Posts

October 17, 2014

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3:30 PM | California Drought Resembles Worst in Millennium
The 1934 drought is the worst on record for North America in the past 1,000 years, and had similar conditions to the current California drought.
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3:00 PM | Fossil Friday – Harlan’s ground sloth jaw
For this week’s Fossil Friday we have a partial lower jaw of Harlan’s ground sloth, Paramylodon harlani, collected near the eastern end of Diamond Valley not far from the museum’s current location. This particular fragment is the back half of … Continue reading →
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3:00 PM | Sun-gazing
By Galileo’s careful hand, sunspot details are exquisite, Through eye of forehead, eye of mind beholds what body can not visit. If only he could see the sights now rendered from Earth’s outer space, Ultraviolet sunscapes – Oh, to see his raptured face!
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2:00 PM | Bonfire!
National Blog Posting Month – September 2014 – Crunch Prompt – When was the last time you went to a campfire/bonfire? Tell us about it. —— One would think based upon the month and months of camping I have done … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Friday Headlines: 10-17-14
Friday Headlines, October 17, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: Massive landslides in Italy Strutting kangaroos   Massive Landslide in Italy Caught on Video This is actually kind of ‘old’ news, as this happened back in 2010. … Continue reading →
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12:55 PM | A brief word on Earthquakes and fracking.
Since the Keranen et al. paper a few months ago, there has been much discussion on the relationship between earthquakes and wastewater disposal wells from unconventional hydrocarbon extraction (a.k.a. fracking). Most of this discussion related to earthquake swarms on Oklahoma, where seismicity has dramatically increased in recent years.   However, it is worth pointing out that Oklahoma is by
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12:07 PM | October linkfest
The linkfest has come early this month, to accommodate the blogging blitz that always accompanies the SEG Annual Meeting. If you're looking forward to hearing all about it, you can make sure you don't miss a thing by getting our posts in your email inbox. Guaranteed no spam, only bacn. If you're reading this on the website, just use the box on the right → Open geoscience goodness I've been alerted to a few new things in the open geoscience category in the last few days: Dave Hale released […]
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11:36 AM | Science Snap (#33): Earth Science Week
James Hickey is a PhD student in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol. A geophysicist and volcanologist by trade, his PhD project is focussed on attempting to place constraints on volcanic unrest using integrated geodetic modelling. Earth Science Week is an international initiative to promote the great work that goes on in […]
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11:30 AM | Friday fold: Santorini schist
Happy Friday! Here’s some folded schistocity in the schist of Santorini’s Cycladean subduction complex: The blunt crest of the fold in the second photo appears to be a folded marble boudin. Neato!
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11:00 AM | The known unknowns – the outstanding 49 questions in Earth Sciences (Part IV)
We are coming to the end of the known unknowns series and so far we have explored issues which mainly affect the inner workings of our planet. Today we’ll take a look at the surface expression of the geological processes which shape the Earth. Topography significantly affects our daily life and is formed via an […]
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10:22 AM | The effects of disasters on society
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Professor Andrew Collins who leads the Disaster and Development Network at Northumbria University gave an important talk at IHRR on addressing hazard, risk and disaster in society. We share with you some audio highlights from the seminar along with some [...] The post The effects of disasters on society appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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9:21 AM | Hendrick van Anthonissen’s Long Lost Whale
Something about the painting was peculiar…not necessarily ‘wrong’, but certainly peculiar.  At face value, Scheveningen Sands by Hendrick van Anthonissen (1641) appeared to be just another fine Dutch Golden Age landscape, […]
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9:00 AM | Images of Guatemala (2) – Pyroclastic Flow Deposits
Pyroclastic Flow Deposits close to Volcan de Fuego, Guatemala. The scale of these deposits, formed in 2012, can be seen against the scale of the person standing in the background [dark line, just above the red shrub]. Pyroclastic flows, alongside lahars, are two of the most significant and destructive volcanic hazards associated with Volcan de Fuego. […]
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7:18 AM | Northern Convergence: Tragedy at Crowsnest Pass
Frank was a coal mining town of around 600 people in 1903. The coal seam ran along the base of Turtle Mountain, so the town was established there as well. The Canadian Pacific Railway also crossed the area on its way to Crowsnest Pass.The local First Nation people did not like Turtle Mountain. They called it the "Mountain that Moves", and refused to camp in the area. The Europeans had no such worries, and mining of the coal was well underway. In the early morning of April 29, 1903, a […]
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6:10 AM | Why ice sheets will keep melting for centuries to come
This article was originally published on The Conversation [UK] on Sep 26, 2014. Why ice sheets will keep melting for centuries to come By Eelco Rohling, University of Southampton It may already be too late to stop Antarctic ice sliding into the ocean. EPA Ice sheets respond slowly to changes in climate, because they are so massive that they themselves dominate the climate conditions over and around them. But once they start flowing faster towards the shore and melting into […]
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3:32 AM | tiny brontosauruses
This arrived on my Facebook wall, courtesy of Raul Diaz. For a split second I really did think the one second from the right was an older-model Carnegie Brachiosaurus toy. I assume that, like me, you have people in your life that you don’t correspond with very often, and when you remember that they exist, […]
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12:53 AM | Another Well Written Defense of Science
Jonathan Bines is a staff writer for Jimmy Kimmel and he has a piece in Huff Post that is superb- it deserves sharing and widely. In this memorable October, a lot of virologists (and disease experts) are getting a taste of what evolutionary biologists, and climate scientists have experienced. A quote from Bines: “Science cannot be refuted by appeals to intuition or personal experience, attacks on the character or motivations …

October 16, 2014

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11:55 PM | Bárðarbunga update for 16-October-2014
Largest earthquake in Bárðarbunga volcano today (16-October-2014) had the magnitude of 5,0. Second largest earthquake had the magnitude of 4,6. Other earthquakes have been smaller. There have been more earthquake activity today compared to yesterday. The eruption in … Continue reading →
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10:14 PM | Did Deforestation Pave the Way for Ebola Outbreak?
Cutting down trees isn't just bad for the climate. It also can facilitate the spread of deadly diseases. Continue reading →
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10:10 PM | MiSTORY
Anyone who follows the science of climate change knows that we are heading for environmental and social turmoil along our current path. In his new novel MiSTORY author Philip Temple imaginatively pictures what that turmoil might mean decades on from now. New Zealand is in a political mess. Conflict abroad and conflict within. A long-lasting […]
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8:51 PM | The Winter Forecast Is Out, and It’s Probably Wrong!
  NOAA Released the 2014/2015 winter forecast today and it is probably wrong. I’m not taking a slam at NOAA here, they will also admit to you that the odds are that this forecast will not be correct. The truth is, that any forecast beyond 5-7 days has very low skill. That said, we cannot learn to make long-range forecasts unless we try, and that’s how science works: we make …
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8:00 PM | Winter Forecast for US Nothing to Shiver About
Don't expect the polar vortex to pummel the eastern United States this winter.
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6:50 PM | Drought-hit US Town Learns to Live Without Water
Hundreds of residents and business people in the small town of Porterville, in California's normally verdant Central Valley, who have no running water and are having to re-think how they live.
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5:55 PM | The Strange Medical Case of the Radioactive Landslide
The landslide of Köfels (named after a small village in Tyrol) is one of the largest recognized landslides in the Alps – large enough to dam up a 92 meters (300 feet) deep prehistoric lake and divide in two the valley of Ötz. Wood fragments discovered during the construction of a gallery in the landslide [...]
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5:55 PM | The Strange Medical Case of the Radioactive Landslide
The landslide of Köfels (named after a small village in Tyrol) is one of the largest recognized landslides in the Alps – large enough to dam up a 92 meters (300 feet) deep prehistoric lake and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:36 PM | And now for the fun part: choosing your outreach activities!
The wonderful thing about science communication and outreach is that there are an almost infinite number of ways to share your science. We’ve made a quick list of some of the kinds of activities you can be involved in to share your science.
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4:50 PM | Environmental Earth Science in the News Roundup #5
View the story “Environmental Earth Science News Roundup #5″ on Storify
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4:08 PM | Principal Features of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity were Present in Triassic Eucynodonts
Ruf, I., Maier, W., Rodrigues, P. G., and C. L. Schultz. 2014. Nasal Anatomy of the Non-mammaliaform Cynodont Brasilitherium riograndensis (Eucynodontia, Therapsida) Reveals New Insight into Mammalian Evolution. The Anatomical Record 297: 2018–2030. DOI: 10.1002/ar.23022Abstract - The mammalian nasal cavity is characterized by a unique anatomy with complex internal features. The evolution of turbinals was correlated with endothermic and macrosmatic adaptations in therapsids and in early […]
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3:35 PM | Offshore Oil Rigs Are Turning Into Fish Condos
Fish are flocking to the structures beneath oil drilling platforms, and turning them into living spaces. Continue reading →
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3:22 PM | Magic Mushrooms in My Yard: Photos
The mushrooms springing out of the ground lately are of the magic variety...literally.
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