Posts

July 21, 2014

+
7:17 PM | As far as the moral high-ground is concerned...
...the earth is flat. [sorry, just watched the evening news, couldn't help myself.]
+
6:13 PM | Mike Taylor’s ESOF2014 talk: should science always be open?
As recently noted, it was my pleasure and privilege on 25 June to give a talk at the ESOF2014 conference in Copenhagen (the EuroScience Open Forum). My talk was one of four, followed by a panel discussion, in a session on the subject “Should science always be open?“.   I had just ten minutes to […]
+
5:40 PM | DNews: What Could Have Made Siberia's Mystery Crater?
It's big, it's deep, it's just all-around spooky, and so far no one has a clue how it got there! But the big honkin' crater in Siberia didn't just appear there out of thin air ... er, did it?
+
4:13 PM | View From an Iceberg
The science goal for today is to complete 8 CTD casts. We load into our vessel, a Poca 500GR. We have discussed a 6 to 8 hour window of boat time with Gabriel the captain and Magnus our navigator and stocked up on 40 liters of benzene.
+
3:45 PM | Plastic 'Trash Islands' Forming In Ocean Garbage Patch
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch may be developing permanent features, such as trash islands.
+
3:20 PM | Mystery of Stone Arch Formation May Be Solved
The bewildering shapes apparently owe their origin in large part to how rock can strengthen when squashed from above.
+
1:52 PM | The Search for Ithaca
This post unifies two of my absolutely favourite topics: geology and classical Greek history. I have always had a soft spot for the classics. In fact, when I started my undergrad I was planning on doing a double major of geology and classics. I decided to focus on geology, but I have not lost my […]
+
1:03 PM | One Day on Mars
A single day's observations take us from orbital overviews all the way down to ground truth.
+
11:00 AM | Imaggeo on Mondays: Entering a frozen world
Dmitry Vlasov, a PhD Student and junior scientist from Lomonosov Moscow State University, brings us this week’s Imaggeo on Mondays. He shares his experience of taking part in a student scientific society expedition to Lake Baikal. This picture shows icy shores of Lake Baikal – a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the world’s largest natural […]
+
10:28 AM | (Near) Garden of the Gods Reprise: Jackson Falls
Remember when we visited the Shrooms of the Gods at Garden of the Gods? That’s not the only wondrous place formed by the Pounds Sandstone. Reader Heliconia got to visit the area in early... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
9:57 AM | Maoxian County landslide: a dramatic video of a fatal rockslide
On Thursday a rockslide occurred in Maoxian County in Sichuan Province, China. The terrifying moments of the landslide were captured on a dashboard camera
+
9:14 AM | Postgraduate scholarship for research in hazard and risk
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Applications are invited for the Christopher Moyes Memorial Foundation Scholarship to support a suitably qualified postgraduate student for a three year PhD programme of research in the Department of Geography at Durham University, UK. The scholarship is to support research of [...] The post Postgraduate scholarship for research in hazard and risk appeared first on Institute of Hazard, […]
+
8:02 AM | Eodelphis kabatensis illustration on the cover of JVP
Last year I was contacted by my friend and colleague Mizuki Murakami (now Dr. Murakami), who wanted to commission an illustration of a fossil odontocete from Japan for a manuscript he was working on and planning on submitting to the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology in the hopes that it would be accepted and selected as the feature article. To make a long story short, it was. The illustration depicts "Eodelphis" kabatensis - a fossil delphinid and possible ancestral globicephaline or orcinine […]
+
8:00 AM | Science snap (#31): Mammatus clouds
After all the thunderous weather this weekend and being British, I thought I’d do a weather themed science snap. Don’t bolt yet; it’s a volcanic-weather themed! This is a picture of mammatus clouds following the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. These clouds are pretty rare, unusual and distinctive. Formally, the Glossary of Meteorology […]
+
6:21 AM | I'm Sorry, This Trench is Full; Those Rocks Will Have to Go Elsewhere
Looking south from Hurricane Ridge into the heart of Olympic National ParkThere will be few detailed blogs these next few weeks; I'm on the road leading our Canada/Pacific Northwest field class, and I will be just a bit busy. But I can't help putting up a few photos here and there. In today's pictures we see what happens when subduction zones get out of control, so to speak.Subduction zones are places where oceanic crust sinks back into the Earth's mantle to be recycled at some future time as […]
+
5:34 AM | Climate models accurately predicted global warming when reflecting natural ocean cycles
Predicting global surface temperature changes in the short-term is a challenge for climate models. Temperature changes over periods of a decade or two can be dominated by influences from ocean cycles like El Niño and La Niña. During El Niño phases, the oceans absorb less heat, leaving more to warm the atmosphere, and the opposite is true during a La Niña. We can't yet predict ahead of time how these cycles will change. The good news is that it doesn't matter from a […]
+
3:43 AM | Pteranodon Flying Reptile Stamp
Here is a picture of the Pteranodon flying reptile stamp. It was issued in 1965 by the small republic of San Marino (located on the Italian peninsula). It had a value of 3 lire but the country now uses the euro as their currency. The U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) website has a 1965 listing of currency rate exchanges. One United States dollar was equivalent to 625 Italian lire. So this
+
2:38 AM | The Only Thing More Amazing Than The Moonwalk 45 years Ago Tonight
Exactly 45 years ago tonight, everyone who could see a TV, was in front of one. The clip below is the actual coverage from CBS News that evening. You can actually watch all of the Moonwalk online, and if you were not born yet, I highly recommend you do so. A lot of folks do not realize that when the camera came on (and a lot of folks doubted it …
+
2:03 AM | Large drilling program announced for St. John's CO2-helium field
A Kinder Morgan  representative told the Arizona Oil & Gas Conservation Commission on Friday that the company is on track to complete their current evaluation drilling in the St. John's, Arizona carbon dioxide and helium filed [right, credit, Kinder Morgan] by year's end.  Then they anticipate filing permits for 14 additional wells.Kinder Morgan propose a roughly $1 billion investment in the field, with three-quarters of it for drilling and field development and one-quarter for a […]
+
12:58 AM | Latest M 3.0 Duncan aftershock close to New Mexico border
I seem to have missed another magnitude 3.0 aftershock last Thursday from the June 28 magnitude 5.2 Duncan earthquake. This latest event occurred at 2:12 am, and was almost on the New Mexico border, further east than the other large aftershocks.  [Right, orange star marks the epicenter.  Credit, USGS]

July 20, 2014

+
11:45 PM | Field work travelog – Day 9, So much measuring.
It was a hot one today. Running out of water was a theme, not one I like to have. Ever. But we survived and successfully completed the needed tasks. We finished measuring the reference section needed for a project I’m … Continue reading →
+
11:10 PM | Whatcom Rural Element: Water Quality Struggles
I have periodically posted on Whatcom County's long and complex struggles with rural planning and the Growth Management Act - long and wonky and local issues that shape the landscape. Whatcom County is just one county, but being local I know the GMA planning here better than elsewhere. Whatcom County lost on water quality and water quantity issues on appeals before the Growth Hearings Board last year.  The County has appealed the Boards rulings on water quality and quantity planning […]
+
10:15 PM | Geo 730: July 20, Day 566: 9 to 5, and Nighttime, Too
Interzone's sundial is marked from nine AM to five PM, and oddly, "Night" is marked, too. How does that work? When the sun goes down, the street light comes on, and casts a shadow along the marked path. We're on a spnning ball of rock, which means the sun appears to move through the sky, but the lamp spins with it, so it appears fixed.Photo unmodified. July 18, 2014. FlashEarth location.
+
6:42 PM | The Horrors of Seven Mile Hole
A smoky haze filled the skies, drifting across Yellowstone from forest fires burning to the west of us. I did not bring binoculars, nor did I bring my bigger “good” camera. The idea was to carry as little weight as possible, down into and up out of Seven Mile Hole.Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone RiverWe both carried bear spray, of course, and hiker buddy ranger Brian brought a park radio (since there have been one or two occurrences lately in which we were involved, concerning […]
+
2:04 PM | Taking a short break--no post his week
I'm taking a short break. I expect to post again on Sunday, July 27.
+
11:53 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #29
SkS Highlights Dana's Rupert Murdoch doesn't understand climate change basics, and that's a problem understandably generated the most comments of the articles posted on SkS during the past week. Is global warming causing extreme weather via jet stream waves? by John Abraham attracted the second highest number of comments. Both articles are very topical and informative.   El Niño Watch A Super-Strong El Niño Is Now Off the Table. Here’s What That […]
+
6:41 AM | Nation's Birds at the Northwestern Corner of the Lower 48
Just a nice moment from my day. We were scouting out our impending field studies route with a trip to the Makah Nation's lands near Cape Flattery, the northwesternmost point of the lower 48 states. The Makah have a museum housing artifacts from America's version of Pompeii, a village that was overwhelmed by a mudflow about 500 years ago. The fine-grained mud protected and preserved fabrics and wood artifacts, which are usually quickly decayed in this wet environment.We were driving the […]
+
4:54 AM | Courtland Creek cut
Courtland Creek runs just south of High Street; presumably the valley was a footpath long before High Street was laid out in the 1800s. It has the peculiarity of crossing the old alluvial fan without cutting out a floodplain, as shown here in the geologic map. I visited it a few weeks ago. As you […]
+
12:58 AM | A meeting for the Kullorsuaq Community
It seems that many of the local fishermen have gone to hunt Narwal further north but there are several good prospects for boats that Søren will scout further as several of the fishermen are sleeping as the fishing is better right now at night. With 24 hours of daylight day or night fishing doesn’t really seem to matter.
+
12:34 AM | Field work travelog – Day 8, More section and hobby indulgence.
Today was a very productive day for us. We measured 213 meters of section, all the while collecting rock samples at 1.5 meter intervals. End result: lots of rock samples. It’s great to have a crew of myself and three … Continue reading →
123456789
546 Results