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Posts

April 10, 2014

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5:12 AM | The Most Pervasive Scientific Myth
I’ve written before here about how pervasive the myth is that science is divided about the reality of and the threat of man-made interference with our climate system. It truly is the number one science myth out there. Just by writing this post, I’ll get the usual comments with links to the usual rabid political sites (with unflattering pictures of Al Gore) telling me that thousands of scientists disagree, and …
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3:36 AM | The Bottleneck Years by H.E.Taylor – Chapter 87
The Bottleneck Years by H.E. Taylor Chapter 86 Table of Contents Chapter 88 Chapter 87 The Chinese Girlfriend, April 15, 2060 At the end of an Ecology 110 lecture the other day, Carman unobtrusively entered the back of the room and sat down. I was going through the history of DNA reading devices from Sanger…
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2:53 AM | The Colorado River is no one thing
Photographer John Trotter on the Colorado River: When they opened those gates on (Morelos) dam and let water back into the main channel on the river, it kind of engaged those people. It brought them back into the mainstream of all the other people who are living along it in Moab or Grand Junction or ...Continue reading ‘The Colorado River is no one thing’ » Related posts:“water hoarding” on the U.S. side of the border Minute 320? A river means different things to […]
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12:21 AM | Life at 400ppm: catching up with a Pliocene atmosphere
With global atmospheric carbon dioxide bumping along just under 400ppm, and sure to break through to higher levels in the near future, it’s worth taking a long hard look at what the climate system was like the last time CO2 was at these levels — the Pliocene period 3-5 million years ago. Professor Maureen Raymo […]

April 09, 2014

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11:10 PM | Come Rock the Planet with Yuri’s Night!!
First launched on April 12, 2001, Yuri’s Night celebrates two amazing accomplishments of humankind: Yuri Gagarin’s becoming the first human to orbit the earth in 1961 and the first launch of the U.S. Space Shuttle, twenty years later to the day. It is also a global celebration of humanity’s future in space and how we can use space to bring us closer together.
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10:48 PM | Geological Society of America Southeast Section meeting
This evening is the opening reception of the GSA southeast section meeting, which is being held this year in Blacksburg, VA at Virginia Tech. VMNH will have a big presence at the meeting; the entire Paleontology and Earth Science departments … Continue reading →
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10:38 PM | what to expense
Last week on ask a manager, someone asked about expensing asprin while on a business trip. They were insulted that the firm wanted to be repaid the $4 for the asprin.All the organizations I've submitted expenses for (college and grad school research, work, travel under a grant) required a strict accounting for those expenses. And they all had a definite and short list of qualifying expenses. Over the counter medicine was out, unless you were stocking up for a large field job and you could […]
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10:08 PM | Communicating geoscience
On Day 1 of the AAPG Annual Convention, I spent most of the morning in a special session entitled Communicating Our Science. I thought I'd share some of my thoughts on the subject. Please share yours in the comments! This was primarily a panel discussion, but the convenors took several of questions from the audience of about 40 people. If the room had been smaller, and the audio system better-behaved, we might have had more of a conversation. The panel consisted of three academics, two […]
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9:00 PM | Killer Shrimp Hitching Rides Across UK by Canoe
Damp canoes and fishing gear provide a route for invasive species to spread.
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5:55 PM | Acid-bath stem cell scientist apologizes and appeals
Haruko Obokata, the Japanese scientist at the centre of a controversy over studies purporting to turn mature cells to stem cells simply by bathing them in acid or subjecting them to mechanical stress, today apologized for her errors in the work.  Read more
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5:44 PM | MS Student Transitions to Career in Sustainable Investing
Prior to joining the M.S. in Sustainability Management program, current student Carolyn was working as a consultant for Perkins+Will, an architecture and planning firm, where she focused on green building and sustainability planning work. Carolyn chose the MSSM program because she wanted to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to transition into a career in sustainable investing – a goal that she has already accomplished during her time as a student. Carolyn credits the MSSM program […]
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5:25 PM | Geo 730: April 9, Day 465: Abstract
As I mentioned in the March 27th post, erosion of cross beds in wind-blown sand can create some beautiful patterns. Here we're looking down the axis of a trough. It appears that in both the older, eroded cross beds, and in the more recent transverse ripples to either side of the eroded area, the direction of the transporting winds were roughly similar.Photo unmodified. July 10, 2012. FlashEarth location (approximate).
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4:12 PM | Sand is not just sand: the demands of fracking
In the lively discussion period following the US premier screening of Sand Wars in Washington DC a couple of weeks ago, and following the showing at the Zurich environmental film festival, there was one outstanding theme – surprise. Which is...
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3:36 PM | Some Animals Win, Most Lose as Southwest Warms
Most reptile and bird species will lose chunks of their homelands by 2099. Only a few will stay the same or gain. Continue reading →
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3:28 PM | Look how clean Opportunity is now!
While climbing Murray Ridge, Opportunity enjoyed a major cleaning event that has left the rover's solar panels more dust-free than they have been in years. The rover captured a pretty panorama of the newly clean deck with its Pancams, and James Sorenson processed the version shown here.
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3:24 PM | Getting a Whiff of Climate Change
Monday was the day when millions of people in New York and New Jersey learned what climate change smells like, or at least what one of its aromas is.
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2:48 PM | Arecibo Observatory operational after repairs to fix earthquake damage
Early in the morning on January 13, 2014, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Atlantic Ocean north of Puerto Rico, damaging Arecibo Observatory, the world’s largest single-dish radio telescope. The telescope is now operational after repairs and scientists have resumed observations. However, the future of Arecibo Observatory remains unclear due to funding uncertainties in the federal budget.
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2:44 PM | Dissolving the Future of Coral Reefs
Coral reefs, some of the planet's most beautiful and biodiverse ecosystems, face many natural and anthropogenic threats. Tremendous effort has gone into protecting and rehabilitating these reefs worldwide, but the mounting problem of ocean acidification has the potential to obliterate all progress made by marine scientists, conservationists, and policy-makers thus far.
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2:39 PM | Columbia Students Win Environmental Policy Competition
Three Columbia students recently won the top prize in the Columbia Economics Review’s annual environmental policy competition, which challenged students from eight universities to make policy recommendations addressing climate change.
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1:27 PM | fighting off the desert with fake water
We come to a desert but it is not to our liking. One wonders why, then, we came to a desert, but no matter. We can engineer our way out of this: Meadow Lake was never much of a meadow. It was too wild, too wide, its sage-studded plains golden with buffalo grass and endless ...Continue reading ‘fighting off the desert with fake water’ » Related posts:Water in the Desert Legislative Failings and New Mexico Water Wars Water in the Desert: Tempe Town Lake
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1:24 PM | Earth Institute Scientists Speak Out on Climate Change
In the light of recent varied efforts to focus public attention on the risks of climate change, we asked Earth Institute scientists what they want the public to understand about the issue and how they see their roles.
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1:00 PM | GeoEd: An African GIFT Experience
This year the EGU embarked on a new journey into Africa to deliver its renowned Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) programme to teachers in South Africa and neighbouring countries in collaboration with UNESCO and the European Space Agency (ESA). The topic: Climate Change and Human Adaptation. Jane Robb reports on the week’s events… Set in ‘the windy city’ […]
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1:00 PM | “H” is for Hit, and for Haeg
“H” is for Hit, and the Ernemann Haeg Hit cameras are very small film cameras first marketed under the Hit name. Hit cameras are adorable little cameras, originally made by Tougodo Optical of Japan. They were popular in the 1950s. … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | What a Difference a Day Makes!
After all the planning, preparation, travel and heightened anticipation we have got to the starting line and we are off! The drill pipe is in place, the seabed survey completed, the drilling has started and at last the core is coming up on deck. It has been arriving from the seabed every hour and a half with a shout of ‘core on deck’ ringing around the corridors. read more
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12:51 PM | Faults disrupting the contact between the Muleros Andesite and Mesilla Valley Formation shale
Hark! What gleams on yonder contact? Well, there’s no glaciers to polish anything ’round these here parts (southernmost New Mexico + westernmost Texas), so I reckon it must be fault polish. Let’s test that hypothesis by looking for slickensides… Sure enough! There they are! Unlike the deformation we saw yesterday, this faulting of the contact between the Muleros Andesite (Eocene) and the Mesilla Valley Formation shale (Cretaceous) into which it …
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10:32 AM | Eyewire: Solving mysteries of the brain through gaming
While some may be familiar with the concept–made famous by Foldit, a pioneer online video puzzle where you “fold” protein as part of a University of Washington research project–the crowd at Bibliotheca Alexandria were blown away by a similar game model: Eyewire, neurology’s first ever computation game, open to laypeople.  Read more
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8:00 AM | Windback Wednesday: Entrepreneurship
The word entrepreneur comes from the 13th century french verb entreprendre, which literally translates to “to do something” or “to undertake”. By the 16th century, the word entrepreneur had developed a meaning of its own: someone who undertakes a business venture. It’s distinguishing features, according to Richard Cantillon (an 18th century economist), are an understanding of risk and being prepared to do business without guaranteed profits. Sounds scary, but it […]
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6:12 AM | IPCC says adapt and mitigate to tackle climate risks
This is a re-post from Roz Pidcock at Carbon Brief The front page article of today's Spectator claims the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has "updated" its position on climate change, to accept that "climate change is now a question of adaptation". Author Matt Ridley suggests that this is such a departure from the UN climate panel's previous findings that its conclusions are now in line with those of climate skeptic lobbyist Lord Lawson. Lawson stresses "the need to adapt […]
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5:52 AM | Taxidermy photobombs of the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History
Visiting relatives in Texas, just like last spring. Very distant relatives. And this happened: Here’s the culprit, with his sidekicks Monorail Badger, Trashbag Tortoise, and Kas-Tor, Last Beaver of Krypton. A disreputable bunch. The victim. Some call him the Winter Cervical. He was fast, strong–and he had a metal arm…ature. Meanwhile, in the back:
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2:51 AM | Camera - DOWN! Core- UP!
“WOAH!” Is all I have to say! (Please do say it like Joey Lawrence does in Blossom… and if that isn’t ringing a bell, give it a quick youtube to enhance this experience) read more
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