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Posts

April 17, 2014

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2:36 PM | When the Clock Strikes Twelve
When the hand reaches 12 noon it is time for the ‘day shift’ scientists to start work. read more
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2:11 PM | Mountainous Fib: Andes Lie About Their Age
New research into the height of a very remote Andean plateau reveals just the latest surprise from the Earth's second-greatest mountain belt.
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1:52 PM | Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface
Leonardo da Vinci studied rocks and landscapes not only to improve the realism of his paintings, but also in an attempt to understand how the earth works. Leonardo was obsessed with water, which he considered a vector to erode ancient rocks and to deposit new sedimentary rocks, reshaping so over time the “living” earth. The running water is for earth what blood is for the human body – it flows from the mountains to the sea, then – so Leonardo – in […]
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1:36 PM | Tipping Points Annual Report 2013-14
IHRR’s Tipping Points project has now published its fourth annual report. It provides recent updates on the multiple strands of its research that combines different fields in the physical and social sciences, and arts and humanities. The project has generated a tremendous amount of academic research investigating the many different kinds of tipping points in […]
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1:17 PM | $1.5 Mln World Record Gold Crystal Verified
The 217.78 gram (7.68 oz.) nugget is a single, intact gold crystal.
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1:04 PM | The Code of Hammering
As field season returns in my part of the world, I'm gearing up for some nice outings. So it's time again to present my code of hammering. There are guidebooks that touch on matters of professional practice, and every rockhound group teaches its members hammer safety. But as an amateur geologist I practice a game between that of the professional and the rockhound. It incorporates a respect for the rock as something with its own aesthetics and right to exist as nature made it. See if you […]
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1:00 PM | Thirsty Thursday: Porter Ahoy!
OK. I actually started this brew more than a week ago. But then suddenly… time passed, and I didn’t blog about it. What’s up with that? So I started a porter two Sundays ago. A honey porter. This weekend, it’s … Continue reading →
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12:17 PM | Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface
In the Renaissance (1450-1600) architecture and pictorial arts, but also scientific disciplines like astronomy, physics and medicine, experienced a rebirth and important improvements – but what about geology? There were some lone geniuses in the earth sciences – Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci (born April 15, 1452-1519) recognized fossils as petrified remains of former living [...]
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12:17 PM | Vitruvian Geology – Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface
In the Renaissance (1450-1600) architecture and pictorial arts, but also scientific disciplines like astronomy, physics and medicine, experienced a rebirth and important improvements – but what... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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12:15 PM | Pseudopictographs
I found this interesting looking slab of gray limestone last summer in the Bridger Range of Montana, in one of the talus slopes on the north side of Sacagawea Cirque. The high-contrast pattern reminded me of something, but I couldn’t say quite what. Then I realized: it looks like one of those indigenous pictographs, where the artist puts their hand up to the rock and spits paint all over it, …
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12:00 PM | “O” is for Optima
“O” is for the Agfa Optima. The Optima series of cameras by Agfa were among the first ‘automatic’ 35mm cameras. That is, by pressing the certain buttons, it would select the correct shutter speed and aperture for getting the correct … Continue reading →
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11:00 AM | GeoCinema at the 2014 General Assembly
GeoCinema is the home of geoscience films at the EGU General Assembly. This year features 38 fantastic films from across the geosciences, so you can step into some soil science, dive into deep ocean investigations, catch a glimpse of climate change research and more! GeoCinema runs almost continuously throughout the conference, with short films, documentaries […]
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7:51 AM | One of the World's Most Precious Places, Under the Volcano
Yosemite Valley, hands down, is one of the most extraordinary places on our amazing planet. I have been going to Yosemite National Park three or four times a year for the last quarter century, and I never get tired of spending time there. The thousand square miles of national park that surround Yosemite Valley are incredible, but the valley itself is hypnotic. I would hope that everyone could visit the park at least once, but it becomes something special when you can see it throughout the […]
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7:48 AM | Citibanker: the age of renewables is here
Kathryn Ryan’s interview earlier this week with Michael Eckhart, Managing Director and Global Head of Environmental Finance and Sustainability at the giant investment bank Citigroup was arresting. He was in New Zealand as a keynote speaker at the Wind Energy Conference and Ryan asked him about a recent report from Citi, Energy Darwinism: The Evolution […]
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7:02 AM | Meesc
My previous post Policy? trailed off in the comments in a variety of odd directions, as long comment threads are wont to. So I’ll offer you this quote: For there are some people on the left who keep insisting that economic growth is incompatible with reduced emissions, and that therefore we have to turn our…
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5:06 AM | A Few Deep-Seated Bedrock Landslides in Whatcom County
Shortly after the Oso/Hazel slide John Stark with the Bellingham Herald contacted me and asked if Whatcom County has any comparable landslide risks. In terms of likely imminent threat, there are no sites in Whatcom County that are directly comparable to the Hazel Slide in terms of size and pending risk. The Clay Banks (nooksack-river-temporarily-blocked-by-landslide, nooksack-river-blocking-landslide-notes, further-update-on-nooksack-river/clay-banks-via-DT, and […]
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4:57 AM | Orthospirifer Lophophore Brachiopod Fossil
This fossil is a great example of the brachiopod lophophore feeding tubes preserved in a white quartz form. This brachiopod appears to be some sort of Orthospirifer. It was found in the Sellersburg Limestone that formed in the Middle Devonian Period (Eifelian).Thanks to Mary Ann for letting me take some pictures of it.
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2:18 AM | What is that? Wednesday: Realistic Dinosaurs
I’m a paleontologist. I’m a little selective about dinosaur toys… understandably. So when I saw this toy set at the drug store yesterday, I had to buy it – if only to protect unsuspecting children from buying it and thinking … Continue reading →
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2:11 AM | Pulse flow slows
The Colorado River pulse flow, three weeks in: Related posts:Updated Pulse Flow Map pulse flow progress Following the flow

April 16, 2014

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7:50 PM | The Birth of the Wanderers
How did planets originate? This is a question that has puzzled scientists for centuries, but one which they have been able to tackle directly only in the last few decades, thanks to two major developments: breakthroughs in telescope technology and ever-increasing computing power.
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5:57 PM | Geo 730: April 16, Day 472: Depoe Bay, Abridged
Looking south-southwest from fnder the Depoe Bay Bridge, you can see the narrow notch the fleet must navigate to get into and out of the harbor. As hair-raising a prospect as that sounds to me, the lack of major currents- even those of tides, due to the restricted size of the basin- means that it's probably a less complicated and risky proposition than in larger estuaries. I'm pretty much guessing here, but I've heard stories about "crossing the bar" from several other Oregon locations, […]
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3:07 PM | Directory of Geoscience Organizations of the World
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2:18 PM | Heartland logic: More people have heard of Fidel Castro than Michael Mann, therefore global warming is false.
This is a guest post from Narahani.   Or is happening and is good for you, or has stopped happening, or is caused by CO2 but only a little, or is about to reverse due to lots of yet-to-be-discovered negative feedbacks, and clouds. And anyhow, peas and water lilies love CO2 so ramping it up to 1000 ppm would be fantastic. The logic is dizzying.   And yes, Joe Bast repeated his widely criticized statement equating people who support action to limit climate change with […]
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2:00 PM | Summer 2014 Earth Institute Internship Program Opportunities
This spring, the Earth Institute is offering Columbia students opportunities to intern within various departments and research centers at the institute. All full-time Columbia and Barnard students are eligible to apply. These internships are funded at a rate of $15/hour for up to 35 hours per week. See below for the descriptions of these opportunities.
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1:41 PM | Deep-Sea Rocks May Make Smartphones
A new method extracts high-tech metals from common seafloor ores.
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12:58 PM | Turitella in Buda Formation limestone
Back to Texas, today. Here’s a cross-sectioned Turitella snail from the Buda Formation limestone: It’s exposed in a block of rock on the north side of Mt. Cristo Rey. You can explore these GigaPanned blocks of the Buda in search of your own Turitella… How many can you find? link link link
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12:37 PM | Frogs Shrinking and Squeaking as Climate Warms
The tweets of Puerto Rico's unofficial mascot, the common coqui frog, became higher pitched during the past two decades, while the animals grew shorter. Continue reading →
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12:00 PM | “N” is for Nikomat
“N” is for Nikomat, one of Nikon’s early SLRs. The Nikkormat (or Nikomat in Japan) cameras were cheap alternative SLRs to the Nikon F cameras.   Reference: McKeown’s Price Guide to Antique and Classic Cameras, 12th edition, ISBN 0-931838-40-1 The … Continue reading →
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11:44 AM | EGU 2014: Get the Assembly mobile app!
The EGU 2014 mobile app is now available for iPhones and Android smartphones. To download it, you can scan the QR code available at the General Assembly website or go directly to http://app.egu2014.eu on your mobile device. You will be directed to the version of the EGU 2014 app for your particular smartphone, which you can download for free. […]
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11:17 AM | New agricultural trends to feed the world
The agriculture sector needs to double food production by 2050 to meet growing global populations – a tremendous feat considering the challenges posed by climate change, water shortage and how the increase in farming land is not catching up with demand. That’s why scientists are up to their ears looking for ways to sustainably increase production of crops capable of withstanding different environmental stresses.  Read more
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