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April 11, 2014

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2:50 AM | Via Nature podcast, Alex Witze on the grand pulse flow experiment
If I’d done the geek stuff right, hit the play button below to hear a really nice piece by Alex Witze of Nature magazine from the Colorado River delta pulse flow. (I know, it’s a magazine, this is audio. Brave new world and all.) If I haven’t done the geek stuff right, you can probably ...Continue reading ‘Via Nature podcast, Alex Witze on the grand pulse flow experiment’ » Related posts:Colorado “pulse flow”: fighting deeply held […]
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2:19 AM | It now looks like 2017 is the earliest we could see a shortage declaration on the Colorado River
The latest Bureau of Reclamation monthly basin operating report, out today (the “24-month study”, pdf), makes it increasingly clear that we’re not going to see Lake Mead drop to levels that would require a shortage declaration in 2016. The shortage is based on Lake Mead’s surface elevation, and the trigger level is 1,075 feet above sea ...Continue reading ‘It now looks like 2017 is the earliest we could see a shortage declaration on the Colorado River’ […]
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1:38 AM | Peter Sinclair interviewing Maureen Raymo
Another good video from Peter Sinclair on his YaleClimateForum YouTube channel: Maureen Raymo is an expert in paleo-climates.  This is probably the most informative climate science specialty when it comes to anticipating the final outcome of our global experiment in climate disruption.  The rapidity of the current change is outside the realm of anything previously…
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1:02 AM | Bet You Did Not Know This
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April 10, 2014

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11:31 PM | Help name the last phase of the Cassini mission!
The scientists on the Cassini team are incredibly excited about the final, "proximal orbit" phase of the mission. But they want a punchier name for it, and they're asking the public for help.
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10:44 PM | Will We Finally Rove Mawrth Vallis?
Mawrth Vallis was axed as a landing site for Curiosity, but will we get a chance to explore it with ESA's ExoMars rover?
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9:47 PM | Former NIH stem-cell chief joins New York foundation
Stem-cell biologist Mahendra Rao, who resigned last week as director of the US National Institutes of Health’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), has a new job. On April 9, he was appointed vice-president for regenerative medicine at the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), a non-profit organization that funds embryonic stem cell research.  Read more
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9:46 PM | Shatter Cones
Today I've been deeply preoccupied with cosmic impacts after reading a new paper that models a truly gigantic asteroid impact. The paper, in the journal Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, bristles with ...Read Full Post
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9:37 PM | More AAPG highlights
Here are some of our highlights from the second half of the AAPG Annual Convention in Houston. Conceptual uncertainty in interpretation Fold-thrust belt, offshore Nigeria. Virtual Seismic Atlas.Fold-thrust complex, deepwater Nigeria. Virtual Seismic Atlas.Rob Butler's research is concerned with the kinematic evolution of mountain ranges and fold thrust belts in order to understand the localization of deformation across many scales. Patterns of deformed rocks aren't adequately explained by […]
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8:16 PM | pulse flow progress
Courtesy of the folks at CILA, the Mexican boundary and water commission, the latest Colorado River pulse flow map shows water making it past the Laguna restoration sites in the Colorado River delta, continue its slow push toward the Sea of Cortez: Related posts:Updated Pulse Flow Map Following the flow Plumbing the pulse flow
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8:08 PM | Yutu Update
We don’t hear a lot at the moment about Chang’E 3 and Yutu, the Chinese lander and rover which were all over the news a few months ago. But Phil Stooke has been collecting news online and in person last month at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference and now tries to put it all together and address the current state of the mission.
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8:00 PM | Will drinking tea get us thinking about soils? Yes, but only if you help us spread the word!
Taru Lehtinen PhD candidate at the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland tmk2@hi.is The Tea Bag Index Project wants to create a global map on decomposition with the help of citizen scientists. We use teabags to collect vital information on the global carbon cycle. With our protocol (see our web page and […]
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7:00 PM | A Concise History of Geological Maps: Mapping Noah’s Flood
Sometimes a geological map supports an intriguing idea not by showing the rocks that are there, but by showing the rocks that aren’t there anymore, eroded by a flood of biblical proportions. “No one with an eye for land forms can cross eastern Washington in daylight without encountering and being impressed by the “scabland.” Like [...]
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7:00 PM | A Concise History of Geological Maps: Mapping Noah’s Flood
Sometimes a geological map supports an intriguing idea not by showing the rocks that are there, but by showing the rocks that aren’t there anymore, eroded by a flood of biblical proportions.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:41 PM | Mapping fantasy: The story behind the Game of Thrones geologic maps
Science fiction can be a really cool gateway for sharing science fact. Earth science is imaginative, and can draw on pop culture, like the HBO show Game of Thrones. My graduate school friend and Generation Anthropocene co-producer, Miles Traer, recently brought science fact and science fiction together over this show in a hilariously awesome and super fun project.
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5:44 PM | Are Himalayan Glaciers Retreating?
Open Access in Current Science- A remote sensing survey of 2018 glaciers across the Himalayan arc for the time period 2001 -2010 was carried out. Change in snout position was compared. The majority of glaciers over the last ten years show stable snout positions. About 12% show retreat and only 0.9% show advancement. Himalayan glaciers are retreating though. Studies that cover larger time periods have shown that studied glaciers have been in retreat over all of the last century with the largest […]
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5:00 PM | Geo 730: April 10, Day 466: Abstract II
A different angle on yesterday's shot. I've said before that what drew me to geology was the beauty of it. What rooted me in it was the awe I feel toward it, and the wonder I feel at being able to interpret the stories it's telling.Photo unmodified. July 10, 2012. FlashEarth location (approximate).
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4:47 PM | Transforming Urban Transport in Nairobi: CSUD Partners with Volvo Research and Educational Foundations
In an effort to strengthen and expand public transport in Nairobi, Kenya, the Volvo Research & Educational Foundations is partnering with the Center for Sustainable Urban Development on a new project to improve accessibility in the city.
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3:56 PM | Satellite Images Show Kansas in Flames
Kansas grasslands are burning, and these controlled burns will help preserve the prairies. Continue reading →
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3:31 PM | In Las Vegas, an acknowledgment that growth is gone
You can’t understand water in the west without understanding urban growth patterns. They’re joined at the hip. Here, in a single graph, is the explanation for the Vegas announcement yesterday that its two main water agencies are laying off 7.5 percent of their staff: Henry Brean explained it thus: The Southern Nevada Water Authority and ...Continue reading ‘In Las Vegas, an acknowledgment that growth is gone’ » Related posts:A change in the Vegas business […]
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2:58 PM | Reducing air pollution is key to public health
Air pollution caused by industry and other human-made sources is a determinant of health that continues to be largely overlooked despite its disastrous consequences. In 2012 the World Health Organization estimates that seven million people died as a result of pollutants in the air people breathe, this includes both indoor and outdoor air quality. While […]
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2:15 PM | Camp Dark Snow 2014
Today marks the end of this semester’s teaching and hopefully a return to both research activity and posting on TTP! Greenland 2014 has become a collaborative effort with team Dark […]
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2:00 PM | As gene therapy technologies blossom, ddRNAi tries to take root
Before there was Twitter, there was Facebook, and before that, Friendster. And who can forget MySpace? There’s a similar trend of successive usurping technologies in the fast-moving quest to develop therapeutics capable of modifying the genome. Since the late nineties, we’ve witnessed the rise of several gene-silencing approaches, from “antisense” oligonucleotides and RNA interference (RNAi) to the latest targeted genome-editing techniques, such as those based on zinc […]
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1:48 PM | The Casual Conversationalist Podcast Survey
Yesterday, I posted a survey to my social media followers with four simple questions about what they would like to see from my upcoming podcast. I’ve started putting together some shows and am working with an audio producer to develop and intro and outro to the show, so this is totally happening! The problem is…
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1:24 PM | Cups and crayons
After all the excitement of the ‘core on deck’ over the last 24 hours we are now on the move again. The drilling we did was an exploratory core for another expedition still in the planning stage. read more
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1:15 PM | Entrepreneurship with Steve Blank
In this month’s Windback Wednesday series, we’re exploring entrepreneurship: how to brush up on your business skills, where to get venture capital funding and more. In this podcast, I speak to Steve Blank, an associate professor at Stanford University engineering school, a lecturer at UC Berkeley Haas Business School, Columbia Business School and the University of California in San Fransisco (UCSF). On top of all of that, he is also a thought leader of […]
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1:00 PM | “I” is for Instamatic
“I” is for Instamatic, Kodak’s camera for 126 cartridge film Instamatics arose with the advent of 126 cartridge film. The cartridge made loading and unloading the camera very easy.   Reference: McKeown’s Price Guide to Antique and Classic Cameras, 12th … Continue reading →
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12:16 PM | Fusulinids and stylolites, Hueco Formation
My colleague Joshua Villalobos shared this image with me the other day – it’s a thin section of fusulinid-bearing limestone of the (Permian aged) Hueco Formation, from the Tom Mays Unit of Franklin Mountains State Park, Texas. Click to enlarge Note the scale bar at lower left. The big fusulinid in the middle is 3mm in diameter! And that’s not even it’s longest axis! Fusulinids were big honking burrito-shaped protists …
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11:00 AM | Geotalk: Claudia Cherubini and the art of characterising aquifers
This week in Geotalk, we’re talking to Claudia Cherubini, a research professor from La Salle Beauvais Polytechnic Institute. Claudia shares her work in hydrogeological modelling and delves into how such models can be used in water management… Could you introduce yourself and tell us a little about what you’re currently working on? I am an environmental […]
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6:16 AM | IPCC issue official rebuttal to more David Rose/Daily Mail nonsense
David Rose. That name rings a bell, huh? This was the guy who last year  manufactured an IPCC crisis meeting in the UK right-wing tabloid the Daily Mail, where he hangs out and writes pages of nonsense about climate science.  At Skeptical Science, as pointed out in the above link, we have previously pre-bunked and debunked and debunked again his articles on the subject of climate change, but he continues to appear oblivious to legitimate criticism of his work or, indeed, facts. In his […]
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