Posts

October 27, 2014

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12:35 AM | By the Fire
The RocNaNo blog offers weekly “Wordless Wednesday” writing challenges. The most recent challenge was to use this photo as a jumping-off place for a story. Let’s see where I get with this… Signs of change Winter is on its way. … Continue reading →

October 26, 2014

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5:47 PM | Tell us what you think: New blog content
A lot of what we post is very serious stuff, and although it’s critically important to discuss those issues, perhaps we could introduce some new, practical content; specifically, things that could be seen as more day-to-day, “lifestyle” topics for women.
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5:13 PM | Parvamussium cristatellum
Here is a picture of a Parvamussium cristatellum (Dautzenberg & Bavay, 1912) bivalve fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the Miocene Epoch of Neogene Period. At the museum it was labeled as Amussium cristatum aka Pecten cristatum (Bavay, 1905). Image taken in June 2014. Info Sources: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?
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4:43 PM | Bedding / cleavage relations in the Stephen Formation, Yoho NP
Good afternoon! Here are a few photos, both plain and annotated, showing the relationship between primary sedimentary bedding and tectonic cleavage in the “tectonised Stephen” Formation atop the Cathedral Escarpment (in Yoho National Park), just northeast of the Walcott Quarry where the (thicker, basinward) Stephen Formation hosts the Burgess Shale. Weathering exploits both these planes of weakness… Here, the cleavage is more planar at the bottom of the sample, and …
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4:28 PM | AZGS geologists will lead field trip to Sabino Canyon debris flows
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3:51 PM | Conflict sells
Here is Maria Gibson, the groundwater geek: Although research shows, on an international level, collaboration rather than conflict is the norm, most would agree “water collaboration” is far less exciting than “water wars”…. Via the always helpful Michael Campana, and more Gibson here.
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3:18 PM | Taking a short break--no post this week
I'm taking a short break. I expect to post again on Sunday, November 2.
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11:59 AM | After a busy summer, we have returned to the blogosphere…
Well, it has been a while since either of us has produced a GeologyJenga post, so first of all apologies on this front. We both have the same excuse – finishing our PhD theses! Our mutual deadline was 30 September 2014, and thankfully we both made it. The last few months were challenging at times […]
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11:48 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #43
SkS Highlights John Abraham's Another global warming contrarian paper found to be unrealistic and inaccurate garnered the most comments of the srticles posted on SkS during the past week. If you have not already checked it out, you will want to do so. Dr. John Abraham is a Professor of Thermal Sciences where he researches in climate monitoring and renewable energy generation for the developing world. His energy development work has extended to Africa, South America, and Asia. He […]
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7:19 AM | The Blind Men and the Elephant, as Told by Geologists: The Channeled Scablands of Washington
A dry channel in basalt on the Columbia Plateau in central Washington (photo by Mrs. Geotripper)I'm sure most are familiar with the parable of the blind men and the elephant. Several men investigate an elephant, but each touches a different part, so one describes it as being like a snake (the trunk), and others as a wall (the body), a rope (the tail), a fan (the ear), or a tree (the leg). The story of the Spokane Floods and Channeled Scablands of Washington is pretty much the Blind Men and […]
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4:14 AM | Adaptive capacity to the California drought
It’s often argued, and generally true, that municipal water use is less vulnerable to drought because cities can afford to pay more for water than farmers. But as U.C. Davis water researcher Amanda Fencl points out, the arrow of adaptive capacity doesn’t always point in that direction:   Key point about adaptive capacity to #cadrought- ...Continue reading ‘Adaptive capacity to the California drought’ »
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1:30 AM | Constellaria Bryozoan Fossil
Here is a picture of a Constellaria bryozoan fossil. It is known for its star like patterns on the fossil surface. Recently, it was found in Maysville, Kentucky, USA. The Upper Ordovician Period formations found at that location are Grant Lake (Maysvillian) and Bull Fork (Richmondian). Thanks to Kenny for the image. Past related blog posts: http://louisvillefossils.blogspot.com/2012/09/

October 25, 2014

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9:45 PM | Geo 730: October 25, Day 663: Surfing USA
I know squat about surfing, but I do know it has been getting more popular along the Oregon Coast over the last couple decades, and I've noticed that it's often on the south sides of major headlands. A woman I know- though I can't remember who- was dating a man who came to this spot, south of Devils Punchbowl, frequently. I'm guessing here, but my suspicion is that longshore drift, which is often north to south along the coast, moves sand away from the headland, deepening the water and allowing […]
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8:28 PM | Geo 730: October 24, Day 662: Faulty Tower
In the Devils Punchbowl area, the Astoria Formation is shot through with numerous, nearly vertical faults with small offsets- generally, just a couple inches. They're not obvious at the above photo scale, but more so in the full-size image. For a fracture to be declared a fault (as opposed to a joint), one must be able to show there was offset parallel to the plane of the fracture. Even in the full-size photo, many of the cracks in this view are questionable as faults, but it's much easier to […]
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5:16 PM | Penjing—in Oakland?
Havenscourt Boulevard is a handsome street—wide, with a row of large palms up one side and offering nice views of the Seminary gap and the low and high hills. Then there are the homes, where I spotted this creative use of a roof drain. The water runs down a chute to a stilling basin, where […]
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3:57 PM | A Lesson in Stopping Blight: Condemnation in Bellingham
The Aloha Motel in Bellingham could be considered a lesson on the great good the internet provides when researching a place to spend the night. Over the years a fair number of unsuspecting travelers have stumbled into Bellingham's not so great areas with the Aloha Motel being one of a string of crime ridden motels along the gateway entrance to my fair city.The City of Bellingham appears to be on the cusp of condemning this motel property on Samish Way (COB Condemnation Ordinance).  […]
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3:24 PM | GSA and the Biggs Award
The recently-concluded Geological Society of America meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, was one of my best meetings ever. I gave two talks and a digital poster, supervised three student digital posters and one student group regular poster, attended and contributed to meetings on a variety of subjects, met new colleagues, reunited with old friends, and even attended some stimulating science talks. Plans were hatched, ideas refined, projects discussed. Tuesday was …
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12:00 PM | Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (Oct. 25)
Autumn blossoms in the U.K., toxic sulfur boils near Sicily and high above the U.S. Southwest, an an aurora is captured from space.
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9:00 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #43B
Recently discovered microbe is key player in climate change Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly Recently discovered microbe is key player in climate change As permafrost soils thaw under the influence of global warming, communities of soil microbes act as potent amplifiers of global climate change, an international study has shown. Tiny soil microbes are among the world's biggest potential amplifiers of human-caused climate change, but whether microbial communities are […]
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12:10 AM | chain of custody
This is part 4 of my epic discussion on shipping environmental samples (see here and here and here for previous installments).Environmental samples are much like samples gathered as part of a criminal investigation: you need to prove that they were collected properly (that is, that they are representative of actual conditions) and that they have not been tampered with.The chain of custody involves two parts: keeping samples secure, and documenting the handover of samples.Sample security […]

October 24, 2014

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11:52 PM | Saying Good-bye to the Glaciers of Glacier National Park
The view north from Logan Pass in Glacier National ParkMake no mistake about it. Glacier National Park is one of the most spectacular parks in the United States, and indeed is one of my favorite places on planet Earth. That said, it's losing something important, and the change is profound.How many animals are in this picture?When I was a child, I loved museums, but I knew there was a big difference between seeing a stuffed animal in a quiet exhibit hall versus seeing one in the wild. A living, […]
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10:38 PM | Bárðarbunga volcano Friday update on 24-October-2014
This is the Friday update for Bárðarbunga volcano eruption. During the past 48 hours total (when this is written) of 69 earthquakes with magnitude of larger than 3,0 have happened in Bárðarbunga volcano. Total number of earthquakes in … Continue reading →
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9:51 PM | Vancouver Rain. Again.
October 17, 2014 Why does it seem to rain every time I go for a walk in Vancouver?  There has been precipitation on every day I have spent there on recent visits, even if it is sometimes just what the Irish would term a “grand, soft day.” For those of us who live elsewhere, this could be […]
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9:34 PM | Circumzenithal Arc over Maryland
The halo near the sun is at 22 degrees, and the bright spot to the left is a sundog (or more technically a Parahelia). Now, Look at the top of the pic, and you see something rather more rare: a CIRCUMZENITHAL ARC. I took the picture (with my newly arrived iPhone 6) just before 5 PM EDT (21 GMT) this Friday evening here in Salisbury,Maryland. The image below from Les …
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7:03 PM | Surveyor Digitization Project Will Bring Thousands of Unseen Lunar Images to Light
A team of scientists at the University of Arizona plan to digitize 87,000 vintage images from the surface of the moon, of which less than two percent have ever been seen.
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6:45 PM | Fossil Friday – Cretacous invertebrate donation
Last Wednesday, Hemet resident Jeanette Hughes visited the Western Science Center to donate a box of Cretaceous invertebrate fossils that she and her late husband Richard collected more than a decade ago in Texas. Most of the specimens in the … Continue reading →
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3:44 PM | The Ice Age Washington Coast
During the last glacial period sea level was significantly lower due to the fact that a lot of water was stored within the masses of glacial ice covering the northern latitudes. So if one lowers the sea level and uses current bathymetry the former coast can be estimated.  As can be readily seen after doing that exercise, the outer coast would have been on the order of 40 miles further out from the present day coast. It also shows that a fair bit of what is now covered by the Salish Sea […]
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3:37 PM | Tiny, Carbon-Scrubbing Champ Under Attack
Phytoplankton remove and store half the world's carbon, but they're under attack from rising ocean temperatures and viruses. Continue reading →
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3:33 PM | Friday fold: Three more from the Chancellor Slate
Remember our examination of buckle folding versus passive folding in the Chancellor Slate (cleaved limy mudrock) of eastern British Columbia? Well, here’s another example: There’s so much awesomeness going on in that image, it’s hard to know where to start. The prominent black thin layers are buckled in a very boxy, asymmetric way. In places, the layer is discontinuous, suggesting faulting or shortening via pressure solution. Note how the cleavage …
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2:00 PM | Friday Headlines: 10-24-14
Friday Headlines, October 24, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: California is DOOMED Deinocherus: Terrible Hands (Goofy Body) Turbidites: Nature’s Seismometers   Creep in 4 faults means big quake may be poised to hit With modern technology, … Continue reading →
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