Posts

April 22, 2015

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11:35 PM | Earth Day 2015: 7 #BLACKandSTEM Environmental Scientists you should follow today
1. Dr. Dawn Wright Dr. Wright is Chief Scientist of the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) and a professor of Geography and Oceanography at Oregon State University. Her research... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:53 PM | Earth Day Bouquet
Mixed lettuces: Bibb, black-seeded Simpson, oakleaf, harvested today and in the sink for washing.
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7:37 PM | A simple explanation of rejection sampling in R
The central quantity in Bayesian inference, the posterior, can usually not be calculated analytically, but needs to be estimated by numerical integration, which is typically done with a Monte-Carlo algorithm. The three main algorithm classes for doing so are Rejection sampling Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampling I have previously given…
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7:18 PM | What Drove the Great Dying?
As long ago as forever and as far away as home, life was withering away wherever you looked. At the …Continue reading →

Clarkson MO, Kasemann SA, Wood RA, Lenton TM, Daines SJ, Richoz S, Ohnemueller F, Meixner A, Poulton SW & Tipper ET & (2015). Ocean acidification and the Permo-Triassic mass extinction., Science (New York, N.Y.), 348 (6231) 229-32. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25859043

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7:09 PM | More Bad News About The Lionfish Invasion (Happy Earth Day?)
As I've described before, the Indo-Pacific lionfish in the Atlantic and Caribbean are quite possibly the worst marine invasion ever. These toxic predators have been eating their way around for the past few decades, driving down populations of native species and threatening already-struggling habitats. Now, a pair of papers released this month have more bad news: the lionfish are continuing to spread, and they may be eating the very last of critically endangered […]
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2:55 PM | Happy Earth Day!
It's Earth Day and TPP doesn't know whether to celebrate or cry. You see TPP remembers the first Earth Day because he was a senior, and it was spring, and he was going to graduate school, and he had a great girl friend who he had figured out he was going to marry one day. But all that hope and good fortune was tainted by the protests over the Vietnam War that led to Kent State and all the rest. All these things remained inextricably linked in memory. Environmentalism seems to be losing ground […]
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2:19 PM | Interview: The landscape of Ian Wang’s reading list
To follow up on some recent posts on The Molecular Ecologist about landscape genetics and isolation by environment, I brought in an expert. Dr. Ian Wang is an assistant professor in the Department of Environment Science, Policy, and Management at … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Help Solve the Mystery of the Disappearing PhD
Very VERY few of those who pursue a PhD in science will continue on to a tenure track position. We’ve spoken a lot on this blog about postdocs, faculty positions, and what industry might look like. From Science: Now Melanie Sinche of theLabor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School is trying to learn more. […]
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12:00 PM | Boys Will Be Boys… And Then Girls
Biology concepts – botany, monoecious, dichogamy, imperfect and perfect flowers, self-pollination, cross-pollination, self-incompatibility, heterostylyThis clip shows the mating of hermaphroditic leopard slugs. Each may provide male gametes for the other, or it may just go one way. They hang from a branch to do this, and the male reproductive organs spiral around one another. The trait has gone mad – in some species, the male organ has reached 92 cm long!There are a few ways for […]

Casimiro-Soriguer I, Buide ML & Narbona E (2013). The roles of female and hermaphroditic flowers in the gynodioecious-gynomonoecious Silene littorea: insights into the phenology of sex expression., Plant biology (Stuttgart, Germany), 15 (6) 941-7. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23174011

Pérez-Barrales, R., Vargas, P. & Arroyo, J. (2006). New evidence for the Darwinian hypothesis of heterostyly: breeding systems and pollinators in Narcissus sect. Apodanthi, New Phytologist, 171 (3) 553-567. DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2006.01819.x

Miller, J. & Diggle, P. (2003). Diversification of andromonoecy in Solanum section Lasiocarpa (Solanaceae): the roles of phenotypic plasticity and architecture, American Journal of Botany, 90 (5) 707-715. DOI: 10.3732/ajb.90.5.707

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5:06 AM | Who’s really pollen their weight: Bees, or Flies?
When it comes to pollination ecology research, bees are their own knees. Along with butterflies, birds, and bats, bees reign supreme as the queens of pollinator studies, with huge amounts of money and time spent each year trying to understand everything about their biology, from how they choose which flowers to visit, to the structure [...]

April 21, 2015

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11:41 PM | Richard Dawkins or how he became a product of postmodernism
I am going to say it before I start. I don’t like Richard Dawkins as a person. And I have a personal rule to avoid his twitter account and comments. He definitely has an image problem, and Declan Fahy knows … Continue reading →
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4:31 PM | Beatboxing birdsongs of New York
SUMMARY: In these fascinating videos, we see how one man’s quest to merge two passions -- bird watching and beatbox music – has created an experimental new form of music I love beatboxing, but as an ornithologist and birder, I am absolutely delighted by this amazing experiment that a fellow New Yorker, Ben Mirin, is working on: he is using birdsong produced by birds that can be found in New York state as the inspiration for his beatboxing. Mr Mirin... Read more
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3:20 PM | Flipping the Classroom with Meteorite Impacts
Our introductory courses don’t have labs, but that doesn’t stop our students from having hands-on experiences. Today, students in the Geology of Natural Hazards investigated the relationship between impact craters and projectile properties (size, mass, velocity) by experimenting with a tray of sand and a variety of projectiles. Students had a marble, ping pong ball, golf ball, […]
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3:03 PM | Spitting cobras
This post will soon be available in Spanish!Spitting cobras have been known for centuries,as you can see from this report published in the Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society in 19001A clever comic from birdandmoonhighlighting the fact that king cobrasare not true cobrasCobras are some of the most iconic snakes in the world, instantly recognizable by their hoods even to those who have never seen one. They are also among the most dangerous snakes—fast-moving, with […]
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10:45 AM | Beatboxing birdsongs of New York | @GrrlScientist
In these fascinating videos, we see how one man’s quest to merge two passions -- bird watching and beatbox music – has created an experimental new form of musicI love beatboxing, but as an ornithologist and birder, I am absolutely delighted by this amazing experiment that a fellow New Yorker, Ben Mirin, is working on: he is using birdsong produced by birds that can be found in New York state as the inspiration for his beatboxing. Mr Mirin is a professional beatboxer, freelance […]
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7:16 AM | Bodies of Light by Sarah Moss -- book review | @GrrlScientist
Bodies of Light is a powerfully evocative exploration of the history of medicine, of feminism, and poverty in Victorian EnglandBodies of Light by Sarah Moss is a historical novel set in 19th century Manchester. As we follow the growing-up years of the main character, Alethea “Ally” Moberly, until she earns her medical degree, we learn about the social and legal plights of women during the early suffrage movement in Britain. We also become acutely aware of the truly terrifying male […]

April 20, 2015

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10:49 PM | Baby Mosasaurs Were Born Out at Sea
If you want to find sea monsters, there’s hardly a better place to look than western Kansas. Not …
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10:40 PM | We are not the same (& that is fine): Different Approaches to Animal Behavior
I’m full throttle Research mode and as I am oft to do – I think very deeply about the meaning and purpose of my tests. My ever-evolving research philosophy definitely a very whole... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:05 PM | April Flowers
April has been quite mild, even warmish, so the gardens (and field work) are charging along at an alarming pace. This must be pretty close of peak flowering, whatever that may mean. So far over 75 different plants have flowered in our gardens, and a long-time friend upon hearing this at a brunch said, "That's inconceivable." And yes, for that person, that many different flowering plants is inconceivable. You see, it's like this: Trillium - nivale, recurvatum, flexipes, erectum, […]
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6:59 PM | Birdbooker Report 369
SUMMARY: Books, books, beautiful books! This is a list of biology, ecology, environment, natural history and animal books that are (or will soon be) available to occupy your bookshelves and your thoughts. “Words in leather and wood”. Bookshelves in the “Long Room” at the old Trinity College Library in Dublin. Image: Nic McPhee from Morris, MN, USA. 2007. (Creative Commons.) Books to the ceiling, Books to the sky, My pile of books is a mile high. How I love them!... Read […]
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5:11 PM | Some of The Things I Have Gotten Wrong
As a regular reader, you might know that Tet Zoo has been going for over nine years now. I’ve written about a lot of stuff, I’ve been intrigued and enthused by a substantial number of animals... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:35 PM | Adaptive divergence in the monkey flower
Theory suggests adaptive divergence can proceed in the face of gene flow when adaptive alleles occur in areas of the genome, such as chromosomal inversions, that are protected from recombination, which can break up beneficial allele pairings. In their recent Evolution paper, … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Wandering Far From Home: Did <i>Phoneutria</i> Almost Get Introduced To Hawaii?
Last week, agents from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection here in Honolulu caught an unwelcome stowaway in a container of granite and flagstone from Brazil: a 3.5 inch wandering spider (Phoneutria species). A second spider was found in another container from the same shipment four days later, and was likely another of the same species — though agents are not entirely sure because the worker unloading the container smashed the bugger beyond positive ID. One spider is not so […]
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2:00 PM | What Drove the Great Dying?
As long ago as forever and as far away as home, life was withering away wherever...
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2:00 PM | Life, GLORIOUS Life
If you are a sucker for good natural photography (OOHH ME!) and like the uncharismatic organisms that comprise the vast majority of the tree of life (OOOHHH DEFINITELY ME!) then I strongly suggest you take a look at the BBC collection of All animal Life in 35 photos. Here are a few of my favorites: […]
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11:04 AM | Watch spring explode into view at Kew Gardens | @GrrlScientist
Today’s “Museum Monday” video is a short time-lapse that celebrates the glory of springtime at London’s Royal Botanic Gardens at KewToday’s “Museum Monday” video is a gorgeous (and at times, quietly amusing) time-lapse short that captures the springtime explosion of flora currently taking place at Kew Gardens. In this video, we watch magnolias, tulips, daffodils, bluebells and trees as they burst into flower and leaf, transforming the Gardens into a […]
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3:49 AM | Change is Coming
The German edition of The Ice Finders. Some years ago a book of mine appeared and told the story of the discovery of the ice age. The idea of an ice age met a lot of resistance at first because...

April 19, 2015

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10:00 PM | Clonal conundrum, part un
Molecular ecologists are faced with a clonal conundrum when we wish to investigate the evolutionary ecology of clonal organisms. An attack of the clones is not something that should frighten one away … I had wanted to write a bit … Continue reading →
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9:06 PM | Hierarchical competition and the ethology of sexual dimorphism in humans
In most animals, males are the ones who dispute the group supremacy and fight for a high hierarchical position that grants them more resources and access to females. Because the genes of the most powerful and aggressive males pass on from one generation to another, the new generations of males are, at their turn, aggressive […] The post Hierarchical competition and the ethology of sexual dimorphism in humans appeared first on Social Ethology.
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7:06 PM | Offence!
Many people already strongly defend the view that no one has the right to not be offended*, I agree completely. In this post I’ll try to stretch the argument even further, and propose that offensive material can, under frequent circumstances,…Read more ›
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