Posts

March 19, 2015

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2:58 PM | EPA Researchers Win Best Toxicological Paper Awards
By Dina Abdulhadi EPA researchers will be honored March 22, 2015 at the Society of Toxicology’s 54th annual meeting and ToxExpo in San Diego, CA for their work to advance understanding of the effects of chemicals on human and environmental health. Having worked in a toxicology lab at EPA for the past year, I can […]
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2:00 PM | In Los Angeles, Cleaner Air Is Helping Children Breathe Easier
Children’s lungs are growing substantially stronger as air pollution in Southern California decreases. The Los Angeles area had struggled with air pollution for decades. But, according to new... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:00 PM | Will e-bikes help the environment?
Electric bicycles, which include a motor to boost pedal-power, will reduce emissions if people use them instead of driving their cars. But critics have pointed out that if e-bikes simply replace regular bikes, “there would be no benefit to either the environment or public health,” researchers in Norway write in Transportation Research Part D. To investigate
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1:00 PM | After an Earthquake, Use Your Phone Camera – For Science
Large earthquakes are in our future. When one strikes, there are ways you can help scientists study the event using your phone.
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5:43 AM | Amazon Rainforest Living Fast Dying Young In High CO2 World
Most extensive study of the Amazon to date reveals startling early death of rainforest trees. Tree mortality rates have increased by more than a third... The post Amazon Rainforest Living Fast Dying Young In High CO2 World appeared first on Russ George.
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1:59 AM | The Other Big Drought Story You Need to Pay Attention To
With California's scary, record-breaking drought capturing so much attention lately, an important bit of news about the dearth of water across a much larger region has gotten short shrift. I'm talking about the Colorado River Basin, which supplies water to 40 million people in seven states — including Californians. Over the long run, the Colorado has been providing less than it once did, even as demand for its water has risen. And this year, as in most years during the past 15, the […]
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1:46 AM | Dangers of the Sun
Normal 0 false false false EN-...
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1:43 AM | climateadaptation:nrdc:In an interview with vicenews,...
climateadaptation:nrdc:In an interview with vicenews, barackobama explains why some members of Congress refuse to accept that climate change is real. Interesting interview.
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12:36 AM | sci-universe:A Golden Night on Saturnimage credit:...
sci-universe:A Golden Night on Saturnimage credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute  I try not to reblog a lot of space-porn, but this photo is simply stunning.

March 18, 2015

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10:55 PM | The Salton Sea: the importance of getting 21st century water policy management widgets right
Ensconced in my office in Albuquerque, I’ve been popping in and out of the webcast of today’s California State Water Resources Control Board workshop on the future of the Salton Sea, and I’ve noticed a very interesting subtext to the discussion that I think is important. It’s about the importance of Salton Sea environmental management ...Continue reading ‘The Salton Sea: the importance of getting 21st century water policy management widgets right’ »
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9:32 PM | natureconservancy:Schooling bigeye jacks in the waters of Cocos...
natureconservancy:Schooling bigeye jacks in the waters of Cocos Island National Park, Costa Rica.
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7:24 PM | Winter Hack: New Rubber Grips Icy Surfaces
Winter storms dumped record amounts of snow on the East Coast and other regions of the United States this year, forcing many people to navigate icy sidewalks and roads. However, treacherous travel by foot may soon be a thing of the past thanks to a team of researchers from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the […] The post Winter Hack: New Rubber Grips Icy Surfaces appeared first on EH Science.
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5:52 PM | That's not Hank, that's John Green.
Thanks anon - fixed!
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5:46 PM | laughingsquid:An Interesting List of Lesser-Known Facts About...
laughingsquid:An Interesting List of Lesser-Known Facts About Different Species in the Animal KingdomEdit: John Green drops some fun knowledge bombs.
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5:43 PM | A Badly Flawed NYT Story Trumpets Cell Phone Health Dangers
I'm racing to meet a deadline, but this story in the New York Times is so dismaying I had to take a few minutes to call attention to it. The headline alone is a red flag: "Could Wearable Computers Be as Harmful as Cigarettes?" It gets worse: We have long suspected that cellphones, which give off low levels of radiation, could lead to brain tumors, cancer, disturbed blood rhythms and other health problems, if held too close to the body for extended periods. Who is "we"? The reporter, Nick […]
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4:52 PM | biodiverseed: abluegirl: Living Wall These vegetated surfaces...
biodiverseed: abluegirl: Living Wall These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency. What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings. For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the […]
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4:44 PM | Drought: the waiting
Faith Kearns has a smart look at an under-covered piece of the problem of drought – the psychology of waiting: [W]hile waiting for uncertain news, people often focus on preparing—emotionally and logistically—for any possible outcome. People tend to shift between optimism and pessimism, and both states can help increase readiness. Optimism engenders people to take ...Continue reading ‘Drought: the waiting’ »
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4:35 PM | That’s not my migraine
This photo is used in article after article about migraine and it drives me nuts. It is of an actual person having an actual attack, but I don’t think it’s at all a representative image for the disease. Shining a … Continue reading →
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4:30 PM | neuromorphogenesis:Glassed-in DNA makes the ultimate time...
neuromorphogenesis:Glassed-in DNA makes the ultimate time capsule IF YOU must preserve messages for people in the far future to read, Blu-ray discs and USB sticks are no good. For real long-term storage, you want a DNA time capsule.Just 1 gram of DNA is theoretically capable of holding 455 exabytes – enough for all the data held by Google, Facebook and every other major tech company, with room to spare. It’s also incredibly durable: DNA has been extracted and sequenced from […]
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3:59 PM | Sacramento Delta 101, and sharing water
Emily Green has written a great primer for Southern Californians on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the distant geography from which a big chunk of their water emerges: [W]hat makes the Delta the Delta is water. After winter rain and snow, roughly half of California’s fresh water arrives in this quirkily engineered, mis-named place. Twenty five ...Continue reading ‘Sacramento Delta 101, and sharing water’ »
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3:50 PM | The cost to avoid extinction
Falco punctatusIt seems to me that today every discussion on biodiversity or conservation revolves around costs and monetary benefits. The question is if we can put realistic values on biodiversity, e.g. can we put a price tag on, lets say, the efforts to save a species from becoming extinct? An international team of researchers was asking this question and they were able to calculate such a value for a subset of species. They computed the cost of, and opportunities for, conserving 841 […]
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2:32 PM | Exciting Times for Toxicology: Creating New Predictive Models
By Dr. James H. Johnson, Jr. Next week, a number of my EPA colleagues will join toxicologists from across the world in San Diego, CA for the Society of Toxicology’s 54th Annual Meeting and “ToxExpo.” The gathering will feature more than 160 scientific sessions and 2,400 poster presentations, providing important insights into how the study […]
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12:00 PM | Who is to blame for mammal declines in the Everglades?
Who would want to harm a cute, cuddly, little bunny? Burmese pythons, it turns out. That’s the result of an experiment recently conducted in Florida’s Everglades. In recent years, the mammal communities of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem – and, in particular, within Everglades National Park – have seriously plummeted. The obvious culprits when entire taxa
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10:00 AM | Neighborhood Planning for Resilient and Livable Cities, Part 2: Can ‘Nested’ Neighborhood Planning Lead to Urban Ecological Democracy?
Is neighborhood planning worth doing? We argued in our last blog entry (Part 1 of this series) that neighborhood planning has the potential to be transformative in improving community resilience, but that it also has a dark side. It can be divisive both spatially—by setting clear geographic ‘limits’ that signal exclusion or exclusivity—and socially, by putting local … Continue reading Neighborhood Planning for Resilient and Livable Cities, Part 2: Can […]
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6:16 AM | 18 percent of the tiger deaths in 2014 were due to poaching: MoEF
70 percent of the wild tigers remaining in the world are found in India Though the latest tiger population estimates in India point to an increase in the population of striped cats in the country, situation is far from safe for these big cats, shows the tiger mortality data from 2014. According to the data on tiger mortality from last year, 18 percent of the total tiger deaths in the country
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3:26 AM | Daylighting and restoring urban streams, ponds and wetlands can provide huge ecological and social benefits. Are such restorations “worth it”? What are the pitfalls? How can we demonstrate these benefits and elevate them in the public discourse so that urban wetlands become urban planning priorities?
No summary available for this post.
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1:24 AM | WATCH: The Solar Eruptions That Caused Today's Spectacular St. Patrick's Day Auroras
Curtains of hyper-luminous green, white, purple and red light glittered in the skies around the world today as a result of a severe geomagnetic storm caused by two massive explosions on the Sun. These St. Patrick's Day auroral displays started early on Tuesday, March 17th, and they are predicted to continue overnight. The video above, from the SOHO spacecraft, shows the two coronal mass ejections from the Sun, or CMEs, responsible for the auroral fireworks.  These […]
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12:53 AM | engadget:Underwater Aussie wave farms pump both power and...
engadget:Underwater Aussie wave farms pump both power and waterI’m super intrigued by this. Also, ocean-power in general. I mean, there’s so much ocean! And finding suitable space on land can be very challenging. I know the ocean-power alternative energy field isn’t as robust as its land-based counterparts, but I’d really love to see more work like this, esp since this *seems* like an environmentally safe setup.

March 17, 2015

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11:46 PM | Soil microbiology interview for British Science Week
MMU Engage interviewed me for British Science Week to find out about the research being done at MMU by various researchers. In the video I explain how we extracted DNA from the sand of the Kalahari in Botswana, which we then used to identify the microbial communities that glue the …
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9:01 PM | Calif. Water Regulators Tighten the Screws — But Just a Little
As California plods into its fourth year of drought, critics say the latest round of statewide water restrictions are too little -- and possibly too late.
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