Posts

October 27, 2014

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10:47 AM | Soil wind erosion is influenced by soil inherent properties
Carlos M. Asensio Grima casensio@ual.es Department of Agronomy University of Almería, Spain Soil wind erosion is influenced by soil inherent properties, different wind characteristics and surface vegetation cover. For a better understanding of this process is necessary to explain the effect and consequences of wind erosion on the ground and especially in agricultural areas of […]
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9:54 AM | Images of soil erosion
Frans Kwaad, physical geographer Soil erosion is the removal of soil from cultivated land at a rate that is (much) higher than the rate that would occur under the natural vegetation at the considered site. Besides the loss of fertile topsoil, soil erosion entails the dissection of cultivated land by rills and gullies and the […]
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3:29 AM | Priority administration and Arizona’s Colorado River allotment
It’s generally more complicated than I think: A member of the Inkstain brain trust points out two catches in my “why can’t Phoenix just leave its unused apportionment in Lake Mead” post last week. The first has to do with Arizona’s application of the doctrine of prior appropriation with respect to its allocation of Colorado ...Continue reading ‘Priority administration and Arizona’s Colorado River allotment’ »

October 26, 2014

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3:51 PM | Conflict sells
Here is Maria Gibson, the groundwater geek: Although research shows, on an international level, collaboration rather than conflict is the norm, most would agree “water collaboration” is far less exciting than “water wars”…. Via the always helpful Michael Campana, and more Gibson here.
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1:47 PM | Two Years After Sandy’s Surge, New York City Shifts Toward a Softer Relationship with the Sea
Two years after Sandy swamped parts of New York City, a vision emerges for a mix of hard and soft landscape changes reflecting the reality of rising seas.
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8:04 AM | Book Review: Qaqamiigux
Shortly before I moved, I came across references to a new book with an unpronounceable title – Qaqamiiĝux̂: Traditional Foods and Recipes from the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands. I was intrigued, especially since I had to look up where the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands are. It turns out that they’re off the south western coast of Alaska, with a cool, wet and stormy climate. The region is volcanically active. Qaqamiigux (if you’ll forgive the ongoing lack of […]
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4:14 AM | Adaptive capacity to the California drought
It’s often argued, and generally true, that municipal water use is less vulnerable to drought because cities can afford to pay more for water than farmers. But as U.C. Davis water researcher Amanda Fencl points out, the arrow of adaptive capacity doesn’t always point in that direction:   Key point about adaptive capacity to #cadrought- ...Continue reading ‘Adaptive capacity to the California drought’ »

October 25, 2014

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2:22 PM | Top Ten Funny Halloween Animals
Check out what these black and orange animals have to say about Halloween!
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7:46 AM | Gardening offers 25/10
Penny Royal If you’re stocking up on seeds, then head over to VegetableSeeds.net, where they’re offering a whopping 75% discount on everything until 17th November 2014. Thompson & Morgan are offering ‘buy one, get one free’ on selected varieties of onions for autumn planting. To make use of this offer, click through to see the list of varieties, and add your chosen ones to your basket. The cheapest pack will be free, providing that you complete your order before […]

October 24, 2014

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9:50 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
9 Things That Reveal How Airbnb Lets Rich People Run a Bunch of Illegal Hotels Tracking one hundred students The iPad Air 2 Has Its Own SIM So You Change Carriers Whenever You Want Controversial: Should Workers Be Paid For … Continue reading →
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9:21 PM | Why Americans Should Fear Fear of Ebola More than the Virus
Two vital efforts to tamp down unfounded fears of Ebola contagion.
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8:18 PM | This Week in EPA Science
By Kacey Fitzpatrick Competition can bring out the best in people or the worst in people. Anyone who’s been watching the World Series or following football this season knows what I mean. But when it comes to competing for sustainability, everybody wins! Read about the student teams selected to compete for this year’s People, Prosperity, […]
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4:31 PM | Florida Lizards Evolving Rapidly: Visible Change in 15 Years, 20 Generations
Scientists working in Florida have documented the high-speed evolution of a native lizard species, in as little as 15 years, in response to pressure from an invading lizard species.Left hind foot of a green anole, with enlarged toepads(Yoel Stuart)After contact with the invasive brown anole lizards, the native green anole lizards began perching higher in the trees. With each generation, their feet have changed to become better at gripping the thinner, smoother branches found higher up.According […]
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4:26 PM | Another Round on Energy Rebound
Two analysts of energy trends expand on their view that efficiency's climate and energy benefits have been overstated.
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4:25 PM | There Will Be Blood
The pressure to reach for a gun to help save one animal from another is stronger than ever. And it has triggered a conservation problem from hell.
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4:24 PM | The Future Will Not Be Dry
The most resilient cities aren't the ones that fight the water back—but the ones that absorb it.
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4:22 PM | Please Step Out of Your Car
With imaginative, green ways of getting around the city, cars may finally go the way of the horse and buggy.
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4:20 PM | DIY Glaciers
In a desert 13,000 feet above sea level, a remarkable man is taking on the global warming challenge—and winning.
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4:20 PM | Add a Few Species. Pull Down the Fences. Step Back.
Brandom Keim reviews George Monbiot's Feral
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4:19 PM | Our Changing Seas
Tiny marine organisms painstakingly build expansive coral reefs, one tiny piece of calcium carbonate at a time. Sculptor and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison mimics that process, patiently handcrafting reef pieces one by one, shaping and texturing them with simple tools such as chopsticks, and assembling them into complex colonies. Mattison has constructed a series of
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4:14 PM | Reality Is Too Confining
We know that nature experiences can change environmental behavior—but it turns out those experiences don’t have to be real.
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4:13 PM | Bug Art
Steven Kutcher is an artist, an entomologist, a teacher—and a Hollywood bug wrangler. Kutcher got his start in bug art in the 1980s when he was asked to figure out how to make a fly walk through ink and leave footprints for a Steven Spielberg–directed TV project. From there he went on to work with
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4:12 PM | Who’s Afraid Now?
In predator-human conflicts, the thing we have to fear most is fear itself
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4:11 PM | The Interspecies Internet
Why restrict the Web to one species?
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4:06 PM | The Sugarcane Borer
The sugarcane borer moth, Diatraea saccharalis, is widespread throughout the Western Hemisphere, and is considered an introduced species in the southern United States. Although this moth has a wide distribution and is a pest of many crop plants including sugarcane, corn, sorghum and rice, it is considered one species.The larvae bore into the sugarcane stalks. In mature plants the tops tend to weaken or die, sometimes breaking off. In young plants the inner whorl of leaves is killed, resulting […]
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3:07 PM | Sustainability and Resilience: Making the Connection
By Alan Hecht, Ph.D. When most people consider “resilience,” they think about bouncing back from some sort of unwelcome catastrophe. Whether it’s “super storms” devastating coastal communities and disrupting millions of people along the east coast, wildfires in the mountain and western states, or natural disasters and related, human-caused emergencies such as the tsunami and […]
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3:06 PM | Texas Power Consumer Complaints On The Rise, Reports TCAP
A recent analysis by the consumer advocacy group Texas Coalition for Affordable Power (TCAP) shows that consumer complaints filed with the state’s Public Utility Commission (PUC) have risen again in 2014, after four years of decline. In 2002, Texas became … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Save the Redwood League’s Fern Watch Program Helps Monitor Climate Change
How will climate change affect the redwood ecosystem, which is so dependent on summer fog and plentiful winter rain? Learn about Save the Redwoods' ongoing "Fern Watch" study from Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Park District.
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12:28 PM | When the Rainforests Run Dry
By Susan Cosier If you thought the California drought was bad (and it is), take a look at what's happening in southeastern Brazil. These satellite images of the Jaguari Reservoir—one of the main water sources for São Paulo, South America's largest city—show how much water levels have dropped in just one year. In the lower photo, taken in August, the resevoir is only at 3 to 5 percent of its carrying capacity. São Paulo, home […]

October 23, 2014

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10:46 PM | Indian Vultures Are Dying for Some Good News
When a species experiences catastrophic population declines as high as 99.9 percent, any bit of good news is cause for celebration—even if the news isn’t exactly great. India’s vultures now... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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