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Posts

April 11, 2014

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1:19 PM | World Wildlife Fund’s Dr Brendan Fraser on improving fish diversity and conservation agriculture in Mozambique
Dr. Brendan Fisher is a research scientist at the World Wildlife Fund. His research and fieldwork lie at the nexus of conservation, development, and natural resource economics. Brendan is the author of over 50 peer-reviewed articles on topics such as poverty, human welfare, ecosystem services and biological conservation, and the co-author of two books, Valuing Ecosystem Services (Earthscan, London, 2008) and A Field Guide to Economics for Conservationists (Forthcoming, Roberts and […]
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12:52 PM | Friday fold: kink from the Billy Goat Trail
My student James O’Brien took this image of a kink band along the Billy Goat Trail, downstream of Great Falls in Maryland’s metamorphic Piedmont province. A lovely little structure, don’t you think? Thanks, James! Happy Friday, all.
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12:23 PM | Away from home: Collaboration in a global organisation
The ‘Away from home‘ blogging series features Indian postdocs working in foreign labs recounting their experience of working there, the triumphs and challenges, the cultural differences and what they miss about India. They also offer useful tips for their Indian postdocs headed abroad. You can join in the online conversation using the #postdochat hashtag.  Read more
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12:03 PM | “J” is for Jiffy
“J” is for the Jiffy Kodak The Jiffy Kodak is a fairly common camera with a pop-out front that took roll film. Many of the Jiffy Kodaks have an art-deco flair. The Jiffy Koday Six-20 took 2.25 X 3.25 inch … Continue reading →
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11:34 AM | Ship Shape and in Bristol Fashion!
There is a common saying in the UK that comes from a nautical root – ‘everything is ship-shape and in Bristol fashion’! Bristol refers to the City of Bristol that has been an important port for hundreds of years, sitting as it does at the head of the Bristol Channel - a deep and wide inlet between the Cornwall/Devon isthmus and South Wales. read more
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11:00 AM | Exhibits at EGU 2014 – The Face of the Earth
This year, the conference will have a theme: The Face of the Earth. Much like a human face, our planet exhibits a huge diversity of shapes and forms, and the 2014 theme celebrates this diversity in geoscience processes – from the Earth’s core to interplanetary space. In line with this year’s theme, you’ll find exhibits on […]
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10:26 AM | Earthquake preparedness and geohazard vulnerability in Chile
Dr Sergio Sepulveda from the University of Chile is visiting Durham University as a Cofund Senior Research Fellow through the Institute of Advanced Study, to work with the International Landslide Centre at IHRR that is led by Professor Dave Petley and Dr Nick Rosser from the Department of Geography. Sepulveda is from Chile, one of […]
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10:06 AM | Under the covers (Nature revealed) – 10 April 2014
In the latest Under the covers (Nature revealed) blog, Nature’s Art Director Kelly Krause discusses the inspiration behind this week’s front cover choice on brain-wide axonal projection patterns.  Read more
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9:00 AM | Friday Photo (123) – St. Joseph Cathedral (Antigua, Guatemala)
   Ruins of St. Joseph Cathedral (Antigua, Guatemala) This Cathedral was destroyed in the significant 1773 earthquake. Part of the Cathedral has been rebuilt, and the ruins are now opened for tourists to visit. Credit: Joel Gill, 2014
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5:32 AM | Climate imbalance – disparity in the quality of research by contrarian and mainstream climate scientists
A new paper has been published in the journal Cosmopolis entitled Review of the consensus and asymmetric quality of research on human-induced climate change. The paper was authored by John Abraham, myself, John Cook, John Fasullo, Peter Jacobs, and Scott Mandia. Each of the authors has experience in publishing peer-reviewed responses to flawed contrarian papers. Despite the 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warming supported by peer-reviewed research, expert opinion, the IPCC reports, […]
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3:00 AM | SE-GSA meeting, Day 1
Today was the first full day of the Southeastern GSA meeting. As I expected, running an exhibit booth has put a bit of a crimp in my ability to attend talks, even with Ray, Christina, Ashley, and Brett all helping. … Continue reading →
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2:50 AM | Via Nature podcast, Alex Witze on the grand pulse flow experiment
If I’d done the geek stuff right, hit the play button below to hear a really nice piece by Alex Witze of Nature magazine from the Colorado River delta pulse flow. (I know, it’s a magazine, this is audio. Brave new world and all.) If I haven’t done the geek stuff right, you can probably ...Continue reading ‘Via Nature podcast, Alex Witze on the grand pulse flow experiment’ » Related posts:Colorado “pulse flow”: fighting deeply held […]
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2:19 AM | It now looks like 2017 is the earliest we could see a shortage declaration on the Colorado River
The latest Bureau of Reclamation monthly basin operating report, out today (the “24-month study”, pdf), makes it increasingly clear that we’re not going to see Lake Mead drop to levels that would require a shortage declaration in 2016. The shortage is based on Lake Mead’s surface elevation, and the trigger level is 1,075 feet above sea ...Continue reading ‘It now looks like 2017 is the earliest we could see a shortage declaration on the Colorado River’ […]
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1:38 AM | Peter Sinclair interviewing Maureen Raymo
Another good video from Peter Sinclair on his YaleClimateForum YouTube channel: Maureen Raymo is an expert in paleo-climates.  This is probably the most informative climate science specialty when it comes to anticipating the final outcome of our global experiment in climate disruption.  The rapidity of the current change is outside the realm of anything previously…
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1:02 AM | Bet You Did Not Know This
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April 10, 2014

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11:31 PM | Help name the last phase of the Cassini mission!
The scientists on the Cassini team are incredibly excited about the final, "proximal orbit" phase of the mission. But they want a punchier name for it, and they're asking the public for help.
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10:44 PM | Will We Finally Rove Mawrth Vallis?
Mawrth Vallis was axed as a landing site for Curiosity, but will we get a chance to explore it with ESA's ExoMars rover?
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9:47 PM | Former NIH stem-cell chief joins New York foundation
Stem-cell biologist Mahendra Rao, who resigned last week as director of the US National Institutes of Health’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), has a new job. On April 9, he was appointed vice-president for regenerative medicine at the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), a non-profit organization that funds embryonic stem cell research.  Read more
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9:46 PM | Shatter Cones
Today I've been deeply preoccupied with cosmic impacts after reading a new paper that models a truly gigantic asteroid impact. The paper, in the journal Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, bristles with ...Read Full Post
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9:37 PM | More AAPG highlights
Here are some of our highlights from the second half of the AAPG Annual Convention in Houston. Conceptual uncertainty in interpretation Fold-thrust belt, offshore Nigeria. Virtual Seismic Atlas.Fold-thrust complex, deepwater Nigeria. Virtual Seismic Atlas.Rob Butler's research is concerned with the kinematic evolution of mountain ranges and fold thrust belts in order to understand the localization of deformation across many scales. Patterns of deformed rocks aren't adequately explained by […]
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8:16 PM | pulse flow progress
Courtesy of the folks at CILA, the Mexican boundary and water commission, the latest Colorado River pulse flow map shows water making it past the Laguna restoration sites in the Colorado River delta, continue its slow push toward the Sea of Cortez: Related posts:Updated Pulse Flow Map Following the flow Plumbing the pulse flow
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8:08 PM | Yutu Update
We don’t hear a lot at the moment about Chang’E 3 and Yutu, the Chinese lander and rover which were all over the news a few months ago. But Phil Stooke has been collecting news online and in person last month at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference and now tries to put it all together and address the current state of the mission.
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8:00 PM | Will drinking tea get us thinking about soils? Yes, but only if you help us spread the word!
Taru Lehtinen PhD candidate at the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland tmk2@hi.is The Tea Bag Index Project wants to create a global map on decomposition with the help of citizen scientists. We use teabags to collect vital information on the global carbon cycle. With our protocol (see our web page and […]
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7:00 PM | A Concise History of Geological Maps: Mapping Noah’s Flood
Sometimes a geological map supports an intriguing idea not by showing the rocks that are there, but by showing the rocks that aren’t there anymore, eroded by a flood of biblical proportions. “No one with an eye for land forms can cross eastern Washington in daylight without encountering and being impressed by the “scabland.” Like [...]
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7:00 PM | A Concise History of Geological Maps: Mapping Noah’s Flood
Sometimes a geological map supports an intriguing idea not by showing the rocks that are there, but by showing the rocks that aren’t there anymore, eroded by a flood of biblical proportions.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:41 PM | Mapping fantasy: The story behind the Game of Thrones geologic maps
Science fiction can be a really cool gateway for sharing science fact. Earth science is imaginative, and can draw on pop culture, like the HBO show Game of Thrones. My graduate school friend and Generation Anthropocene co-producer, Miles Traer, recently brought science fact and science fiction together over this show in a hilariously awesome and super fun project.
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5:44 PM | Are Himalayan Glaciers Retreating?
Open Access in Current Science- A remote sensing survey of 2018 glaciers across the Himalayan arc for the time period 2001 -2010 was carried out. Change in snout position was compared. The majority of glaciers over the last ten years show stable snout positions. About 12% show retreat and only 0.9% show advancement. Himalayan glaciers are retreating though. Studies that cover larger time periods have shown that studied glaciers have been in retreat over all of the last century with the largest […]
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5:00 PM | Geo 730: April 10, Day 466: Abstract II
A different angle on yesterday's shot. I've said before that what drew me to geology was the beauty of it. What rooted me in it was the awe I feel toward it, and the wonder I feel at being able to interpret the stories it's telling.Photo unmodified. July 10, 2012. FlashEarth location (approximate).
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4:47 PM | Transforming Urban Transport in Nairobi: CSUD Partners with Volvo Research and Educational Foundations
In an effort to strengthen and expand public transport in Nairobi, Kenya, the Volvo Research & Educational Foundations is partnering with the Center for Sustainable Urban Development on a new project to improve accessibility in the city.
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3:56 PM | Satellite Images Show Kansas in Flames
Kansas grasslands are burning, and these controlled burns will help preserve the prairies. Continue reading →
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