Posts

July 13, 2014

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9:54 AM | Only In It For The Gold: Neither Optimist nor Pessimist, Just Activist
Only In It For The Gold: Neither Optimist nor Pessimist, Just Activist. “We must stop treating the natural world as something to exploit, and start realizing that it is our home. If we do that, we can thrive.“
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7:53 AM | It's a SUPERMOON, But Then Again, the Moon is Always Pretty Cool
The Moon has an elliptical orbit, which means that it is sometimes closer and sometimes farther away from the earth. Today the moon is full and making one of its closer approaches (perigee Moon), at 222,611 miles. At other times it can be as far away as 250,000 miles (an apogee moon), which makes for a difference of about 14% in its apparent size as seen from Earth. It's also about 30% brighter.Such events are not rare, and in fact there will be five of them in 2014, including each of the […]
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7:39 AM | A.Bogus Voyage
After the "Raccophoon"- Pictured is a baby raccoon dog, much less threatening than the storm of its namesake.   read more
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2:23 AM | Field work travelog – Day 1, outrunning the Ohio-geists
Today is the first day of the month-long field season of 2014. Today is also the forest day of the the-day drive to get to the field area. I’m always adamant about getting past Ohio on the first day. Sometimes, … Continue reading →

July 12, 2014

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11:22 PM | Geo 730: July 10, Day 556: Stumped
From an Ore Bin article by Irene Gregory:   Scattered deposits of Tertiary fossil (petrified) woods are to be found throughout most of the Western Cascades adjoining the eastern side of Oregon's Willamette Valley, but those deposits making up the area known as the Sweet Home Petrified Forest in Linn County are among the most abundant and well known.   The abundance of the area's fossil wood is evident even to the casual traveler. It may be seen crushed or as fill in […]
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11:00 PM | Pecten jacobaeus Bivalve Fossil
Here is a picture of a pelecypod fossil housed in a display case at the Geologia building located on the campus of Sapienza University of Rome. The case can be found on the second floor of the building. The fossil is called Pecten jacobaeus and lived during the Pliocene Period. The fossil was found in Roman countryside. The university was founded in 1303 by Pope Boniface VIII. In 1870, it
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9:38 PM | Geo 730: July 9, Day 555: Roll Over
Heading back toward Corvallis, we got off I-5 in the North Eugene-Coburg area to get a better look at an outcrop we'd passed at other times. It's quite visible from the freeway, but there's no good or safe spot to stop and get a better look-see. I took a number of photos here, but I'm not really happy with any of them.Here's an annotated version. I'm not sure if we're actually seeing the right/south margin of the dike here, so that's dotted. Also, now that I have the photo marked up and loaded, […]
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8:43 PM | Lower conductivity detected in glacier rivers from Mýrdalsjökull glacier (Katla volcano)
Today (12-July-2014) it was reported in the news that conductivity in rivers coming from Mýrdalsjökull glacier are showing signs of less conductivity and lower water levels. There is still an uncertainty level in effects around this area, since … Continue reading →
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8:34 PM | Out of the Desert and Back to the Green Hills of Home
Today wraps up the story of a week-long journey through the deserts of the southwest. I've been telling the story as if in real time, so it sounds like I'm just now arriving home, but actually we finished the trip just over a month ago. It's a time warp of sorts. I'm about to leave on another trip, this time to British Columbia and Alberta.Coming home. You can live in a boring place, a place that is the worst in the country even, but coming home is coming home. There is the familiar kitchen, […]
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7:59 PM | Geo 730: July 8, Day 554: Technical Terminology
The technical term for these rocks is "squarshed." (Actually, I think that's more drag folding over a low-angle reverse fault.)Photo unmodified. March 9, 2012. FlashEarth location.
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7:26 PM | But to live outside the law, you must be honest
We didn’t win the Timed Race, alas. But we rowed well enough. In other news: * ATTP bemoans the poor quality of “skeptic” out there. As usual, wise comments from PP who amongst other ideas proposes that Another possibility is that the idea is to learn from the discussion. * If you’d like a fine…
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3:21 PM | Building DC goes to Mexico (or, why is the geologist taking pictures of the doorframe?)
One of the interesting things about inviting a geologist to any sort of historic site is the inevitable moment when they get distracted by the stones that have been used to build whatever fabulous architectural treasure it is that you're admiring. Case in point: When I was invited to go to the New Horizons Symposium in the Chimalistac neighborhood of Mexico city, I spent at least a few minutes each day taking photos of the walls (much to the amusement of my fellow conference-goers).
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3:13 PM | Biggest aftershock yet from Duncan quake - M 4.1
A magnitude 4.1 aftershock last night at 7:48 p.m. local time, is the biggest since the main 5.2 Duncan earthquake struck on June 28.  [Right, southern-most orange circle is the M 4.1 event.  Credit, USGS]There was another M 3.0 aftershock at 12:53 a.m. this morning.  That makes 7 events in a day and half of about magnitude 3 or larger, most of which were felt by local residents and some at least 30 miles away.
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5:56 AM | Rezball
No summary available for this post.
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5:09 AM | Stromatolite from near Crypt Lake
Greetings from the field… here’s a scene I contemplated yesterday…

July 11, 2014

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11:33 PM | Map of largest aftershocks from the Duncan M 5.2 earthquake
We posted a map [right] this afternoon of all of the magnitude 3.0 and larger aftershocks from the June 28 magnitude 5.2 Duncan earthquake [shown in red]. Five of the 13 events have occurred in roughly the last 24 hours.The seismic stations used to record the aftershocks are far enough away that there may be significant errors in their initial locations.  The five portable stations deployed by AZGS in the past few days should give us more detailed subsurface velocity information so we can […]
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11:24 PM | Studying the Duncan M5.2 aftershocks: What can we learn?
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11:00 PM | #Not The Polar Vortex
That message is going around twitter this Friday afternoon, courtesy of many meteorologists. My friend Stu Ostro at The Weather Channel posted a nice graphic about it that is worth sharing!
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10:00 PM | Bothrophyllum Horn Coral Fossil
Here is a picture of a horn coral fossil housed in a display case at the Geologia building located on the campus of Sapienza University of Rome. The case can be found on the second floor of the building. The fossil is called Bothrophyllum conicum and lived during the Carboniferous Period. The fossil was found in Russia. The university was founded in 1303 by Pope Boniface VIII. In 1870, it
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9:41 PM | Geo 730: July 7, Day 553: Slant
A closer view of the right limb of the previous post's anticline.Photo unmodified. March 9, 2012. FlashEarth location.
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9:34 PM | Surveying Mount Sylvan
Ah, Mount Sylvan. Such a magnificent sight. And nearby, those huge rocky cliffs reach up to the sky! I admit this is not really such a grand landscape as it might first appear. In Manitoba’s Interlake you have to take your topography where you can find it, and heaps of quarried limestone may well be the […]
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9:15 PM | Japan Tsunami Advisory Lifted After Quake
The Japan Meteorological Agency said a local tsunami of up to one metre (3.3 feet) could impact the Pacific coastline after the quake.
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9:04 PM | Time and Tide
A new paper (Foster and Brown 2014, Time and Tide: Analysis of Sea Level Time Series, Climate Dynamics, doi:10.1007/s00382-014-2224-3) looks at how some authors have analyzed sea level data, and how they’ve gone wrong. There has been a spate of … Continue reading →
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7:00 PM | What Geology Has to Say About Global Warming
The most important lessons drawn from geology are that the earth’s climate can change radically and that the pace of change can be rapid. The precision of measurement is currently too poor to give an exact answer to a critical question, At what carbon dioxide level are we in danger of melting Antarctica? However, while crude, these estimates suggest that this threshold will be reached in 150-300 years, if carbon dioxide levels continue to rise at the current rate.
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6:24 PM | Geo 730: July 6, Day 552: Another Anticline
The right limb is more evident than the left, but I trust you can see both sides. In this case, we have a clear enough view of the strike and dip to see the anticline is plunging away from us- generally speaking, to the east.Photo unmodified. March 9, 2012. FlashEarth location.
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6:17 PM | So did Lake Mead break the record yet or not?
At this point it’s just a parlor game, but has Lake Mead broken through the old “lowest since they filled it” record yet or not? Regardless of the fractions of an inch involved, it’s a big deal. (Go to Circle of Blue for an explanation.) But the conversation this week has been a bit confused ...Continue reading ‘So did Lake Mead break the record yet or not?’ »
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6:13 PM | Duncan quake aftershock rocks Clifton
We are getting reports that another aftershock, M3.6,at 10:33 a.m. this morning shook buildings in Clifton, about 30 miles to the north-northwest.[Right, orange star marks latest aftershock to the June 28, M5.2 Duncan earthquake.  Credit, USGS]
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4:55 PM | Drunk on Geology - Lava Cap
Our next entry into Drunk on Geology is Lava Cap. Lava Cap is a Californian wine:"Nestled in the lovely Sierra Nevada Foothills, Lava Cap Winery's handcrafted wines will awaken your senses. We are pleased to celebrate over 25 years of wine making with you."One of the neat things about this particular geologically friendly wine is that the Chardonnay, El Dorado bottle was tagged especially for the GSA meeting last year in Denver, celebrating GSA's 125th birthday. For a nice breakdown of the […]
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4:45 PM | Climate change film Chasing Ice screened in Durham
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. by David Saddington and Christopher Vos Back-to-back events on Friday 13th June brought the issue of climate change into the heart of Durham City, UK. The Market Place was transformed into an outdoor cinema for the afternoon as students and [...] The post Climate change film Chasing Ice screened in Durham appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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4:18 PM | Geophysics at SciPy 2014
Wednesday was geophysics day at SciPy 2014, the conference for scientific Python in Austin. We had a mini-symposium in the afternoon, with 4 talks and 2 lightning talks about posters. All the talks Here's what went on in the session... Matt Hall — Modelr seismic models Patrick Cole — PyGMI grav-mag modeling Joe Kington, Chevron — 3D seismic viz in Python Leo Uieda, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro — Fatiando poster preview (full 2013 talk) Rowan Cockett, UBC and […]
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