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April 15, 2014

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8:41 AM | Horrible sauropod skulls of the Yale Peabody Museum, part 2: Brontosaurus; and no, I do not mean Apatosaurus
How can it be? All credit to the Yale Peabody Museum for having the courage to display this historically important object in their public gallery instead of hiding it in a basement. It’s the skull from the original mount of the Brontosaurus (= Apatosaurus) excelsus holotype YPM 1980. Needless to say, it bears no resemblance […]
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8:02 AM | Meanwhile, in the Skies Tonight...
Lunar eclipses are always interesting, and they can be shared by most of a planet, unlike solar eclipses that follow a narrow strip of land across the globe. I was a little frustrated tonight because high cloudiness affected the view of the unfolding eclipse, but I did what I could.I was reminded of one of the greatest teaching moments I've ever had, among them having an earthquake take place while teaching about earthquakes. During one of those moments, I was watching the students intently […]
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4:27 AM | Perspective on Rain and Oso/Hazel Landslide
Rain gets a bum wrap when it comes to landslides. Heavy rain caused the landslide is a common statement. Record breaking rain caused landslide or landslides. Yes, there is a correlation of when landslides happen and rain events, but you can not blame the rain for making steep mountain slopes, steep shoreline bluffs or steep river valley bluffs. The blame the rain gets added to by forestry types as well. Any suggestion that a landslide was caused by logging leads to […]
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4:00 AM | Alvarado Dr., Holbrook, Ariz.
This isn’t just old west ruin porn. There’s actually a water policy question here. This is in Holbrook, Ariz. There’s a big, expensive new levee protecting this neighborhood from the Little Colorado River. These properties back onto the levee. How do they decide whose property warrants protection? Related posts:Don’t Think About Water Crossing the divide Water in the desert, Kingman, Ariz., edition
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2:21 AM | A weird dry stretch
Here’s a statistical oddity. Through April 14, we’ve measured 0.4 inches (10 mm) of precipitation at the National Weather Service’s Albuquerque gauge in 2014, about 23 percent of the long term mean. This is the seventh straight year that Albuquerque has been below average through April 14. 2007 is the last calendar year in Albuquerque ...Continue reading ‘A weird dry stretch’ » Related posts:Another dry month at my house Running the table: dry at all […]
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12:19 AM | Events
Grab your calendar, plan ahead — biotech events through June, including the annual BIO Convention.  Read more

April 14, 2014

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11:53 PM | Bad news, good news, bad news.
So, the bad news is that it is looking increasingly likely that the world will experience a very strong El Nino event this 2014-2015 winter (winter in the N. hemisphere, summer down under).  There is even talk of a super-El Nino, one to rival 1998′s phenomenal event.  Lots of good information on that here at…
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9:04 PM | Geo 730: April 14, Day 470: Depoe Bay Geology
Not much "geology" to be seen in this photo, aside from a knob of basalt in the lower left. But make no mistake, there's a lot of geology going on here. I had long assumed (due to pillow basalts I'll show in coming days) that in this area, it was Siletz River Volcanics, the basement rock of the Coast Range. However, given the proximity of this area to Otter Rock and the ring dikes there, it should come as no surprise that this is actually Columbia River Basalt, of Miocene rather than Eocene […]
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8:05 PM | Chinese Pollution Changing N. American Weather
The brutal weather in the U.S. Midwest this winter has, in part, coal-burning power plants in China, a new study finds.
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4:39 PM | Renewed earthquake activity in Hekla volcano
Today (14-April-2014) an earthquake swarm took place in south part of Hekla volcano. The earthquake swarm took place close to Vatnafjöll mountains. This area is made up of crater rows from earlier eruptions. The largest earthquake in this … Continue reading →
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3:38 PM | Pretty picture: Sunset over Gale crater
Imagine yourself on a windswept landscape of rocks and red dust with mountains all around you. The temperature -- never warm on this planet -- suddenly plunges, as the small Sun sets behind the western range of mountains.
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3:14 PM | Can openness make us better? Help us find out!
Last year's Unsolved Problems Unsession (above) identified two openness issues — Less secrecy, more sharing and Free the data — as the greatest unsolved problems in our community. This year, we'll dig into that problem. Here's the blurb: At the Unsolved Problems Unsession last year, this community established that Too much secrecy is one of the top unsolved problems in our industry. This year, we will dig into this problem, and ask what kind of […]
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3:04 PM | Sandcastle Flags
All the cores currently on ship have been measured, tested, and described. Half of each core (which is always cut longitudinally from end to end) has been carefully labelled and packed away to ultimately end up in an international repository, where future scientists can go to re-investigate the material. read more
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2:02 PM | The Geological Gems of Georgia
Every state I study, investigating its geological highlights, I fall in love with. Georgia is definitely on my mind after compiling this gallery of geological attractions and destinations. As always, ...Read Full Post
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1:55 PM | Another Week of Global Warming News, April 13, 2014
This weekly posting is brought to you courtesy of H. E. Taylor. Happy reading, I hope you enjoy this week’s Global Warming news roundup skip to bottom Confronting a New Age of ConsequencesApril 13, 2014 Chuckles, COP20+, COP15, WG3 Report, WG3 Comments, WG3 Leaks, WG2 Carbon Limit, Statistics, Energiewende Bottom Line, Subsidies, World Bank, CookFukushima:…
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1:03 PM | Interview with a Mars Explorer
A conversation with Dr. Sarah Milkovich, HiRISE Investigation Scientist.
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1:00 PM | Our plastic sand demonstrates mass wasting. A draft.
Mass wasting and other slope processes using Emriver plastic sand. from Steve Gough on Vimeo.At LRRD we have notebooks full of "what ifs" for our models.  As I worked on other things last weekend I put together this little demonstration and checked one off the list.The video speaks for itself.  I've always known our plastic media could be used to demonstrate hillslope processes, but this is the first time I've attempted to record it.I'm a fluvial guy and not so well versed on slope […]
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12:58 PM | Shadblow (serviceberry)
A sure sign of the advent of spring in Fort Valley is the blooming of the shadblow, an understory tree species with clusters of white flowers: My wife and I took our son for a hike yesterday, and the shadblow was pretty much the only tree with anything on its branches: I infer that shadblow is named for the fact that its flowers “blow” (bloom) when the shad swim upstream …
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12:05 PM | Going to Space
Well, the headline is way too ambitious. Not yet. But here is a photo of me in the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Ready to take off from the Cape Canaveral. It is a cockpit of a space shuttle. It is sad that these birds are not flying anymore. Now USA has to pay [...] The post Going to Space appeared first on Sandatlas.
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12:02 PM | DNews: Should We Close The Ocean To Save Fish?
Overfishing is a growing problem that could mean no more fish for us. Would closing the ocean for a few years stop this trend? Trace discusses one idea.
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12:00 PM | “L” is for Land Camera
“L” is for the Polaroid Land Camera. This camera was named after Dr. Edwin Land, who invented the instant picture process that all the Polaroid cameras used. It’s because of him that we ‘shake it like a Polaroid.’ Then I … Continue reading →
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11:30 AM | Trouble in Haven: Resolving conflicts in academia
Sharing a laboratory with others is typically rewarding – peers in close quarters become a sounding post for new ideas and a support network for the highs and lows of research life. But you don’t choose your desk mates and things can go wrong. Regular Naturejobs contributor Shimi Rii recently experienced how small disagreements can escalate quickly. Finding the right way to deal with conflict is not easy but necessary in order to ensure a harmonious work environment.  Read more
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11:00 AM | Imaggeo on Mondays: Villarrica Volcano
This week’s Imaggeo on Mondays highlights the vulnerability of Villarrica’s slopes and zooms in on the volcano’s spectacular crater… Villarrica, one of the largest stratovolcanoes in Chile, is also one of the country’s most active. The volcano is iced by glaciers that make the mountain a stunning scene, but also a dangerous one. The glaciers cover some […]
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10:03 AM | Arctic Ozone Hole Looking Good
A global ban on the chemicals that caused the Antarctic ozone hole was successful in staving off one in the Arctic.
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10:00 AM | Plant These Flowers to Power Bees: Photos
Check out these flowering plants that can help give bees a boost.
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9:14 AM | Dart River (Te Horo) landslide complex in New Zealand
The Dart River landslide in New Zealand is an unusual case of a complex landslide that has generated valley-blocking debris flows. A new GNS Science report provides the details.
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8:00 AM | Guest Blog: Groundwater Quality Management in Rural Uttar Pradesh, India
Donald John MacAllister, serves on the Executive Committee of Geology for Global Development. He is currently leading the Hazard Factsheet project. Donald John is a PhD student at Imperial College London and is researching the application of self-potential monitoring to seawater intrusion problems in coastal aquifers. He has a BSc in Geophysics from the University […]
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7:05 AM | The Yosemite No One Sees in Summer...the Merced River Canyon
The drought in California is horrific. It is quite probably the worst drought in centuries, but we received a slight respite in the form of showers and snow during the last part of March and early April. It was a drop in the bucket towards relieving the huge water deficit that has built up in the last few years, but it gave a shot of energy to the seedlings of grasses and wildflowers. They perhaps should have sprouted and grown months ago, and they will be dried out in a few short weeks, but […]
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6:01 AM | Climate contrarian backlash - a difficult lesson for scientific journals to learn
Scientific journals have had a bumpy road trying to learn how to deal with climate contrarians. Poor decisions by journal staff in dealing with contrarians have often led to editors resigning and a damaged reputation in the academic community. The latest such example is the journal Frontiers and its response to bullying by contrarians over a paper by Stephan Lewandowsky and colleagues. The paper analyzed the conspiratorial psychology of contrarian comments made on public blogs. As I previously […]
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4:58 AM | Arroyo Viejo emerges
Quietly, at the edge of the Coliseum station parking lot, Arroyo Viejo comes out of hiding from beneath Hegenberger Expressway. It runs under the walkway to the Coliseum and joins Lion Creek just short of the bay. Even in its coffinlike culvert, the stream wants to curve, laying a gravelly point bar on its left […]
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