Posts

November 11, 2014

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9:39 PM | 385 Millionen jahre alter Porno gefunden…
Jetzt wo ich alle hier unter Vorspiegelung falscher Tatsachen her gelockt habe, folgt die Enttäuschung natürlich auf dem Fuße. Erstens, es ist eine Animation. Und zweitens, es geht um Fische. Zugegeben, um sehr alte Fische. Denn so ähnlich hat man sich wohl den ersten (Wirbeltier-) Sex unter der Sonne vorzustellen. damals, vor rund 385 Millionen Jahren. Da sah die Welt noch etwas anders aus, ebenso die Fische. Denn Fische, wie wir sie heute kennen, standen erst am Anfang […]
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9:00 PM | In the heart of the machine
By Eleanor “Is that like a transformer?” I’ve just been to Japan for a synchrotron school. Most of my non-scientist friends had never even heard of the word ‘synchrotron’ before I told them where I was going. One friend thought … Continue reading →
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8:55 PM | Art Every Day – Day 11
It’s funny how committing to 15 minutes a day of art expands into much more than a mere 15 minutes. But it’s fun. Today’s work is a little shift away from the fish project I’ve been working on to the … Continue reading →
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8:40 PM | Waking the Frog
Canadian Tom Rand is an enthusiastic promoter of the clean technologies which are fully capable of saving us from the worst ravages of climate change. He’s also an investor in the field – a capitalist, he happily acknowledges. And importantly for his readers he’s a lively and thoughtful writer with a knack for striking observation. […]
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7:40 PM | Geo 730: November 10, Day 679: Red Wood
No, not a redwood, but there's a fair chance this was a dawn redwood, or Metasequoia. Peavy Hall, the Forestry building at Oregon State, has a living dawn redwood near the north entrance, and two petrified logs of it, one near the east entry, and another in the atrium. Both were from the Eagle Creek Formation, as I suspect the above is. Not a terribly informative photo, but I love the color, and the contrast with the fern below.Photo unmodified. October 10, 2012. FlashEarth Location.
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7:31 PM | WSC’s Fossil Preparation Exhibit
Like most collections-based museums, the Western Science Center has far more specimens than we could ever put on exhibit. We want to make our collections and procedures accessible to as many people as we can, but there are all kinds … Continue reading →
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7:21 PM | Philae update: First of four "go-no-go" decisions is a GO!
It's been a day of calm before the storm here at the European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, as we get ready for the big event tomorrow: Philae's hoped-for landing on a comet. The first of four "go-no-go" decisions has been made, and it's a "go." Mission navigators have gotten data back from Rosetta that indicates that the spacecraft is on the correct trajectory to deliver Philae to the comet.
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7:15 PM | Scientists Engage With the Public During Lava Flow Threat
On 27 June, lava from Kīlauea, an active volcano on the island of Hawai`i, began flowing to the northeast, threatening the residents in Pāhoa. Eos recently spoke with Michael Poland, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) and a member of the Eos Editorial Advisory Board, to discuss how he and his colleagues communicated this threat to the public.
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5:43 PM | Veterans Day and The Green Fields of France
Originally Veterans Day was Armistice Day celebrating the end of Word War I on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. The day is still a day of remembrance in may nations. In the United States the day was was switched to Veterans Day in 1954 to honor all veterans. But is worth recalling a line from Woodrow Wilson's speech to Congress proclaiming Armistice Day, "Hunger does not breed reform; it breeds madness." Something to think about when contemplating Syria […]
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5:02 PM | William Dampier and the Burning Islands of Melanesia
A tweet from Jenni Barclay about a Pirate Scientist gave me an excuse to visit the newly opened reading rooms in the Bodleian’s Weston Library.. William Dampier was a seventeenth century pirate, and later maritime adventurer, whose several books of ‘Voyages and Discoveries’ make for fascinating reading. In 1699, he set sail in HMS Roebuck […]
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4:40 PM | Hawaii Lava Flow Burns Through First Home
Lava from a slow-moving flow ignited a house on Hawaii's Big Island, the first home to catch fire in a town threatened by the eruption.
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2:52 PM | Geosonnet 18
The Vikings lived in Greenland 'till in cooled. Ten thousand years before, as glac'ers thawed, Melt water in the North Atlantic pooled, The Younger Dryas cold snap shocked and awed. In Norway, glaciers reappeared on high, Above the fjords where stoic Norse rule lapsed. Then Carolina icebergs floated by, As Greenland outlet glaciers collapsed. Why would cold make this icecap melt, not grow?
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2:34 PM | R is for Resolution
Resolution is becoming a catch-all term for various aspects of the quality of a digital signal, whether it's a photograph, a sound recording, or a seismic volume. I got thinking about this on seeing an ad in AAPG Explorer magazine, announcing an 'ultra-high-resolution' 3D in the Gulf of Mexico (right), aimed at site-survey and geohazard detection. There's a nice image of the 3D, but the only evidence offered for the 'ultra-high-res' claim is the sample interval in space and time (3 m × 6 […]
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2:23 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: Drought-tolerant alfalfa
It’s a little thing, this new breed of drought-tolerant alfalfa bred on New Mexico State University research plots in the southern part of my arid state. But it provides another clue (behind a Google surveywall) about what the path forward in western water management might look like: Adoption of a new crop takes time, so don’t ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: Drought-tolerant alfalfa’ »
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11:46 AM | Review of a paper: The Donghekou landslide in China
A recent paper in Engineering Geology discusses the mechanisms of the Donghekou landslide in China, which killed over 700 people. A strange aspect of the landslide was the formation of fumeroles on the landslide deposit; these are believed to have been the result of oxidation of shales exposed by the landslide
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11:11 AM | Santorini panorama
Here is the view north across the central caldera of Santorini, Greece: Click to enlarge to 9000 pixels wide This caldera formed during the Bronze Age, maybe as early as 1628 BCE or so, maybe as late as 1500 BCE. There are new volcanic islands rising in the center.
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9:04 AM | Report from Darmstadt: Philae status and early Rosetta results from DPS
I'm reporting live from the press room at the European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany. There's little news on Philae yet except that its status is good. Meanwhile, Rosetta scientists presented their first early comet results at the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Tucson, Arizona, which I watched from afar using Twitter.
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6:39 AM | The iPhone 6 Pressure Sensor- It’s REALLY Good
The new iPhone 6 has a pressure sensor, and this may very well be the beginning of a massive increase in atmospheric weather observations. It comes at a time when computer power is making it possible to run numerical weather models at resolutions we’ve only dreamed of in the past. NOAA is already running a model with a resolution of 3km (the HRRR), and the UK Met office just bought …
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2:57 AM | When people have less water, they use less water
People in arid lands have always been very ingenious when it comes to conserving water. The late New Mexico writer and irrigator Juan Estevan Arrellano, from his new book Enduring Acequias: Wisdom of the Land, Knowledge of the Water, which came out in August, shortly before his recent sad and untimely death.
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2:14 AM | Solite Excavation: Day 12
Saturday was a double-booked day for me. Therefore, Ray took the crew out to excavate bright and early while I stayed behind to give a tour to a class from Lynchburg College. While the students wandered through the exhibits, I … Continue reading →

November 10, 2014

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11:40 PM | Robot Gliders See How Antarctic Ice Melts From Below
Scientists suspect Antarctica's shrinking glaciers are melting from the bottom up, and a fleet of robot ocean gliders may help explain why.
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11:16 PM | Hulme: In what ways is religious belief relevant for understanding climate change?
For some time I’ve been concious of how lucky I am to live in Cambridge with its wealth of cultural opportunities, and dissatisfied with my own poor response: so often, its easier to follow routine. So last saturday, in the market square, amongst the poster for “Spem in Alium” and others I found this. And…
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9:52 PM | Bárðarbunga volcano update Monday 10-November-2014
No major change took place in the eruption in Holuhraun during the weekend. The lava field is now around 70 square kilometres wide and it keeps growing each day. I don’t know the total volume so far, since … Continue reading →
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9:38 PM | Why a Bomb Cyclone Means Frigid Weather for the US
As the central and eastern U.S. are hit with an unseasonably early blast of frigid weather, we're struggling to comprehend more mysterious meteorological lingo. Continue reading →
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9:22 PM | Killerschwämme – Das leben Ist kein Ponyhof #14
Schwämme sind uns ja der Inbegriff eines primitiven und wohl harmlosen Lebewesens. Einfach am Meeresgrund festsitzen und vor sich hin filtrieren, das dürfte kaum bedrohlich wirken. Und manche Schwämme haben noch ein Nachleben als unsere Badegenossen. Also nichts, vor dem man sich wirklich in Acht nehmen muss, oder? Abgesehen davon, dass so etwas immer auch ein klein wenig auf die Größe der beteiligten ankommt (Hauskatzen sind niedlich, aber Löwen...). Aber […]
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7:12 PM | Art Every Day – Day 10
So far, ten for ten in spending a few minutes a day doing some art. Here’s today’s fish: Also, the dinosaurs have been at it again… The carnivores are trying to look cool while the herbivores look on, unimpressed. #Dinovember … Continue reading →
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6:45 PM | Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (Nov. 10)
Our recap this week from around the planet: A Super Typhoon menaces Alaska, a colorful remembrance of World War I, and supercooled crystals punch a hole in the sky.
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5:21 PM | An Apology
Buttes of the Cross in Canyonlands along the Green RiverDear Readers -I know I have been remiss in posting updates lately and for that I apologize. Life gets busy and sometimes posting takes a break.However, I will have a post up later this week on my 2014 Canyonlands river trip on the Green and Colorado rivers. I have a few spots left for the 2015 trip so look at these and join us if you can.Additionally, I will be lecturing on a Smithsonian Journeys expedition beginning next week to Peru and […]
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5:19 PM | Student Profile: Denis Tan
For Denis Tan, the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program has exposed him to a wide variety of real world sustainability issues while training him to be a better team member and manager. Denis hopes to bring his newly acquired training back to his native Singapore to affect change through the creation and development of government policy.
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3:33 PM | In Pictures: Expedition 41 Crew Returns to Earth
The crew of Expedition 41 is safely back on Earth following a 165-day stay aboard the International Space Station.
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