Posts

October 09, 2014

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4:35 PM | New Hope for Amputees: Luke Skywalker's Prosthetic Hand is a Reality
Robotic arms and hands controlled by neuromuscular implants are now a clinical reality. These prosthetic limbs are giving amputees new opportunities in their personal and professional lives.An early prosthetic hand prototype,Photo courtesy University of WashingtonMind ControlIn January 2013 a Swedish arm amputee was the first person in the world to receive a replacement arm that is surgically connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles. He can control it with his brain."We have used […]
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4:10 PM | Upcoming Seminar – What next for hazard, risk and resilience in society?
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. 13th October 2014, 13:00 to 14:30, W007, Dept of Geography, Andrew Collins, Northumbria University This lecture given by Andrew Collins, Professor in Disaster and Development at Northumbria University, will address the conundrum of what next for hazard, risk and resilience [...] The post Upcoming Seminar – What next for hazard, risk and resilience in society? appeared first on […]
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4:07 PM | Rewriting the book on living with chronic illness
Have you or someone you loved with a chronic condition been let down by the medical system’s approach to chronic pain self-management? @CampOther, @ElitaBaldridge, @cginpvd, myself, and others are working on a project to improve things a bit and we’d … Continue reading →
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2:40 PM | This Just in: No El Niño Yet, But it’s Probably Coming Soon
The U.S. Climate Prediction Center has just come out with it’s monthly update on the evolution of a long-anticipated El Niño in the Pacific Ocean. And the envelope please: Keep waiting… From the CPC Diagnostic Discussion report issued this morning: The consensus of forecasters indicates a 2-in-3 chance of El Niño during the November 2014 […]The post This Just in: No El Niño Yet, But it’s Probably Coming Soon appeared first on ImaGeo.
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2:05 PM | Bright Idea
By Brian Palmer The day the Nobel committee began announcing its 2014 winners earlier this week, National Geographic published a list of Nobel should-have-beens. Dan Vergano’s contribution—Thomas Edison for the light bulb—proved prescient. One day later, a Nobel for physics was finally awarded for the light bulb. Unfortunately for the Wizard of Menlo Park, it didn’t go to Edison. The winners were Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and […]
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1:59 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
Stuff worth reading Sometimes My Body Is a Cage Do I share everything Roxane Gay writes?I should. What will we do if the system can no longer create jobs? An interview with Ansel… To be chronically ill in our society … Continue reading →
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1:41 PM | Three Stunning Views of Super Typhoon Vongfong, Now Churning Toward Okinawa and Eyeing Japan
After intensifying explosively and becoming the strongest storm of the year earlier this week, Super Typhoon Vongfong is churning toward U.S. military bases on Okinawa and is expected to make landfall in Japan on Saturday. The powerful storm comes on the heels of Typhoon Phanfone, which left at least seven dead in Japan earlier this […]The post Three Stunning Views of Super Typhoon Vongfong, Now Churning Toward Okinawa and Eyeing Japan appeared first on ImaGeo.
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1:02 PM | Coachella: More California drought resilience
In the latest episode of “whos’ not running out of water in California?” we join Ian James for a visit to the Coachella Valley: [V]ast amounts of water are still flowing as usual to the farms of the Coachella Valley, soaking into the soil to produce lemons and tangelos, grapes, and vegetables from carrots to ...Continue reading ‘Coachella: More California drought resilience’ »
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1:00 PM | Will crabs invade Antarctica?
Many predatory crabs don’t live in Antarctica for a simple reason: it’s too cold. But as the Earth warms, these clawed critters could invade pristine polar waters and threaten native species, scientists warn in an editorial. The Southern Ocean “has traditionally been regarded as the most biologically isolated and invasion-resistant ocean,” the team writes in
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12:23 PM | Moon Over Miami? King Tide Underfoot
By Susan Cosier When the moon, sun, and earth align just right, and the full moon is at its closest proximity to our planet, its gravitational pull creates the king of all tides. Seriously, the bi-annual event is called a “King Tide,” and there’s one happening right now, which is sort of bad news if you live in a low-lying city like, say, Miami. The video above shows what the moon did to Miami last October. The city is expecting peak tide […]
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10:45 AM | ¿POR QUÉ EXPLOTA UNA GRANJA DE VACAS?
QUÉ TIENE QUE VER LA EXPLOSIÓN DE  UNA GRANJA DE VACAS CON LA EXTINCIÓN P/T Y EL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICOIGNACIO LÓPEZ GOÑI

October 08, 2014

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10:09 PM | Where Stuff Went Wrong for Missing Planes
My colleague Allison Eck and I assembled a map of the presumed locations of the accidents that led to the disappearance of the 28 passenger planes that have vanished since 1948. ∞∞
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9:20 PM | I’m famous!
My Tenure, She Wrote post on poverty in grad school was cited and extensively quoted in a New York Times blog, which is basically the same thing as the newspaper, right?
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7:30 PM | From the 'It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time' Dept.
By Jesse Greenspan This story is a part of OnEarth's Invasive Species Week.Patrick L. Rakes recalls scouring the waterways of south-central Tennessee, looking for Barrens topminnows, a species found nowhere else on Earth. This was back in the 1980s, when he was a graduate student in zoology at the University of Tennessee. He did find the species, whose breeding males turn a striking, iridescent blue-green color, in 14 locations, alleviating fears that […]
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7:28 PM | Elephants are Worth 76 Times More Alive Than Dead: Report
Ivory from a poached elephant sells on the black market for about $21,000. A living elephant, on the other hand, is worth more than $1.6 million in ecotourism opportunities. That’s the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:20 PM | David Suzuki’s Blue Dot Tour: Changing a Nation
Last week I attended the David Suzuki Foundation Blue Dot Tour here in Toronto. I admit, I didn’t really  know what the tour was about (they had me at “David Suzuki”).  I figured it had to do with climate change and I’m always interested in what Suzuki has to say on that subject. Plus I […]
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5:13 PM | Stanford Scientist Shares Nobel in Chemistry
Two Americans and a German will share the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a new type of microscopy that allows researchers, for the first time, to see individual molecules inside living cells.
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5:11 PM | How Dinosaurs Divided their Meals at the Jurassic Dinner Table
Sauropods were the largest land animals ever on earth, and many different species of them lived close together, so how did they all find enough food? New research from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum, London can now answer this question.Mounted Apatosaurus at the Carnegie MuseumPhoto by Tadek KurpaskiSauropods, large, long-necked plant-eating dinosaurs such as Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, lived between 210 and 65 million years ago. The biggest weighed in at 80 […]
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4:43 PM | New Old Perspectives
The first month in the Netherlands and of MSc Forest and Nature Conservation at Wageningen University (WUR) is behind me. And what an interesting and illuminating month that was! About programme, people and Conservation.
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4:32 PM | Carpet corals in the Coral Triangle
Source: thefragtank.caThe central Indo-Pacific is commonly called the Coral Triangle due to its high hard coral diversity, which is in fact the highest in the world (at least 500 species). The region contains a wide range of habitats which likely gave rise to the generally very high biodiversity. More than 3,000 species of fish live there together wit other species rich groups such as foraminifera or stomatopods. However, for many groups of marine animals especially invertebrate species we […]
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4:08 PM | Living with the Kosi River floods: Interview with geoscientist Prof Rajiv Sinha
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Professor Rajiv Sinha from the Department of Civil Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur visited IHRR and the Department of Geography as a COFUND Senior Research Fellow based at St Aidan’s College. He is one of the most [...] The post Living with the Kosi River floods: Interview with geoscientist Prof Rajiv Sinha appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and […]
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2:30 PM | Now You Can Take a Virtual Hike in California State Parks
You can now visit 14 California State Parks from the comfort of your own web browser, using Google Street View.
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1:56 PM | Urban Protected Areas: Important for Urban People, Important for Nature Conservation Globally
The international conservation movement traditionally has concentrated on protecting large, remote areas that have relatively intact natural ecosystems. It has given a lot less attention to urban places and urban people. About ten years ago, four of us long involved … Continue reading →
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1:43 PM | #23: Salps
From reading our blog you are aware that so far this season we have documented two newly entangled whales this summer/fall in the Bay of Fundy (Catalog #3279 and Catalog #4001).  The last couple of weeks of the field season have been frustrating since we have been plagued with high winds, rain and fog.  Inclement weather can be very frustrating so when we were faced with a small weather window we
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12:21 PM | The Skinny on Who Eats Meat
By Susan Cosier Say you took all the countries in the world and skewed their borders to represent how much meat each consumes. Well, what you would get is this map. Lands of big meat eaters would bulge, while more omnivorous nations would trim down. Across the globe we are taking increasingly bigger bites of burgers, pork chops, and chicken breasts, but carnivores in the European Union and the United States eat the most meat per person per day. (New […]
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12:00 PM | Blame humans, not lions, for cheetah declines
Wild cheetahs have suffered tremendously over the last century—their population has been reduced by an order of magnitude, from some 100,000 one hundred years ago to just 10,000 today. While it’s certain that human activity bears at least some proportion of the responsibility for that decline, many have also pointed fingers at other predators in
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3:01 AM | The Long Bright Path to the Nobel Prize for LED Lighting
A Nobel Prize for the breakthrough behind the LED light bulb honors a long lineage of inquiry.

October 07, 2014

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8:29 PM | Invasives Week: Clawing Their Way to the Top
By Elizabeth Royte This story is a part of OnEarth's Invasive Species Week.In the chill of a New England April, Chad Coffin, a 12th-generation Mainer, raced against the dying of the light, the rising of the tide, and the prospect of his livelihood falling to pieces. Wearing chest waders, earmuffs, and multiple layers of hoodies, he muscled heavy wooden fence rails—strung with netting and aluminum flashing—into the soft muck at the mouth of […]
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8:04 PM | Invasives Week: Attack of the Schwartzencrab
By Rocky Kistner When you think of Maine, you probably think of a brisk coastline teeming with lobster and shellfish. But there is one crustacean that just doesn’t belong on those rocky shores. Meet the green crab, a voracious European invader and the subject of “Clawing Their Way to the Top,” Elizabeth Royte’s contribution to OnEarth’s Invasive Species Week. The pinchy poacher is also the star of “Attack of the Green […]
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8:04 PM | Attack of the Schwartzencrab
By Rocky Kistner When you think of Maine, you probably think of a brisk coastline teeming with lobster and shellfish. But there is one crustacean that just doesn’t belong on those rocky shores. Meet the green crab, a voracious European invader and the subject of “Clawing Their Way to the Top,” Elizabeth Royte’s contribution to OnEarth’s Invasive Species Week. The pinchy poacher is also the star of “Attack of the Green […]
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