Posts

August 22, 2014

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4:48 PM | Robots aren't taking our jobs -- but they are creating a wider gap between the haves and have-nots.
Robots aren't taking our jobs — but they are creating a wider gap between the haves and have-nots. This is the intriguing argument of MIT economics professor David Autor, which you can read about in the Wall Street Journal today.Read more...
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4:48 PM | U.S. Geologist Discovers Earth-Like Soils on Mars
Paleosols (ancient fossilized soils) filling the Yellowknife Bay geologic formation within the 3.7-billion-year-old Gale Crater on Mars are strong evidence that the planet was once much warmer and wetter, says geologist Dr Gregory Retallack of the University of Oregon, based on images recently released by NASA. “The images, taken by NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover, reveal [...]
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4:39 PM | If You're Too Sick To Fly, Airlines Might Not Offer A Refund
Airlines have the right to refuse a passenger suspected of having Ebola. But if you're sick with a contagious disease, what are your rights when it comes to canceling and refunds?
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4:30 PM | Today on New Scientist
All the latest on newscientist.com: how to see the world as a baby, China's net censors, short fiery lives of first stars, chimp empathy and more
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4:30 PM | Nestle Nudges Its Suppliers To Improve Animal Welfare
The world's largest food company is requiring all of its suppliers of dairy, meat, poultry and egg products to comply with tighter animal welfare standards. Animal rights groups applaud the move.
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4:25 PM | Your Driving Speed Is All That's Needed To Track Your Car
Your insurer could soon know a lot more than how fast you drive.
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4:16 PM | Watch: Grouper Slurps Down A Shark, Not A Typical Meal
A massive grouper gobbles down a shark in one bite. The unfortunate victim seems to have been a meal of opportunity rather than part of a steady diet, according to an expert.
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4:15 PM | The Future Of Urban Planning: Zoning For Drones
Drone Zones At Human Level Mitchell Sipus A century ago, as cars first emerged into the world, cities and laws that were designed for horses suddenly had to adapt to a whole new presence in their space. Cities didn’t know how to handle these fast machines, and fatal accidents in the early age of cars led to legal battles between pedestrians and cars over who had the right to the road. Now,  commercial drones are approaching their Model-T moment, and planners can get ahead […]
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4:12 PM | Scientists Searching For Alien Air Pollution
Looking for extraterrestrial smog may be a good way to search for alien intelligence, according to a Harvard researcher.
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4:11 PM | Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself
Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks.
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3:16 PM | Who Will Save the Last Primary Forests on Earth?
By Brendan Mackey and James Watson It’s now or never if the world’s surviving primary forests are to be saved. Will the international community act or continue to turn a blind eye to our planet’s key life support systems? Despite their shortcomings, international environmental agreements can provide incentives for national governments and land custodians to turn back the tide of forest destruction. Primary forests, however, remain invisible in forest policy debates and […]
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3:11 PM | What Rosetta can tell us about life on Earth
On August 6th, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft reached the end of its 10-year journey: 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a comet currently hovering in the distance between Mars and Jupiter. While Rosetta’s mission will naturally help scientists understand more about the nature of comets- how they form, what they’re made of, and how old they really are- several of the questions scientists are hoping to answer will actually have the most impact on how we understand how […]
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3:10 PM | Journal that “suffered” from plagiarism purges itself
When Pharmacy Practice found out it had been victimized by plagiarists, it apparently took the news personally — and to heart. In an elaborate statement with more than a dozen references — but not one to the plagiarizing work — the journal lashed out against the behavior of word thieves, and described the discovery as […]
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3:10 PM | Updates From the North Woods
Guest post by Eric Larson, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium Where Am I? I’m working predominantly in Vilas County, Wisconsin out of the University of Notre Dame’s Environmental Research Center (UNDERC), as well as doing some research at the University of Wisconsin’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on Trout Lake. Off the football field,…
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3:04 PM | Jungle Book: Origins (Starring Batman)
Did you know they’re* making a new Jungle Book movie? Well, they are. And you’ll never guess who they’re getting to make it. In a bold, brave, possibly ingenious move they have given the project to none other than Gollum. Personally, I think he’s going to use the new power and wealth to increase his […] The post Jungle Book: Origins (Starring Batman) appeared first on HeadStuff.
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3:00 PM | Christian Attempts to Outlaw Boobies in Ohio
Categories: ReligionSupport more videos like this on Patreon! Keep the Thor in Thursday tee available here (don’t forget to take 50% off with the code “hellyeah50″ for a limited time!)! Transcript: ...(Read more...)
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3:00 PM | San Francisco Wants to Know: Is Your Living Room Window Killing Migratory Birds?
Between 100 million and one billion birds die each year from colliding with glass windows of commercial or residential buildings. San Francisco is launching a program to track the damage caused by windows in homes.
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3:00 PM | Shortcuts to an infant-like view on the world
Psychoactive stimulants such as caffeine and magic mushrooms may to some extent revert the brain to an infant-like state
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2:45 PM | Superwhite Beetles, Spongy Brain Models And Other Amazing Images Of This Week
Unfathomably Pasty Beetles Imagine the color white. Make it whiter. These beetles are even whiter than that. Natives of Southeast Asia, the Cyphochilusbeetles camouflage to the white of the fungus commonly found in their habitat. But they do the color white so much better than any engineer has been able to. Their bodies are made of chitin, the same compound in a lobster shell with a function similar to that of keratin in the human body (it's in your skin, hair and nails). The filaments are […]
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2:39 PM | Robert Aumann: Lessons from game theory for humans as collectives
By treating collectives like individuals, game theory can explain how we apportion moral blame for events such as the My Lai massacre. Treating collective groups such as countries and workplaces the same as individuals is important not just for game theory but for our view of moral responsibility, according to Nobel Laureate Robert Aumann. Presenting […]
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2:25 PM | Eggs, Milk And Ink: Venezuela Wants All Supermarket Shoppers Fingerprinted
The government hopes to clamp down on rampant cross-border smuggling of government-subsidized staples that has caused shortages on the country's store shelves.
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2:23 PM | Flashback Friday: Why watching cooking shows could sabotage your diet.
With their close-ups of food and attractive hosts, shows on the Food Network and other cooking channels have been likened to pornography – and some even have the music and camerawork to go along with it. But do these shows also resemble porn by making viewers want to participate in the action? Here, researchers tested […]The post Flashback Friday: Why watching cooking shows could sabotage your diet. appeared first on Seriously, Science?.
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2:15 PM | Botox blitz could work against stomach cancers
When you think of botox, you are more likely to imagine it smoothing skin than fighting cancer, but the toxin could be effective against stomach tumours
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2:06 PM | In Riots Sparked By An Ebola Quarantine, A Teen Is Shot And Dies
Protesters were on the move. Soldiers fired. A teenage boy suffers wounds to both legs. For half an hour, no one could find an ambulance and no one came to care for him.
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2:04 PM | Who Owns A Monkey's Selfie? No One Can, U.S. Says
The U.S. Copyright Office says a monkey's photo can't be copyrighted — by the person who owns the camera or by anyone else — because it wasn't taken by a human.
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2:02 PM | Chimps show empathy by mimicking pupil size
Humans and chimps both involuntarily mimic pupil dilation in others – but only if those others are members of the same species
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2:00 PM | Evidence-based parenting: the perks and perils of combining a science writing career with raising children  
One of the job hazards of science writing is that our work gives us plenty to fret about.  Whether about climate change, the rise of antibiotic resistance or the mysterious […] The post Evidence-based parenting: the perks and perils of combining a science writing career with raising children   appeared first on The Science Writers' Handbook.
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2:00 PM | ESA’s Rosetta Spacecraft Makes a First-Ever Comet Rendezvous
The European Space Agency’s (ESA) Rosetta has reached its target -- the Comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko -- becoming the first spacecraft in history to rendezvous with a comet.
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2:00 PM | 5 Very Good Questions
Nature has published a comment by William P. Hanage suggesting ways to inoculate oneself against the hype associated with the burgeoning field of microbiome studies. As Bethany Brookshire (aka, SciCurious) notes, these questions should be applied to any and all research, not just … Continue reading →
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1:45 PM | Gamers Reveal The Inner Workings Of The Eye
The human retina at 480x magnification. A player's map in EyeWire is 4.1 micrometers wide -- 1/20 the width of a human hair. Louise Hughes/Science Photo Library The human retina allows the eye to follow the path of a moving object, such as a Ping-Pong ball in play. Neuroscientists have been toiling for 50 years to explain how, but they lack the processing power to map the eye’s neural network. (With today’s cutting-edge modeling software, 100 people would have to work […]
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