Posts

September 10, 2014

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11:00 PM | A Natural Offset for the Rio 2016 Olympic Park
Brazilian landscapes suffer rapid and repetitive transformations through intense and successive periods of exploitation—for example, the Brazilwood that gave the country its name, sugar cane, coffee, cattle, soy or urbanization and its infrastructural needs. Such degradation processes provoke losses of nature … Continue reading →
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7:08 PM | Hey Birds, Wear a Helmet
By Brian Palmer Football and dead birds seem to go together. Super Bowl Sunday brings an enormous bump in chicken wing sales, and for many Americans, digesting Thanksgiving turkey doesn’t seem right without a little gridiron action. The Minnesota Vikings, however, are preparing to offer a much less festive threat to our feathered friends: a new stadium featuring 200,000 square feet of glass, situated on a major bird migration route. Audubon Minnesota […]
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6:32 PM | Preliminary data
I looked up at the iv bag, half empty now, wondering when or if it would work. The drug dripping coldly into my arm was one familiar to me. In the past, it had made me writhe across the bed … Continue reading →
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4:46 PM | Science needs voices. All of them. Thank you @ehmee. by Madhusudan Katti
I can’t tell you how glad I am, as a father of daughters growing up in today’s world, that we have Emily Graslie’s voice, inspiring them every day in ways that I cannot, building their confidence so they too can add their voices to the conversation, as the discoverers and adventurers and explorers they are, […]
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2:30 PM | Roasted Barley tea
Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is rich in dietary fiber and nutrients such as starch, protein, fat, vitamins B1 & B2, calcium, phosphorus, iron, and phenolic compounds. Roasted barley tea is very popular in Japan and Korea where it is believed to contribute to the digestion of greasy food and to be beneficial for the stomach after long term alcoholism. Roasted barley tea, known in Japanese as mugicha or in Korean as boricha, is available as loose grains, in tea bags or as prepared tea drinks […]
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2:29 PM | Can Humans Get Used to Having a Two-Way Relationship with Earth’s Climate?
Can humans get used to having a two-way relationship with Earth's climate?
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2:22 PM | NASA Turns Forests into Laser Light Show (Cue Pink Floyd?)
By Susan Cosier The world’s forests have never looked so good! Well, that’s not exactly true, but NASA is developing a laser probe that will map our forests in colorful 3D. Once the GEDI lidar is completed in 2018, it will measure canopy heights and internal structures (branches, bushes, and the like) in order to give researchers a better idea of how much carbon forests contain (and how much would be released into the atmosphere if we chop or […]
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2:00 PM | PARIS III: EPA’s Solvent Substitution Software Tool
By Paul Harten, Ph.D. For decades, companies have used chemicals or solvents to improve the performance of their industrial processes.  Unfortunately, many of these solvents are released as harmful wastes into our environment.  EPA researchers are helping reduce that practice. Recently, my colleagues and I developed a software tool, called PARIS III, that helps companies […]
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12:00 PM | California blue whales are back to pre-whaling levels
Conservation science is an endless cycle of hope and despair. But there’s a little bit more hope now, because blue whales off the coast of California appear to be doing quite well: they’ve recovered, it appears, from a century of systematic whaling. Between 1905 and 1971, almost ten thousand individual blue whales were harvested from
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10:55 AM | Soils at Imaggeo: fall into litter
Antonio Jordán University of Seville, Spain Description Wet forest soil surface after a rainfall simulation experiment in Los Alcornocales Natural Park, southern Spain. When pores are saturated with water, rainfall does not infiltrate, but a dense litter layer may inhibit runoff for some time. About Imaggeo Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. […]
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7:00 AM | Energy efficiency can have negative impacts on public health
Some energy efficiency improvements could cost lives by increasing indoor radon exposure and the resulting risk of developing lung cancer. According to an article in the British Medical Journal,... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:05 AM | Apple Jumps Into Health Monitoring With New Watch
The debut of the device marks Apple's entrance into multibillion-dollar mobile health industry.

September 09, 2014

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10:00 PM | Soils at Imaggeo: Soil erosion-desertfication, Iceland
Picture by Ragnar Sigurdsson / Artic Images.com. Soil banks show the former appearance of areas with dwindling vegetation and soil cover. Higher resolution images available from rth@arctic-images.com (there is a licensing fee depending on the use). Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union.
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9:52 PM | In Limbo Since 1991, the Oregon Spotted Frog Finally Gets Protected Status
It only took 23 years but the Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) has finally gained protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The small, aquatic frogs—which only reach about 100 millimeters... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:12 PM | A Closer Look at the Ebola Epidemic in the Context of Ecological Health
There's a chance the Ebola outbreak could spur increased conservation and surveillance in ecosystems that might harbor dangerous pathogens.
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6:51 PM | Ships Slowing Down to Avoid Collisions with Whales
Large container ships traveling through the Santa Barbara Channel off the coast of southern California are being offered a bonus of US$2,500 per trip to slow down.A fin whale, the second largest animal after the blue whale,Photo courtesy of NOAAThe purpose of the program is two-fold: To combat exhaust emissions from the ships, which account for half of the ozone pollution in Santa Barbara County, and to reduce the number of whales that are struck by ships each year. Dead whales are often found […]
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6:04 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
Stuff worth reading A brash tech entrepreneur thinks he can reinvent higher education by stripping it down to its essence, eliminating lectures and tenure along with football games, ivy-covered buildings, and research libraries. What if he’s right? This school sounds … Continue reading →
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5:56 PM | Discoveries of the week
And yet another round of new species.Spinonychiurus sinensisA new collembolan species is described, Spinonychiurus sinensis sp. n., which has seven chaetae in the distal row of the tibiotarsi. It is placed in the genus Spinonychiurus due to two important characters: the two subsegments on Abd. III sternum and the absence of d0 on the head. This is the first report of the genus Spinonychiurus in China. The diagnosis of Spinonychiurus is broadened and the key to the world species is […]
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4:54 PM | Power Hungry
By George Black Two years ago, as Indians sweated through 115-degree temperatures on the eve of an unusually late monsoon, the electricity grid collapsed across the entire northern tier of the country. The two successive blackouts that resulted represented the biggest power outage in history, affecting more than 620 million people. Airports, railways, and offices shut down. Streets were gridlocked. Miners were trapped underground. Hospitals struggled to […]
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2:19 PM | Bye Bye Birdies
By Susan Cosier Climate change threatens more than half the bird species in the United States and Canada. According to a new study published by the National Audubon Society, numerous species are at risk of going extinct over the next century, as changes in temperatures, precipitation, and migration seasons disrupt their habitats. No more orioles in Balitimore. No more loons in Minnesota. And trumpeter swans, it could be time for your swan song.Other things […]
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1:00 PM | Marine reserves benefit only badly managed fisheries
When you’re close to hitting bottom, there’s a whole lot more room for success. This appears true with regard to a long-held belief about the benefits of marine reserves, protected areas where fishing of many species is illegal: the commonly cited idea that the reserves provide spillover benefit to neighboring fisheries may only be true when
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11:50 AM | Safety is primary focus in GM’s driverless vehicle announcement
Driverless cars came to the forefront of transportation discussions this weekend when General Motors CEO Mary Barra announced her company’s plan to add “hands-free and feet-free” driving capabilities... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:01 AM | Quake-Revived Streams Could Keep Flowing For a While
The Napa quake jump-started several streams in the Napa and adjoining valleys, but how long they'll run and where the water is coming from is hard to pin down.
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5:00 AM | How to Drive Home the Drought Message: Make it a Game
As the drought continues, efforts to spur action include an online game that puts users in charge of California's water supply.
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4:31 AM | Boxall on the modesty of California’s approach to groundwater regulation
Bettina Boxall: California is finally about to join the rest of the West in regulating groundwater supplies. But the package of bills awaiting Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature is not an instant fix for the state’s shrinking, over-pumped aquifers. It could be decades, experts say, before the most depleted groundwater basins recover under the legislation, which ...Continue reading ‘Boxall on the modesty of California’s approach to groundwater regulation’ »

September 08, 2014

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11:51 PM | Interns Summer in Review, Part 1: From the University to the Field
During the 2013 spring semester, I registered for the Surveying for Engineers class at my college. The class was not required for my Environmental Science major, which caused my advisor to question why I would want to take it. I told him that thirteen years earlier, on a summer walk with my mom, I saw … Continue reading »
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10:34 PM | Postcard from Norway’s Magical Lofoten Islands — A Biodiversity Hotspot to Rival the Amazon
Greetings from Norway’s spectacular Lofoten Islands, one of the crown jewels of our planet’s biodiversity: an environment above the Arctic Circle where coral reefs actually thrive, seabirds by the millions roost, and Orcas, humpbacks, and sperm wales — not to mention humans — feast on teeming stocks of fish. This biodiversity has been described as an […]The post Postcard from Norway’s Magical Lofoten Islands — A Biodiversity Hotspot to Rival the […]
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9:35 PM | Texas Electricity Providers Perform Well In Survey
Green Mountain Energy has taken the top spot in the JD Power 2014 Retail Electric Provider Residential Customer Satisfaction Study.  The study, now in its seventh year, surveys electric customers in Texas and several other deregulated electricity states.  Using the … Continue reading →
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8:26 PM | A Twitterholic and Green Blogger Assesses a Year of Living Offline
A longtime environmental blogger and Twitter addict logs on after a year of self-imposed exile to the analog world.
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8:10 PM | What's Up with All the Climate Events in NYC?
By John Upton This story originally appeared on Climate Central.The climate buzz in the Big Apple later this month will have more effervescence than a bottle of hard cider. You may have heard of Climate Week NYC, the U.N. Climate Summit, and the People's Climate March. They're all scheduled at around the same time, but they're all different things. Here's the skinny on all of them.Does “Climate Week NYC” mean the Big […]
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