Posts

September 21, 2014

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11:44 PM | Upcoming MOOC makes sense of climate science denial
In collaboration with The University of Queensland, Skeptical Science is developing a MOOC, or Massive Online Open Course, that makes sense of climate science denial. The Denial101x MOOC will launch in March 2015 on the EdX platform. Registration has just opened so you can now register for free. Here is a description of the MOOC:   Denial101x: Making Sense of Climate Science Denial Climate change is real, so why the controversy and debate? Learn to make sense of the science […]
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6:44 PM | Geo 730: September 21, Day 629: Anniversary Beach
Here we're at Sutton Beach/Creek, a recreation area on Siuslaw National Forest land. We're looking north to the headlands between Florence and Yachats, which are composed of Yachats Basalt, about 35-30 million years old. I've just realized, looking through these photos, that I haven't included many of them from this area on this trip, although I did thoroughly cover a later stop at Cape Perpetua (April 8 to 28 in the Geo 365 Series), about 15 miles north of here. So there's geology in the […]
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4:31 PM | Another Side of Cedar Breaks
In the low desert of southern Utah these days, when mid–September temperatures not only approach triple digits but also have the audacity to linger there, it is time to head to the high country for a hike along the redrock near Cedar Breaks National Monument. It never hurts to bring along a few friends. Judy points out the blazes, so we must be going in the right direction. Soon views emerge of Cedar Breaks and the 50–million–year–old lake and river deposits of the […]
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3:17 PM | Women’s Confidence is Tied to Success
Evidence shows that women are less self-assured than men—and that to succeed, confidence matters as much as competence. Here’s why, and what to do about it. http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/04/the-confidence-gap/359815/Filed under: Retention, Women in the News Tagged: career, gender, women
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3:00 PM | Taking a short break--No post this week or next
I'm taking a short break this week and next and expect to post again on Sunday, October 5.
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7:21 AM | 2014 SkS Weekly Digest #38
"Today, we march... In Berlin, London, Amsterdam, Oslo, Rome, Stockholm, Paris, Madrid, Porto, Geneva, Ljubliana, Budapest and so many other places." - 350.0rg SkS Highlights As to be expected, Dana's The 97% v the 3% – just how much global warming are humans causing? garnered the most comments of the articles posted on Skeptical Science during the past week. Deciding who should pay to publish peer-reviewed scientific research by John Abraham attracted the second […]
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4:01 AM | Invertebrate of the Week #10 – Spiny Flower Mantis (Pseudocreobotra wahlbergii)
Meet the spectacular Spiny Flower Mantis (Pseudocreobotra wahlbergii) which hails from Africa. P. wahlbergii is a member of a polyphyletic group of mantises referred to as flower mantises which employ of […]
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1:30 AM | Granocardium Clam Fossil
The fossil appears to be Granocardium stantoni? pelecypod fossil. It existed during the Cretaceous Period (about 70 million years ago). This fossil was found in McNairy County, Tennessee (Ripley Formation). Fossils from this locality have an identification PDF at this LINK. Learn more about these fossils at the Coon Creek Science Center web site: http://www.memphismuseums.org/

September 20, 2014

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10:30 PM | Not-so-serious Sunday 49: Diatom Art
By Kelly It’s been such a long time since I posted a ‘tangentially related to geoscience’ post, but after seeing this clip I just couldn’t resist. Enjoy! The following text is taken directly from Vimeo where this video was sourced, … Continue reading →
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9:34 PM | Cattle, groundwater and “ecological subsidy” in Northern Mexico
In his book Political Ecologies of Cattle Ranching in Northern Mexico, geographer Eric Perramond offers a fascinating description of the linkages among choice of cattle breed, farm and ranch practices and the resulting groundwater levels in the Río Sonora of northern Mexico, with irrigated farm fields once used to grow food for human inhabitants now ...Continue reading ‘Cattle, groundwater and “ecological subsidy” in Northern Mexico’ »
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7:57 PM | 2014 SkS Weekly News Roundup #38B
2014 on track to be hottest year on record Arctic Sea Ice to reach sixth lowest extent on record China's dirty coal ban causes waves "If we want to prevent conflicts, we have to address climate change now" India's push for renewable energy: Is it enough? Latin America at a climate crossroads Michael Bloomberg presses the case for urban action Obama delays key power plant rule of signature climate change plan Prince Charles will tell leaders climate action is ‘only rational […]
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6:10 PM | Geo 730: September 20, Day 628: Anniversary Tyee
Four years ago today, I met Dana Hunter for the first time. We went up Marys Peak to get a good look at a transect of Oregon's Coast Range Geology. So I'm interrupting the current series in the Newport area for a couple of days. (The following day, we went to Florence and the headlands between Florence and Yachats.) Above, we see steeply dipping beds of Tyee Formation along Route 34, a couple miles east of Alsea Pass. This outcrop is close to the Corvallis Fault; it lies just to the west here, […]
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3:56 PM | Conkered?
Not perhaps entirely fair – it is a cartoon, after all – but I liked it (nicked from the Times, if you were wondering). I also feel somewhat critical of Salmond: with his shiniest toy taken away he’s chosen to walk off and leave others to sort out the mess. Perhaps. Is there a mess…
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3:35 PM | Haul Road Repaired Below Ross Dam
I got a brief view of the rock slide below Ross Dam at the upper end of Diablo Lake diablo-lake-rock-slide. The slide area was repaired by knocking down the loose stuff and remaining precarious rock and rerouting the access road outward a bit.   I happened to be taking in the view when the supply barge was pulling up to the upper end of the lake. The logistics of managing the Ross Dam power house and dam present some challenges. The same applies to […]
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9:34 AM | Dinosaur Provincial Park 2014
The Musings has been quiet again in part because I have changed jobs / cities yet again, but also with a general wind-up towards the start of teaching. This is now my third year at Queen Mary, but more importantly for me, I’m finally teaching on a course I have specifically created with a colleague […]
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7:36 AM | 50 Canadian climate researchers speak out in support of the People's Climate March
The Canadian government is hell-bent on exploiting the Alberta tar sands to the fullest extent possible, even at the expense of the global climate. Canada simply cannot meet its carbon pollution reduction pledges if it continues to expand tar sands operations. While the American government has finally begun to take the threat of climate change seriously and do something about it, the Canadian government has merely played lip service to the problem. 50 Canadian climate researchers have reached […]
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12:30 AM | Caecum Micro Sea Snail Shell
Here is a magnified image of a Caecum sp. sea gastropod shell. It was found in 2014 during a diving trip to Key West Florida, USA. The specimen was about 2 km off shore in about 5 meters under the water. I do not think this is a fossil. Viewed under microscope with a 3 mm field of view. Thanks to Kenny for the specimen and Herb for letting me use his microscope. Learn more at these sites:

September 19, 2014

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11:43 PM | Friday update on Bárðarbunga volcano
This information is going to get outdated quickly. This is also a Friday update and that means I won’t write new articles during the weekend. I am just going update this one with latest information. New article is … Continue reading →
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10:09 PM | NOAA: Hottest August On Record. Ocean Temperatures Smash Old Record
The NOAA, National Climate Data Center has released the global summary of temperatures this summer. It was the hottest June-August period on record, and August was also the hottest on record globally. Ocean temperatures were also hottest on record. NASA, and the Japanese Metr. Agency also compile the data (using a slightly different method ), and they also showed record temps. Here is the data from NCDC: Global Highlights The …
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9:23 PM | hotel rewards
I do have a preferred hotel "brand" - it's the one that I have a credit card for, and it has a pretty good money spent: reward ratio. I think it's best to pick one brand and stick with it, to the extent possible - otherwise, you dilute out all your rewards and never build up enough to collect anything.With that said, I still have a fistful of hotel rewards cards from other brands. Sometimes "my" hotel brand doesn't have a cheap enough option local to my fieldwork, or I've been outvoted by […]
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7:34 PM | Tanzania Launches Plan to Fight Climate Impacts on Agriculture
Vital Signs is a key part of Tanzania’s new Agriculture Climate Resilience Plan, which presents a strategy for sustainable agricultural development in the face of shifting rainfall patterns and other effects of a changing climate.
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6:07 PM | More jets from Rosetta's comet!
Another lovely view of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko contains jets. Bonus: Emily explains how to use a flat field to rid these glorious Rosetta NavCam images of faint stripes and specks.
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5:19 PM | Geo 730: September 19, Day 627: Faulty Cove
In this overview of the cove on the north side of Yaquina Head, we can see the fault-mediated cave on the west side, the smaller fault-mediated cave on the east, and we can see that these faults are essentially parallel to each other. This suggests that the cove itself is the result of a broad fault zone creating a weak brecciated area between the two walls, where wave action has managed to erode out the broken rock. Though a casual tourist is not in a position to do so, what further […]
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4:47 PM | Why This Climate Scientist Is Taking to the Streets
In my early years I didn’t talk about the politics of global warming much. I didn’t bring it up with friends or family, let alone engage in any public way. It seemed to me unseemly for a scientist to be vocal on a political issue related, even indirectly, to his own research. Wouldn’t that be an indication of bias, of a lack of scientific impartiality? But I have changed my mind.
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3:18 PM | Scottish winter weather
Following on from my previous post about September weather, it seems appropriate (for my research and blog) to look at winter weather specifically for Scotland. This post again uses Met Office data. I… Continue reading →
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3:00 PM | Friday Headlines: 9-19-14
Friday Headlines, September 19, 2014 THE LATEST IN THE GEOSCIENCES   Today’s round-up: An aquatic dinosaur! Eruptions in the Philippines What started plate tectonics?   Giant Spinosaurus Was Bigger Than T. Rex—And First Dinosaur Known to Swim Spinosaurus is an … Continue reading →
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2:35 PM | Pulling secrets from deep-sea, drillbit-eating rocks
Amy West is the science writer and outreach and education officer for the JOIDES Resolution, a drill ship operated by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) that is on a two-month expedition studying the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc in the region where the Pacific Plate is descending under the Philippine Plate to form the Mariana Trench and the deepest point in the ocean–the Challenger Deep. This is her latest blog post about the expedition.
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2:00 PM | Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (Sept. 20)
Check out some of the coolest images of the planet from space and below.
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1:57 PM | Going on a rock cruise
A trio of two-month expeditions in 2014 will be in the region where the Pacific Plate is descending under the Philippine Plate to form the Mariana Trench and the deepest point in the ocean–the Challenger Deep. Scientists will get under the skin of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc, which stretches nearly the distance from Los Angeles to Chicago
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1:30 PM | Nearly 600 Years of Tree Rings Show Altered Ocean Habitat
Data records spanning almost 600 years have shown that the strength of coastal upwelling off the west coast of North America has become more variable since 1950.
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