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April 11, 2014

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10:55 PM | Ohio Tightens Fracking Regulations
Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is the well-publicized process by which "tight" rocks can be made to produce oil and gas. It involves explosives, and in a handful out of approximately a million cases small earthquakes have resulted as existing stresses in unmapped faults were released. One of those exceedingly rare cases happened in Ohio last month, and the authorities revised the regulations today to ensure greater caution when the signs arise again. Now, when permits are issued for drilling […]
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8:29 PM | Unstirring the Himalayan Pot of Mashed Mountains
New work shows how the highest mountain range in the world is not so much a tectonic train wreck as a shuffled pile of crumbly crustal dominoes.
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7:40 PM | Natural Noah's Arks on Earth
Many animals and plants hold on to existence in fragments of their former homelands, surrounded by a flood of human farms and homes.
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7:31 PM | Intro Astronomy Class 9: Titan, Uranus and Neptune Systems
Examine Saturn's moon Titan and explore the Uranian and Neptunian systems in this video of class 9 of Bruce Betts' Introduction to Planetary Science and Astronomy class.
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7:28 PM | Intro Astronomy 2014. Class 8: Icy Galilean Satellites, Saturn System
Explore the icy moons of the Jupiter System and tour the Saturnian system in this video of class 8 of Bruce Betts' Introduction to Planetary Science and Astronomy class.
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5:19 PM | Geo 730: April 11, Day 467: Sunken Grade
After departing Agate Beach, we drove north past Beverly Beach and Otter Crest. I believe this road... disruption... was just before the pullout to Beverly Beach. It's a bit counter-intuitive; we're facing north, so the ocean is to our left, but the slump movement was clearly to the right. I'm pretty sure what happened here was the result of erosion in a stream off to the right, hidden in this perspective. Coast range sediments in this area weather quickly in our mild, moist climate, and mass […]
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5:08 PM | Curiosity update: Initial reconnaissance of the Kimberley, sols 585-595
Curiosity has been busy performing a survey of the Kimberley, walking the length of the outcrop and taking enormous quantities of photos. The team is now ready to go in for a closer look, and maybe even to drill.
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4:10 PM | Dino-Killing Asteroid Dwarfed by Earlier Space Rock Crash
Scientists have reconstructed a long-ago asteroid impact that makes the strike that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago look like a playful chuck on the chin.
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3:46 PM | Shorter list for gamma-ray telescope sites, but no home yet
Where will host the world’s next generation ground-based γ-ray detector, the Cherenkov Telescope Array? The answer is, still no one knows. But a panel of funders have narrowed the field following a meeting in Munich, Germany, this week.  Read more
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3:07 PM | Measuring NEP
Some under- and post-grad students recently asked me to explain how to measure NEP in cryoconite holes, and this post represents a brief overview on their behalf – apologies to other readers […]
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2:55 PM | Planetary Meeting Travel Grants (PhD students)
Uwinga will award 10-15 travel grants, up to $1500 each, to graduate students studying planetary science and/or exoplanets and completing their PhDs in 2014. Applications are due no later than  April 30, 2014, and you can find the application form here. Filed under: planetary science Tagged: conference travel, grants
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2:46 PM | Take Ownership Of Your Health
I did a sleep study a couple months ago. I’ve had sleeping issues my entire life. My parents stopped giving me naps as a toddler because I would stay up until midnight. When the naps stopped, I still stayed up until midnight. I won’t bore you with the complicated details of my sleep habits, but…
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2:21 PM | Lords of the Past
With life, legged and finned, Earth had been teeming, Slitherers, predators, graceful trees tall … Now, of these species, we are only dreaming: Glossopteris, trilobites, eurypterids, all.
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1:19 PM | World Wildlife Fund’s Dr Brendan Fraser on improving fish diversity and conservation agriculture in Mozambique
Dr. Brendan Fisher is a research scientist at the World Wildlife Fund. His research and fieldwork lie at the nexus of conservation, development, and natural resource economics. Brendan is the author of over 50 peer-reviewed articles on topics such as poverty, human welfare, ecosystem services and biological conservation, and the co-author of two books, Valuing Ecosystem Services (Earthscan, London, 2008) and A Field Guide to Economics for Conservationists (Forthcoming, Roberts and […]
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12:52 PM | Friday fold: kink from the Billy Goat Trail
My student James O’Brien took this image of a kink band along the Billy Goat Trail, downstream of Great Falls in Maryland’s metamorphic Piedmont province. A lovely little structure, don’t you think? Thanks, James! Happy Friday, all.
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12:23 PM | Away from home: Collaboration in a global organisation
The ‘Away from home‘ blogging series features Indian postdocs working in foreign labs recounting their experience of working there, the triumphs and challenges, the cultural differences and what they miss about India. They also offer useful tips for their Indian postdocs headed abroad. You can join in the online conversation using the #postdochat hashtag.  Read more
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12:03 PM | “J” is for Jiffy
“J” is for the Jiffy Kodak The Jiffy Kodak is a fairly common camera with a pop-out front that took roll film. Many of the Jiffy Kodaks have an art-deco flair. The Jiffy Koday Six-20 took 2.25 X 3.25 inch … Continue reading →
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11:34 AM | Ship Shape and in Bristol Fashion!
There is a common saying in the UK that comes from a nautical root – ‘everything is ship-shape and in Bristol fashion’! Bristol refers to the City of Bristol that has been an important port for hundreds of years, sitting as it does at the head of the Bristol Channel - a deep and wide inlet between the Cornwall/Devon isthmus and South Wales. read more
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11:00 AM | Exhibits at EGU 2014 – The Face of the Earth
This year, the conference will have a theme: The Face of the Earth. Much like a human face, our planet exhibits a huge diversity of shapes and forms, and the 2014 theme celebrates this diversity in geoscience processes – from the Earth’s core to interplanetary space. In line with this year’s theme, you’ll find exhibits on […]
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10:26 AM | Earthquake preparedness and geohazard vulnerability in Chile
Dr Sergio Sepulveda from the University of Chile is visiting Durham University as a Cofund Senior Research Fellow through the Institute of Advanced Study, to work with the International Landslide Centre at IHRR that is led by Professor Dave Petley and Dr Nick Rosser from the Department of Geography. Sepulveda is from Chile, one of […]
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10:06 AM | Under the covers (Nature revealed) – 10 April 2014
In the latest Under the covers (Nature revealed) blog, Nature’s Art Director Kelly Krause discusses the inspiration behind this week’s front cover choice on brain-wide axonal projection patterns.  Read more
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9:00 AM | Friday Photo (123) – St. Joseph Cathedral (Antigua, Guatemala)
   Ruins of St. Joseph Cathedral (Antigua, Guatemala) This Cathedral was destroyed in the significant 1773 earthquake. Part of the Cathedral has been rebuilt, and the ruins are now opened for tourists to visit. Credit: Joel Gill, 2014
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5:32 AM | Climate imbalance – disparity in the quality of research by contrarian and mainstream climate scientists
A new paper has been published in the journal Cosmopolis entitled Review of the consensus and asymmetric quality of research on human-induced climate change. The paper was authored by John Abraham, myself, John Cook, John Fasullo, Peter Jacobs, and Scott Mandia. Each of the authors has experience in publishing peer-reviewed responses to flawed contrarian papers. Despite the 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warming supported by peer-reviewed research, expert opinion, the IPCC reports, […]
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3:00 AM | SE-GSA meeting, Day 1
Today was the first full day of the Southeastern GSA meeting. As I expected, running an exhibit booth has put a bit of a crimp in my ability to attend talks, even with Ray, Christina, Ashley, and Brett all helping. … Continue reading →
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2:50 AM | Via Nature podcast, Alex Witze on the grand pulse flow experiment
If I’d done the geek stuff right, hit the play button below to hear a really nice piece by Alex Witze of Nature magazine from the Colorado River delta pulse flow. (I know, it’s a magazine, this is audio. Brave new world and all.) If I haven’t done the geek stuff right, you can probably ...Continue reading ‘Via Nature podcast, Alex Witze on the grand pulse flow experiment’ » Related posts:Colorado “pulse flow”: fighting deeply held […]
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2:19 AM | It now looks like 2017 is the earliest we could see a shortage declaration on the Colorado River
The latest Bureau of Reclamation monthly basin operating report, out today (the “24-month study”, pdf), makes it increasingly clear that we’re not going to see Lake Mead drop to levels that would require a shortage declaration in 2016. The shortage is based on Lake Mead’s surface elevation, and the trigger level is 1,075 feet above sea ...Continue reading ‘It now looks like 2017 is the earliest we could see a shortage declaration on the Colorado River’ […]
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1:38 AM | Peter Sinclair interviewing Maureen Raymo
Another good video from Peter Sinclair on his YaleClimateForum YouTube channel: Maureen Raymo is an expert in paleo-climates.  This is probably the most informative climate science specialty when it comes to anticipating the final outcome of our global experiment in climate disruption.  The rapidity of the current change is outside the realm of anything previously…
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1:02 AM | Bet You Did Not Know This
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April 10, 2014

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11:31 PM | Help name the last phase of the Cassini mission!
The scientists on the Cassini team are incredibly excited about the final, "proximal orbit" phase of the mission. But they want a punchier name for it, and they're asking the public for help.
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10:44 PM | Will We Finally Rove Mawrth Vallis?
Mawrth Vallis was axed as a landing site for Curiosity, but will we get a chance to explore it with ESA's ExoMars rover?
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