Posts

August 11, 2014

+
4:27 PM | Summertime Science Roundup
What have you been doing this summer? Have you gone to the beach? How about fishing? Or do you prefer to stay home and garden? A few weeks ago I took a look through this summer’s Science Borealis blog feed to find stories where science overlaps with summer fun. Click on over there to read […]
+
4:00 PM | Some of Us May Have a Genetic Predisposition to Disliking Exercise
About 90% of us over the age of 12 fail to get as much exercise as we should. This is almost certainly not because we don’t believe in those benefits. Instead, it looks like at least part of the reason may be that some of us are genetically programmed to hate exercise.
+
2:37 PM | Attraction in the World of Bats
We spend much of our lives attempting to figure out the opposite sex in the hopes that it will lead to increased opportunities to attract a mate. But even when in a relationship, looking back to see how it all kicked off can still leave … Continue reading →
+
2:15 PM | From the inbox
Sounds like a great learning opportunity and Innsbruck is a wonderful city:Course module on Molecular Analysis of Trophic Interactions held at the University of Innsbruck, Austria.This course welcomes anyone interested in the analysis of food web interactions using DNA-based approaches. The module includes a lecture and seminar series as well as a practical lab course and runs from 29 September to 10 October 2014.
+
2:09 PM | Fire, Forests, and Fighter Jets
By Jason Bittel The 35,284-acre Oregon Gulch fire burning about 15 miles east of Ashland, Oregon, is now 64 percent contained, but last week, the blaze sent rare pyrocumulus (that’s fire + cumulus) clouds high into the sky. That’s when aerial photographer Jim “Hazy” Haseltine was able to capture this shot of an F-15C from Oregon’s Air National Guard with a bad-ass backdrop. A combination of lightning and dry conditions (read: […]
+
1:30 PM | Schizophrenia: What It’s Like to Hear Voices
People who hear auditory hallucinations say the voices can be quiet or cacophonous, singular or crowd-like, but they are almost always harsh and disapproving.
+
9:46 AM | Writing environment: the basic things
The last instalment in my short series about environment writing. For now. I say this because recently, when I’ve been telling people about my imminent departure, everyone’s asking if I keep writing. And I usually say yes.
+
7:25 AM | The Cyclic Nature of “Crazy Bad” Air Pollution and Fuel Transitions
  China has become an icon for global air quality discussions – with its infamously horrible airpocolypses leading to widely publicized health impacts on the local population including... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
12:54 AM | #5: A Successful Second Survey
On Friday, we left the dock around 6:45 AM, eager to see what our second survey would hold. Not too far in to our tracklines, the dark clouds that seemed so far away decided to let a few raindrops loose on us. The worst of the weather ended up on land, where folks experienced a severe storm. Lightning even struck not too far from our field station in Lubec! Quatro at the

August 10, 2014

+
8:09 PM | Atlantic Cod Declining Even More — We Can Bring Them Back
More bad news as federal regulators declare populations of Atlantic cod continue to diminish, despite severe cuts in fishing quotas. We can bring the cod... The post Atlantic Cod Declining Even More — We Can Bring Them Back appeared first on Russ George.
+
5:29 PM | Guest blog posts for CSP and CSWA
This past week I blogged about the Mount Polley mine disaster, an event that I think we won’t hear the end of anytime soon as clean up (hopefully) gets underway. At the same time that I posted that blog, I also had a couple of guest posts go up. The first was at the Canadian…
+
3:21 PM | USBR: Gila diversion costs exceed benefits
On the scale of Colorado River water diversions yet unbuilt, the possibility of taking water out of the Gila River in southwestern New Mexico is small stuff – 14,000 acre feet per year, or maybe less if the water’s simply not there. But the current debate in New Mexico illustrates a common refrain as western ...Continue reading ‘USBR: Gila diversion costs exceed benefits’ »

August 09, 2014

+
10:18 AM | Detrimental dissent – impacts of uncertainty on public support for environmental policy
Environmental issues are inherently complex and multi-faceted. The innate variab...
+
3:35 AM | The problem with “drought”
I’m increasingly at a loss about how to do useful journalism because of the gap between the technical world I try to understand (risks associated with water contamination, for example, or the problem of drought) and the public reaction to my efforts to provide a nuanced but accurate explanation of the thing at hand. Mark ...Continue reading ‘The problem with “drought”’ »

August 08, 2014

+
10:54 PM | Tropical Cyclones Parade Across the Pacific
Tropical Storm Iselle made landfall on the Big Island of Hawaii today, Aug. 8th — only the second tropical storm in recorded history ever to do so, and one of four cyclones that have been swirling in the Pacific Ocean. Iselle struck with winds of 60 miles per hour, and it brought torrential rains of […]The post Tropical Cyclones Parade Across the Pacific appeared first on ImaGeo.
+
9:08 PM | Clearest Water On Earth Grows In Area – The Wonder – The Horror
What do you think of when you hear a report of the clearest water on earth? For most the idea that comes to mind is... The post Clearest Water On Earth Grows In Area – The Wonder – The Horror appeared first on Russ George.
+
6:48 PM | 8/8/2014 This Week in Energy: Beyond Headlines
Here’s a bit of energy news that didn’t make it into our daily coverage during the past week. In this review, we collected some of less big, but nonetheless interesting news, of the week that went by, from the world of energy science and technology.
+
6:26 PM | More Facts on Climate Change = What?
Climate concerned advocates received some welcome news yesterday: A new study finds that when they understand climate basics, some conservatives are more likely to accept that climate change is happening I continue to be amazed at how much time and resources are spent justifying attempts to win over the most ideologically entrenched demographic in the climate […]The post More Facts on Climate Change = What? appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
+
5:27 PM | Used Cigarette Filters Can Power Our Gadgets
A group of researchers from South Korea have converted used cigarette filters into a high-performing material that can be used to store energy.
+
5:19 PM | Puerto Rico's Preemies, Darwin's Finches Under Fire, Not-So Sci-Fi Climate Solutions
By Jason Bittel Born Too Soon One out of every five babies in Puerto Rico is born premature, and doctors think pthalate pollution might explain why. Pthalates are a plastic additive found in scores of household products, and these potential toxins fill many of Puerto Rico's Superfund sites. In fact, the island has the highest concentration of these toxic waste sites in the United States. Could pthalates be bringing babies into the world too soon? As Paul […]
+
4:29 PM | First Solar Sets New CdTe Solar Cell Efficiency Record
First Solar, Inc. this week announced it has set a world record for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) research cell conversion efficiency, achieving 21.0% efficiency certified at the Newport Corporation’s Technology and Applications Center (TAC) PV Lab.
+
4:08 PM | A mysterious butterfly
Credit: Chihuahuan Desert Research InstituteAbout three years ago in spring 2011 the undergrad student Jon Spero found a dead butterfly beside a road next to our institute. The street cuts right through the campus of the University of Guelph and a large number of students need to cross it sometimes several times to get to their classes.Admitted, finding a dead bug beside a road isn't something special worth a blog post but as it turns out this find is extremely unusual. Actually it was so […]
+
2:15 PM | Tesla, Panasonic to Build Battery ‘Gigafactory’ in U.S.
Panasonic Corporation and Tesla Motors, Inc. have signed an agreement that lays out their cooperation on the construction of a large-scale battery manufacturing plant in the United States, known as the Gigafactory.
+
2:00 PM | NASA’s Opportunity Rolls a Record Distance on Mars
One of NASA's most senior and still-operational spacecraft reached a milestone: the rover Opportunity completed its first 25 miles traveling across the surface of Mars!
+
1:43 PM | We Didn’t Start the Fire—Ohhhh Wait, We Did
By Jason Bittel Got three minutes? Dr. John Holdren, science advisor to the president, has a thing or two to tell you about climate change and wildfires. Basically, a warming world fuels the perfect firestorm. Longer, hotter, and drier summers make wildfires more frequent and more intense. Meanwhile, heat stress, droughts, and invasive pests turn trees into kindling. Poof! And this is not only a problem for the West: the Southeast actually leads the nation […]
+
12:00 PM | How Much Logging Can Tropical Forests Withstand?
It is universally agreed in conservation circles that when forests are razed to make room for roads or agriculture, the consequences for biodiversity are dire. But there are other forms of timber harvest, like selective logging, for which the consequences are either mixed or uncertain. In selective logging, only a certain amount of timber may
+
5:08 AM | Why Lake Mead keeps dropping
Water released from Lake Mead, through Hoover Dam’s turbines, travels downstream about 150 miles to Lake Havasu. There, massive pumps on the river’s left bank push the water up on the start of a 336 mile journey that ends in groundwater spreading basins west of Tucson. The Colorado River’s water then recharges an aquifer, where ...Continue reading ‘Why Lake Mead keeps dropping’ »
+
2:45 AM | The Air Up There
By Susan Cosier A foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in 2001 forced British farmers to slaughter more than six million sheep, cattle, pigs, and goats. What caused the outbreak was never definitively determined, but scientists suspect a dust cloud transported the virus from the Sahara Desert in Africa to the British Isles. But because no one had tested the cloud and what it contained, there was no way to tell for sure if the disease had arrived with the dust. […]
+
1:11 AM | #4: Whales, Brownies and Poop
This morning we left the dock around 7:15 AM, slightly later than usual to avoid any lingering fog. We were all thrilled to finally get back on the water, but encountering some of our favorite things made the day even more amazing. Around 9:30 AM, we photographed our first right whale! Everywhere we looked, there were right whales. Typically when we hang in one area for a while, we start

August 07, 2014

+
10:09 PM | Annals of Indian water: “hot, scorching sands”
Most of the land in these reservations is and always has been arid. If the water necessary to sustain life is to be had, it must come from the Colorado River or its tributaries. It can be said without overstatement that when the Indians were put on these reservations they were not considered to be ...Continue reading ‘Annals of Indian water: “hot, scorching sands”’ »
123456789
377 Results