Posts

October 14, 2014

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2:38 PM | Children’s Health: An Investment in Our Future
By Dr. James H. Johnson Jr. Although children make up 30 percent of the population, they are 100 percent of our future. As a former college professor, I’ve had the distinct honor of serving as an educator and mentor to many, many young people, and there is no greater personal or professional pleasure than watching […]
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1:00 PM | Green space makes for better students
We’ve been hearing for a while now how simply being around green space more can be beneficial. Early this year, for example, a study found that moving to areas with more trees and vegetation led to an immediate and prolonged improvement in mental health. Just looking at a tree every now and then seems to
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12:57 PM | This Little Piggy Bred a Superbug
By Ted Genoways Earlier this year OnEarth’s editor-at-large reported on the explosion of hog farming in Iowa and the resulting damage to the state’s waterways. His new book The Chain: Farm, Factory, and the Fate of Our Food is out today. This adapted excerpt explains how the rise of antibiotic-resistant infections in U.S. hospitals can be traced directly to modern farming practices. In 1937, at the height of the Great Depression, Jay C. Hormel […]
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12:22 PM | Nature Talks Back, and Sounds a Lot like Edward Norton
Edward Norton, Julia Roberts and other actors give voice to soils, seas and other natural assets.

October 13, 2014

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4:37 PM | Fastest Computing Ever: Researchers Take One More Step Toward Putting it in Your Hands
Two research teams at the University of New South Wales have taken us a step closer to building super powerful quantum computers.The teams have created two types of quantum bits, or qubits. Qubits are the building blocks for quantum computers. These qubits are not only super fast, it's also super accurate, with each processing data with an accuracy above 99%. Menno Veldhorst of UNSW says, "It is really amazing that we can make such an accurate qubit using pretty much the same devices as we […]
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4:19 PM | Things I probably shouldn’t talk about with my doctor
You know what’s worse for a hypochondriac than access to google? Having a friend in med school. Me: Why am I tired all the time even though my iron and thyroid check out? Med Student: LEUKAEMIA Me: Why does my … Continue reading →
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3:43 PM | NASA: September Was Warmest on Record
This just in: The global average temperature in September was the warmest in a record dating back to 1880, according to an update from NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. That makes it two months in a row: August was also the hottest on record by NASA’s reckoning. Later this week, the National Oceanic and […]The post NASA: September Was Warmest on Record appeared first on ImaGeo.
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2:23 PM | Video – Introducing the Global Earthquake Model
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. A video introduction to the Global Earthquake Model (GEM), a global collaborative effort with the aim to provide organisations and people with tools and resources for transparent assessment of earthquake risk anywhere in the world. It also gives a preview [...] The post Video – Introducing the Global Earthquake Model appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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1:05 PM | Map Monday: Global Pesticide Scorecard Launched
The prevalence of pesticides may seem like something of a bygone era, one marked by Silent Spring and the Bhopal Disaster, but the grim reality is that they are unfortunately very much around.... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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1:00 PM | 25 Years After the Loma Prieta Earthquake, Are We Safer?
Bay Area taxpayers have spent billions of dollars over the last quarter-century to make our bridges, water pipes and power supplies safer in an earthquake. Experts say that means the Bay Area is much better off now. At the same time, the work is far from over.

October 12, 2014

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9:36 PM | Mead, Powell monthly data update
It is no surprise that Lake Mead ended the “water year” Sept. 30 at the lowest level it’s been since the government began filling it in the 1930s. Perhaps more importantly, combined storage in the two big reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, ended the water year at its lowest level since 1968, when they ...Continue reading ‘Mead, Powell monthly data update’ »
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8:55 PM | Publishing, power dating and technology
Every year, a staggering 1.5 million scholarly articles are published in c. 27,000 peer-reviewed journals, and… the number of articles is set to double every 20 or so years (Campbell, […]
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8:09 PM | Change, stasis and (or?) resilience in New Mexico water policy
I spent a thoroughly fascinating couple of days last week at a workshop organized by the University of New Mexico’s Utton Center (legal wonks thinking about water institutions) on resilience in New Mexico water management. It was a lot of fun, made all the more so by the fact that I was invited Thursday evening ...Continue reading ‘Change, stasis and (or?) resilience in New Mexico water policy’ »
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4:07 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: an inordinate fondness for beetles
In central New Mexico, the salt cedar beetle seems here to stay, enforcing the Law of Unintended Consequences: Introduced in the 19th century to protect railroad bridge abutments, praised for its ability to protect riverbanks from erosion, vilified for alleged water-sucking ways while simultaneously defended as wildlife habitat, the story of the Eurasian tamarisk – ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: an inordinate fondness for beetles’ »
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3:02 PM | Migraine Memory
My memory is strange lately. I was talking to someone last weekend about my mother’s visit to Epiphyte City awhile ago. Then a few nights later, on the phone with her, she brought it up and I did not remember … Continue reading →
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9:41 AM | Garden visit: Roman Fishbourne Palace & Gardens
It was raining last weekend when Ryan and I went to visit Fishbourne Roman Palace & Gardens, the remains of what was one a high-status Roman building by the sea. It doesn’t make a difference to viewing the ruins, which are housed in a lovely, open-plan building with specially-constructed walkways that allow you to get reasonably close to the mosaic floors without any risk of damage to them. Which is important, as subsidence and algae (they were built without foundations, and water […]
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3:11 AM | The newest Colorado River management widget: the “System Conservation Program”
tl;dr The new Colorado River conservation program may not conserve a whole lot of water. But growing the “civic community” needed to solve the basin’s water problems may be far more important. Longer Version: The Colorado River Pilot System Water Conservation Program crept forward last week, in the process demonstrating an endearing quirk of Colorado ...Continue reading ‘The newest Colorado River management widget: the “System Conservation Program”’ […]

October 11, 2014

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5:26 PM | The Media and Conventional Wisdom
The Nation has published an excellent article on the U.S. government’s vendetta against James Risen, a New York Times investigative journalist. The campaign is part of a larger effort by the Obama Administrations to punish government whistleblowers and “intimidate other investigative reporters,” as Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg told The Nation. This week Risen gave a talk at […]The post The Media and Conventional Wisdom appeared first on […]
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3:40 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
Stuff worth reading Comment on Toxic academic mentors by GermanPostdoc Bad supervisors have extraordinary power over people’s careers in academia Frameworks for Understanding the Future of Work Adobe’s e-book reader sends your reading logs back to Adobe—in plain text. Considering … Continue reading →
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2:27 PM | Top Ten Animals in Disguise
These species may look like one thing, but they are actually something else!
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4:48 AM | Jack-O-Lantern Sun
This is no Rorschach test — the Sun really does look like a Jack-O-Lantern in this image captured on October 8th by NASA’s orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory. To be sure, we’re looking at the Sun in two particular wavelengths (171 and 193 Angstroms) that have been colorized in Halloween-appropriate gold and yellow. Whether the folks […]The post Jack-O-Lantern Sun appeared first on ImaGeo.

October 10, 2014

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11:23 PM | Typhoon Vongfong Lashes Okinawa, Poses Threat to Japanese Mainland Over the Weekend
As I’m writing this, Typhoon Vongfong is slamming Okinawa and will soon pass directly over it. Vongfong has been lashing the Japanese island with winds exceeding 50 miles per hour for most of the past 12 hours. The typhoon’s forecast track takes it on a projected course along the length of Japan this weekend, posing […]The post Typhoon Vongfong Lashes Okinawa, Poses Threat to Japanese Mainland Over the Weekend appeared first on ImaGeo.
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7:42 PM | Team Sunflower!
Meet Elizabeth, Tia, Alannah and Shawnice – four friends working together to help protect animals and preserve the environment.
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6:54 PM | Caution: Do Not Touch, Eat, or Inhale
By Susan Cosier We already know that cigarette smoke can cause cancer. Flame retardants in our couches, too. But I bet you didn’t know that fence posts and telephone poles can be a cancer risk. That’s because they’re often treated with a wood preservative that just made the government’s watch list of substances that might cause cancer in humans.That list is now 243 items long, after the Department of Health and Human Services added […]
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6:43 PM | This Week in EPA Science
By Kacey Fitzpatrick Happy Friday! Like most people, I love Fridays—and not just because that’s when Research Recap is posted. This Friday is especially happy because it’s a long weekend which means an extra day to relax and recharge. Did you know that mental breaks actually increase productivity and encourage creativity? Before you head out […]
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6:09 PM | Glittering Curtains of Auroral Fire on #SpaceVine
U.S. astronaut Reid Weiseman sure is having fun up on the International Space Station. Two days ago, he spent six hours and 13 minutes on a spacewalk And when he hasn’t been outside the ISS with the Earth rushing by more than 200 miles below him he’s been busy taking pictures and shooting little Vine […]The post Glittering Curtains of Auroral Fire on #SpaceVine appeared first on ImaGeo.
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6:00 PM | I Have Seen the Future of Transit and It Is in Raleigh
We long ago lost the skill of paying for the things we need: I won’t bore you with the statistics of how far we are behind in our infrastructure investments. You’ve heard them from me... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:35 PM | Of headless elephants and diving flippers
Today at Perranporth I found an assortment of children’s toys washed up by the spring high tides. A tractor wheel, a headless elephant, loom bands (a current trend in children’s fashion) and a lego divers flipper: The significance of such a find comes down to the small Lego flipper, which has been drifting around the Cornish […]
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4:13 PM | Stunning New Finds from Ancient Greek Shipwreck, Using Rebreather Technology
An international team of divers and archaeologists has retrieved amazing new finds from an ancient Greek ship that sank more than 2,000 years ago. Because of it's large size and luxury cargo, they are calling this ship the "Titanic of the ancient world."Greek technical diver Alexandros Sotiriou discovers an intact ceramic table jug and a bronze rigging ring on the Antikythera Shipwreck.  (Brett Seymour, Return to Antikythera 2014)The Antikythera wreck was first discovered in 1900 […]
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4:06 PM | Can Peru Control the Murderous Resource Rush on its Forest Frontiers?
A fresh push builds for Peru to bring law and order to its violent Amazon forest frontier.
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