Posts

February 15, 2015

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9:34 PM | Connectivity: an emerging issue
Antonio Jordán (University of Seville, Spain) Paulo Pereira (Mykolas Romeris University, Lithuania) Saskia Keesstra (Wageningen University, The Netherlands) Artemi Cerdà (University of Valencia, Spain)   What is connectivity? Over the recent decades, a growing number of studies have highlighted the role of hydrological and sediment connectivity processes in relation to watershed management, topography, aspect, soil erosion (Bracken and Croke, 2007; Heckmann et al., 2010; Hopp […]
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7:08 PM | Bad January, worse February in Colorado, Rio Grande basins
January was bad for snowpack and therefore spring runoff in the Colorado and Rio Grande basins. February has been worse. But we don’t use water at the basin scale, we use it one irrigation district and city at the time. Here I will attempt to sum up the current snowpack and water supply situation and ...Continue reading ‘Bad January, worse February in Colorado, Rio Grande basins’ »
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6:06 PM | Bill would task AZGS with re-opening Mining & Mineral Museum with '5C's' theme
Legislation was introduced late on Friday afternoon that would transfer the former Mining & Mineral Museum building in Phoenix [right] and all of its assets from the Arizona Historical Society to the Arizona Geological Survey to re-open it as the Arizona Mining,  Mineral, and Natural Resources Education Museum.    A hearing on the bill, SB1200, is scheduled for 9 a.m., Tuesday, February 17 in the Senate Rural Affairs and Environment Committee.The bill says the State […]
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5:21 PM | William Catton's warning
William Catton Jr., author of the seminal volume about our human destiny, Overshoot: The Ecological Basis of Revolutionary Change, died last month at age 88.Catton believed that industrial civilization had sown the seeds of its own demise and that humanity's seeming dominance of the biosphere is only a prelude to decline. His work foreshadowed later works such as Joseph Tainter's The Collapse of Complex Societies, Richard Heinberg's The Party's Over: Oil, War and the Fate of Industrial […]
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3:00 PM | Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (Feb. 16)
In this collection of our favorite recent shots of Earth: The Southwest heats up, Louisiana gains ground and we get a bird's eye view of the Sydney Opera house. Plus: A 44-square-mile chuck of ice makes a break for it off East Antartica.
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12:51 PM | Eppur non si muove - Galileo Galilei and the impossible biomechanics of giants
Until the 17th century the discovery of skeletons of giants was a quite common event. In January 1546 and then in the years 1564, 1580 and 1613 bones were unearthed near the castle of Chaumont (France). The bones were identified as the bones of the giant Teutobochus, king of the barbarians, and exhibited in many French cities. Jesuit Jacques Tissot describes the discovery as follows:“The real story of the life and the bones of the giant Teutobochus, king of the Teutons, Cimbrians and […]
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9:36 AM | Fox Glacier – a time lapse video of slope failures as the glacier retreats
Victoria University of Wellington has compiled a fascinating time lapse video of slope movements as the Fox Glacier in New Zealand retreats in response to climate change
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7:50 AM | Climate Intervention Is Not a Replacement for Reducing Carbon Emissions
This article is a lightly edited version of a news release posted by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) on Feb 10, 2015. Proposed Intervention Techniques Not Ready for Wide-Scale Deployment There is no substitute for dramatic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate the negative consequences of climate change, a National Research Council committee concluded in a two-volume evaluation of proposed climate-intervention techniques. The two reports are: Climate Intervention: […]
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3:31 AM | A Reliable Vaccine to Treat Dunning-Kruger Syndrome
Well, it actually an effect rather than a syndrome, but it can seem like one to others. The vaccine for it is science literacy, but make no mistake, it does not work for everyone. It’s kind of like the flu shot, it protects many and lessens the severity for most others but some people get the full-blown illness anyhow. If you are wondering what the Dunning-Kruger effect is, just look …
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1:28 AM | Seminary Creek at Mills College
The third creek running through Mills College is Seminary Creek. It gets its name not just from Mills, but from the Beulah Heights district that forms its headwaters. On the 1897 USGS topo map it’s the dashed blue line, signifying an intermittent stream, running due south to East Creek (now named Lion Creek). Nowadays it’s […]

February 14, 2015

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10:43 PM | Geo 1095: February 14, Day 775: Heart-Shaped Rock
All Apologies, Nirvana. I don't recall the name of this feature, but it's something predictable, like "Lover's Grotto," or "Valentine Rock," or something along those lines. Chronologically, it fell between the posts of Feb. 10 and Feb. 11, but it was too perfect for Valentine's Day, so I put it on hold until now. I'm amused that my set of photos from Oregon Caves just happened to coincide with this holiday. It's not a holiday I'm terribly fond of, and I certainly wasn't thinking about it when I […]
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10:24 PM | The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature, by C. S. Lewis
I don’t have much science to talk about; it looks like I may have finally cured myself of writing about the stupidities of the denialists and arguing with idiots. So, instead: Way back in November last year I went to a talk by Hulme on “In what ways is religious belief relevant for understanding climate…
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9:28 PM | Geo 1095: February 13, Day 774: Niagara Falls
Most guided cave tours lean heavily on (what I often feel are) cutesy names for specific rooms or features. Given that attitude, it's easy to understand why I most often don't register or recall those names. The downside, though, is that I can't use the generally accepted name of the room/feature when I post a photo of it. Enter the interwebz. I was trying to track down the name (without success) of the feature I'll post for the Valentine's Day photo, and found a photographic tour of Oregon […]
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8:20 PM | Geology of the Garden of the Gods, Colorado
At the end of January, I was fortunate to visit the Rocky Mountain Front Range, scouting an itinerary for a tour group back east. One of the highlights was a visit I made to the Garden of the Gods City Park in Colorado Springs. For years I have heard about and seen photos of this exceptional geo-scape. I was happy to finally see it in person.A view of the entrance road off of 30th Street in Colorado Springs. The snow capped mountain in the background is Pikes Peak, elevation 14,115 ft. or 4,302 […]
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5:39 PM | Las Vegas, Nev.: “Splendid Climate and Pure Water”
Getting mentally packed for a reporting trip later this month to southern Nevada, I ran across this delightful bit of business, from (I think) 1904: William R. Clark, a U.S. Senator from Montana, had bought an old ranch in the valley in 1902, land that became the staging area for the Union Pacific’s construction of ...Continue reading ‘Las Vegas, Nev.: “Splendid Climate and Pure Water”’ »
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12:54 PM | Happy Valentine’s Day!
No summary available for this post.
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12:12 PM | Love Can Move Mountains
January 11, 1996 a single seismograph of the Geological Survey of Canada buried in a quiet wooded area on central Vancouver Island started to record an unusual strong seismic signal – slowly, but perpetually increasing in amplitude over time it was recorded only at this station – nearby station (located within a radius of 20km) didn´t show any movements – this was no ordinary 6.8 magnitude earthquake as could occur along the Cascadia Subduction Zone.Fig.1. Seismogram […]
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6:12 AM | 2015 SkS Weekly News Roundup #7B
Climate hacking is barking mad Climate science denialists in tailspin over hottest years Exclusive: Bjorn Lomborg think tank funder revealed as billionaire Republican 'Vulture Capitalist' Paul Singer Fiddling with global warming conspiracy theories while Rome burns Geoengineering might work in a rational world … sadly we don’t live in one Investments in African schools, health and other infrastructure exposed to climate risks Is climate change fuelling war? Nations agree […]
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5:21 AM | New cars 2015 models
rtuner-2015-powerful-suv/http://newcars2015models.com/expensive-suv-2015-land-rover-range-rover/http://newcars2015models.com/2015-cars-worth-waiting-acura-nsx/http://newcars2015models.com/best-coupe-cars-subaru-brz/http://newcars2015models.com/great-new-cars-2015-toyota-camry-2015/http://newcars2015models.com/reliable-suv-suzuki-sx-4/http://newcars2015models.com/cool-new-cars-alfa-romeo-4c/http://newcars2015models.com/advantage-best-affordable-car/http://newcars2015models.com/choose-affordable-sport-cars/http://newcars2015models.com/criteria-best-crossover-suv/http://newcars2015models.com/top-luxury-car-brand-audi/ […]
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4:17 AM | Splitting Core...and Peering Back in Time
Once core has come into the labs, warmed up to room temperature (the bottom of the ocean is very cold!), and passed through a series of tracks that measure the physical properties of the whole core, it's time for the cores to be split in half.  The Bengal Fan scientists are eagerly waiting to get their hands on the core and see what's inside.  read more
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1:07 AM | A Fresh Approach to Fundraising
We want you to know that we’ve been listening to you. Members have highlighted the number of fundraising appeals from The Society, and we agree that the number of requests should be streamlined.
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12:40 AM | Friday Headlines: 2-13-15
Friday Headlines, February 13, 2015 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Grass and dinosaurs and LSD, oh my! The core of the core of the core. Happy Valentine’s Day!   Amber fossil links earliest grasses, dinosaurs and fungus … Continue reading →

February 13, 2015

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10:59 PM | Magnitude 7,1 earthquake (USGS) deep south of the Reykjanes Ridge
At 18:59 UTC today (13-February-2015) a magnitude 7,1 earthquake (USGS) took place deep south of the Reykjanes Ridge. EMSC is reporting this earthquake having the magnitude of 6,8 (link). This earthquake was 1401 km south of Reykjavík, Iceland. … Continue reading →
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7:27 PM | An active comet, from a distance
Rosetta has closed to within 50 kilometers of Churyumov-Gerasimenko, on its way to a very close, 6-kilometer flyby of the comet tomorrow. To prepare for the flyby, Rosetta traveled much farther away, allowing it to snap these amazing photos of an increasingly active comet from a great distance.
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7:20 PM | New Global Warming Goal Is Goal of Paris Talks
U.N. climate negotiators are searching for a new target — something to complement the popular, but complicated, 2°C goal. Continue reading →
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6:38 PM | Video in Education and Outreach
Video is an excellent tool for conveying emotion and generating excitement. It’s got beautiful moving images, ambient sound, and music (if you dare). It’s got human connection if you talk with people on camera or see them active on screen. It’s the most visceral way to capture an audience and tell a story. It’s not the best at communicating the details of a story however. Text, well written, still does a good job at that. But if your audience is prepped and excited about […]
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6:33 PM | Fossil Friday – Bison antiquus skull
Bison are among the most common large animals from the Diamond Valley Lake region, and we have a number of nice specimens at the Western Science Center. Shown above is a cranium of Bison antiquus, one of several such skulls … Continue reading →
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3:42 PM | The Levee Hook at Deming
I've posted before about the Deming levee (nooksack-levee-at-deming). The image below shows what is being protected and points out the hook at the downstream, west end of the levee.  The hook at the west, downstream end is taking the brunt of the river of late and has been progressively eroded. The only purpose of the hook is to prevent the river from entering into an area of bottom land with forest and old river channels. The hook was built by the Army Corps […]
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12:48 PM | Friday fold: Ptygmatic Irving Fm., Colorado
Another one from Kim: Kim says: Pygmatic folds in the Precambrian Irving Formation. I think this is 1.7 Ga deformation, late in the Yavapai orogeny, which added various arcs in Colorado to North America. Good place to think about strain ellipses in progressive deformation. Zooming in on the best part, and dialing up the contrast a bit: That’s intense! Seriously strained rocks. What fun!
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9:29 AM | The Titanic was sunk by an Apatosaurus cervical
According to Rare Historical Photos from the 1860s to the 1960s, this is the iceberg that sank the Titanic: Clearly this was no iceberg, but a gigantic Apatosaurus vertebra, most of it hidden under water. Here is an artist’s impression: They get everywhere, don’t they?
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