Posts

December 17, 2014

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7:00 PM | SciFri Book Club: Vote for a Book to Beat the Winter Blues
No summary available for this post.
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7:00 PM | Picture of the Week: Mechanical Calculator
No summary available for this post.
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6:45 PM | Blogging for Science Outreach, Blogging for Myself
A few weeks ago, I blogged about a new paper that came out in Public Understanding of Science on science bloggers’ practices, motivations and target audiences. In the paper, Mathieu Ranger and Karen Bultitude interviewed seven authors of popular science blogs. Among their findings, most of the bloggers they interviewed cited personal motivations to blog about science: “The most commonly reported motivation was intrinsic in nature, […]
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6:45 PM | Blogging for Science Outreach, Blogging for Myself
A few weeks ago, I blogged about a new paper that came out in Public Understanding of Science on science bloggers’ practices, motivations and target audiences. In the paper, Mathieu Ranger and Karen Bultitude interviewed seven authors of popular science blogs. Among their findings, most of the bloggers they interviewed cited personal motivations to blog about science: “The most commonly reported motivation was intrinsic in nature, […]
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6:40 PM | How to Get Into Hobby RC: Building Foam Airplanes
Electric airplanes made of molded foam are very popular in the RC world right now. While this class of airplanes used to be limited to small models with modest power, there is seemingly no limit to the size and power handling of modern “foamies”. Perhaps the largest contributor to their popularity is the marginal effort that’s required to assemble an attractive and nice-flying foam model. There are, however, some things to be aware of, and habits you should develop to court […]
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6:31 PM | Prisoner Exchange With Cuba Led To Freedom For Top U.S. Intelligence Agent
President Obama called the unnamed man "one of the most important intelligence agents that the United States has ever had in Cuba." The agent spent nearly two decades in a Cuban prison.
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6:30 PM | Managed Care Plans Make Progress In Erasing Racial Disparities
Though blacks still lag whites nationwide in health, disparities have been largely eliminated in the western states, a study finds. Kaiser Permanente's Medicare HMOs did best on that.
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6:30 PM | What’s So Scary About A Nuclear-Armed Drone?
It's a plane designed for the war no one wants to fight. The Long Range Strike Bomber is the Air Force’s secretive and long-running project to develop the next generation of nuclear-armed bombers, designed to unload hell in hostile skies. And there's a chance that it'll be optionally manned, allowing it to fly some missions as a drone. Sounds pretty terrifying, right? Well, despite years of advancement in unmanned technology, military brass isn’t comfortable trusting a drone […]
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6:30 PM | Giant robotic insect takes its first steps
A six-legged robot that moves its legs independently can walk over obstacles and rough terrain
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6:26 PM | Curiosity samples methane surges in Martian atmosphere
Point to a dynamic and local process—possibly biological—that's releasing the gas.
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6:26 PM | New Cuba Policy Is Met With Cheers And Jeers On Both Sides Of The Aisle
Sen. Marco Rubio and other prominent Cuban-American lawmakers issued blistering rebukes of plans to normalize diplomatic relations with Cuba.
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6:19 PM | Early Inhabitants of Easter Island Thrived on Sweet Potato Diet
Ancient Easter Islanders had a diet of mostly sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) before European contact, according to researchers Dr John Dudgeon from Idaho State University and Monica Tromp from the University of Otago, New Zealand. The team has just published a new paper clearing up their previous puzzling finding that suggested palm may have been [...]
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6:10 PM | A Holy Land Christmas Porridge Honors A Damsel In Distress
Some Christians in Israel and the West Bank celebrate Eid el-Burbara on Dec. 17. The feast honors St. Barbara, an early convert to Christianity whose story is echoed in the Rapunzel tale.
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6:07 PM | The Exhibitionist | 5 | feat. Punch a Monet
NEWS So we’re winding up for Christmas and the art world has already checked out. Released this week is http://punchamonet.gallery/, where you can follow in the footsteps of jailed art vandal Andrew Shannon who last year put his fist through Monet’s “Argenteuil Basin with a Single Sailboat” (1874) at the National Gallery of Ireland. Luckily this virtual game […] The post The Exhibitionist | 5 | feat. Punch a Monet appeared first on HeadStuff.
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6:02 PM | #RosettaWatch: Comet lander could wake up next year
The Philae lander is getting enough sunlight to keep warm, team members say, and the Rosetta spacecraft may have already taken pictures of its landing spot
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6:00 PM | Stem cell researcher Hanna “working…to correct the unfortunate and inadvertent mistakes” in papers
Jacob Hanna of Israel’s Weizmann Institute has been a media darling for years, including as a member of the 2010 Technology Review 30 under 35 for his work with stem cells. However, questions have been mounting about his research, both on PubPeer (which has critical comments for 15 papers he’s an author on) and in other stem cell labs, who have […]The post Stem cell researcher Hanna “working…to correct the unfortunate and inadvertent […]
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6:00 PM | Sony Device Aims To Turn Any Glasses Into Smart Glasses
Sony's announced a micro display unit that can be used to turn any pair of glasses into an augmented reality device.
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5:45 PM | 2014 may be the warmest year on record
In early December I wrote a post called “2014 will not be the warmest year on record, but global warming is still real.” The very first thing I said in that post is that I was going out on a limb. I also discussed whether or not one year mattered, and I discussed the nature…
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5:45 PM | From Goat Herding to Lion Conservation: The Story of a Samburu Warrior. Part 1
Meet Jeneria Lekilelei, a young Samburu warrior who comes from the Sasaab area in Westgate Community Conservancy, Samburu, Kenya. Jeneria started working with Ewaso Lions in 2008 as a Lion Scout and has since taken a substantial leadership role in his current position as Field Operations and Community Manager. Jeneria is a wildlife hero and…
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5:40 PM | Update On Bighorn Sheep Released Near Tucson
On December 11, 2014, the Arizona Daily Star reported that a bighorn ewe recently transplanted to the Santa Catalina Mountains near Tucson was killed by a mountain lion. The Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) confirmed the kill. The yearling sheep was the first documented kill since 30 sheep were released last month to join the 12 surviving sheep from a group of 31 transplants released in November of 2013. The status of a number of lambs born last spring... Read more
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5:40 PM | What Would Happen If All The Earth's Microbes Suddenly Disappeared?
It's generally agreed that life on this planet would not be possible if it weren't for microbes. In a fascinating thought experiment, a pair of biologists scrutinized this assumption to find out. As their paper makes clear, a microbe-free world would be a strange place, indeed.Read more...
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5:30 PM | Today on New Scientist
All the latest on newscientist.com: block rockin' beasts, evolution, asteroid soil for space farms, sexology, tsunami shield, Martian methane burps and more
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5:20 PM | Ageing, God and Lindau: An Interview with Aaron Ciechanover
Nobel Laureate Aaron Ciechanover is talking about medical progress and its implications. What was your dream job when you were a kid? Aaron Ciechanover: I wanted to be a physician. And I am a physician, so I fulfilled that dream. I did not know anything about science. I did not know what one was supposed […]
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5:20 PM | Midwives Are Often Safer Than Docs–Why Don't They Deliver More Babies?
This month, Britain's national health service advised women with low-risk pregnancies that it was safer to give birth under the supervision of midwives than doctors, as the latter are more likely to perform interventions like forceps deliveries and cesarean sections that carry risks of infection and surgical accidents.Read more...
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5:16 PM | Star's flying visit could fling comets at Earth
It might not happen for a quarter of a million years, but a nearby star coming closer to the sun could send planetary remnants hurtling to Earth
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5:15 PM | Moon Rover 'Andy' Takes Home Two XPrize Milestone Awards, Totaling $750,000
In the Google Lunar XPrize competition, three-dozen teams are racing to become the first private enterprises to land a rover on the moon. The winner takes home $30 million.
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5:06 PM | Behind The Scenes At The Lab That Fingerprints Microbiomes
Inside the lab, a lone technician sorts through new samples, snipping off swab heads intentionally fouled with fecal material. One head goes to cold storage and the other is processed for sequencing.
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4:55 PM | Risks Have Never Been Greater For Medical Workers In Conflict Zones
They've always been caught in the crossfire. But now they're being directly targeted. And no place is more dangerous than Syria.
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4:45 PM | What’s Eating You, and/or Vice Versa: Microbes
If you enjoyed the new opera “What’s Eating You“, which was about two people and all the microbes in and on them, you will (probably) enjoy this newly published study. It’s about people, their microbes, and who eats whom: “The microbes we eat: abundance and taxonomy of microbes consumed in a day’s worth of meals […]
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4:34 PM | Satellite Images Show How Much More Light Americans Use During The Winter Holidays
U.S. cities use so much more light at night during December that the difference can be detected by satellite.
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