Posts

March 31, 2015

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8:23 PM | Ovulation changes women’s desire for variety in products
We know that hormones affect who we are, even when we aren’t aware of it. In the past scientists have found that people who are hungry tend to buy more things, no surprise for those of us who have shopped hungry. However, new research shows that women seek a greater variety of products and services, […]

Durante, K. & Arsena, A. (2015). Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety, Journal of Consumer Research, 41 (6) 1372-1391. DOI: 10.1086/679652

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7:59 PM | Methods for Maneuvering Through Spring Mud, Vol. 1
Tim Brtis outlines many a method for navigating one's way through spring mud on the prairie.
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7:26 PM | Dozens Of Countries Join China-Backed Bank Opposed By Washington
Some of Washington's closest allies have signed on to a new Asian development bank. The U.S. opposes the bank in part because it presents a challenge to American influence in the Asia region.
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7:15 PM | Obama Releases Frozen Military Aid To Egypt
Delivery of the F-16s, Harpoon missiles and M1A1 Abrams tank kits was suspended in 2013 after a military-backed coup. The White House cited national security as the reason for its decision today.
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7:10 PM | What The 2016 Hopefuls Are Saying About Indiana's 'Religious Freedom' Law
"This is simply allowing people of faith space to be able to express their beliefs," said Jeb Bush. Hillary Clinton tweeted: "Sad this new Indiana law can happen in America today."
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6:52 PM | The Resurrection Of Lamb Ham: A Colonial Tradition Revived
British colonialists brought lamb ham to America, where a sugar-cured, smoked variety became popular. Easier-to-cure pork ham eventually took its place, but now two Virginians are bringing it back.
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6:36 PM | Hackers Teach Computers To Tell Healthy And Sick Brain Cells Apart
Scientists are still better than computers at assessing a neuron's health by looking at its shape. But an effort that includes an international series of hackathons could help speed the process.
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6:18 PM | Trevor Noah, Jon Stewart's Replacement, Goes From Hero To Villain In 24 Hours
Soon after it was announced that Noah will host The Daily Show, it emerged that some of his tweets mocked women and Jews — tweets that critics have called sexist and anti-Semitic.
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6:17 PM | Nigerian President Said To Concede Election To Opposition Candidate
A sitting president has never lost a presidential bid in Nigeria, Africa's most populous country. Partial results showed Goodluck Jonathan trailing Muhammadu Buhari by close to 3 million votes.
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5:35 PM | Staff At Britain's Windsor Castle May Strike Over Low Wages
It's the first time Queen Elizabeth is facing a possible strike by employees of the royal family. At issue is whether employees should be expected to do extra work for no additional pay.
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5:15 PM | Alabama Judge Says Raising Money To Be Elected Is 'Tawdry'
Mixing judges with campaign contributions can lead to conflicts of interest. Fresh Air talks to retired Judge Sue Bell Cobb and the Center for American Progress' Billy Corriher.
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4:00 PM | New Technique Could Make Atomic Clocks More Accurate
An international group of physicists led by Prof Vladan Vuletic of MIT has developed a novel technique that can successfully entangle 3,000 atoms using one photon. The new technique, described in the journal Nature, provides a realistic method to generate large ensembles of entangled atoms, which are key components for realizing more-precise atomic clocks. Today’s [...]
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3:44 PM | If Drones Make You Nervous, Think Of Them As Flying Donkeys
In Africa, where there aren't always roads from point A to point B, drones could take critical medicines to remote spots. But the airborne vehicles make people uneasy for lots of reasons.
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3:42 PM | Major Power Outage Darkens Dozens Of Cities In Turkey
The outage halted public transportation and shuttered business across much of Turkey. An investigation is underway to determine the cause of the country's blackout, the biggest in 15 years.
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3:36 PM | How Sea Floor Ecosystems Are Damaged By, And Recover From, Abrupt Climate Change
A new study by Sarah Moffitt, Tessa Hill, Peter Roopnarine, and James Kennett (Response of seafloor ecosystems to abrubt global climate change) gets a handle on the effects of relatively rapid warming and associated Oxygen loss in the sea on invertebrate communities. The study looked at a recent warming event (the end of the last…
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3:19 PM | Meet The Bacteria That Make A Stink In Your Pits
Scientists say they've IDed the bacteria that emit that rank smell after a hard workout. Future deodorants might target that bad actor rather than blocking sweat glands or nuking all bacteria.
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3:03 PM | U.S. Promises To Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions Up To 28 Percent By 2025
The new target was submitted to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Tuesday. It is part of a plan for a new international treaty to be hammered out in December in Paris.
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3:00 PM | The Science Of Spontaneous Healing
A person comes down with a terrible disease. The doctors give up all hope. Then, suddenly, the disease is gone. It's a great soap opera plot, but it can actually happen in real life. The question is, how?Read more...
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2:43 PM | Cassini Zeroes in on Saturn’s Icy Moon Rhea
The NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has captured the best images so far of Rhea, the fourteenth of Saturn’s known moons. Saturn has a great many more moons than Earth – a whopping 62. Rhea is the second-largest of Saturn’s moons and the ninth-largest moon in the Solar System. Discovered on December 23, 1672 by Giovanni Cassini, [...]
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2:32 PM | The Fear Of Black Men In America: Join Our Twitter Chat #FearAndRace
This week, NPR's Michel Martin has been leading challenging conversations about the fear of black men. Now we want to hear from you.
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2:24 PM | WALKING THE TORNADO LINE
Justin Nobel at The Oxford American: On the fourth night of my journey I camp in woods owned by a Baptist deacon named Sammy Swinney. It was here in the rolling hills of northern Alabama where the April 27, 2011,...
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2:21 PM | Israel: The Stark Truth
David Shulman at the New York Review of Books: And then there was his truly astonishing, by now notorious statement on election day itself, in which he urged Jewish voters to rush to the polls because “the Arabs are voting...
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2:16 PM | Would Telepathy Help?
Kat McGowan in Aeon (Anthony Quinn and Anna Karina on the set of 'The Magus'. 1976. Photo by Eve Arnold/Magnum): Every modern generation has had its own idiosyncratic obsession with telepathy, the hope that one human being might be able...
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2:16 PM | Faith, Hope, and Chemistry
Bert Keizer at the Threepenny Review: In my first year as a medical student I thought I had a pretty good notion of what medicine was all about. I saw it as a branch of mechanical engineering, like building bridges,...
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2:15 PM | From 'Dragon Tattoo' To The 'Spider's Web': Stieg Larsson's Heroine Returns
The late novelist's Millennium series is getting an addition, The Girl in the Spider's Web. The book, written by David Lagercrantz, just got its title and a U.S. release date: Sept. 1.
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2:03 PM | Plush Dissected Knit Creatures and Other Scientific Wonders
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2:02 PM | Getting Personal
Anne Fausto-Sterling in Boston Review (Photo: Rachel Mack): During the 1950s peanut butter came in notoriously hard-to-close pry-top jars, and an enterprising rat in my family’s home took advantage. At night, after my parents’ bedroom door clicked shut, they would...
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2:00 PM | How the Golden Age Lost Its Memory
Andrew Heisel in the LA Review of Books: THIS MAY BE a golden age of television, but it’s hard to feel particularly blessed about it. According to Brett Martin’s recent book Difficult Men, this TV golden age is actually America’s...
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2:00 PM | Europe’s oldest pharmacy
Prepared wolf guts, sun-bleached dog faeces, coffee, and an overseas human mummy. These are just some of the things you could find in an Estonian pharmacy in 1695. This particular pharmacy is still in business. Records of the Raeapteek in … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | We must pull together to grasp consciousness
Human-like artificial intelligence and consciousness are two of the toughest topics in science. Margaret Boden explains why
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