Posts

September 08, 2014

+
11:00 AM | Imaggeo on Mondays: Trapped air
Can you imagine walking into the depths of an icy, white, long and cavernous channel within a thick glacier? That is exactly what Kay Helfricht did in 2012 to obtain this week’s Imaggeo on Mondays photograph. Tellbreen Glacier is a small glacier (3.5Km long) in the vicinity of the Longyearbyen valley in the Svalbard region […]
+
11:00 AM | Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (Sept. 8)
Volcanoes erupt, a wolf gets up close with a bear and the Napa quake deforms the Earth.
+
10:11 AM | Should We Stay or Should We Go?
There comes a time toward the end of the expedition where things can spin on a dime from having lots of time to not having enough. After the second bit change we were bringing up loads of rocks- sometimes recovering 70 percent. We were making progress toward drilling a column of rocks that would overlap with the rocks in the previous site to discover how this subduction zone was layered. read more
+
10:05 AM | The Sunkoshi landslide dam breach
The Sunkoshi landslide dam in Nepal breached and drained early on Sunday morning. The discharge data suggests that the breach was initiated in response to increased river flow caused by heavy rainfall.
+
9:00 AM | GfGD Conference – Selected Poster Abstracts (Part 2)
An important part of our annual conference is giving students and recent graduates the opportunity to present their work – through a poster and drinks reception at the end of the day. Last year we had some fantastic posters – from both undergraduate and postgraduate students, and recent graduates. Today we continue publishing the titles and abstracts […]
+
6:14 AM | Quote: Steven Pinker On Education
The Ivy League admissions process comes under Steven Pinker's critical eye. It should be more meritocratic and less "holistic" he thinks. I liked this passage on the role of education:It seems to me that educated people should know something about the 13-billion-year prehistory of our species and the basic laws governing the physical and living world, including our bodies and brains. They should grasp the timeline of human history from the dawn of agriculture to the present. They should be […]
+
5:50 AM | In the Years of Living Dangerously, Part 2
This episode brings us away from the world of hard science a bit and into a realm of personality and ideology. The episode provides an intimate view of family relationships that are repeated across the nation and the world. Dinner table conversations that are played out with different characters, in a different cities, but with similar results. This is the setting for the next Years of Living Dangerously episode I am reviewing. In part of this episode, we travel with Ian Somerhalder to South […]
+
2:06 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #36
SkS Highlights   97 hours of consensus: caricatures and quotes from 97 scientists by John Cook  El Niño Watch For months now, the tropical Pacific Ocean has been flirting with blossoming into a full-fledged El Niño state: Waters off the coast of South America have warmed, a hallmark of the climate phenomenon, but then cooled, only to warm once again. Winds, which normally blow east-to-west have made tentative moves in the other direction, another key criteria, but […]
+
2:00 AM | Aporrhais uttingerina Gastropod Fossil
Here is a picture of an Aporrhais uttingerina gastropod fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed at the time of the Pliocene Epoch of Neogene Period. Fossil found in San Faustino Umbria Italy. Image taken in June 2014.
+
12:24 AM | 97 Scientists Attempt To Dispel The Greatest Scientific Myth in 97 Hours
The biggest scientific myth of today is that the science community is divided about the threat to our climate from burning fossil fuels. It is simply not true, and if you were to read the different scientific journals, you would quickly see that the consensus is overwhelming. Progress is being made, and those who refuse to accept it are increasingly being seen as out of touch with reality. The media …

September 07, 2014

+
10:00 PM | Monday paper: Modelling microbial exchanges between forms of soil nitrogen in contrasting ecosystems
Pansu, M., Machado, D., Bottner, P., and Sarmiento, L.: Modelling microbial exchanges between forms of soil nitrogen in contrasting ecosystems, Biogeosciences, 11, 915-927, doi:10.5194/bg-11-915-2014, 2014. The questions It is well known that N and C combine to form organic molecules due to biological processes, although they come together from different pathways. C is extracted from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and used to […]
+
9:43 PM | Geo 730: September 7, Day 615: Mossy Quartz
Nice contrast between the green moss colonizing the vein rock and the earthy tones of the quartz crystals. A lot of the latter's coloration is surface staining with iron oxides/hydroxides and manganese oxides. I've learned that much of the staining can be removed by boiling samples (in Pyrex, not metal!) in oxalic acid. But there are still some impurities in the interior, which gives the quartz nice red, yellow and orange tones, and sometimes even amethyst-like purples from the manganese.Photo […]
+
8:23 PM | In Case You Haven't Seen It: Shock-wave from Volcanic Blast at Papua New Guinea's Tavurvur Volcano
This has been making the rounds on Facebook and Google+, but just in case you missed it, have a look at the shock wave from an eruption at Papua New Guinea's Tavurvur (or Rabaul) volcano. The footage was captured by an Australian couple, Phil and Linda McNamara. The shock wave is astounding.Tavurvur is a small stratovolcano on the island of New Britain that has been highly active and dangerous. It nearly destroyed the town of Rabaul in 1994 and killed more than 500 people during an eruption in […]
+
3:58 PM | Small quake near Holbrook
A magnitude 2.6 earthquake hit about 6 miles northeast of Holbrook at 2:07 a.m. this morning. This area rarely sees measurable earthquakes.  [Right, orange star marks the epicenter. Credit, USGS]
+
2:46 PM | 97 hours of consensus: caricatures and quotes from 97 scientists
Climate scientists from across the globe feature in our 97 Hours of Consensus campaign addressing one of the most significant and harmful myths about climate change. Each hour, beginning at 9am Sunday EST, September 7th, we'll publish a statement and playful, hand-drawn caricature of a leading climate scientist. Each caricature lists the scientists’ name, title, expertise and academic institution. 97 Hours of Consensus communicates the fact that 97% of climate scientists have […]
+
1:42 PM | The more uncertain we are, the more careful we should be
It is a staple of apologists for the chemical and fossil fuel industries to say, "We have no proof that what you are talking about is dangerous." Let me restate that in probabilistic terms: "We are highly uncertain about the harm of what you are talking about."When stated in probabilistic terms, uncertainty about harm becomes much more alarming. Nassim Nicholas Taleb has added to a working paper which I discussed last week entitled "The Precautionary Principle: Fragility and Black Swans from […]
+
12:59 PM | Happy Birthday Plate-Tectonics !
September 7, marks the anniversary of the publication of an important paper, “Magnetic Anomalies Over Oceanic Ridges” (1964) describes the discovery of parallel stripes of magnetized igneous rocks along the ocean floor. These stripes are formed when lava pours out along the Mid-Ocean-Ridges, cools and solidifies and pushes aside older oceanic and continental crust. This [...]
+
12:59 PM | Happy Birthday Plate-Tectonics !
September 7, marks the anniversary of the publication of an important paper, “Magnetic Anomalies Over Oceanic Ridges” (1964) describes the discovery of parallel stripes of magnetized... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
12:58 PM | Lightening the clay (II)
  According to the previous post, tetrahedral and octahedral sheets combine to form layers, and we can find two main types of clay structures: structure 1:1 (one tetrahedron sheet and one octahedral sheet) and 2:1 (two tetrahedral sheets and one octahedral sheet). The basic structure of clays is this: Substitutions between cations may occur in the tetrahedral and octahedral […]
+
11:58 AM | A new paradigm for Barrovian metamorphism?
The phrase ‘new paradigm’ is a little shop-worn but it still catches the eye. To see it used in a “discussion and reply” on a dry-looking metamorphic petrology paper is really something unusual. Tracing through these articles really shows how … Continue reading →
+
3:26 AM | Volcanic Shock Wave from Papua New Guinea
Turn up the sound, and watch. Isn’t geology cool!
+
2:17 AM | A Chicksplosion!
We live rurally, so we do a few rural things. One of those things is to have chickens. It’s fabulous to always have fresh eggs to eat! For grins, my husband decided to incubate a bunch of eggs to see … Continue reading →
+
2:00 AM | Neptunea contraria Gastropod Fossil
Here is a picture of a Neptunea contraria gastropod fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed at the time of the Pliocene Epoch of Neogene Period (geological timescale: Emilian). Image taken in June 2014.
+
1:10 AM | Who Really Declared War on Coal
Have you seen those slick adverts about clean coal on cable TV lately? They seem to have disappeared, but I may be just missing them. If you live in the UK, you won’t be seeing them on British TV, because they’ve been banned by regulators there as misleading, and that’s the kind way of putting it. Bald faced lie is IMHO more accurate. (Here in America, you can get away …

September 06, 2014

+
10:56 PM | The great climate voter debate
Last week’s Great Climate Voter Debate is a must view for anyone wanting to understand NZ’s mainstream political parties stance on policies to address carbon emissions and climate change. Moderated by TV3’s Samantha Hayes, the debate features climate change minister Tim Groser, Labour’s deputy leader David Parker, Greens co-leader Russel Norman, NZ First’s deputy leader […]
+
9:54 PM | Connecting European connectivity research (COST Action ES1306)
Saskia Keestra E-mail: saskia.keesstra@wur.nl Deputy President of the Soil System Sciences Division of the European Geosciences Union Why connecting connectivity research? Successful prediction of pathways of storm runoff generation and associated soil erosion is of considerable societal importance, including off-site impacts such as water quality and the provision of related ecosystem services. Recently, the role of connectivity […]
+
9:21 PM | Geo 730: September 6, Day 614: Multicolored Quartz
Above is a fairly typical scene from a boulder that has weathered out of the quartz vein. The vein material itself is just massive quartz- there's very little to see that's of any interest, and very little hint as to the nature of the crystals. It occurs to me belatedly that it might actually be kind of interesting to see what a thin section of that material looks like under crossed polars. However, it's the void spaces in the breccia that hold little treasures. The colorful spot in the lower […]
+
8:45 PM | Spring!
No summary available for this post.
+
7:19 PM | Women in Physics around the World
Fascinating quotes about the status of Women in Physics from a variety of countries – gathered at the International Conference on Women in Physics in Waterloo, Canada and published in a short piece in Scientific American: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/voices/2014/09/03/female-physicists-worldwide-fight-sexist-stereotypes/ I have heard a very successful, senior, female professor in the US say she felt left out of the loop when she […]
+
5:00 PM | Stink Bug – Chapter 36
V’x lept into the air, flapping her one good wing, wrenching out of the grey’s grasp. “No!” she cried. She turned, rushing for the door. The greys scattered. Only I remained, blocking her path. I grabbed at her feathers as … Continue reading →
34567891011
625 Results