Posts

September 20, 2014

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12:30 AM | Caecum Micro Sea Snail Shell
Here is a magnified image of a Caecum sp. sea gastropod shell. It was found in 2014 during a diving trip to Key West Florida, USA. The specimen was about 2 km off shore in about 5 meters under the water. I do not think this is a fossil. Viewed under microscope with a 3 mm field of view. Thanks to Kenny for the specimen and Herb for letting me use his microscope. Learn more at these sites:

September 19, 2014

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11:43 PM | Friday update on Bárðarbunga volcano
This information is going to get outdated quickly. This is also a Friday update and that means I won’t write new articles during the weekend. I am just going update this one with latest information. New article is … Continue reading →
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10:09 PM | NOAA: Hottest August On Record. Ocean Temperatures Smash Old Record
The NOAA, National Climate Data Center has released the global summary of temperatures this summer. It was the hottest June-August period on record, and August was also the hottest on record globally. Ocean temperatures were also hottest on record. NASA, and the Japanese Metr. Agency also compile the data (using a slightly different method ), and they also showed record temps. Here is the data from NCDC: Global Highlights The …
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9:23 PM | hotel rewards
I do have a preferred hotel "brand" - it's the one that I have a credit card for, and it has a pretty good money spent: reward ratio. I think it's best to pick one brand and stick with it, to the extent possible - otherwise, you dilute out all your rewards and never build up enough to collect anything.With that said, I still have a fistful of hotel rewards cards from other brands. Sometimes "my" hotel brand doesn't have a cheap enough option local to my fieldwork, or I've been outvoted by […]
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7:34 PM | Tanzania Launches Plan to Fight Climate Impacts on Agriculture
Vital Signs is a key part of Tanzania’s new Agriculture Climate Resilience Plan, which presents a strategy for sustainable agricultural development in the face of shifting rainfall patterns and other effects of a changing climate.
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6:07 PM | More jets from Rosetta's comet!
Another lovely view of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko contains jets. Bonus: Emily explains how to use a flat field to rid these glorious Rosetta NavCam images of faint stripes and specks.
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5:19 PM | Geo 730: September 19, Day 627: Faulty Cove
In this overview of the cove on the north side of Yaquina Head, we can see the fault-mediated cave on the west side, the smaller fault-mediated cave on the east, and we can see that these faults are essentially parallel to each other. This suggests that the cove itself is the result of a broad fault zone creating a weak brecciated area between the two walls, where wave action has managed to erode out the broken rock. Though a casual tourist is not in a position to do so, what further […]
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4:47 PM | Why This Climate Scientist Is Taking to the Streets
In my early years I didn’t talk about the politics of global warming much. I didn’t bring it up with friends or family, let alone engage in any public way. It seemed to me unseemly for a scientist to be vocal on a political issue related, even indirectly, to his own research. Wouldn’t that be an indication of bias, of a lack of scientific impartiality? But I have changed my mind.
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3:18 PM | Scottish winter weather
Following on from my previous post about September weather, it seems appropriate (for my research and blog) to look at winter weather specifically for Scotland. This post again uses Met Office data. I… Continue reading →
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3:00 PM | Friday Headlines: 9-19-14
Friday Headlines, September 19, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: An aquatic dinosaur! Eruptions in the Philippines What started plate tectonics?   Giant Spinosaurus Was Bigger Than T. Rex—And First Dinosaur Known to Swim Spinosaurus is an … Continue reading →
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2:35 PM | Pulling secrets from deep-sea, drillbit-eating rocks
Amy West is the science writer and outreach and education officer for the JOIDES Resolution, a drill ship operated by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) that is on a two-month expedition studying the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc in the region where the Pacific Plate is descending under the Philippine Plate to form the Mariana Trench and the deepest point in the ocean–the Challenger Deep. This is her latest blog post about the expedition.
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2:00 PM | Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (Sept. 20)
Check out some of the coolest images of the planet from space and below.
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1:57 PM | Going on a rock cruise
A trio of two-month expeditions in 2014 will be in the region where the Pacific Plate is descending under the Philippine Plate to form the Mariana Trench and the deepest point in the ocean–the Challenger Deep. Scientists will get under the skin of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc, which stretches nearly the distance from Los Angeles to Chicago
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1:30 PM | Nearly 600 Years of Tree Rings Show Altered Ocean Habitat
Data records spanning almost 600 years have shown that the strength of coastal upwelling off the west coast of North America has become more variable since 1950.
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11:58 AM | Anatomy of an earthquake
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. In this video geologist Professor Iain Stewart gives a fantastic overview of what happens to a seismic hazard deep below the Earth’s surface and how it affects a vulnerable population above it. He also explains what can be done to [...] The post Anatomy of an earthquake appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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11:52 AM | Friday fold: Miette Group anticline in Banff National Park, Alberta
Here’s an outcrop of Miette Group slate, seen at the intersection of the Icefields Parkway with the Trans-Canada Highway, just north of Lake Louise, Alberta: There’s a lovely anticline just to the right of Zack, who obligingly provided a sense of scale. Also note how cleavage which is subparallel to bedding on the far left side of the outcrop, becomes perpendicular to bedding along the crest of the anticline… Happy …
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11:45 AM | The known unknowns – the outstanding 49 questions in Earth Sciences (Part II)
Here is the second instalment in our series covering the biggest unknowns in the Geosciences. Last week we explored what it is about the Earth’s origin that still remains unclear and this week we probe the Earth’s deep interior. Unlike in Jules Verne’s Journey to the Centre of the Earth, there are no volcanic tubes […]
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11:35 AM | Move over, All Yesterdays: It’s time for #MikeTaylorAwesomeDinoArt!
                                   
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11:20 AM | Is UK September weather improving?
A friend called me this week to ask about a news story he’d heard on the radio. He’d been listening to a caller say that this warm September in the UK was really… Continue reading →
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11:00 AM | New York Climate Change March Could Draw 100,000
Here's what you need to know about the Sunday protest planned ahead of the UN's climate change summit in New York City. Continue reading →
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8:48 AM | Moving to the University of East Anglia and two new landslide videos
I have now moved to the University of East Anglia at PVC (RE). To restart blogging, two new landslide videos have been posted, from India and Costa Rica
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7:06 AM | Fossil Friday – mammoth jaw
It’s Fossil Friday, and in what I intend to be a regular feature we’ll look at different specimens in the Western Science Center collection. To kick off, we’ll examine a mammoth jaw to show that not not everything in the Valley … Continue reading →
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6:00 AM | HGVs – Henceforth Gas Vehicles?
This post was inspired by my recent attendance at the ADBA UK Biomethane & Gas Vehicle conference. You may not own or drive a car, but it is almost inevitable that part of your day-to-day your is delivered by heavy goods vehicle (HGV). That Amazon parcel, the food you bought in the supermarket, the pint […]
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5:56 AM | The Perplexing PETM
The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) around 56 million years ago is perhaps the most studied of the many episodes of global warming in the geological record, but it still has plenty of puzzles. Professor Daniela Schmidt has written an article in "Geology" highlighting a couple of them, which is an excuse to delve a little into this episode of climate change that has some similarities to, and some important differences from, modern climate change.   A […]
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1:42 AM | Near record peak discharge on San Pedro River
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1:30 AM | Fenestella Bryozoan Fossils
These fossils appears to be a Fenestella. It was found in the Glen Dean formation.of Grayson County, Kentucky USA. There is an interesting set of spines in the middle of the image. The fossils date to the Mississippian Period. Image was taken with a microscope with an approximate 4 mm field of view (FOV). Thanks to Kenny for the image.
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12:31 AM | The abundantly peculiar Arctic ground squirrel
They survive colder core body temperatures than any other known vertebrate, sustaining a temperature below freezing yet not becoming frozen. They emerge from hibernation with clock-like accuracy despite having spent 8 months in underground burrows below Arctic tundra and layers of snow, out of sight of the Sun. The Arctic ground squirrel is an adorable furball of mystery. Loren Buck, University of Alaska Anchorage Department of Biological Science professor, has been enticed by the truths he […]

September 18, 2014

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10:00 PM | Antarctica Nearing Record Sea Ice, Arctic Ice Shrinks
Antarctica's sea ice is poised to smash a new winter record for 2014, while Arctic summer sea ice hit its sixth lowest minimum.
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9:17 PM | Habicht
I packed some stuff (too much as it turned out) and headed off to the Stubai. First stop is the Innsbrucker Hutte (interior pic, including the lovely huge ceramic stove) and first mountain is the Habicht, which SummitPost doesn’t take too seriously, at least for the Voie Normale. Probably correctly; it isn’t hard in decent…
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8:52 PM | New Executive Program on Sustainable Investments in Agriculture
The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment will be addressing the challenges of sustainable agricultural investment in its inaugural Executive Training Program on Sustainable Investments in Agriculture, which will be held at Columbia University from March 8-13, 2015.
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