Posts

July 22, 2014

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3:44 PM | New Material Stores Industrial, Coal Plant Waste
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created a new material that combines sodium bentonite clay and polymers to create a substance that can withstand industrial, coal plant waste.
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3:36 PM | Researchers Question Expansion of Antarctica’s Fringe of Sea Ice
Antarctic sea ice may not be expanding as much as recent estimates concluded.
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2:24 PM | EIA Expects Light-Duty Vehicles’ Share in Energy Use to Decrease
Transportation energy consumption, including energy demand from light-duty vehicles, heavy-duty vehicles, aircraft, marine vessels, rail, and other sources, reached 13.8 million barrels per day oil equivalent (boe/d) in 2012 (28% of all energy consumption in the United States), down from a peak of 14.6 million boe/d in 2007.
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2:23 PM | NHL Crosschecks Climate Change, Shazam for Bird Song, Hey New Orleans, Show Us Your Butts!
By Jason Bittel Sanctuary!: The Fish and Wildlife Service has decided to phase out neonicotinoid pesticides in federal wildlife refuges in the Northwest, Hawaii, and U.S. territories in the Pacific. (Earlier this month NRDC—which publishes OnEarth—filed a legal petition asking the Environmental Protection Agency to stop the use of these pesticides.) Neonics wreak havoc on bee populations, and recent research also links them to declines in bird […]
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1:55 PM | Security and risk at Sport Mega Events
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Findings on Sport Mega Events from two former IHRR researchers, Dr Francisco Klauser and Dr Richard Giulianotti, reveals that these are far more complex and dynamic than is normally realised. Their work shows the variety of public, government, and commercial [...] The post Security and risk at Sport Mega Events appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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1:54 PM | Genetically Engineering Almost Anything
Yours truly and Eleanor Nelsen, reporting for NOVA Next: With gene drives—so named because they drive a gene through a population—researchers just have to slip a new gene into a drive system and let nature take care of the rest. Subsequent generations of whatever species we choose to modify—frogs, weeds, mosquitoes—will have more and more […]∞
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1:13 PM | World’s Largest Carbon Capture Facility To Be Built Near Houston
The world’s largest carbon capture facility is coming to Texas.  The US Department of Energy has announced that work will soon begin a project to capture up to 90% of the carbon emissions from the W.A, Parish Generating Station; a … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Is kosher seafood an accidental eco-label?
Eco-labeling, from Fair Trade to Organic and beyond, has proliferated rapidly in recent years. Seafood is a particularly interesting arena for this type of labeling: many markets now drop different types of fish into categories like “good” or “avoid” based on the supposed sustainability of the fishery. Though there have been questions whether the labels
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12:47 PM | Environmental risks from Britain’s mining legacy
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Steven Kershaw explains the environmental risks left by coal mining in Britain and how they can be managed Centuries of mining in Britain has left a legacy of abandoned underground mines that continues to represent a risk to public safety [...] The post Environmental risks from Britain’s mining legacy appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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3:23 AM | How well is California weathering the drought?
Peter Gleick runs down some of the impacts of California’s remarkable drought: [W]ater still comes out of my tap, in unrestricted amounts and superb quality, at a reasonable price. And this is true of every resident in the state: drinking water supplies have not been affected, especially for the vast majority of the population that ...Continue reading ‘How well is California weathering the drought?’ »
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3:05 AM | Clouds
No summary available for this post.

July 21, 2014

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8:38 PM | Hard Facts About Fracking
By Scott Dodd Growing up in northern West Virginia in the 1970s, I remember seeing a lot of big white plastic candy canes sticking out of the ground, marking the natural gas pipelines that ran just below the surface. You’d encounter them along streams and fence lines and the backcountry roads that always made me carsick. What I didn’t realize as a kid was how much of my family history was intertwined with those hidden gas lines. My […]
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7:27 PM | Giant Lithium Titanate Battery to Be Connected to Grid in UK
The UK’s first 2 MW lithium titanate battery will be connected to the electrical grid later this year, as part of new research as a part of a research effort to tackle energy storage challenges.
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6:51 PM | California Fire Season: Threat of Dry Lightning Looms
Weather experts say the next couple of weeks could be some of the worst in state history for wildfires caused by lightning strikes.
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6:00 PM | The Story of Mr. Bisbing, Part III: Spending the Summer at the Outer Banks
This is the third chapter in the story about a great egret that we gave a GPS tracking device on the Outer Banks of North Carolina in spring 2013 (see photo). We followed his movements for about 8 months and reconstructed his story with his GPS and ACC data (see parts I and II). On […]
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5:15 PM | Report Shows European Countries as World’s Most Innovative
The Global Innovation Index 2014, co-authored by Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management Dean Soumitra Dutta, was released in Sydney, Australia, July 18 at the B20 international business summit.
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3:52 PM | Catalyst Helps Get More Energy From Biofuel
A new, simple catalyst, developed at the University of Twente, improves the quality of oil produced from biomass before it is even sent to the refinery.
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2:45 PM | Drilling the Atlantic, Germany Wins (Again), Synchronized Swimming with Robots and Hippos
By Jason Bittel Cold calculation: The Obama administration announced Friday that it will open the Eastern Seaboard for offshore drilling, and allow oil and gas companies to use sonic surveying cannons, a technology known to disrupt the communication systems of marine mammals, causing them to beach themselves. But hey, apparently that’s OK with the feds. “The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management acknowledged that thousands of sea creatures will […]
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2:43 PM | New Insight Into Hot Carriers May Help Make Better Solar Cells
Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a method to study the properties of “hot carriers” in semiconductors. This method could hold the key to the design and development of new, more efficient solar cells.
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2:32 PM | A cousin of the dodo
The closely related and extinct Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) and Rodrigues Solitaire (Pezophaps solitaria), both in the subfamily Raphinae, are members of a clade of morphologically very diverse pigeons. Genetic analyses have revealed that the Nicobar Pigeon (Caloenas nicobarica) is the closest living relative of these birds, thereby highlighting their ancestors’ remarkable migration and morphological evolution. The Spotted Green Pigeon (Caloenas maculata) was described in 1783 and showed […]
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2:00 PM | New UC Berkeley Study Shows Oxytocin May Help Rejuvenate Aging Muscles
UC Berkeley researchers have discovered that administering oxytocin may help maintain healthy muscles during aging.
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1:52 PM | The Search for Ithaca
This post unifies two of my absolutely favourite topics: geology and classical Greek history. I have always had a soft spot for the classics. In fact, when I started my undergrad I was planning on doing a double major of geology and classics. I decided to focus on geology, but I have not lost my […]
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1:11 PM | Fuel/Cost Savings of Improving Fuel Economy from 12->15 mpg = 30->60 mpg
Consumer tip-of-the-day: increasing efficiency of fuel economy on a miles-per-gallon scale is not linear, as more miles-per-gallon (mpg) are initially better for your wallet and the planet than you... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:14 AM | Postgraduate scholarship for research in hazard and risk
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Applications are invited for the Christopher Moyes Memorial Foundation Scholarship to support a suitably qualified postgraduate student for a three year PhD programme of research in the Department of Geography at Durham University, UK. The scholarship is to support research of [...] The post Postgraduate scholarship for research in hazard and risk appeared first on Institute of Hazard, […]
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7:01 AM | California Has Little Say Over Oil Train Safety
The state can't set speed limits on trains. It can't tell railroads to choose less hazardous routes. It can't tell oil companies not to bring trains carrying volatile crude through cities.

July 20, 2014

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11:17 PM | Is There Any Type of Urban Greenspace that Addresses the Urban-Rural Continuum? Urban Agriculture
In my last post, I wrote that efficient urban sustainability policy should be inclusive, in the sense that it should address sustainability in an area large enough to encompass urban centers, but suburban, periurban and dependent rural, or natural places. … Continue reading →
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6:01 PM | Earth Art: Wildfire Abstraction
By mid-afternoon on Saturday, July 19th, raging wildfires in Oregon and Washington had consumed 947,583 acres, according to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center. That’s an area more than three times the size of New York City, and up from a bit more than 300,000 acres on Thursday. About 100 homes have been destroyed in Washington, and […]The post Earth Art: Wildfire Abstraction appeared first on ImaGeo.
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12:41 PM | Deliberating Over Kennedy’s Thimerosal Book
Last September, Robert Kennedy Jr. and Mark Hyman received a letter from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). It pertained to a “report” that Kennedy, an environmental attorney and Hyman, a medical doctor,  had sent to federal health officials on the dangers of thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative once commonly used in pediatric vaccines […]The post Deliberating Over Kennedy’s Thimerosal Book appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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9:06 AM | Bees in space
Image credit: the NASA History Office and the NASA JSC Media Services Center Today marks the 45th anniversary of the Apollo Moon landing, which seems like a good time to take the next step on our space adventure. You choose the topic of bees in space, so here we go! In 1984, 3400 honey bees (Apis mellifera) joined the crew of the Challenger space shuttle for a mission in space, housed in an aluminium “bee enclosure module” (BEM) as part of a student experiment to so see whether […]

July 19, 2014

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6:29 PM | Grinning, winning cress heads
Photo by kennysarmy If you’re looking for ways to keep the little ones occupied in the summer holidays, then check out this competition from Chiltern Seeds. Call 01491 824675 or email info@chilternseeds.co.uk to request a free “CRESS HEAD PACK”, and they’ll send you a packet of cress seeds, some googly eyes and some coloured pompoms to make your very own Cress Head/Animal/Alien/Loch Cress Monster (I’d love to see a Loch Cress Monster :) It’s then up to […]
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