Posts

October 12, 2014

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12:44 PM | Osprey Bailing Twine Problem Near Ellensburg
I had heard reports of ospreys having the bad habit of collecting bailing twin in their nests fatal-attraction-ospreys-bind-baling-twine-fishing-line. I spotted this osprey nest on a platform built for providing a nest site west of Ellensburg on the broad Manastash alluvial fan. The platform is located within an area of extensive irrigated hay and hence, lots of available twine wrapped into the nest.  As reported in the NPR piece I heard, there has been an effort in Montana to reduce this […]
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11:18 AM | Earth Science Week 2014
"Since October 1998, the American Geosciences Institute has organized this national and international event to help the public gain a better understanding and appreciation for the Earth Sciences and to encourage stewardship of the Earth. This year's Earth Science Week...
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11:16 AM | Paths across the Cheshire Peak
Driving west across the edge of the English Peak District is a good way to see how geology shapes landscape. Tracing the routes that cross it – feeling their shapes with a finger on a map or with your body as … Continue reading →
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8:31 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #41
SkS Highlights Howqr Lee's original Sks article, The long hot tail of global warming - new thinking on the Eocene greenhouse climate, generated the most comments of the articles posted on SkS during the past week.  El Niño Watch "In their monthly update, scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Columbia University said there is still […]
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5:18 AM | Hiking Along the Headwaters of the Virgin River
It was a crisp October morning as we zipped up Cedar Mountain in our three–car caravan, bound for an eight–mile hike around Navajo Lake and along the Virgin River rim trail. Interspersed with the grayed skeletal remains of Engelmann spruce (victims of an endemic beetle population and a dubious forest management policy of the past century), the aspen leaves blazed their burnt red–orange and golden yellow brilliance against a cloudless sapphire sky. As we cruised I noticed […]
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4:36 AM | Science: Alive and Well in the Great Valley, Against the Odds
No, no enthusiasm here for science. None at all.We are close to or on the bottom of every list there is: worst place to live, most polluted air, highest crime rate, highest unemployment. To listen to the people who write the articles, living in California's Great Valley is just one step away from living in hell itself. Maybe. It sure makes life tough on those of us who labor to make things better here: who is going to want to make a career in such a hopeless place? But to those who take delight […]
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4:14 AM | Oreopithecus bambolii Fossil
An interesting fossil shown in this picture is of an Oreopithecus bambolii primate. The fossil can be found at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the Miocene Epoch of Neogene Period. Fossil was found in Baccinello Basin located in Tuscany, Italy. The area was known for its lignite mines. An intact Oreopithecus fossil skeleton was
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3:21 AM | 7th Annual Meeting of SeAVP Day 1
Today marked the first day of the 7th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Association of Vertebrate Paleontology (SeAVP). This year’s meeting is being held at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (MMNS) in Jackson, MS. According to the website for the … Continue reading →
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3:11 AM | The newest Colorado River management widget: the “System Conservation Program”
tl;dr The new Colorado River conservation program may not conserve a whole lot of water. But growing the “civic community” needed to solve the basin’s water problems may be far more important. Longer Version: The Colorado River Pilot System Water Conservation Program crept forward last week, in the process demonstrating an endearing quirk of Colorado ...Continue reading ‘The newest Colorado River management widget: the “System Conservation Program”’ […]
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2:02 AM | New role with National Data Repositories
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1:11 AM | Geosciences is top UA program in Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities
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October 11, 2014

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8:35 PM | Geo 730: October 11, Day 649: Boiler Bay Breakers
A final shot of the ocean from Boiler Bay State Park, though I have one more shot from the park tomorrow. It looks as if a breccia/conglomerate in the foreground overlies a more uniform sandstone on the shore. To sum up my take on this spot, if I was to plan a trip to look at key geologic sites along the central Oregon Coast, this isn't a spot I would even consider. The geology is quite simple, and not terribly illuminating; it just doesn't tell you very much. And that's before you take into […]
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6:13 PM | Updated subsidence maps released with standardized legends
Arizona Dept. of Water Resources has updated all the land subsidence maps on ADWR’s website so that they are all using the same color scale.  Project manager Brian Conway expects this will help eliminate any confusion that people are having when comparing maps for one or more area and when looking at different periods of […]
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5:21 PM | Rockfall on Arizona route 77
A large rockfall occurred on AZ Route 77, north of Carrizo Junction in east-central Arizona on Sunday, Sept 28.  AZGS's Steve Rauzi happened to be there and captured this picture. The rock in the road appears to be about 4 ft X 4 ft X 4 ft.  The total weight is probably on the order of 3,200 pounds.  Steve's image is superposed on a Google Earth image of AZ 77 near where the rockfall occurred. 
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10:51 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #41B
40% drop in solar PV cost is brightest spot of global epergy picture Climate change alters the ecological impacts of seasons Global CO2 pricing scheme surfaces ahead of 2015 climate summit Great Barrier Reef: 'a massive chemistry experiment gone wrong' How family planning could be part of the answer to climate change India evacuates 150,000 as cyclone Hudhud intensifies New ‘slurry’ could make carbon capture more efficient Powerful typhoon churns toward Okinawa with strong […]
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12:00 AM | Friday update for Bárðarbunga volcano on 10-October-2014
This is current status on Bárðarbunga volcano on 10-October-2014. There is no change or little in the eruption in Holuhraun far as I know. Visibility has been low today due to bad weather and snow. Largest earthquake today … Continue reading →

October 10, 2014

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8:07 PM | San Gabriel Mountains National Monument Established Today! A Wonderful Moment
Looking west from Cow Canyon Saddle into San Gabriel Canyon, the heart of the new monument.This is a big day for me, in the personal sense. The mountains I explored in my youth, the mountains where I learned to love the outdoors, are today being declared a National Monument. The San Gabriel Mountains National Monument designation is a long overdue recognition that the Los Angeles basin is surrounded by an extraordinary series of mountain ranges with unique and stunning geology, inspiring […]
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5:40 PM | Los Angeles-Area Wilderness Named National Monument
About 350,000 acres in the San Gabriel Mountains near Los Angeles will become the next national monument, the White House said today.
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4:08 PM | Geo 730: October 10, Day 648: The Astoria Formation Has Its Faults
Another view, with a different orientation and closer in, of the same faults as in yesterday's photo. There are quite a few apparent offsets, but as I noted at the previous link, some of those may simply be tricks of perspective, as more or less planar bedding forms intersect with a complex three-dimensional surface. However, at least one- in the middle left- shows clear displacement.Photo unmodified. July 15, 2014. FlashEarth Location.
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3:07 PM | From Mercury orbit, MESSENGER watches a lunar eclipse
Watch as our enormous moon -- a quarter the diameter of the planet -- just winks out as it passes into Earth's long shadow, in an animation captured from more than 100 million kilometers away.
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2:08 PM | A conservative response to climate change
Climate change is in the news again, with the liberals renewing their call for collectivist action, and the anti-science branch of conservative practicing various forms of do-nothingness.  As a goal-oriented, pro science conservative, I am not really comfortable with either of these approaches. And the lack of a broad tent conservative response irks me, so I suggest we go with the following,
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2:00 PM | Friday Headlines: 10-10-14
Friday Headlines, October 10, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Slump takes out a house. Eek! Is Pluto a planet again, or what? Rock fall video!   North Salt Lake home being demolished after landslide This actually … Continue reading →
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1:26 PM | Chemical silence
What if you couldn't smell smoke? Or detect flirty signs from a bloke? Imagine the cost Of faculties lost, Of signals that deafness would cloak ...
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1:00 PM | I’ll take mine al dente, if you don’t mind.
National Blog Posting Month – September 2014 – Crunch Prompt – Tell us your favourite crunchy thing to eat. —— Crunchy. Yummy. Crunchy = yummy. There is no greater truth. Crunchy apples. Carrots. Pizza. Pasta. Cookies. I put potato chips … Continue reading →
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12:48 PM | Friday folds: ploudin trio from Corridor H
Three folded sandstone slab-blobs will serve as today's Friday folds. Meet the ploudins!
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12:11 PM | Great geophysicists #12: Gauss
Carl Friedrich Gauss was born on 30 April 1777 in Braunschweig (Brunswick), and died at the age of 77 on 23 February 1855 in Göttingen. He was a mathematician, you've probably heard of him; he even has his own Linnean handle: Princeps mathematicorum, or Prince of mathematicians (I assume it's the royal kind, not the Purple Rain kind — ba dum tss). Gauss's parents were poor, working class folk. I wonder what they made of their child prodigy, who allegedly once stunned his teachers by […]
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11:27 AM | How should we report the age of fossils? Pitfalls and implications for paleontologists.
A few years ago during a talk I was watching at a conference (the […]
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9:07 AM | Images of Guatemala (1) – Volcan de Fuego
Volcan de Fuego, Guatemala. Taken from the adjacent peak of Acatenango, this photograph captures ones of the many small eruptions of the volcano named Fuego (the Spanish word for fire!). Fuego, formed by the subduction of the Cocos plate beneath the Caribbean plate, is an active basaltic stratovolcano. You can read more about Fuego and […]
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7:50 AM | Fossil Friday – rabbit teeth
Not all the fossils in the Western Science Center collection came from huge Ice Age mammals. In keeping with my post from a few days ago about possible modern rabbit traces on the WSC grounds, for this Fossil Friday we’ll … Continue reading →
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6:50 AM | What's the role of the deep ocean in global warming? Climate contrarians get this wrong
This is a re-post from Greg Laden's Blog What is the role of the ocean’s abyss in global warming?1 I’ve already posted on a study published in Nature Climate change that shows that the amount of extra global warming related heat in the Southern Oceans is greater than previously thought. There is another paper in the same journal by Llovel et al, “Deep-ocean contribution to sea level and energy budget not detectable over the past decade.” This paper verifies previous […]
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