Posts

August 30, 2014

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5:54 PM | Getting Droned On Greenland’s Ice Sheet
If you’re as fascinated by the science of our planet as I am, you’ve probably seen all sorts of imagery of the world’s frozen places, including dramatic photos of summer meltwater coursing across the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet. And now, for a new and thoroughly spectacular perspective, check out the video above. Shot […]The post Getting Droned On Greenland’s Ice Sheet appeared first on ImaGeo.
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5:29 PM | Love in a mist
Nigella damascena One of my favourite flowers, but one that I have yet to grow, is Nigella damascena, commonly known as “Love-in-a-mist”. It has delicately beautiful flowers, held high on ferny foliage, followed by stately seed heads. I believe it self-seeds quite readily. The picture above shows a predominantly blue mixture, but you can also get a mix called ‘Persian Jewels’ that has a few more colours. I think it would make a nice addition to my Middle Eastern […]
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3:13 AM | Landmark Groundwater Reform Headed to Governor’s Desk
The era of unlimited groundwater pumping in California could be ending. A package of bills would require local agencies to restore over-pumped aquifers.

August 29, 2014

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8:58 PM | Smuggled Giant Millipedes Seized at SFO
Twenty squirming foot-long millipedes in a falsely labeled package from Germany were seized at San Francisco International Airport last month, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection official said Friday.
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8:13 PM | A Trio Of Smart Cities: How Technology Makes Them More Efficient
A smart city is one that is currently testing or regularly using information, communications and technology (ICT) solutions in at least three areas, states IHS. These can include areas like transportation, safety, energy and the physical infrastructure of the city. … Continue reading →
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7:53 PM | It’s not how much water you get, it’s what you do with it – Indiana edition
Indiana, where nine out of the past ten years have been wetter than the long term average, is talking about water shortages: Water shortages are coming to Indiana unless the state implements policy changes, according to a recent prediction by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Data courtesy NCDC.
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5:11 PM | Glutbusters!
The productive, but labour intensive, kitchen garden at Hampton Court Palace Conventional advice for growing your own fruit and vegetables tends to follow one of two tacks – it either assumes you have acres of dedicated space, and the time to look after a traditional kitchen garden, or that you have no space and are limited to a few pots on the patio or the windowsill. It doesn’t resonate with the modern reality of homes being built with ever-smaller gardens and allotments being […]
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4:07 PM | Weekend Reads: New Jersey Gone Wild, California’s Bivalve Battle, Louisiana’s Disappearing Act
By Jason Bittel The Lion Sleeps TonightBaboons and tigers don’t usually spring to mind when you think of New Jersey, but for a brief period in the 70s, Warner Brothers operated an ill-fated (and ill-conceived) animal theme park there. The park’s problems were myriad, but the fact that one visitor lost an ear to a lion gives you an idea of just how poorly the place was managed. More recently, Jen Miller returned to the ruins of “Jungle […]
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3:23 PM | The World’s Largest Oil Producer Is…
..the United States. Have you heard? Computer scientist and data whiz Randy Olson dove into the UT Energy Poll data and noticed that the American public is pretty confused about where we get out... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3:20 PM | Whale: It’s What’s Not for Dinner. Anywhere.
By Brian Palmer Norwegians killed 729 whales this year, marking the largest catch in two decades. The hunt persists despite a more than 30-year ban on commercial whaling worldwide, making Norway one of only three countries that continue to flout international restrictions. The deputy director of the Norwegian Fishermen's Sales Organisation calls this season’s haul “very good,” though he acknowledges a major problem for the industry: nobody […]
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3:05 PM | Research Recap: This Week in EPA Science
By Kacey Fitzpatrick A good amount of my college career was spent on the top floor of the library, cramming for exams the next day. Even after graduating, I have yet to drop the habit. The night before my first day at EPA, I was frantically trying to catch up on all the research that […]
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2:41 PM | Resilience to drought, California tomato crop edition
From the USDA (pdf): Contracted production of California processing tomatoes is forecast at a record high 14.0 million tons, averaging 48.61 tons per acre, according to a survey conducted by the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The current forecasted production is 17.6 percent above the 2013 crop. Drought has been an issue for some crops, but apparently ...Continue reading ‘Resilience to drought, California tomato crop edition’ »
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2:00 PM | The First Annual World Shorebirds Day Kicks off on September 6
Shorebird populations worldwide are declining, and endangered birds like the spoonbill sandpiper are facing extinction in the next five years. Learn about shorebirds who migrate to San Francisco Bay during winter months and how you can join the first annual "World Shorebirds Day" celebration.
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1:34 PM | Toronto Trashes Its Litterbugs
By Jason Bittel Toronto has a new anti-littering campaign that tells it like it is. The ads portray juxtaposed pieces of trash that spell out not-so-nice words above the tagline: “Littering says a lot about you.” (You can see more below or view the whole set here.) According to Livegreen Toronto, the city’s environmental initiative, litterbugs are “lazy, selfish, low-life pigs,” but don’t worry, reform is easy! Just throw […]
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12:00 PM | Paying Brazil’s Farmers To Conserve Is Smart Economics
The world is currently experiencing species extinction at an unprecedented scale. As biodiversity declines and species disappear, the roles they place in their local ecosystems will also disappear. Ecological equilibria will shift, pests will proliferate, invasive species will dominate, and in the worst cases, food security will be threatened and terrorism will increase. One strategy
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2:00 AM | The New Is Well Forgotten Old: Scandinavian Vernacular Experience on Biodiverse Green Roofs
Green roofs are becoming more popular around the globe and are considered to be a very progressive landscape design devise in urban areas. The green roof has started to become fashionable—it is even considered as one of the “compulsory” sustainable … Continue reading →

August 28, 2014

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11:32 PM | Now That the Shaking’s Over from the South Napa Earthquake, Read This Comic
Among the helpful advice and resources that government agencies are sharing after the South Napa earthquake, the most effective product may be the newly released comic book "Without Warning."
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7:54 PM | Oil Transport by Train Continues to Climb
Sixty-six percent more oil came into California by rail in the first half of this year, compared to the first half of last year.
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6:55 PM | Accounting for the Expanding Carbon Shadow from Coal-Burning Plants
A pitch for considering a lifetime's worth of carbon dioxide emissions when examining power plants in the context of climate change.
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5:24 PM | Leaky Pipes Lose Billions of Gallons of Water Every Year in the Bay Area
On top of the drought, the South Napa Quake damaged dozens of water pipes and last month a ruptured pipe ruptured on the UCLA campus leaked about 20 million gallons of water. So how strong is California's water infrastructure?
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1:03 PM | Will Logging 'Ghost Trees' Come Back to Haunt Us?
By Jason Bittel The U.S. Forest Service announced yesterday that it will be logging more than 32,000 acres of California forest scorched by last summer's Rim Fire. The agency contends that removing the burned trees will make money and might help prevent another fire. But scientists and conservationists are condemning the plan, arguing that fire is a natural and necessary process and that Stanislaus National Forest has already begun to regenerate. Logging […]
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1:00 PM | Do driving restrictions work?
How can cities cut down on smog? One appealing solution is to restrict the number of cars allowed on the road. For instance, Beijing forbids cars with certain license plate numbers from entering part of the city on specific days of the week. But a new study suggests that this approach simply doesn’t work that well: About
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12:45 PM | Write Club 2014
September is fast approaching, and whilst I haven’t got a date for moving yet, there are big changes on the horizon. I’m getting a new home, and a garden, and the website is getting a revamp – more on that later, but I’m hoping that will be in October. The new design is clean, clear and very modern, and works very well on mobile devices. It will also be a lot simpler to navigate, for me as well as for you! Whilst I’m otherwise engaged working my way through […]
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12:34 PM | Winged Warning: Heavy Metal Song Distortion
A series on birds as environmental sentinels includes a story on how mercury contamination distorts birds' songs.

August 27, 2014

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10:46 PM | Feds Will Allow Logging in Some Areas Burned by Rim Fire
A U.S. Forest Service decision will allow loggers to remove dead trees from 52 square miles of forests blackened last year in a massive central California wildfire, a move contested by environmentalists.
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9:20 PM | Dump the Bucket, Hold the Water
By Chris Tackett Forget the obsession with the song of the summer. We might have to start picking a social media meme of the summer, and this year's title definitely belongs to the "Ice Bucket Challenge," which has raised (at last count) more than $94 million in research money for ALS, a fatal neurological disease.But it has also faced some backlash for using water when part of the country is in the midst of a terrible drought. So let's give extra points to […]
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9:13 PM | Oceans Agency Lists 20 Coral Species as Threatened
Twenty coral species, facing harms from global warming, coastal pollution and other perils are listed as threatened by the federal oceans agency.
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8:41 PM | Cut Carbon, Breathe Easier, Live Longer
By Brian Palmer What if I offered you an investment that would make us all healthier, save thousands of lives, and pay for itself? It would be hard to turn down a deal like that. According to a new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, there is such an investment, and it’s called cap and trade—the market-based plan to reduce carbon pollution that is still somehow controversial, despite the benefits it offers to human health, the […]
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6:57 PM | #11: The Birds of the Bay
Since its my first time in Lubec for the Bay of Fundy field season, I was pretty excited for what sightings were in store for me! Although I’ve already had experience with right whales, mainly flying aerial surveys, I was excited to see the whales from a different perspective. I was also interested to see the different kinds of birds that lived in the waters of the Bay of Fundy. Many of the
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5:14 PM | Food, Politics and Sustainability: An Introduction to the Native American Food Sovereignty Movement
Throughout the United States a movement for food sovereignty has emerged among a number of Tribal Nations and communities. ‘Food sovereignty’ was first coined by members of La Via Campesina in […]
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