Posts

November 10, 2014

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2:00 PM | Parched: California Wildlife Suffers in Drought
Birds, salmon and snakes depend on marshes and rivers for survival and migration, and to propagate the species. But many wildlife species are unable to find the water they need as the drought shrinks rivers and dries up wetlands.
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2:00 PM | Your Next Mission: Homemade Holiday
Help protect the boreal forest while getting your craft on!
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1:58 PM | Homemade Holiday Card Ideas
Need some inspiration for your Homemade Holiday cards? Check out these ideas.
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1:50 PM | Make Your Own Paper
Follow these instructions to learn how you can make your own recycled paper.
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1:22 PM | Opportunity costs, and tea
A lovely set-up for a spot of outdoor tea My problem with the garden at the moment is that I’m not seeing its possibilities – I’m seeing the opportunity cost of going down any particular route. The garden is (as they all are) of finite size. This shouldn’t be an issue, because I have finite resources of energy, time and money to lavish on it, so there will always be a limit to how many different things I can grow. But how to whittle down the list so that I don’t […]
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12:30 PM | Open Letter to Bill Nye from a Plant Scientist
Below is an open letter from Kevin Folta, a plant scientist at the University of Florida, Gainsville. In recent years, Folta has taken a leading role as an educator on the subject of agricultural biotechnology. He often engages with GMO critics and foes. Folta is a professor in a public institution and his research is […]The post Open Letter to Bill Nye from a Plant Scientist appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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11:41 AM | Pondering Dot Earth’s Path After Seven Years and 2,500 Posts
Reviewing the bidding as a blog on smoothing the human journey passes its seventh year and 2,500th post.
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3:19 AM | Armored Dinosaurs Had Elaborate Nasal Passages
Since paleontologists began using CT scans and 3D reconstructions of dinosaur remains, they have been able to tell us much more about dinosaurs than ever before.Ankylosaur skull(William Diller Matthew, US PD)Now a new study shows that armor-plated dinosaurs (ankylosaurs) had the capacity to modify the temperature of the air they breathed using nasal passages shaped like "crazy straws."We know that animals use strategies such as sweating, panting, and swimming to prevent their brains from […]
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12:34 AM | Cranes in the outfield
No summary available for this post.

November 09, 2014

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8:56 PM | Happy Birthday, Carl Sagan!
One of the great astrophysical minds and proponents for reaching beyond our limits as a species, was Dr. Carl Sagan, born today, November 9, 1934. Dr. Sagan died from an illness in 1996, but his voice and contributions to exploring the cosmos live on. Carl Sagan was a big supporter of SETI — the Search for […]
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6:16 PM | The Emerald Necklace: Metropolitan Greenspace Planning in Los Angeles and Beyond
Introduction Mike Houck Urban Greenspaces Institute In winter 2009, Houston Wilderness hosted an inaugural meeting of what would become the Metropolitan Greenspace Alliance.  Today the Alliance is a national coalition of coalitions working in ecologically, culturally, and economically diverse communities … Continue reading →
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11:57 AM | Pandan
The giant Pandan triffid surveys its domain Back in March this year, when I naively thought having a garden would be just weeks ago, I ordered some plants from Suttons. The Chilean guavas have spent all summer on the windowsill at work, but have now come home and are acclimatising to life outside in the garden. The current plan is for them to make a little hedge in the front garden – I’ll have to see whether they need some friends to help them fill the space. The kaffir lime […]

November 08, 2014

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11:00 PM | Revolutionary Image of Planet Formation Around a Young Sun-like Star
A few days ago, astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array telescope (or, ALMA) released this astonishing image: This is an image of a protoplanetary disk — the ring of gas and dust that astronomers think surrounds most forming stars (or, protostars). The image amazes for a few reasons. It is the first image to […]
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10:49 PM | We’re using less water
The latest USGS “Estimated Use of Water in the US” is out. It says we’re using less water. From 2005-10, a 13 percent drop. “Peak water” happened back in 1980:   There are lots of caveats. This analysis uses “withdrawals” rather than “consumptive use”. So if a power plant sucks up river water for cooling, ...Continue reading ‘We’re using less water’ »
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10:33 PM | Giant Storm that Battered Alaska May be Strongest on Record for the North Pacific
As the monster storm that once was Super Typhoon Nuri swept toward the western Aleutian Islands, bringing hurricane force winds and 50-foot waves, it may have been one for the record books. But luckily, there are no reported injuries or significant damage on the sparsely populated islands. One measure of the strength of a storm […]The post Giant Storm that Battered Alaska May be Strongest on Record for the North Pacific appeared first on ImaGeo.
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3:38 PM | Top Ten Weirdest Looking National Birds
Did you know that countries have national birds? Here's our countdown of some of the weirdest looking national birds from all around the world.
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2:42 PM | Making History: Rosetta Catches its Comet Next Week!
It’s an exciting time for solar system scientists, as next Wednesday, November 12, 2014, the European Space Agency‘s Rosetta mission will become the first spacecraft in human history to land on a comet — one of the primitive, icy bodies that are left overs from our solar system’s formation about 4.6 billion years ago. Rosetta […]
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2:05 PM | Space worms
Worms were the only survivors when space shuttle Columbia broke up on re-entry in 2003. Caenorhabditis elegans, nematodes, had been sent into space to test a synthetic nutrient solution. Their naturally short life-span meant that the survivors were several generations removed from the worms that were blasted into space at the beginning of the mission. Nematodes experiments have also been conducted on the International Space Station (ISS), looking at the effect of microgravity – it turns […]
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4:01 AM | Sewage treatment plant, Albuquerque
Water is photogenic, even at a sewage treatment plant. This is from a tour this afternoon of the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority’s Southside Wastewater Reclamation Plant with a couple of University of New Mexico faculty colleagues and a bunch of students, including the graduate students in the Water Resources Program, where I’m an ...Continue reading ‘Sewage treatment plant, Albuquerque’ »

November 07, 2014

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11:58 PM | Move Over Super El Niño, Here Comes the Tasmanian Devil (Or Would that be the Dreaded Polar Vortex?)
Andy Revkin, my friend and colleague, has an excellent post up over at DotEarth on the ‘Super El Niño’ Forecast Fadeout’ (which I wrote about yesterday here). And as he notes, attention is now focusing — again — on the return of the polar vortex. The super El Niño that was predicted back in June […]The post Move Over Super El Niño, Here Comes the Tasmanian Devil (Or Would that be the Dreaded Polar Vortex?) appeared first on ImaGeo.
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10:09 PM | The ‘Super El Niño’ Forecast Fadeout
Early-year warnings of a "super El Nino" are history.
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7:51 PM | This Week in EPA Science
This morning I heard “Jingle Bells” on the radio and an announcement alerting me of the exact number of days I had left to shop. My coffee cup has made the switch from standard white to holiday red and all that pumpkin spice hype has been replaced by demands for gingerbread and peppermint. Sometimes it […]
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7:05 PM | Where have all the taxonomists gone?
"Erosion of taxonomic experts"For a good number of years colleagues keep pointing out that taxonomy as science is in decline because of the ever shrinking number of active taxonomists - professionals and amateurs alike. However, all the numbers that were thrown out were mostly not backed up by actual numbers resulting from dedicated studies. Well, that has now changed. A study looked at the development of the taxonomic workforce in the past years and also provides projections into the future. […]
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6:38 PM | Remnants of Nuri Explode, Creating a Monster Storm Now Threatening Alaska With Hurricane-Strength Winds
The Aleutian Islands in Alaska are bracing today for a monster storm born of the remnants of Super Typhoon Nuri. The forecast in the westernmost part of the island chain is for hurricane strength winds and waves up to 35 feet high or more. You can see the transformation of the cyclone into an extra-tropical […]The post Remnants of Nuri Explode, Creating a Monster Storm Now Threatening Alaska With Hurricane-Strength Winds appeared first on ImaGeo.
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5:29 PM | Scented leaf pelargoniums
My mistreated scented geraniums As previously mentioned, among the plants that I have rescued from the allotment so far are two scented leaf pelargoniums (aka scented geraniums). I’d wanted to add some of these edible flowers to the garden for years, and so in February I ordered a collection of four plants from Otter Farm. And then life kicked off (as it does) and they ended up being dumped on the allotment and left to fend for themselves while I took care of buying the new house. The […]
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3:00 PM | Technical Models Informed by Indigenous Cultural Values
November is Native American Heritage month. Throughout the month, we will be featuring blogs by EPA and EPA-supported Native American environmental and public health researchers, and about issues related to Tribal Science.  Technical Models Informed by Indigenous Cultural Values By Len Necefer Growing up in the Navajo Nation, I learned firsthand about the link between […]
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3:00 PM | Bay Area’s Coal Mining History at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve
One-third of the world's energy use relies on the greenhouse gas-producing coal, and the United Nations released a sobering report last week about its ongoing impact on global climate change. Find out about the Bay Area's own legacy with this fuel source.
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1:00 PM | The tale of the city bird and the country bird
Blackbirds have adapted quite well to the city despite the ever-present glow of lights, but what are those adaptations?
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1:30 AM | Frozen Extinct Bison Found in Siberia
Many large mammals went extinct at the end of the last Ice Age (approx 11,000 years ago), including the Steppe bison, or Bison priscus. A team of scientists has found one of these extinct bison frozen and naturally mummified in Eastern Siberia. It's a complete specimen frozen in time.A Steppe bison on display at the University of Alaska Museum of the North(Bernt Rostad from Oslo, Norway, via Wikimedia Commons)According to the research team, they have uncovered the most complete frozen […]

November 06, 2014

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11:13 PM | Migraine log – October
It’s been some time since I did a migraine log. Let’s slog through some data. Frequency Back when I did my last migraine log at the end of May, I was all aflutter about topamax, which I’d started 6 weeks … Continue reading →
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