Posts

July 08, 2014

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3:12 PM | Oklahoma: Ready to Rumble
By Susan Cosier Oklahoma has had a whole lot of shaking going on during the last six years. Seismic activity in the state has risen dramatically, from just over a dozen earthquakes recorded back in 2008 to more than 100 in 2013. And here we are only halfway through 2014, and already the number of Oklahoma quakes with a magnitude of 3.0 or higher has surpassed the number of such earthquakes in California—a state famous for its big temblors. What on […]
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2:42 PM | The Tar Sands Diet, Ebola and the Environment, Giant Salamander Hits the City
By Jason Bittel False balance: Trustees of the BBC have told the British news network to reevaluate the way it covers global warming and other scientific issues. Specifically, the trustees wrote in a progress report that the BBC needs to give less air time to climate deniers and that the “over-rigid application of editorial guidelines on impartiality” was giving “undue attention to marginal opinion.” In other words, stop booking […]
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2:25 PM | New Electrochemistry Tech Makes Batteries Last Longer
Scientists at the University of Alberta have used a process called induced fluorination to create faster-charging, longer-lasting batteries.

Cui X, Chen J, Wang T & Chen W (2014). Rechargeable Batteries with High Energy Storage Activated by In-situ Induced Fluorination of Carbon Nanotube Cathode., Scientific reports, 4 5310. PMID: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24931036

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1:30 PM | Improving IRIS: Please Join the Conversation
By Kacee Deener Over the past few years, EPA has embraced a major new effort to enhance its Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program to improve the scientific foundation of assessments, increase transparency, and improve productivity. IRIS is a human health assessment program that evaluates information on health effects that may result from exposure to […]
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1:00 PM | Climate change will alter fire patterns, push caribou herds around
It’s not just the heat. Climate change will find (is finding) many creative ways to mess with wildlife and challenge conservationists. One such way is to change the patterns of fires that burn across animal habitats; in many areas, drought and heat have led to increases in fire frequency and severity. New research suggests that these

July 07, 2014

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9:45 PM | Field Studies
By Tracie McMillan A few early-summer visits to the local farmer’s market are usually all it takes to turn us into cheerleaders for the American farm. But if you really want to know about the current state of farming in the U.S.A. (as opposed to merely knowing the current state of this summer’s heirloom tomatoes), you’ll need some real, hard facts.For that, you'll want to turn to the latest Census of Agriculture (COA). Chances are […]
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7:09 PM | DNA Barcoding and the Neutral Theory
COI barcode variation within avian species is uniformly low regardless of census population size. This finding directly contradicts a central prediction of neutral theory and is not readily accounted for by commonly proposed ad hoc modifications. As an alternative model consistent with empirical data including the molecular clock, we propose extreme purifying selection, including at synonymous sites, limits variation within species and continuous adaptive evolution drives the molecular […]
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7:05 PM | Advanced Modular Hydrogen Tank for Vehicles Created
The German Aerospace Center (DLR), together with its partners in the SSH2S European research project, has developed an advanced hydrogen tank for vehicles. The new hydrogen tank is suitable for holding hydrogen in a compact space under moderate pressure and at ambient temperature.
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5:52 PM | NENT: Petroleum Research Still Ethical, Unless It Impedes Renewables
Norway’s National Committee for Research Ethics in Science and Technology (NENT) has concluded that petroleum research is still relevant and ethical, as long as it doesn’t impede renewables expansion and energy-savings.
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5:39 PM | The Good, the Bad and the Anthropocene (Age of Us)
A three-way conversation about how to think about, and respond to, evidence that Earth is in our sway.
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5:08 PM | Do exotic, invasive, aliens keep you up at night? Are they in your neighborhood? by Madhusudan Katti
Most of us live in cities now, which must seem like rather exotic, alien habitats to other denizens of our planet, full of strange creatures they’ve never encountered before. By which I mean not just us hairless apes, but many other species too, from distant corners of the Earth. For we also tend to fill our […]
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4:32 PM | IEA: $80 Billion Wasted on Energy for Online Devices Annually
According to the latest report by the International Energy Agency (IEA), the world’s 14 billion online electronic devices waste around $80 billion per year due to low energy efficiency.
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4:00 PM | How Efficient Is Your Sprinkler?
Irrigating your lawn can waste 50 percent of the water you use, but state agencies offer a handful of solutions
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3:05 PM | How much should we worry about exotic species in urban zones? How do we reduce damage from exotic invasives when management resources are limited? Are there conflicts between management or eradication efforts and building general support for urban biodiversity?
 
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2:57 PM | Interested in air sensors? Tune in to our webinar!
By Dustin Renwick Sensors are everywhere these days. Some determine whether the ball has crossed the goal line in the World Cup. Others help EPA, state and local agencies, and communities take a more in-depth look at air quality. Commercial manufacturers continue to develop low-cost air sensors that are portable and can relay data in […]
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2:41 PM | Natural hazard event reporting in the global media
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. by Alex Holden Effective communication of risk is essential to its management [3]. As the media, in particular internet-based media, is considered the first source of information regarding risk for most people, it is vital to understand how it is [...] The post Natural hazard event reporting in the global media appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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2:41 PM | Mathematical Model Helps Identify Gas Hydrate Pockets
Scientists at Rice University have developed a mathematical model that simulates gas hydrate and free gas accumulation under the ocean floor.

Chatterjee, S., Bhatnagar, G., Dugan, B., Dickens, G., Chapman, W. & Hirasaki, G. (2014). The Impact of Lithologic Heterogeneity and Focused Fluid Flow upon Gas Hydrate Distribution in Marine Sediments, Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, DOI: 10.1002/2014JB011236

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2:20 PM | Deniers in the Desert, Funky Fish, Pallas's Cat Peek-a-Boo
By Jason Bittel What happens in Vegas: Las Vegas this week will host the “biggest gathering of global warming skeptics in the world.” The conference is basically the Heartland Institute’s version of Burning Man—in other words, a big ol’ nihilistic party in the desert where participants go to escape reality. The reality here, of course, is that the rest of the world is no longer debating climate change and instead […]
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1:13 PM | Setting the Table for Migrating Monarch Butterflies
Property owners can help provide migrating and struggling monarch butterflies with a milkweed buffet and then map the insects' arrival.
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8:20 AM | Super Typhoon Neoguri Now Aiming For Japan
Last Thursday, as Hurricane Arthur was bearing down on the North Carolina coast, I posted a short update about trouble just beginning to brew in the Pacific. Now, that trouble has arrived — big time. What was then a tropical storm has now blossomed into Super Typhoon Neoguri. As I’m writing this shortly after midnight […]The post Super Typhoon Neoguri Now Aiming For Japan appeared first on ImaGeo.
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2:20 AM | The Puzzle of Delhi’s Air Pollution
The recent World Health Organisation (WHO) report on Ambient Air Pollution for 2014 showcases a variety of alarming results: across 1600 cities from 91 countries, and covering the period from 2008 to 2013, the cities with the lowest levels of … Continue reading →

July 06, 2014

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11:19 PM | Jagger, Richards and Steinberg on the California water bond
California state senator Darrel Steinberg on the California water bond: In the water world, you can’t always get everything you want, but there’s a whole lot in this bond that California needs. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards on (I think) taking a lot of drugs and getting laid: You can’t always get what you want ...Continue reading ‘Jagger, Richards and Steinberg on the California water bond’ »

July 05, 2014

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9:52 PM | Characteristics of a good water policy solution
Helen Ingram and colleagues on a few necessary conditions for a good solution to water management issues: Good policy design contributes to three key public needs: progress in problem solving that will make tomorrow’s challenges easier than today’s; representation of sufficient interests, so that the policy has a positive balance of support and is politically ...Continue reading ‘Characteristics of a good water policy solution’ »
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9:04 PM | How much rain did Albuquerque get last night?
It’s monsoon season here in New Mexico, which means thunderstorms popping up here and there and, one hopes, everywhere around the state. In my blog stats, I notice that around this time of year I frequently get traffic for people searching for things like “how much rain did Albuquerque get today”. I’m writing this as ...Continue reading ‘How much rain did Albuquerque get last night?’ »
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5:11 PM | It takes discipline
Have you heard of NaNoWriMo? It’s National Novel Writing Month, and it usually happens in November. NaNoWriMo is a virtual writing group: you sign up online, keep track of your word count online, and communicate with your fellow writers online. This year they’re holding a summer edition called Camp NaNoWriMo, which is for the month…

July 04, 2014

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7:19 PM | Cultivating the unculturable majority
Device to isolate pure bacterial cultures from the environmentIt is widely recognized that the overwhelming majority of microorganisms cannot grow in artificial media that is prepared in laboratories. This issue was first realized over a century ago when the direct bacterial counts from environmental samples did not correlate with the number of resulting colony forming units (CFUs), a phenomenon known as “great plate count anomaly”. The problem is not only that very few colonies […]
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6:01 PM | An American icon on the Fourth of July
There are many things that represent the profound, ambiguous complexity that is the United States of America – full of ambitious arrogance, profound success and the inevitable clumsiness when power combines with unintended consequences. Hoover Dam is one of them.
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3:18 PM | Protecting Parrotfish on the Path to a Caribbean Reef Revival
Marine scientists see parrotfish protection as a vital step toward restoration of Caribbean reefs after decades of devastation.
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2:00 PM | Recent Talk on Sea Level Rise Stresses Need for Acceptance and Adaptation
Polar ice sheets are shrinking, sea level is rising and 44% of the world's population lives within 90 miles of the sea in the coastal zone. Oceanographer John Englander's addressed these topics in a recent talk, "Melting Ice, Rising Seas, and Shifting Shorelines: the New Normal" at the Aquarium of the Bay.
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1:00 PM | New Way to Save Endangered Species: Make Predators Puke
Marbled murrelets are rare seabirds that lay just one egg a year, and those eggs are a favorite food item for another bird: Steller’s jays. Scientists are hoping to trick the jays into avoiding the murrelet eggs using decoy eggs with a rude suprise inside.
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