Posts

August 29, 2014

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1:30 PM | Second retraction appears for former University of Florida ob-gyn subject to ORI probe
Nasser Chegini, an ob-gyn formerly on the faculty at the University of Florida who has been the subject of an Office of Research Integrity (ORI) inquiry for several years, has a second retraction. Chegini is suspected of having used bogus data in some of his work — research backed in part by some $4 million […]
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1:30 PM | Emailing angry? Your keyboard feels your pain
By measuring the way you are typing, a computer program can detect how you are feeling with 80 per cent accuracy
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1:09 PM | Volcanoes In Iceland, Papua New Guinea Keep Residents On Edge
Two eruptions a half a world apart have caused evacuations and aviation warnings, but so far no injuries.
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1:02 PM | Quickies: Face mites, megadroughts, and exoplanets
Categories: QuickiesYou’ve got face mites – A great article by Bug Girl including a face mite gif and a photo of a face mite penis. Australian federal ministers urged to boycott ...(Read more...)
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1:00 PM | New Music Friday | 11
Featuring new music from: Jenny Gillespie | J Mascis | Dearly Beloved | Empire! Empire! (I Was A Lonely Estate) | Vukovi |             Artist: Jenny Gillespie Song: Holi   Artist: J Mascis Song: Every Morning   Artist: Dearly Beloved Song: Astor Dupont Payne   Artist: Empire! Empire! (I Was […] The post New Music Friday | 11 appeared first on HeadStuff.
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1:00 PM | Getting Started With the Printrbot Simple Metal
Norm and I kicked off July by building a 3D printer, the Printrbot Simple Metal It was the third printer we’ve built, and it was interesting building a printer with a metal frame, but once we got it assembled and did a couple of test prints, we didn’t have time to touch it for a month. I’ve spent much of the last week dialing in the printer, figuring out its nuances, and getting decent prints out of it. We’ll do a Tested In-Depth video with it at some point in the […]
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1:00 PM | Beautiful spiral cracks could be a feature, not a flaw
Unusually uniform, watercolour-like fractures that form in high-tech materials could be used to manufacture micro-patterned surfaces
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1:00 PM | Big Pic: Stunning Images From The Worlds Sharpest Commercial Satellite
Madrid From Space. DigitalGlobe The WorldView-3 satellite, which launched on August 13, has sent back its first images. They’re gorgeous, and kind of creepy. The new satellite can see to a resolution of 31 centimeters. That means each pixel of the camera captures one square foot of land, which is sharp enough to see home plate at Yankee Stadium, to map crops by pattern and type, to identify the type and speed of cars and trucks, and measure population density, all from […]
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12:53 PM | Plea To Ferguson's Leaders: To Help Heal, Acknowledge Our Hurt
NPR's Michel Martin was invited by St. Louis Public Radio to moderate an intensely emotional community conversation around race, police tactics and leadership.
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12:45 PM | Archaeologists discover Bronze Age wine cellar in Israel
Archaeologists excavating a Canaanite palace in Israel have discovered an ancient wine cellar. Descrier - news and culture magazine
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12:43 PM | from church bells to dumbbells
Katherine Hunt at Cabinet Magazine: In an article in the Spectator in July 1711, the eponymous character Mr. Spectator—as written by Joseph Addison, one of the magazine’s founders—described his exercise routine. When in town, and therefore not able to go...
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12:41 PM | Women’s Shadow in the American Western
Thirza Wakefield at Granta: ‘You want to talk about the vanishing wilderness?’ These are the opening words of John Boorman’s Deliverance (1972), spoken by Burt Reynolds’ character Lewis, the only self-declared outdoorsman among four Atlanta men headed for a canoeing...
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12:34 PM | john Williams' "Augustus"
Daniel Mendelsohn at The New York Review of Books: How to write about such a figure? In Augustus, the question is slyly put in the mouth of the emperor’s real-life biographer Nicolaus. “Do you see what I mean,” the confounded...
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12:31 PM | Hodgkin, Who and hospital food - blogs roundup
Posts on the network this week included a look at the work of Yoshiki Sasai, footage of celebrity wolves, and in-depth coverage from the largest ever summit on scientific adviceWelcome to Signal Boost, our weekly roundup of blog posts over the past week. Continue reading...
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12:09 PM | U.N.: Syrian Refugee Crisis Is 'Biggest Humanitarian Emergency Of Our Era'
The number of refugees from the Syrian civil war is on the verge of surpassing 3 million, the United Nations said. Almost half of all Syrians have been forced out of their homes.
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12:00 PM | Scientists Identify Key Diabetes Enzyme
The disease diabetes mellitus results from the inability of the pancreas to produce insulin for the body. In the most common form of diabetes (Type II), this lack of insulin can start from diet rich is in fatty foods that may cause a person to become overweight to a point where the beta cells in the pancreas can no longer function correctly. Fortunately, scientists have figured out what causes the majority of the damage to the beta cells on a molecular level. Scientists have put the blame […]
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11:40 AM | The Scottish Lion
The Scottish Lion   After work the men arrive to swap work stories war stories sex & pussy stories. Stories where girls do things with their mouths you never thought girls could do.   A lewd fraternity, not unlike our mothers’ quilting bees. But men replace needles and tea for stained bills and beer. Where […] The post The Scottish Lion appeared first on HeadStuff.
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11:33 AM | Giant, fertile city spiders: behind the scenes
I was excited to see the attention around an interesting spider-focused paper published in PLOS last week, titled "Urbanisation at Multiple Scales Is Associated with Larger Size and Higher Fecundity of an Orb-Weaving Spider" by Lizzy Lowe, Shawn Wilder, and Dieter Hochuli. This work ignited creativity in headlings around the world, including things like "City living makes spiders big, fat and fertile, researchers say" or "Our hot, bright cities are spawning gigantic spiders". Lowe et al. looked […]
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11:30 AM | The Closest Known Exoplanet? Maybe…
In 1992, the first planets outside the solar system were discovered, orbiting the dead cinder of a supernova. Three years later, 51 Peg was found, the first exoplanet orbiting a Sun-like star. Now, after a decade of searching, we have a roster of nearly 2000 such planets, alien worlds circling alien stars. They come in many varieties, with some being huge, Jupiter-like behemoths, and others far closer in size to our own hospitable planet. We’ve found them around distant stars hundreds of […]
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11:15 AM | Brand new brain myths to keep neurobloggers in work | Dean Burnett
The recent release of Susan Greenfields new book and the film Lucy, both of which are dependent on tired misconceptions or dubious theories about the brain, suggest one worrying conclusion: we are running out of myths about the brain. So here are some new ones, to keep things mysterious One of the best things about being a neuroscientist used to be the aura of mystery around it. It was once so mysterious that some people didnt even know it was a thing. When I first went to university and people […]
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11:04 AM | About a Blog
In his early collection of miscellaneous writing Paperweight, Stephen Fry includes a column from The Listener called Absolutely Nothing At All, about… writing a column. He prefaces it in the book with the excuse, “Journalist friends tell me that columnists are allowed to write one column of this nature once in their lives.” On the assumption that bloggers get the same allowance, here we go… * I’ve had this post largely worked out in my head for several weeks. […]
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11:00 AM | Flashback Friday: Science proves right-handers are jocks, left-handers are nerds, and ambidextrous people love making pot holders.
What does your handedness say about you? Well, according to this study, it can predict what you like to do in your free time. Although the scientists didn’t determine whether one’s handedness was a cause or a result of one’s hobby preferences, it’s pretty clear that common stereotypes seem to hold out… at least when […]The post Flashback Friday: Science proves right-handers are jocks, left-handers are nerds, and ambidextrous people love making pot holders. […]
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11:00 AM | Feedback: Tipping the quantum scales
The appliance of science, fake delusions equal profit, sinister buttocks in essays and more (full text available to subscribers)
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10:58 AM | Ukrainian Prime Minister Says Government Will Seek NATO Membership
Arseniy Yatsenyuk said Kiev was sending a bill to parliament to get the process rolling. Meanwhile, NATO held an emergency meeting to discuss further Russian incursion into Ukrainian territory.
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10:44 AM | Friday Poem
The Clothes Shrine In the early days to find Light white muslin blouses On a see-through nylon lone Drip-drying in the bathroom Or a nylon slip in the shine of its own electricity- As if St, Brigid once more Had...
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10:00 AM | Gratitude for help among adult friends and siblings
Anna Rotkirch in Evolutionary Psychology: Although gratitude is a key prosocial emotion reinforcing reciprocal altruism, it has been largely ignored in the empirical literature. We examined feelings of gratitude and the importance of reciprocity in same-sex peer relations. Participants were...
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9:58 AM | Cadet Impressions: Tech Entrepreneurs in Tanzania Part 3
During our visit to Dar es Salaam, the cadets on my team, Molly Prins, Jake Moffatt, and Charlie Braman, spent time interacting with, and interviewing young tech entrepreneurs. These interviews are the raw data input for our “Developing Network Models … Continue reading →
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9:18 AM | Etching the Neural Landscape
Greg Dunn in American Scientist: Both art and science arise from our root desires to describe our experience of reality. From this starting point, the artistic and scientific paths diverge. Science describes external reality, about which we share a consensus....
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9:12 AM | Makerbot Mystery Build: Beware the Vertices
No summary available for this post.
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9:11 AM | James Mirrlees: Interesting, important taxation
#LindauEcon14 participant Terhi Ravaska on the relevance of optimal Taxation theory to policy making. From the press to family dinner tables taxation causes a lot of debate. Most often the opinion is that tax rates are too high and wrong people are taxed. Some think that capital and wealth should be heavily taxed, others see that […]
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