Posts

September 30, 2014

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10:00 PM | Soils at Imaggeo: fire watch constellation
Egle Rackauskaite, Xinyan Huang and Guillermo Rein HazeLab, Imperial College London, UK Winner of the Best Fire Science Image, 11th IAFSS Symposium, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2014 Description This composite shows a constellation of combined visual and infrared imaging of a smouldering combustion front spreading radially over a thin sample of dry peat. The central watch […]
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9:27 PM | Plankton Power Swirls Ocean Pastures – A Source Of 1/3 Of Oceans Energy
Winds and Tides and Swimming Plankton Each Provide One Trillion Watts Of Power To Drive The Motion Of Ocean Waters Swirling ocean pasture eddies are... The post Plankton Power Swirls Ocean Pastures – A Source Of 1/3 Of Oceans Energy appeared first on Russ George.
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8:22 PM | How Dinosaur Arms Became Bird Wings
Although people now appreciate that birds evolved from a branch of the dinosaur family tree, a crucial adaptation for flight has continued to puzzle evolutionary biologists. Over time, wrists went from straight to bent and hyperflexible, allowing birds to fold their wings neatly against their bodies when not flying.Hoatzin, a tropical bird whose chicks have claws on two of their wing digits. Photo by Linda De Volder.How this happened has been the subject of much debate. Developmental […]
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7:29 PM | Soiled Justice
By Susan Cosier Three years ago a court in Ecuador ruled that the oil giant Chevron bore responsibility for four decades of pollution that destroyed the homes and livelihoods of thousands of indigenous farmers. The company was on the hook for $19 billion—the largest court award ever for environmental damages. Unfortunately, the farmers’ struggle for justice didn’t end there. Chevron refuses to pay up, and in his new book Law of the Jungle, […]
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3:41 PM | Turn’s out water is for fighin’ over after all?
From Texas: A feud over a water well is blamed for a violent confrontation in Santa Fe, according to the Galveston County Sheriff’s Office. I stand corrected.  
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2:48 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: on public discussion in water politics, Gila edition.
From the morning paper, a column about the importance of putting all the data on the table for a public discussion as we try to make collective decisions about our water future. (This is about the Gila River in New Mexico). The argument here is technical, and I don’t expect you to be able to ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: on public discussion in water politics, Gila edition.’ »
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1:00 PM | Climate change and the Red List: Counting down from vulnerable to extinct
Congratulations, you’ve made the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species! Now what? Is that enough to promise your salvation? Or will the increasing press of climate change on your vulnerable/endangered/critically endangered back spell your doom anyway? A new study aimed to answer this question, of just how long placement on the Red List gives conservationists to
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12:19 PM | Greenland Is the New Black
By Susan Cosier Greenland has never been green, but its massive glaciers aren’t white anymore, either. The icy island is turning black with soot (possibly the combination of increased wildfires in the Arctic, dust, microbes, and fewer winter snowstorms to refresh the whiteness). Glaciologist Jason Box took these these photos over the summer during his crowd-funded scientific expedition, Dark Snow. The besmirched ice isn’t just unsightly. […]
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12:00 PM | Self-Compassion: Key to Positive Body Image and Personal Strength
Women who treat themselves with compassion appear to have a significantly more positive body image. Regardless of their body mass index (BMI), these women are better able than others to overcome disappointments and setbacks.In a new study of 153 young women, researchers at the University of Waterloo found that this self-compassion may be an important means to increase positive body image. Compassion may protect girls and young women against eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia. […]
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10:27 AM | PhDiaries: Settling in and the first fish surveys
I am now going into my third month here in Indonesia – how crazy is that?! It feels as if the weeks are flying by, and I have hardly enough […]
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10:25 AM | Photo blog: Hampton Court Palace
The kitchen garden at Hampton Court Palace (which is in a part of the grounds that is free to visit, if you don’t want to see the Palace itself) is an impressive beast, growing some old-fashioned and unusual plants amongst the more familiar crops. These photos were taken on August 24th, which turned out to be a very hot and sunny day…. A novel way to support tomatoes Good King Henry, Chenopodium bonus-henricus Salad burnett, Sanguisorba minor Costmary, Tanacetum […]
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6:14 AM | ORGANELLES SONG

September 29, 2014

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11:39 PM | The Connection Between California’s Drought and Climate Change
Climate change is making the weather pattern that's responsible for California's drought more likely, according to a new study from Stanford.
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10:44 PM | Interns Summer in Review, Part 3: What’s an Imaging Science student doing at NEON?
NEON is quite the unexpected place for an Imaging Science student to do an internship. NEON is all about Ecology, so where am I supposed to fit in here? My internship is in FIU, which is the Fundamental Instrumentation Unit. FIU is a science department whose purpose is to facilitate the instrument-based collection of abiotic … Continue reading »
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10:35 PM | Pudding hysteria
My migraine brain is strange and frustratingly emotional. One aspect of this is state I now dub “pudding hysteria.” Sometimes after a migraine when I am still feeling terrible I have incredible cravings for particular foods that I do not … Continue reading →
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8:27 PM | Deforestation Threatens Newly Identified Bird in Brazil
Discovering a new species isn’t always as easy as saying “Look, there’s a new species!” In the case of a rare bird recently identified in Brazil, it took about 20 years for... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:07 PM | MRI Research at UCSF Could Help Diagnose Dyslexia Even Earlier in Children
UCSF researchers aim to predict whether children will develop dyslexia before they show signs of reading and speech problems, using a variety of methods including MRI brain scans.
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8:00 PM | More Men and Boys Are Suffering from Anorexia
A new study from the University of Montreal finds that more men and boys suffer from anorexia nervosa than previously believed."Most of the knowledge about anorexia pertains to females. However, about 10% of persons affected are males, and we believe this figure is underestimated," says Laurence Corbeil-Serre, lead author of the study. "Our results show that there appear to be similarities between the behavioral symptoms of males and females [with anorexia], but certain particularities can be […]
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7:46 PM | Not in Anybody’s Backyard
By Brian Palmer The most polluted communities in the country are more likely to be home to people of color. That’s been true for decades, despite many efforts (albeit ineffective ones) to change it. Now the Environmental Protection Agency is trying again, with a proposed rule that would require oil refineries—many of which border poor and largely minority neighborhoods—to measure some forms of pollution along their boundaries and […]
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5:58 PM | #21: The Lone Sea Wolf
The Nereid crew had been waiting patiently for another good weather window to survey the Bay of Fundy, and luckily September 26 held light winds and no fog for us. As we made our way into the Bay, we occasionally stopped and turned off the boat for a listening station, which allows us to hear distant whale blows. Though we heard and saw humpbacks on the horizon, we did not hear or see any right
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5:57 PM | Globally Linking Scientific Knowledge through the Adverse Outcome Pathways Wiki
By Steve Edwards, Ph.D. I am thrilled to announce that on September 25th, we and our partners released the online Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Wiki—an interactive, virtual encyclopedia for the development and evaluation of adverse outcome pathways. An AOP is a conceptual framework that shows what is known about the “pathways,” or links between a […]
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4:40 PM | Earth's Water is Older than the Sun
Washington, D.C.—Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth's water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. New work from a team including Conel Alexander of Carnegie Institution for Science has found that much of our Solar System's water likely originated as ices that formed in […]
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4:30 PM | Big Tech Abandons ALEC
By Brian Palmer Three major tech companies—Google, Facebook, and Yahoo—all announced last week that they are abandoning the American Legislative Exchange Council, a pro-business lobbying group that has pushed to block or gut environmental regulations at the state and local level in recent years. Then on Friday, ALEC suffered an even more ignoble loss when a large oil and gas company bolted.Google CEO Eric Schmidt blew the organization a […]
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4:14 PM | Sclerotia
Sclerotia are hard, compact masses of fungal mycelium that usually form in soil or plant tissue. They are thought to serve as resting structures that can survive and remain quiescent in adverse environmental conditions until circumstances become favorable for fungal growth. Some sclerotia have been used as food and medicine for a long time in human history.The fungus Cenococcum geophilum forms sclerotia in forest soils. It is one of the most common ectomycorrhizal fungi encountered in forest […]
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1:36 PM | Map Monday: Will Global Warming Drown Your Hometown?
You may recently have read about climate change and North Carolina for all the wrong reasons, entailing laws designed to forbid the mentioning of the term “climate change” as well as outright banning... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:00 PM | How Big Data Is Changing Medicine
Used to be that medical researchers came up with a theory, recruited subjects, and gathered data, sometimes for years. Now, the answers are already there in data collections on the cloud. All researchers need is the right question.
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12:31 PM | Antarctica Is Doing Its Best Sandra Bullock Impression
By Susan Cosier Melting on the Antarctic Ice Sheet is weakening the region’s gravitational pull. OMG! Are penguins floating into the heavens? Um, no. The changes are slight, but they're still significant enough for the European Space Agency to detect with its most “accurate gravity model ever.” Earth’s gravitational pull can vary due to the planet’s rotation and changes in land mass, such as mountains or ocean trenches. Between […]
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9:36 AM | Autumn at Kew
 This blog posting is © copyright Emma Cooper 2014. Unauthorized duplication and/or republication is not permitted.
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2:56 AM | Killing Fields for Songbirds
By Rocky Kistner A small brown warbler dangles upside down in a grove of acacia trees, its feet and wings stuck to a sticky, lime-soaked branch. The bird had been flying from Europe to northern Africa, when it decided to make a pit stop on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. Little did it know that thousands of traps and nets wait there for migrating songbirds.According to the new documentary Emptying the Skies, directed by Douglas Kass, hunters in rural […]

September 28, 2014

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10:03 PM | Water in the desert, apple orchard edition
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