X

Posts

April 14, 2014

+
12:57 PM | Holiday in Mitzpe Ramon
MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–Pesach (Passover) begins this evening at sundown, but essentially the holiday has started today as people prepare for this evening’s family seders. The town has gone very quiet as stores have closed and traffic dropped to almost no vehicles moving. I spent the day walking around the periphery of Mitzpe Ramon enjoying the […]
+
12:55 PM | Birdbooker Report 316
SUMMARY: Books, books, beautiful books! This is a list of biology, ecology, environment, natural history and animal books that are (or will soon be) available to occupy your bookshelves and your thoughts. “Words in leather and wood”. Bookshelves in the “Long Room” at the old Trinity College Library in Dublin. Image: Nic McPhee from Morris, MN, USA. 2007. (Creative Commons.) Books to the ceiling, Books to the sky, My pile of books is a mile high. How I love them!... Read […]
+
11:30 AM | Trouble in Haven: Resolving conflicts in academia
Sharing a laboratory with others is typically rewarding – peers in close quarters become a sounding post for new ideas and a support network for the highs and lows of research life. But you don’t choose your desk mates and things can go wrong. Regular Naturejobs contributor Shimi Rii recently experienced how small disagreements can escalate quickly. Finding the right way to deal with conflict is not easy but necessary in order to ensure a harmonious work environment.  Read more
+
8:41 AM | Evidence for the existence of three primary strategies in plants and its relevance to ecological and evolutionary theory
JP Grime. The American Naturalist 111(982): 1169-1194. Evidence for the existence of three primary strategies in plants and its relevance to ecological and evolutionary theory I’m a zoologist who somehow keeps looking at plants, and this paper is probably the best demonstration of how plant and animal ecologists really do seem to think differently (in my mind, […]
+
2:29 AM | Landscaping challenge
One thing leads to another, and the Phactors done one thing, in this instance, removing several old declining spruces, a big old ugly yew, and a rear-view mirror-removing redbud with no other redeeming features (it grew immediately adjacent to the neighbor's driveway). This leaves a 65 foot, south-facing, bed, our eastern front garden without any trees. After so many years of seeking shade-tolerant plants, to be seeking full-sun plants is quite a different challenge. However, with […]

April 13, 2014

+
10:25 PM | Nuclear Fusion & the Elements of Life
I hope you’ll all forgive this brief post today. I’ve been buried under insane levels of work for the last several weeks. However, as I was taking a short break […]
+
6:55 PM | In the Valley of Elah
MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–Simon Schama begins his magnificent series The Story of the Jews at an archaeological site near the Valley of Elah called Khirbet Qeiyafa. He said that the first physical evidence for the existence of the Jewish people was not the Exodus from Egypt (for which there is not a trace) but the structures […]
+
6:45 PM | You Should Know: Dr Caleph Wilson and 1st Generation STEM
The hashtag #ScholarSunday is very much like #FollowFriday or #FF for short. Dr. Raul Pacheco (@RaulPacheco and raulpacheco.org). He created it as a vehicle for academics to engage with each other... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
3:42 PM | IPCC report calls for climate mitigation action now, not later
The world is heading towards possibly dangerous levels of global warming despite increasing efforts to promote the transition to a low-carbon economy, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns in its latest report today.  Read more
+
2:23 PM | Robust Predictive Control
My wife and I were both sick from some nameless fever-inducing alien virus all last weekend.  Fairly horrible.  Not Agent Coulson, “Let me die, please just let me die” horrible, but not pleasant at all.  Thus the flashback. I tried to read a couple of papers about sleep, including A new theoretical approach to the functional meaning of sleep and dreaming in humans based on the maintenance of ‘predictive […]
+
5:17 AM | Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: An unusual scleractinian coral from the Upper Cretaceous of Israel
Originally this was going to be a mystery fossil for a crowd-sourced identification while I’m here in Israel doing fieldwork, but through the wonders of the internet I finally found a match for the strange fossil above: it is the scleractinian coral Aspidiscus König, 1825 (Family Latomeandridae).  Yoav Avni and I found several specimens in […]

April 12, 2014

+
10:03 PM | Bitter greens of spring
TPP appreciates the anonymous tip to this poetic description of spring greens at Salt and Stone Poetry. Although if you considered TPP's comment in the last blog as anything other than saying dandelion greens were the best of a bad lot, then best this author brush up on his writing. You must understand the world of 2, or for most of you, 3 generations back. Over the winter food was canned or winter-stored; cabbage was as close to green and fresh that you got.  My Father […]
+
6:11 PM | Wooster’s X-ray Lab Hosts Expanding Your Horizons
WOOSTER, OH — What a beautiful Saturday for science!!  Expanding Your Horizons (EYH) hit Scovel Hall again this year, and area middle school girls were able to select “Minerals in My Jewelry” as one of the fun science sessions held around campus.  Meagen Pollock, who oversees Wooster’s X-ray Lab, organized and taught “Minerals in My […]
+
5:27 PM | Tar Pits Bees Connect California’s Past to the Present
The La Brea asphalt seeps are practically synonymous with megafauna. Sculptures of American lions and scrapping Smilodon draw …
+
4:30 PM | Seeing the archaeological site of Shivta through a geologist’s eyes
MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–The tradition we’ve built over the years on our Israel expeditions is to travel to interesting places on Saturdays to take a break from work. Yes, it appears geologists never really stop geologizing, but then that’s not really “work”, is it? Today Yoav, part of his family and I went to the Nabatean-Byzantine […]
+
8:45 AM | True facts about the owl | video | @GrrlScientist
Just in time for caturday! A lovely and humourous video about owls and of course, a story about one of my favourite owl species.Yep, it's caturday once again so you know what that means: it's time for an animal video! Continue reading...

April 11, 2014

+
11:44 PM | Meeting wrapup from ECFG12 in Seville
The 12th European Conference on Fungal Genetics was a fun and successful exchange of science and ideas in Seville, Spain.
+
9:46 PM | Eat the weeds?
Generally TPP like the articles posted at Treehugger, but not this one on edible weeds so much.  The reasons are the usual ones: dubious advice.  OK here's the list of 9 weeds they recommend: dandelion, purslane, clover, lamb's quarters, plantain, chickweed, mallow, wild amaranth (pigweed), curly dock.  The best of the bunch are very young dandelion leaves, but they are better if you get the more upright growing meadow race rather than the very flat rosette lawn-mower selected […]
+
5:18 PM | Google Doodle Honors Chemist Dr. Percy Julian
April 11, 2014 would have been Dr. Julian Percy’s 115th Birthday and it was a beautiful site to behold – seeing today’s Google Doodle honoring the man and his science. Dr. Julian’s... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
4:32 PM | Cretaceous fieldwork around Mitzpe Ramon
MITZPE RAMON, ISRAEL–Today Yoav and I worked on the outskirts if his hometown. This was a field trip that began in his garden and then we wandered into the hills behind his house, eventually circling this little city to return to his house. About half the journey was along the cliff of Makhtesh Ramon, so […]
+
3:46 PM | Shorter list for gamma-ray telescope sites, but no home yet
Where will host the world’s next generation ground-based γ-ray detector, the Cherenkov Telescope Array? The answer is, still no one knows. But a panel of funders have narrowed the field following a meeting in Munich, Germany, this week.  Read more
+
3:27 PM | Friday Fabulous Future Flowers - the blue lawn
The Phactors' blue lawn is almost upon us (which TPP has reported on before); the peak flowering of the thousands of Scilla bulbs that actually form a major component of our lawn in the spring. Dang, if we aren't going to be so busy that it'll be tough to find the time to enjoy the display. All that blue will be a minor pain in a few weeks, but right now all those blue flowers are a cheerful reminder than spring has sprung (and fortunately or unfortunately bunnies don't eat it).  It […]
+
2:10 PM | Paleoartist John Gurche on Recreating Prehistoric Life: Part II
Paleoartist John Gurche has worked on the movie Jurassic Park, designed stamps for the US Postal Service, and recently crafted the sculptures for the Smithsonian Museum’s Hall of Human Origins. In his new book Shaping Humanity, Gurche delves into the data, research, creativity, and emotion employed in constructing the Smithsonian exhibit.
+
2:00 PM | Friday Coffee Break
  Documenting butterfly life cycles through paintings, long before such things were done. Especially by women! (From CJ) Whales eat a lot. So if there were a 100x more whales in the ocean than there are now, where did all their food come from? Turns out whales create a more fertile ocean using their own […]
+
1:44 PM | New Books Party: books received this week | @GrrlScientist
What good is a weekend without a good book to read? Take a look at these books -- hot off the presses -- that you may enjoy!Below the jump, I mention the books that I received recently. They are gifts, review copies that arrived in the mail, or that I purchased in London. These are the books that I may review in more depth later, either here or in print somewhere in the world. Perhaps the most starting finding is that those boobies bullied as chicks are more likely to go on to torment […]
+
1:42 PM | Humbling wingnuts
I have just read Cass Sunstein’s short collection of essays How to Humble a Wingnut and Other Lessons from Behavioral Economics. It is a decent summary of the behavioural science literature on political bias, although there are few surprises and not a lot of fresh opinion. The one piece new to me concerned the moderation […] The post Humbling wingnuts appeared first on Evolving Economics.
+
1:19 PM | World Wildlife Fund’s Dr Brendan Fraser on improving fish diversity and conservation agriculture in Mozambique
Dr. Brendan Fisher is a research scientist at the World Wildlife Fund. His research and fieldwork lie at the nexus of conservation, development, and natural resource economics. Brendan is the author of over 50 peer-reviewed articles on topics such as poverty, human welfare, ecosystem services and biological conservation, and the co-author of two books, Valuing Ecosystem Services (Earthscan, London, 2008) and A Field Guide to Economics for Conservationists (Forthcoming, Roberts and […]
+
1:00 PM | What we’re reading: Polygenic mutation-selection balance, demographics of invading mice, and the U.S. consensus on climate change
In the journals de Vladar HP, N Barton. 2014. Stability and response of polygenic traits to stabilizing selection and mutation. Genetics. doi: 10.1534/genetics.113.159111. The interplay between stabilizing selection and mutation leads to a sharp transition: alleles with effects smaller than … Continue reading →
+
1:00 PM | Science online, surprising consensus edition
This week, at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! Do sloths benefit from carrying around poop-eating moths?And, at The Molecular Ecologist: Readers explain their views for and against anonymous peer review.Because non-monophylly. Manta rays aren't a thing anymore.Wow. Actually, Americans are pretty strongly agreed on climate change.But mostly: big garbage is still garbage. An itemized list of problems with big data.With a little help from William Hamilton's aunt. A look back on the kin selection […]
+
12:23 PM | Away from home: Collaboration in a global organisation
The ‘Away from home‘ blogging series features Indian postdocs working in foreign labs recounting their experience of working there, the triumphs and challenges, the cultural differences and what they miss about India. They also offer useful tips for their Indian postdocs headed abroad. You can join in the online conversation using the #postdochat hashtag.  Read more
123456789
322 Results