Posts

July 22, 2014

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12:00 PM | A Trinket from Majuba Hill
Rhyolite from Majuba Hill, in the shape of Nevada (a pin).As per this little blurb (above) by the NBMG, tourmaline (the black mineral) has replaced the sanidine and plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts, leaving small blobs and fairly large eyes of translucent and very light gray to faintly yellowish or tan quartz amongst the often large masses of tourmaline. The one tourmaline mass or crystal near the center of Nevada — right about where Kingston Canyon, south of Austin on old Highway […]
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8:54 AM | Erzurum: a landslide destroys an almost new ski jump facility in Turkey
Last Tuesday a landslide destroyed a 20 million Euro ski jumping facility in Erzurum, Turkey. The collapse was in part caught on a video
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7:14 AM | R.I.P. H.E.Taylor
I have a sad announcement to make, further to my previous posting about a missing edition of A Week of GW News. Harvey E. Taylor, aka het, died Monday, July 14, 2014 at his home in Portage la Prairie, a small town in Manitoba, Canada.  All I know of it is from one brief online obituary and one more…
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5:36 AM | Seal of approval - How marine mammals provide important climate data
Understanding what is happening in the oceans is crucial since 90% of global warming is going there and attempts to measure temperatures at various depths go back to the 1960s. But, what does this Weddell seal have to do with this and what is it wearing on its head? Weddell Seal West Antarctic Peninsula (photo: Dan Costa - NMFS 87-1851-03) To answer these questions we have to backtrack a bit and look at the recent history of data collection used to find out what is happening in the […]
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5:01 AM | Field work travelog – Day 10, Regrouping and highlights
We’re back in Laramie for the night after a difficult four-day stint in the field. Tomorrow we re-supply and head back out for the next step in the adventure. Here are some highlights so far: Tomorrow, it’s back out to … Continue reading →
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3:23 AM | How well is California weathering the drought?
Peter Gleick runs down some of the impacts of California’s remarkable drought: [W]ater still comes out of my tap, in unrestricted amounts and superb quality, at a reasonable price. And this is true of every resident in the state: drinking water supplies have not been affected, especially for the vast majority of the population that ...Continue reading ‘How well is California weathering the drought?’ »
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3:05 AM | Clouds
No summary available for this post.
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2:00 AM | Iguanodon Dinosaur Stamp
Here is a picture of the Iguanodon dinosaur stamp. It was issued in 1965 by the small republic of San Marino (located on the Italian peninsula). It had a value of 100 lire but the country now uses the euro as their currency. In 1965 it would be worth about 16 United States cents. The stamp was part of collection of nine issued that year. The Iguanodon existed in the Late Jurassic Period (
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1:31 AM | Barry Brill and Anonymous: U R A Fraud
People send me things. Brightening my email inbox last week was a pithy little email, headed U r a fraud. It didn’t have much to say. Here it is, in its entirety, exactly as it appeared: Please take down your posts about barry brill or Anonymous may have to Make some “unauthorized” changes to your […]
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12:26 AM | Chang'e 3 update: Both rover and lander still alive at the end of their eighth lunar day
Despite the fact that it hasn't moved for 6 months, the plucky Yutu rover on the Moon is still alive. Its signal is periodically detected by amateur radio astronomers, most recently on July 19. A story posted today by the Chinese state news agency offers a new hypothesis to explain the failure of the rover's mobility systems.

July 21, 2014

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10:26 PM | NOAA: Earth Had Its Hottest June On Record
From NOAA: “The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for June 2014 was the highest for June since record keeping began in 1880. It also marked the 38th consecutive June and 352nd consecutive month with a global temperature above the 20th century average. The last below-average global temperature for June was in 1976 and the last below-average global temperature for any month was February 1985. “ FYI May …
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9:49 PM | Geo 730: July 21, Day 567: Sidewalk, Redux
Okay, it's a pretty lousy photo, and the shadows from the fence when I was out taking pictures don't help at all, but here's the same stretch of sidewalk I featured five years (!) and a month ago. I've annotated just two of the more distinctive pebbles, but you can see the full deal here. That photo seems to have a big impact in presentations I've done over the past few years. In a field trip a month ago, participants found quite a few nice agates at our first stop, and were somewhat distracted […]
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9:03 PM | A Better Class Of Garbage: Open, Accessible Science
“When you push the leading edge of analysis, you risk giving away proprietary information.” – a manager at almost every science-technology company today vs. “Tesla knows that its best chance of dominating a large electric vehicle industry depends on there being a large electric vehicle industry.” – Matt Hall on Tesla’s decision to share its […]
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8:52 PM | Rep. Kirkpatrick calls for permanent ban on new uranium mining near Grand Canyon
U.S. Representative Ann Kirkpatrick (D-AZ, 1st Congressional district) tweeted this morning "Will you help me call for a permanent ban on new uranium mining near the Grand Canyon?"http://action.kirkpatrickforarizona.com/page/s/grand-canyon … … #AZ01The link takes you to a re-election campaign website which shows a picture of the Grand Canyon [right] and says "Uranium mining is a real threat to the Grand Canyon. We have to preserve this wonder of the world for future […]
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7:26 PM | Could 2011 Quake Trigger an Eruption of Mount Fuji?
Japan's devastating 9.0 earthquake in 2011 has dangerously increased the pressure beneath Mount Fuji, an active volcano. Continue reading →
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7:17 PM | As far as the moral high-ground is concerned...
...the earth is flat. [sorry, just watched the evening news, couldn't help myself.]
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6:13 PM | Mike Taylor’s ESOF2014 talk: should science always be open?
As recently noted, it was my pleasure and privilege on 25 June to give a talk at the ESOF2014 conference in Copenhagen (the EuroScience Open Forum). My talk was one of four, followed by a panel discussion, in a session on the subject “Should science always be open?“.   I had just ten minutes to […]
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5:40 PM | DNews: What Could Have Made Siberia's Mystery Crater?
It's big, it's deep, it's just all-around spooky, and so far no one has a clue how it got there! But the big honkin' crater in Siberia didn't just appear there out of thin air ... er, did it?
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4:13 PM | View From an Iceberg
The science goal for today is to complete 8 CTD casts. We load into our vessel, a Poca 500GR. We have discussed a 6 to 8 hour window of boat time with Gabriel the captain and Magnus our navigator and stocked up on 40 liters of benzene.
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3:45 PM | Plastic 'Trash Islands' Forming In Ocean Garbage Patch
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch may be developing permanent features, such as trash islands.
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3:20 PM | Mystery of Stone Arch Formation May Be Solved
The bewildering shapes apparently owe their origin in large part to how rock can strengthen when squashed from above.
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1:52 PM | The Search for Ithaca
This post unifies two of my absolutely favourite topics: geology and classical Greek history. I have always had a soft spot for the classics. In fact, when I started my undergrad I was planning on doing a double major of geology and classics. I decided to focus on geology, but I have not lost my […]
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1:03 PM | One Day on Mars
A single day's observations take us from orbital overviews all the way down to ground truth.
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11:00 AM | Imaggeo on Mondays: Entering a frozen world
Dmitry Vlasov, a PhD Student and junior scientist from Lomonosov Moscow State University, brings us this week’s Imaggeo on Mondays. He shares his experience of taking part in a student scientific society expedition to Lake Baikal. This picture shows icy shores of Lake Baikal – a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the world’s largest natural […]
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10:28 AM | (Near) Garden of the Gods Reprise: Jackson Falls
Remember when we visited the Shrooms of the Gods at Garden of the Gods? That’s not the only wondrous place formed by the Pounds Sandstone. Reader Heliconia got to visit the area in early... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:57 AM | Maoxian County landslide: a dramatic video of a fatal rockslide
On Thursday a rockslide occurred in Maoxian County in Sichuan Province, China. The terrifying moments of the landslide were captured on a dashboard camera
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9:14 AM | Postgraduate scholarship for research in hazard and risk
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Applications are invited for the Christopher Moyes Memorial Foundation Scholarship to support a suitably qualified postgraduate student for a three year PhD programme of research in the Department of Geography at Durham University, UK. The scholarship is to support research of [...] The post Postgraduate scholarship for research in hazard and risk appeared first on Institute of Hazard, […]
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8:02 AM | Eodelphis kabatensis illustration on the cover of JVP
Last year I was contacted by my friend and colleague Mizuki Murakami (now Dr. Murakami), who wanted to commission an illustration of a fossil odontocete from Japan for a manuscript he was working on and planning on submitting to the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology in the hopes that it would be accepted and selected as the feature article. To make a long story short, it was. The illustration depicts "Eodelphis" kabatensis - a fossil delphinid and possible ancestral globicephaline or orcinine […]
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8:00 AM | Science snap (#31): Mammatus clouds
After all the thunderous weather this weekend and being British, I thought I’d do a weather themed science snap. Don’t bolt yet; it’s a volcanic-weather themed! This is a picture of mammatus clouds following the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. These clouds are pretty rare, unusual and distinctive. Formally, the Glossary of Meteorology […]
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6:21 AM | I'm Sorry, This Trench is Full; Those Rocks Will Have to Go Elsewhere
Looking south from Hurricane Ridge into the heart of Olympic National ParkThere will be few detailed blogs these next few weeks; I'm on the road leading our Canada/Pacific Northwest field class, and I will be just a bit busy. But I can't help putting up a few photos here and there. In today's pictures we see what happens when subduction zones get out of control, so to speak.Subduction zones are places where oceanic crust sinks back into the Earth's mantle to be recycled at some future time as […]
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