Posts

March 31, 2015

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1:20 AM | mostlysignssomeportents:Hostility seizures depression psychosis...
mostlysignssomeportents:Hostility seizures depression psychosis hallucinationsAlso suicide. And has a reported success rate of just 44%. (x) Kinda makes one wonder whether it’s worth it to quit smoking at all.Just one reason why I take vaping over this nonsense.
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12:05 AM | "The most objective metric of ‘livability’ in cities is probably the rate at which friends happen to..."
“The most objective metric of ‘livability’ in cities is probably the rate at which friends happen to run into one another on the sidewalk.” - (via secretrepublic)This is actually something that I really love about Seattle. It’s a pretty big city, yet I still manage to run into friends. Also, it’s not super-crowded. #SeattleLove

March 30, 2015

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9:59 PM | Keep breathing, California. You can do this.
A year ago, I wrote a piece urging calm in the face of California’s extreme drought: The thing to remember – and this’ll help you get through the tough year ahead – is that drought is no one big thing. It’s a series of little things – one water user, one water system at a time. ...Continue reading ‘Keep breathing, California. You can do this.’ »
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9:56 PM | futuristech-info:Unique microchip can simultaneously receive and...
futuristech-info:Unique microchip can simultaneously receive and transmit data at the same frequency - Doubling networks data capacityBy Charles Q. ChoiA new microchip could double the amount of data one can transmit and receive wirelessly by enabling simultaneous transmission and reception on the same radio frequency, engineers at Columbia University say.This advance could not only improve portables and WiFi networks, “but this could also ease up the frequency spectrum as well,” […]
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8:23 PM | San Juan-Chama forecast: looks like a second year of shortfall
According to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, warm February weather meant the earliest runoff in the 40-plus year history of the San Juan-Chama Project, which brings water from southern Colorado to the Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico. But “early” does not translate to “a lot of water”. San Juan-Chama Project contractors, the largest of ...Continue reading ‘San Juan-Chama forecast: looks like a second year of shortfall’ »
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8:12 PM | Where Can Civic Ecology Lead? TNOC Podcast Episode 003
Also available at iTunes. Story notes: Climate change and other stresses on cities represent great challenges to societies. Some of these challenges are systematic and somehow “knowable”—that is, we know generally what to expect, even if we aren’t sure how to respond. Other threats and stresses are unexpected, even random in the appearance. Things happen that … Continue reading Where Can Civic Ecology Lead? TNOC Podcast Episode 003 →
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7:39 PM | Weiser leaving the Sacramento Bee
Matt Weiser, who has ably served so many of us as a guide to the complexities of California water, is leaving the Sacramento Bee.
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6:16 PM | GMO Labeling Articles Should Reference Scientific Consensus
I recently spoke at Cornell about the public GMO discourse--who has shaped it and how some commonly held perceptions have taken hold in the media. In one talk, I discussed the importance of thought leaders, such as Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva. Pollan and Shiva are cultural icons who speak to (and on behalf of) people who share their values. Pollan has the ear of those who care deeply about the production of food. Shiva has the ear of those who care deeply about the […]
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4:30 PM | scientiflix:New “smart bandages” for burn victims and...
scientiflix:New “smart bandages” for burn victims and others Some bandages are embedded with medicine to treat wounds, but researchers at Harvard University and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have something much more sophisticated in mind for the future of chronic wound care….The new devices, known collectively as flexible bioelectronics, will do much more than deliver medicine. They will be able to monitor all the vital signs of the healing process, such as oxygen levels […]
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3:27 PM | Maybe we shouldn’t put the oil in a pipe or on a train
It looks like Keystone XL isn’t going to be built so all that bitumen from the tar sands is going to have to find another way to market. That means oil trains. Lac megantic wasn’t the only oil train accident, … Continue reading →
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3:19 PM | How Zoos Acquire Endangered Species
How do you transport two young orangutans to a zoo thousands of kilometers away from their native lands? Here’s the simple answer: FedEx. Here’s the less simple answer: It’s a lot of work. Meet Bob... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:07 PM | laughingsquid:First-Person Video of a Drone Herding Sheep in...
laughingsquid:First-Person Video of a Drone Herding Sheep in Ireland Gotta admit, this is definitely one of the best uses for drones now that I’ve seen, or of the use of new tech on farms generallyAlso, fun video. .
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2:08 PM | FracFocus Report: Helping us Paint a Fuller Picture
The following is an excerpt of a blog posted on EPA Connect, the Official Blog of EPA Leadership.  By Tom Burke Only a few years ago, very little was known about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. Congress asked us to embark on a major effort to advance the state-of-the-science to accurately […]
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2:00 PM | Wild Red Kite: Red and Deadly
Photography and Text by Steven Spence This is a wild red kite (German: Roter Milan; Latin Milvus milvus ), which lives mainly in Germany, Poland, France and Spain, but is seen in other parts of Europe. Black kites (German: Schwarzer Milan; Milvus migrans) are more widespread and more often encountered. Red Kite Population and Range […] The post Wild Red Kite: Red and Deadly appeared first on EH Science.
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1:59 PM | Mapping rainforest biodiversity
Australian rainforests have been fragmented due to past climatic changes and more recently landscape change as a result of clearing for agriculture and urban spread. The subtropical rainforests of South Eastern Queensland are significantly more fragmented than the tropical World Heritage listed northern rainforests and are subject to much greater human population pressures. The Australian rainforest flora is relatively taxonomically rich at the family level, but less so at the species level. […]
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1:00 PM | Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems?
After four years of nowhere near enough rain, Californians are wondering where else to look for water, and many are talking about the ocean -- desalination. The problem is, it’s really expensive to turn salt water into drinking water. And it’s hard to do it in a way that’s friendly to sea life. But a group of mayors around Monterey Bay say they don't have any other options.
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4:13 AM | Ocean Organic Carbon Persists For Millenia
European scientists working as part of the globally comprehensive Malaspina Expedition have shown deep ocean carbon is not promptly exhaled as CO2 by microbial activity... The post Ocean Organic Carbon Persists For Millenia appeared first on Russ George.

March 29, 2015

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4:30 PM | corporateaccount:trends
corporateaccount:trends
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3:12 PM | An ‘Ask Me Anything’ Chat on Climate Science and Coverage
A veteran climate scientist and a longtime climate journalist interview each other about three decades of work making sense of global warming.
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2:30 PM | Sunday Species Snapshot: Swift Parrot
The beautiful bird known as the swift parrot may be on the fast track to extinction. Species name: Swift parrot (Lathamus discolor) Description: A small bird, just 25 centimeters long, with bright... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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2:00 PM | Green Transport Routes Are Social-Cultural-Ecological Corridors
Since moving from Edinburgh to London, I have greatly missed my bicycle commute along the former’s Union Canal. There are similar routes in London, but they’re unfortunately not on my way to work. I have always sought out such corridors and they have sometimes influenced my destinations. In response to the “Why are you interested … Continue reading Green Transport Routes Are Social-Cultural-Ecological Corridors →
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3:05 AM | Exaggerated Impacts of Unrealistic Water Shortages
A guest post of sorts* from a group of prominent economists here in the western United States questioning the findings in a widely quoted report (pdf here) by a group from Arizona State about the potential economic impact if the Colorado River went dry: *********** A January 14th article in the Wall Street Journal reported ...Continue reading ‘Exaggerated Impacts of Unrealistic Water Shortages’ »

March 28, 2015

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11:30 PM | Finding home
Spring is out in full force on the West Coast, punctuated by pink cherry blossoms, yellow forsythia, and the delicately sculptured white blooms of sweet-scented magnolia. Red-winged blackbirds are puffing up to squeeze out their buzzing marsh song, and the nighttime frog chorus has become deafening, like those rocky Atlantic cliffs shown on British nature…
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6:20 PM | Koch Brothers, Museums, & An Unpopular Opinion
There’s been a campaign lately to get museums to cut ties with the Koch Brothers, who’ve donated a lot of money to some major institutions (like the AMNH), because of their dealings with the fossil fuel industry. (x) Personally, I have mixed feelings about it. Undoubtedly, I have problems with the Koch brothers’ political and business dealings, but frankly, most museums continually struggle to stay afloat, and most are still struggling to recover after the recession. (x, x, […]
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6:13 PM | As the water drops, so does the power.
As I empty the last of last month’s big snowstorm from my rain barrels onto the garden, I notice the water comes out more and more slowly. It’s a reminder of why power production drops as supply in our big reservoirs declines. Some tricky tradeoffs here:
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4:30 PM | mindblowingscience:Paper Test Quickly Detects Ebola, Dengue and...
mindblowingscience:Paper Test Quickly Detects Ebola, Dengue and Yellow FeverResearchers in the US have developed a silver nanoparticle-based paper test to simultaneously detect dengue, yellow fever and Ebola. This could provide a cheap and reliable diagnosis for all three diseases, that’s as quick as a home pregnancy test.The Ebola epidemic in West Africa underscores an urgent need for rapid diagnostics; quick identification and patient isolation can benefit the sick and the healthy. […]
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2:45 PM | Hahahahahahaha
Instead of opening the field for actors of any race to compete for any role in a color-blind manner, there has been a significant number of parts designated as ethnic this year, making them off-limits for Caucasian actors,” complains Andreeva. Link.
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1:43 PM | Top Ten Birds with Cool Hairstyles
Which bird hairstyle would you love to have?

March 27, 2015

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11:14 PM | Drought Hasn’t Dampened Gorgeous Bay Area Wildflowers Display
The drought hasn't held back the wildflowers this year. See what's blooming in naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embrys blog.
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9:27 PM | Hi. Is there a bunch of note taking in your classes? Is the work hard?
I assume you mean in my museum studies program at UW. Note taking is a personal preference. I’m not big on in-class notes; others are. Whatever works for you.Is it hard? Yes, but manageable. Also, an interesting aspect is how broad the classes are, covering everything from collections, to community outreach, to evaluation, to budgets, etc. Cheers
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