of the plants are completely done, but we have a few that continue to produce well until it really gets to cold and dark. So when home I do a simple process to preserve them.I cut […]
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