Posts

September 25, 2014

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3:20 PM | Will monkeys go hungry with climate change?
Extreme weather, rising seas, and altered habitats are some of the obvious consequences of climate change. But scientists are finding more subtle shifts too. In a new study spanning three decades of tropical forest data, researchers have discovered that tree leaves are losing their nutritional value — a change that could put leaf-eating monkeys at
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2:42 PM | There’s a Big Ocean Out There (and We’re About to Protect More of It)
By Susan Cosier The Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument is about to get a lot larger … nearly seven times larger (and FYI, it’s already pretty darn big). With a wave of his pen and help from the Antiquities Act, President Obama is expected to create the earth’s biggest fully-protected marine reserve today, expanding the existing monument in the central Pacific from 87,000 to 490,000 square miles—home to 130 underwater […]
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2:33 PM | India and the Iron Law of Climate Policy
I have an idealistic streak that is increasingly tempered by real world events. So on Sunday I admired the enthusiasm of the hundreds of thousands of people who marched through the streets of Manhattan to sound their concern about climate change and other environmental issues. I tried not to let this article ruin the good […]The post India and the Iron Law of Climate Policy appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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7:20 AM | Swirling Cyclonic Eye Candy in the Northeast Pacific: Beautiful but Dangerous
At one point, the swirling cyclone in the animation of  weather satellite images above was producing winds of hurricane strength. Luckily, as it neared shore it weakened. Even so, it brought heavy rain to British Columbia on Wednesday, Sept. 24. Here’s what it actually looked like from the shore: Thanks to the Weather Network for […]The post Swirling Cyclonic Eye Candy in the Northeast Pacific: Beautiful but Dangerous appeared first on ImaGeo.
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1:39 AM | Long-Range Forecast: Less Snow for Skiers, Less Water for California
A new federal report affirms what scientists have been saying for years: California's "bank account" of snow-melt water may be overdrawn within decades.

September 24, 2014

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8:21 PM | Distilling the Essence of Climate Change Complexity
I am teaching two journalism classes this semester, with climate change being a main focus these past few weeks. We had an obvious news peg in Sunday’s big climate march and the gathering of world leaders this week in NYC. Students in both classes have received climate change 101 lessons from me–where the body of […]The post Distilling the Essence of Climate Change Complexity appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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8:00 PM | Mysterious Flying Squirrel Could Get Endangered Species Protection
The squirrels gliding amid the mountains east of Los Angeles have been, for the most part, flying under the scientific radar. There has never been a single scientific paper published specifically... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:44 PM | As a New Movement in Earth’s Seasonal Symphony Begins, Climate Change in the Arctic Keeps up its Brisk Tempo
In 2014, Arctic sea ice has continued in its long-term and dramatic decline, a process that is likely helping to accelerate the pace of overall climate change in the north. That’s the news from the National Snow and Ice Data Center, announced on Monday — just as world leaders were preparing to meet at the […]The post As a New Movement in Earth’s Seasonal Symphony Begins, Climate Change in the Arctic Keeps up its Brisk Tempo appeared first on ImaGeo.
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4:42 PM | The smallest European beetle
Photo: Natural History Museum of DenmarkBaranowskiella ehnstromi, a member of the family Ptiliidae (featherwing beetles), is the smallest known beetle species in Europe. It was discovered and described in 1997 by Mikael Sörensson in his home country Sweden. Meanwhile, scientists found the only 0.5mm long animal in Norway, Denmark, Switzerland, Austria and Germany. This little creature is as thin as a human hair and on top of that very elusive as it lives only in pores of the […]
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3:53 PM | Interns Summer in Review, Part 2: Sharing Across Cultures
I am Stephanie Cortes, a summer intern in NEON’s terrestrial instrument group (also known as the Fundamental Instrumentation Unit, or FIU). FIU is a science department whose purpose is to facilitate instrument-based collection of abiotic terrestrial, atmospheric, and soil data in a standardized way across all of the NEON terrestrial sites. I worked on building … Continue reading »
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2:09 PM | How Will World Nations Fight Climate Change? It’s All Over the Map
By Susan Cosier “We’re the first generation to feel the impacts of climate change and the last generation that can do something about it," President Obama declared at yesterday’s landmark United Nations climate summit. He and more than 100 other world leaders called for action on global warming—action that can come in many forms. Above is a map from Mashable that details how different countries are answering the call with initiatives […]
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1:43 PM | In brief: the UN Climate Summit
This week, delegates from the UN met in New York to discuss global climate change and to develop strategies for tackling these issues.  What are the outcomes of their discussions? And what does this mean going forwards? #climate2014   The meeting in New York was the largest climate meeting since Copenhagen 2009, and 120 world leaders took part in discussions. As well as discussing issues surrounding climate change, the summit aimed to encourage member states of the UN to sign the […]
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12:00 PM | The forgotten part of climate change: slower winds
Temperature and precipitation get all the glory in the discussions surrounding climate change. Ocean acidification has earned itself a seat at the table as well. But nobody has really paid any attention to wind. Maybe that’s because you can’t actually see wind, or that the changes have been more subtle than the triple-digit (Fahrenheit) heat
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12:00 PM | Antarctic Fish Doesn't Freeze, Doesn't Thaw
Fish that have adapted to life in icy Antarctic waters by developing antifreeze proteins are swimming in an evolutionary paradox, researchers say. Even when swimming in warmer water, the fish have small ice crystals in their bodies.A notothenoid fish swims at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.Photo by Paul CzikoThe proteins in the bodies of Antarctic notothenioid fish are what keep the fish from freezing in sub-zero sea water. However, those same proteins have a side effect: They cause the fish to […]
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10:36 AM | Researchers produce propane using E.coli bacteria
A team of scientists has transformed E.coli bacteria into a propane factory. In their Nature magazine article, researchers from the University of Turku (Finland) and Imperial College (United Kingdom)... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:00 AM | Drought Rallies Support for California Water Projects
Water worries persist -- and may be driving support for a multi-billion-dollar water bond.
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3:30 AM | New season, more streamflow?
The first of the West Coast’s seasonal storms has blown in on the first day of fall, and Vancouver Islanders may almost be glad to see the clouds touch the ground and feel the rain on their sunburned skin. While there’s been a lot of coverage of the drought in California, wildfires in Oregon and…
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12:53 AM | U.N. Climate Summit Harvests a Host of Commitments
The U.N. Secretary General builds public and private commitments that could slow global warming and blunt its impacts.

September 23, 2014

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10:00 PM | Soils at Imaggeo: fly ash pond
Kripal Singh CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow, India About Imaggeo Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, […]
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9:42 PM | Real Fiscal Conservatives Fight Climate Change
By Brian Palmer Deep down, a lot of climate change denial has always been about money. That’s why Upton Sinclair’s observation—“It's difficult to get a man to understand something if his salary depends upon his not understanding it”—has by some accounts become the signature quote of the climate debate. Somehow, science and morality seem beside the point for the doubters and do-nothings.Yet the Obama administration is now […]
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9:27 PM | This Massive Squirrel Has Been Saved from Extinction
It only took about half a century, but the once-rare Delmarva fox squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus) now has a healthy population once again, placing it in a position to finally leave the protection... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:25 PM | Latest U.S. Air Strikes Steal Climate Summit Spotlight
I’m betting you’ve heard or seen the big news, as reported on the front page of today’s New York Times: The United States and allies launched airstrikes against Sunni militants in Syria early Tuesday, unleashing a torrent of cruise missiles and precision-guided bombs from the air and sea on the militants’ de facto capital of […]The post Latest U.S. Air Strikes Steal Climate Summit Spotlight appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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4:43 PM | Discoveries of the week
New species as every Tuesday. Let's start with some fishes:Paracobitis basharensis, Paracobitis molavii, Paracobitis persa, Paracobitis zabgawraensisThe genus Paracobitis from Iran and Iraq is reviewed, and diagnoses for all nine recognized species are presented. Accordingly, P. longicauda, P. malapterura, P. rhadinaea, P. smithi and P. vignai are considered valid; P. iranica is treated as a synonym of P. malapterura; and four new species are described. Paracobitis basharensis, new […]
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4:37 PM | The Musk Family Plan for Transforming the World’s Energy
Christopher Mims, writing at the Wall Street Journal about cousins Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, and Lyndon Rive, CEO of SolarCity: Mr. Musk’s Tesla makes cars, but it also—in the not too distant future—will make batteries. Lots of them. Tesla is building a $5 billion “gigafactory” in Nevada for batteries. A factory so large that […]∞
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4:18 PM | Preparing to “Move:” EPA Research Supports Taking Action on Climate Change
By Andy Miller, Ph.D. The issue of climate change is generating a lot of headlines again this week. The “People’s Climate March” in New York City, followed by the Climate Summit at the United Nations are sparking renewed interest in “taking action on climate change,” echoing the White House’s Climate Action Plan that President Obama […]
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3:25 PM | As World’s Population Booms, Will Its Resources Be Enough for Us?
Dennis Dimick, who led National Geographic’s “7 Billion” series, breaks down what 11 billion people will mean for ecosystems, economies, and society as a whole. ∞∞
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3:15 PM | World population could hit 11 billion
After years of everyone growing comfortable with a global population of 9.5 billion, a new study claims we’ll fly right past that. Damian Carrington, reporting for the Guardian: The work overturns 20 years of consensus that global population, and the stresses it brings, will peak by 2050 at about 9bn people. “The previous projections said […]∞
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2:23 PM | NYC Cops Arrest Polar Bear!
By Susan Cosier Thousands of protesters flooded Downtown Manhattan yesterday in an effort to hold Wall Street—and the fossil-fuel-based corporations it supports—accountable for exacerbating climate change. The sit-in followed the largest climate march in history, which took place uptown on Sunday, and preceded the international climate talks commencing at United Nations Headquarters today. "Flood Wall Street" is probably the most controversial […]
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1:00 PM | Are songbirds the forgotten wind power victim?
When it comes to wind turbines and their effect on birds, raptors get all the press. The golden eagles of Altamont in California were, are, and probably always will be the poster child for wind energy’s downsides, but should they be? The latest study of bird fatalities thanks to spinning turbine blades found that “small passerines”
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12:03 PM | Sustainable management of flooding on the Kosi River
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Flooding from the Kosi River in Bihar, India and Nepal is a complex issue that has displaced millions of people and current efforts to mitigate flooding on the Kosi have been insufficient in addressing future breaches of the river embankment. [...] The post Sustainable management of flooding on the Kosi River appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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