Posts

October 02, 2014

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1:30 AM | Castanea Plant Fossil
Here is a picture of a Castanea kubinyi plant leaf fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Plants like this existed at the time of the Miocene Epoch of the Neogene Period. The fossil was found in S. Angelo, Senigaglia, Marche Italy. Image taken in June 2014.

October 01, 2014

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7:34 PM | Geo 730: October 1, Day 639: Over the Sea Wall
This is an odd perspective, but we're looking directly over the edge of the sea wall in downtown Depoe Bay. You can see a bit of the wall along the upper right edge of the photo. This is a fairly wide-angle shot, so in the bottom right, we're looking almost straight down; up and to the left, we're looking progressively closer to horizontal. But what are we looking at? These are pillows of Columbia River Basalt, from flows that made it all the way across the state, to the edge of the Pacific […]
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2:40 PM | The Incredible Arizona Monsoon of 2014
I can honestly say that it was the summer clouds that drew first to Arizona. Growing up in California, we had some nice clouds but nothing like the power and size of a summer desert cloud.Friend John P. forwarded this link to me - an amazing 7 minute video by Bryan Snider that captures the power and beauty of the just concluded Arizona monsoon. Check it out here. You will be amazed!In his own words:"It was incredible, epic, amazing," said Snider, a founding member of Arizona Storm Chasers who […]
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12:21 PM | New and Improved Ice Loss Estimates for Polar Ice Sheets
In a previous post, several years ago, I discussed the various ways that we measure changes in the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Today, scientists still use these main methods for identifying ice changes but recent technological and data processing advances have improved the accuracy of these estimates. An example of this is the CryoSAT-2 satellite system which was launched 4 years ago by the European Space Agency and is now giving early results on the state of the two polar ice sheets. […]
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11:33 AM | Science haiku to communicate research and more
NOAA is doing it. Even the entire IPCC Report was boiled down to 19 illustrated haiku. Can science-themed haiku be used for education & outreach, or just for fun?
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9:21 AM | I am now a “famous palaeontologist” … thanks to my antlers
Just over a year ago, in his write-up of the Edinburgh SVPCA, Matt included a photo of me standing in front of a Giant Irish Elk (Megaloceros), positioned so that the antlers seem to be growing out of my head. Matt finished his post with a background-free version of that photo, and commented: … so he […]
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9:13 AM | Geophysical Surveys on Glaciers
Yesterday, I took a group of enthusiastic third year geologists and environmental scientists to the British Geological Survey in Keyworth for a tour of the facilities and discussion/demonstration of their geophysical […]
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9:04 AM | Environmental Management Centre Research Group
Paulo Pereira pereiraub@gmail.com Mykolas Romeris University, Lithuania The Environmental Management Centre The Environmental Management Centre (EMC) was founded in 2013 at Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius, Lithuania. The group is composed by young and proactive researchers from the entire world. The centre has an interdisplinary vision of science and aims to connect environmental, sociological and economical questions, […]
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8:59 AM | Extremes report 2013: NZ drought and record Aussie heat made worse by warming
The latest climate extremes report finds that 9 out of 16 extreme weather events from last year were influenced by climate change. In particular, the conditions that led to New Zealand’s severe North Island drought — the worst for 41 years, estimated to have cost the economy NZ$1.3 billion — were made more likely by […]
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2:59 AM | For this one tree, autumn
What makes the first tree decide, “OK, now’s the time to turn.”
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2:10 AM | Notes on Turtleback Complex and an Old Oak
Turtleback ComplexThis bit of Turtleback Complex is from the southwest of Orcas Island. The Geologic Map of the Washington Portion of the RocheHarbor1:100,000 Quadrangle, Washington (Logan, 2003) indicates the bedrock where this sample was picked up is pre Devonian intrusive rocks of the Turtleback Complex. Much of the Logan (2003) map in the vicinity of the property is derived from mapping and rock descriptions of Vance (1975). Logan notes a lead/uranium date from a […]

September 30, 2014

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10:31 PM | Geosonnet 12
The oxidation of the atmosphere, And buffered ocean water do record Life’s radiation into a frontier. When proxies tell this tale, they are adored. While sulfur oxidation can detect Stagnation deep in Neptune’s dusky realm, A noisy delta S makes us suspect Metabolism signals overwhelm. Portentous albatross foresaw the brine, Which makes the sea the beverage of the dead, Has sulfate
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10:00 PM | Soils at Imaggeo: fire watch constellation
Egle Rackauskaite, Xinyan Huang and Guillermo Rein HazeLab, Imperial College London, UK Winner of the Best Fire Science Image, 11th IAFSS Symposium, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2014 Description This composite shows a constellation of combined visual and infrared imaging of a smouldering combustion front spreading radially over a thin sample of dry peat. The central watch […]
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9:49 PM | Bárðarbunga volcano daily update 30-September-2014
This information is going to change quickly if anything happens in Bárðarbunga volcano. Current status in Bárðarbunga volcano at 21:49 UTC There is no signs of the eruption in Holuhraun is about to end. Currently there are only … Continue reading →
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7:58 PM | Geo 730: September 30, Day 638: Cobble Beach
I've already covered Yaquina Head to an extent in this series (See The Index, and scroll down to Yaquina Head, at the bottom), so for this segment of this particular trip back in July, I had intended to focus pretty much exclusively on observations and features I haven't discussed and shown earlier. However, in yesterday's post, I mentioned the cobble beach here, so I decided I should show a companion photo to illustrate my point.Panorama stitched in HugIn. July 15, 2014. FlashEarth Location.
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7:15 PM | Climate Change Linked to Extreme Weather in 2013
Man-made climate change stoked some of 2013's most extreme heat on the planet, a new report shows.
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6:51 PM | Solite Excavation: Day 8
Day 8 of the excavation at Solite treated us to a number of Tanytrachelos specimens in varying conditions of preservation. In my opinion, the most interestingly preserved Tany. was the one above. The vertebrae of the tail are lying on their sides … Continue reading →
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6:21 PM | Single-Use Plastic Bags to Be Banned in California
Environmentalists rejoice: The single-use plastic bag will soon be no more in the entire state of California. Continue reading →
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6:07 PM | More LightSail Day-in-the-Life Multimedia, and a Community Image Processing Challenge
We have more multimedia from LightSail's day-in-the-life test, as well as a request for some community image processing help.
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5:40 PM | Scientists use fiber-optic cables to measure ice loss in Antarctic
Fiber-optic cables like the ones that bring television and Internet into millions of homes are now being used to measure how fast ice shelves in Antarctica are melting, according to new research. Researchers installed moorings containing fiber-optic cables hundreds of meters down into the McMurdo Ice Shelf in West Antarctica to collect temperature information about the base of the ice shelf, where the thick platform of floating ice meets the ocean. The sensors were able to measure mere […]
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4:37 PM | Not picking parameters
I like socks. Bright ones. I've liked bright socks since Grade 6. They were the only visible garment not governed by school uniform, or at least not enforced, and I think that was probably the start of it. The tough boys wore white socks, and I wore odd red and green socks. These days, my favourites are Cole & Parker, and the only problem is: how to choose? Last Tuesday I wrote about choosing parameters for geophysical algorithms — window lengths, velocities, noise levels, and so on. […]
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4:03 PM | Up close and personal with a volcanic eruption
Thorbjorg Agustsdottir, a Ph.D. student studying seismology at the University of Cambridge, had the rare opportunity to witness a volcanic eruption up close when Iceland’s Bardarbunda volcano erupted while she and fellow researchers were servicing seismometer stations around the volcano.
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3:41 PM | Turn’s out water is for fighin’ over after all?
From Texas: A feud over a water well is blamed for a violent confrontation in Santa Fe, according to the Galveston County Sheriff’s Office. I stand corrected.  
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3:31 PM | Things to Make and Do, Part 14: sheep skull
Just a quick photo-post today. A couple of months ago, walking around the fields near our house, I found a broad shallow pit with a lot of a sheep skeletal elements in it. I took my youngest son out on an expedition, and we rescued the good material. I’ve cleaned up the first two (of three) […]
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3:22 PM | Advice for the next Newbie....
I was going to leave this in the room for the next person (a personal “crossover”) but they’re going in for service before the next Expedition, so I’m putting it here and hopefully the next newbie will look: Advice from a Scientist Departing his first IODP Expedition Preparing… --Bring no more than five days worth of clothing. Great, quick laundry service! read more
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3:01 PM | A Drone’s Eye View of Another Active Japanese Volcano
The day before Japan’s Ontake volcano blew its top, Lamont volcanologist Einat Lev visited Shinmoedake, another active volcano in Japan, to film the aftermath of a recent eruption there. Three years after Shinmoe came to life with a steam explosion similar to Ontake’s, the volcano continues to spew poisonous sulfur dioxide gas.
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2:48 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: on public discussion in water politics, Gila edition.
From the morning paper, a column about the importance of putting all the data on the table for a public discussion as we try to make collective decisions about our water future. (This is about the Gila River in New Mexico). The argument here is technical, and I don’t expect you to be able to ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: on public discussion in water politics, Gila edition.’ »
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12:39 PM | German Pecopteris Pine Cone Fossil
Here is a picture of a Pecopteris acuta pine cone fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Plants like this existed at the time of the Carboniferous Period. The fossil was found in Essen, Germany. Image taken in June 2014.
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12:21 PM | Sculpting Tropical Peaks
Max Cunningham, a graduate student at Lamont-Doherty, traveled to Costa Rica's Mount Chirripó this past summer to test the idea that mountain glaciers carved the summit we see today. He and his colleagues hope to eventually pin down when Chirripó's high-elevation valleys eroded into their current form. Check out a recap of their 2014 field season.
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7:24 AM | The Devil In The Climate Change Details
  Greenland is melting, the oceans are warming, the sea is rising (and becoming more acidic), and the Arctic sea ice is in a serious decline (that seems to be faster than predicted). These are all things that those who work in climate science understand and accept. They also accept that they are almost certainly being caused by rising greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. Yes, large portions of the public may not …
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