Posts

September 22, 2014

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1:00 PM | Building Blocks from the Mississippian Sea
The Columbia Geology Tour, Part 2: Take a trip back 350 million years to the shallow seas of the Mississippian that covered what is now the U.S. Midwest -- source of the finely crafted limestone columns and facade details of St. Paul's Chapel.
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12:27 PM | WaDokei: Attuning to Temporal Time
video: bohinic (This video demonstrates how the hour indicators are moved in proportion, from equal spacing at the equinoxes, to close spacing on one half and wide spacing on the other as the year approaches the solstices.  In reality, it would take a year to complete this revolution.) In celebration the Autumn Equinox, we offer a reminder of the […]
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12:00 PM | What Marks the Start of Fall
Summer ends and a new fall season begins as the Earth will have nearly equal amounts of light and darkness.
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11:30 AM | Imaggeo on Mondays: The Final Effort
We’ve all been there: long hours in the field, a task that seems never ending but which has to be finished today. This week’s Imaggeo on Mondays image is brought to you by Patrick Klenk who highlights the importance of how ‘getting the job done’ relies on good team work! Two years ago I posted […]
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11:14 AM | Sea arch in pyroclastic deposits, Santorini, Greece
A series of blog posts on the geology of Santorini and Athens, Greece begins with a look at a sea arch on the south shore of Thera.
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9:00 AM | Last Chance to Fly Your Name to Asteroid Bennu
You have just until September 30, 2014 at 23:59 Pacific time, to submit your name, and to tell your friends and family to submit their names, to fly to asteroid Bennu and back on board NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission.
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5:23 AM | The Wall Street Journal downplays global warming risks once again
As has become the norm for media outlets owned by Rupert Murdoch, just before a half million people participated in the People’s Climate March around the world, The Wall Street Journal published an opinion piece downplaying the risks and threats posed by human-caused global warming. The editorial was written by Steven Koonin, a respected computational physicist who claims to have engaged in “Detailed technical discussions during the past year with leading climate scientists,” […]
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5:00 AM | Unusual Blooms: Wildflowers that Open in Autumn
On your next walk in the woods, keep an eye out for some of these wildflowers which bloom later in the year.
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4:39 AM | Carbon News headlines 22/9/14: If the PM doesn’t worry about climate change, why should we?
Welcome to a new regular feature on Hot Topic: the week’s Carbon News headlines, brought to you every Monday. Carbon News is an NZ-published web newsletter covering climate and carbon news from around the world, published and edited by experienced journalist Adelia Hallett. The full articles are behind the Carbon News paywall, but there’s a […]
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3:39 AM | Wheelbarrow handles for vertebrae? The cervical rib bundles of Sauroposeidon and other sauropods
We have good descriptions of the proximal parts of the cervical ribs for lots of sauropods. We also have histological cross-sections of a few, mostly thanks to the work of Nicole Klein and colleagues (Klein et al. 2012, Preuschoft and Klein 2013), although histological cross-sections of ribs were also figured as long ago as 1999, […]
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12:30 AM | Cyprimeria Pelecypod Fossil
The fossil appears to be Cyprimeria alta pelecypod fossil. It existed during the Cretaceous Period (about 70 million years ago). This fossil was found in McNairy County, Tennessee (Ripley Formation). Fossils from this locality have an identification PDF at this LINK. Learn more about these fossils at the Coon Creek Science Center web site: http://www.memphismuseums.org/coon_creek-overview

September 21, 2014

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11:44 PM | Upcoming MOOC makes sense of climate science denial
In collaboration with The University of Queensland, Skeptical Science is developing a MOOC, or Massive Online Open Course, that makes sense of climate science denial. The Denial101x MOOC will launch in March 2015 on the EdX platform. Registration has just opened so you can now register for free. Here is a description of the MOOC:   Denial101x: Making Sense of Climate Science Denial Climate change is real, so why the controversy and debate? Learn to make sense of the science […]
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11:16 PM | Things you can do about global warming now we have a new do-nothing government (same as the old one)
Australia’s brilliant First Dog On The Moon on climate action (courtesy of The Tree), deemed by me to be relevant in the aftermath of an election that has delivered New Zealand another three years of National-led government, and therefore little prospect of serious action on climate matters. I’ll have a slightly less amusing reaction to […]
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10:48 PM | A Rather Important Anniversary
I’m terrible at remembering anniversaries and worse at communication, so this post commemorating an important anniversary is a day late. Lockwood reminded me that yesterday marked our fourth... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:49 PM | The perfect machinist's apron.
(Ed. note: No river science or geomorphology today!  This is a post about the perfect shop apron, designed at Little River Research & Design!)As a thanks to all the professional machinists who’ve helped me online, here’s a shop apron design.Please note I am NOT selling anything here, not the design, not aprons; just passing along my experience. You’ll wonder why you didn’t do this years ago if, like me, you’ve not liked any of your shop aprons. I […]
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6:44 PM | Geo 730: September 21, Day 629: Anniversary Beach
Here we're at Sutton Beach/Creek, a recreation area on Siuslaw National Forest land. We're looking north to the headlands between Florence and Yachats, which are composed of Yachats Basalt, about 35-30 million years old. I've just realized, looking through these photos, that I haven't included many of them from this area on this trip, although I did thoroughly cover a later stop at Cape Perpetua (April 8 to 28 in the Geo 365 Series), about 15 miles north of here. So there's geology in the […]
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5:55 PM | MAVEN orbit insertion timeline
Today's the day that MAVEN enters orbit at Mars, bringing the number of Mars orbiters up to four. So far everything looks good. The orbit insertion burn should begin tonight at 18:50 PDT / 01:50 UTC. I'll be on stage with Mat Kaplan and Rich Zurek at Planetary Radio Live, keeping up to date with the latest news from the spacecraft; here is a timeline in PDT, UTC, CEST, and IST to help you follow along.
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4:31 PM | Another Side of Cedar Breaks
In the low desert of southern Utah these days, when mid–September temperatures not only approach triple digits but also have the audacity to linger there, it is time to head to the high country for a hike along the redrock near Cedar Breaks National Monument. It never hurts to bring along a few friends. Judy points out the blazes, so we must be going in the right direction. Soon views emerge of Cedar Breaks and the 50–million–year–old lake and river deposits of the […]
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3:17 PM | Women’s Confidence is Tied to Success
Evidence shows that women are less self-assured than men—and that to succeed, confidence matters as much as competence. Here’s why, and what to do about it. http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/04/the-confidence-gap/359815/Filed under: Retention, Women in the News Tagged: career, gender, women
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3:00 PM | Taking a short break--No post this week or next
I'm taking a short break this week and next and expect to post again on Sunday, October 5.
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1:44 PM | Field Trip to Grand Canyon's Trail of Time with Laura Crossey and Karl Karlstrom
Last week the joint meeting of the Arizona Hydrological Society (AHS) and the American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG) was held in Prescott, Arizona. The meeting was held at the Prescott Resort - a fantastic venue with a fabulous view of the Prescott area. On September 21 and 22, I led two different groups on a field trip to Grand Canyon's South Rim and the Trail of Time. The trip on the 21st was co-led by myself, Karl Karlstrom and Laura Crossey. This trip had about […]
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7:21 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #38
"Today, we march... In Berlin, London, Amsterdam, Oslo, Rome, Stockholm, Paris, Madrid, Porto, Geneva, Ljubliana, Budapest and so many other places." - 350.0rg SkS Highlights As to be expected, Dana's The 97% v the 3% – just how much global warming are humans causing? garnered the most comments of the articles posted on Skeptical Science during the past week. Deciding who should pay to publish peer-reviewed scientific research by John Abraham attracted the second […]
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4:01 AM | Invertebrate of the Week #10 – Spiny Flower Mantis (Pseudocreobotra wahlbergii)
Meet the spectacular Spiny Flower Mantis (Pseudocreobotra wahlbergii) which hails from Africa. P. wahlbergii is a member of a polyphyletic group of mantises referred to as flower mantises which employ of […]
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1:30 AM | Granocardium Clam Fossil
The fossil appears to be Granocardium stantoni? pelecypod fossil. It existed during the Cretaceous Period (about 70 million years ago). This fossil was found in McNairy County, Tennessee (Ripley Formation). Fossils from this locality have an identification PDF at this LINK. Learn more about these fossils at the Coon Creek Science Center web site: http://www.memphismuseums.org/

September 20, 2014

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10:30 PM | Not-so-serious Sunday 49: Diatom Art
By Kelly It’s been such a long time since I posted a ‘tangentially related to geoscience’ post, but after seeing this clip I just couldn’t resist. Enjoy! The following text is taken directly from Vimeo where this video was sourced, … Continue reading →
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9:34 PM | Cattle, groundwater and “ecological subsidy” in Northern Mexico
In his book Political Ecologies of Cattle Ranching in Northern Mexico, geographer Eric Perramond offers a fascinating description of the linkages among choice of cattle breed, farm and ranch practices and the resulting groundwater levels in the Río Sonora of northern Mexico, with irrigated farm fields once used to grow food for human inhabitants now ...Continue reading ‘Cattle, groundwater and “ecological subsidy” in Northern Mexico’ »
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7:57 PM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #38B
2014 on track to be hottest year on record Arctic Sea Ice to reach sixth lowest extent on record China's dirty coal ban causes waves "If we want to prevent conflicts, we have to address climate change now" India's push for renewable energy: Is it enough? Latin America at a climate crossroads Michael Bloomberg presses the case for urban action Obama delays key power plant rule of signature climate change plan Prince Charles will tell leaders climate action is ‘only rational […]
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6:10 PM | Geo 730: September 20, Day 628: Anniversary Tyee
Four years ago today, I met Dana Hunter for the first time. We went up Marys Peak to get a good look at a transect of Oregon's Coast Range Geology. So I'm interrupting the current series in the Newport area for a couple of days. (The following day, we went to Florence and the headlands between Florence and Yachats.) Above, we see steeply dipping beds of Tyee Formation along Route 34, a couple miles east of Alsea Pass. This outcrop is close to the Corvallis Fault; it lies just to the west here, […]
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3:56 PM | Conkered?
Not perhaps entirely fair – it is a cartoon, after all – but I liked it (nicked from the Times, if you were wondering). I also feel somewhat critical of Salmond: with his shiniest toy taken away he’s chosen to walk off and leave others to sort out the mess. Perhaps. Is there a mess…
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3:35 PM | Haul Road Repaired Below Ross Dam
I got a brief view of the rock slide below Ross Dam at the upper end of Diablo Lake diablo-lake-rock-slide. The slide area was repaired by knocking down the loose stuff and remaining precarious rock and rerouting the access road outward a bit.   I happened to be taking in the view when the supply barge was pulling up to the upper end of the lake. The logistics of managing the Ross Dam power house and dam present some challenges. The same applies to […]
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