Posts

November 18, 2014

+
1:56 PM | Celebrating a Decade of Conservation in Chile’s Karukinka Landscape
By Bárbara Saavedra and Cristián Samper On the southern tip of Tierra del Fuego in the Patagonia region of Chile, you’ll find one of the most stunning wild places in the hemisphere, complete with bountiful peat bogs, sub-Antarctic woodlands, windswept steppes, and snow-covered mountain ranges. Spanning 1,160 square miles, the Karukinka landscape is home to Patagonia’s unique wildlife, including the endangered culpeo fox, the Andean condor, guanacos (wild relatives […]
+
1:55 PM | Half Hours with the Lower Animals
No summary available for this post.
+
1:32 PM | What Disco Fog Taught Us About Iguana Lungs
Froggys Fog Swamp Juice is billed as “the world’s greatest fog”. According to the manufacturers, it produces a …
+
1:30 PM | Quickies: Altered Bible verses, softball, and Saartjie Baartman
Categories: QuickiesBible verses where the word “Philistines” has been replaced with “haters” – “His father and mother replied, ‘Isn’t there an acceptable woman among your relatives or among all our people? ...(Read more...)
+
1:30 PM | Starfish made of feather-light foam wins photo prize
With its spindly neon tendrils, a false-coloured image of graphene foam, stripped of its skeleton, has won first prize in an annual engineering photo competition
+
1:25 PM | Christopher Nolan Films: The Definitive List
As of July 2014 I moved to Japan and while it’s been quite an adventure so far, release dates for the cinemas over here leave something to be desired. Case in point; Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar won’t be released here until the 22nd of November. Seeing as I can’t take part in the hype – so […] The post Christopher Nolan Films: The Definitive List appeared first on HeadStuff.
+
12:50 PM | People taught synaesthesia learn to read in colour
Intensive training taught people to see letters in colour in normal life, which may have also raised their IQ. Find out how to teach yourself synaesthesia
+
12:30 PM | Distant Horizons
“Ah, but our reach should exceed our grasp, Or what are the heavens for?”  — with apologies to Robert Browning We humans have lived on Earth a long time. Hundreds of thousands of years, give or take, depending on what you define as human. And all that time we have yearned to reach the stars, to explore, to find out what exists elsewhere. We’re just now starting to do just that. We’ve only been able to fly for a little over a century, and the elapsed time […]
+
12:30 PM | Automated killer robots come with enormous risks
The first world war should be a reminder of the dangers of mass, uncontrolled experimentation with new killing machines
+
12:16 PM | AudioBlind | 6 [feat. Janelle Monáe]
To celebrate the Philae landing this week on AudioBlind I listened to some Science Fiction inspired albums. Janelle Monáe – The ArchAndroid (2010)   The ArchAndroid is Janelle Monáe’s debut studio album and consists of the second and third parts of her Metropolis series. The effect that Fritz Lang’s 1927 epic science fiction had on […] The post AudioBlind | 6 [feat. Janelle Monáe] appeared first on HeadStuff.
+
12:15 PM | Poison frogs have an internal homing device
Amphibians can find the shortest path home when lost
+
12:15 PM | Fish tagged for research become lunch for gray seals
Seals learn to associate ping from acoustic trackers with food
+
12:15 PM | Gecko-inspired adhesives allow people to climb walls
Hand-sized device can lift the weight of a person
+
12:04 PM | How bird flu threatens Europe's Christmas turkeys
The virus's foray into Europe coincides with peak production of Christmas turkeys, the poultry species most vulnerable to bird flu
+
12:00 PM | Snakes are ‘righties’–with their penis, that is.
Here’s a fun fact to break out at your next cocktail party: male snakes have two complete sets of reproductive organs, one on the right side of their body, and another on the left. This includes two separate hemipenes, which are the snake equivalent to a penis that pop out of the body during sex. […]The post Snakes are ‘righties’–with their penis, that is. appeared first on Seriously, Science?.
+
12:00 PM | LakeSim...
Source: Last link in third paragraph below“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” ― Eleanor Roosevelt “Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.” ― Søren Kierkegaard A hundred years ago, one out of every five people lived in urban areas. By 2050, that number will balloon to over four out of five.This rapid urbanization presents significant problems to the world. Even a modest annual […]
+
11:12 AM | Vape gathers linguistic steam to become Word of the Year 2014
Alison Flood in The Guardian: This was the year of vaping, according to Oxford Dictionaries, which has chosen “vape” – the act of inhaling from an electronic cigarette – as its word of 2014 after use of the term more...
+
11:09 AM | Tuesday Poem
Brand New Ancients . In the old days the myths were the stories we used to explain ourselves. But how can we explain the way we hate ourselves, the things we’ve made ourselves into, the way we break ourselves in...
+
10:59 AM | De la paralaje
La paralaje es la diferencia en la posición aparente de un objeto debida a distintas posiciones del observador. Suele expresarse como ángulo y, en astronomía es una forma de expresar la distancia de una estrella (u otro cuerpo) a la Tierra: es el ángulo subtendido por el radio de la órbita terrestre (1 unidad astronómica, 1 UA) en el […] Seguir leyendo The post De la paralaje appeared first on Cuaderno de Cultura Científica.
+
10:43 AM | Why you don't need a Nobel prize to save the world
As the UK's Longitude Prize fires the starting gun for ideas to tackle antibiotic resistance, an innovation champion hails the challenge prize resurgence
+
10:00 AM | Doomed comet lander delivered harvest of science
Elation and disappointment as lander goes into early hibernation, curtailing experiments
+
9:56 AM | Ebola – a Case Study of Scientific Communication
Medical student and Lindau alumnus Yasin Emanee on what the Ebola epidemic taught him about the scientific receptivity of the people in his country. As a final year medical student in India, it is not uncommon to be enquired about the symptoms of diseases and basic medical advice by one’s friends and family. Some time back, when […]
+
9:52 AM | For the Monarch Butterfly, a Long Road Back
Liza Gross in The New York Times: Dara Satterfield hadn’t planned to conduct experiments at the Texas State Fair, but that is where her study subjects showed up last month. She was still in Georgia when they arrived, so she...
+
9:00 AM | Winter Blooms
Winter is settling in: the air is nippy, branches are bare, and wearing open-toed shoes is now out of the question. During a recent visit to a horticulture centre, though, I was impressed to see that many flowers in their gardens still bloomed. Cheery red blossoms, gold-centered asters, and frilly magenta petals popped against a bleak backdrop […]
+
8:00 AM | World's largest landslide?
Ancient slump in Utah large enough to cover almost 40 Manhattans with material hundreds of meters thick
+
6:51 AM | Sulfur: As You Like It
Speaking of sulfur: This common element turns out to be highly useful for understanding planetary processes – both on Earth and Mars. Two new papers by Dr. Itay Halevy use sulfur chemistry to understand the history of sulfur-loving microbes at the bottom of the ocean and the compounds spewed from Martian volcanoes that may have…
+
6:25 AM | Sad news: John Hoyland, father of “nominative determinism”, is gone
Very sad news. John Hoyland, my good friend and longtime collaborator, has died. John created “Feedback“, the best column in New Scientist, my favorite magazine (favorite other than Annals of Improbable Research, of course). As a happy subscriber to New Scientist, I knew and loved John’s work, long before I met him. We began corresponding […]
+
5:50 AM | Do You Know That Chinese Are the First to Invent the Paper Money?
  China invented paper, ink, and printing and was thus the first to experiment with paper money, probably as early as around AD 1000.2 Between the early twelfth and the late fifteenth centuries, extensive paper money systems were developed under the Southern Song Dynasty (1127–1279), the Jin Dynasty (1115–1234), the Yuan Dynasty (1271–1368), and the […] The post Do You Know That Chinese Are the First to Invent the Paper Money? appeared first on Wiley Asia Blog.
+
4:00 AM | Magic Tricks Created Using Artificial Intelligence
Researchers working on artificial intelligence (AI) at Queen Mary University of London have taught a computer to create magic tricks, and audiences are enjoying the results.(Boians Cho Joo Young via freedigitalphotos.net)The research team is using magic tricks as a means of exploring what artificial intelligence can do. "Using AI to create magic tricks is a great way to demonstrate the possibilities of computer intelligence and it also forms a part of our research into the psychology of being a […]
+
3:04 AM | Triclosan study marks PNAS’s tenth embargo break this year
Although it didn’t lead to an early embargo lift, a university press office and a local news site broke the embargo today on a Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) study of whether the soap ingredient triclosan causes liver damage in mice. A press release from the University of California, Davis, where the […]
2345678910
3,350 Results