Posts

October 08, 2014

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10:09 PM | Where Stuff Went Wrong for Missing Planes
My colleague Allison Eck and I assembled a map of the presumed locations of the accidents that led to the disappearance of the 28 passenger planes that have vanished since 1948. ∞∞
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9:20 PM | I’m famous!
My Tenure, She Wrote post on poverty in grad school was cited and extensively quoted in a New York Times blog, which is basically the same thing as the newspaper, right?
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7:30 PM | From the 'It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time' Dept.
By Jesse Greenspan This story is a part of OnEarth's Invasive Species Week.Patrick L. Rakes recalls scouring the waterways of south-central Tennessee, looking for Barrens topminnows, a species found nowhere else on Earth. This was back in the 1980s, when he was a graduate student in zoology at the University of Tennessee. He did find the species, whose breeding males turn a striking, iridescent blue-green color, in 14 locations, alleviating fears that […]
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7:28 PM | Elephants are Worth 76 Times More Alive Than Dead: Report
Ivory from a poached elephant sells on the black market for about $21,000. A living elephant, on the other hand, is worth more than $1.6 million in ecotourism opportunities. That’s the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:20 PM | David Suzuki’s Blue Dot Tour: Changing a Nation
Last week I attended the David Suzuki Foundation Blue Dot Tour here in Toronto. I admit, I didn’t really  know what the tour was about (they had me at “David Suzuki”).  I figured it had to do with climate change and I’m always interested in what Suzuki has to say on that subject. Plus I […]
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5:13 PM | Stanford Scientist Shares Nobel in Chemistry
Two Americans and a German will share the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a new type of microscopy that allows researchers, for the first time, to see individual molecules inside living cells.
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5:11 PM | How Dinosaurs Divided their Meals at the Jurassic Dinner Table
Sauropods were the largest land animals ever on earth, and many different species of them lived close together, so how did they all find enough food? New research from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum, London can now answer this question.Mounted Apatosaurus at the Carnegie MuseumPhoto by Tadek KurpaskiSauropods, large, long-necked plant-eating dinosaurs such as Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, lived between 210 and 65 million years ago. The biggest weighed in at 80 […]
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4:43 PM | New Old Perspectives
The first month in the Netherlands and of MSc Forest and Nature Conservation at Wageningen University (WUR) is behind me. And what an interesting and illuminating month that was! About programme, people and Conservation.
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4:32 PM | Carpet corals in the Coral Triangle
Source: thefragtank.caThe central Indo-Pacific is commonly called the Coral Triangle due to its high hard coral diversity, which is in fact the highest in the world (at least 500 species). The region contains a wide range of habitats which likely gave rise to the generally very high biodiversity. More than 3,000 species of fish live there together wit other species rich groups such as foraminifera or stomatopods. However, for many groups of marine animals especially invertebrate species we […]
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4:08 PM | Living with the Kosi River floods: Interview with geoscientist Prof Rajiv Sinha
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. Professor Rajiv Sinha from the Department of Civil Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur visited IHRR and the Department of Geography as a COFUND Senior Research Fellow based at St Aidan’s College. He is one of the most [...] The post Living with the Kosi River floods: Interview with geoscientist Prof Rajiv Sinha appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and […]
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2:30 PM | Now You Can Take a Virtual Hike in California State Parks
You can now visit 14 California State Parks from the comfort of your own web browser, using Google Street View.
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1:56 PM | Urban Protected Areas: Important for Urban People, Important for Nature Conservation Globally
The international conservation movement traditionally has concentrated on protecting large, remote areas that have relatively intact natural ecosystems. It has given a lot less attention to urban places and urban people. About ten years ago, four of us long involved … Continue reading →
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1:43 PM | #23: Salps
From reading our blog you are aware that so far this season we have documented two newly entangled whales this summer/fall in the Bay of Fundy (Catalog #3279 and Catalog #4001).  The last couple of weeks of the field season have been frustrating since we have been plagued with high winds, rain and fog.  Inclement weather can be very frustrating so when we were faced with a small weather window we
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12:21 PM | The Skinny on Who Eats Meat
By Susan Cosier Say you took all the countries in the world and skewed their borders to represent how much meat each consumes. Well, what you would get is this map. Lands of big meat eaters would bulge, while more omnivorous nations would trim down. Across the globe we are taking increasingly bigger bites of burgers, pork chops, and chicken breasts, but carnivores in the European Union and the United States eat the most meat per person per day. (New […]
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12:00 PM | Blame humans, not lions, for cheetah declines
Wild cheetahs have suffered tremendously over the last century—their population has been reduced by an order of magnitude, from some 100,000 one hundred years ago to just 10,000 today. While it’s certain that human activity bears at least some proportion of the responsibility for that decline, many have also pointed fingers at other predators in
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3:01 AM | The Long Bright Path to the Nobel Prize for LED Lighting
A Nobel Prize for the breakthrough behind the LED light bulb honors a long lineage of inquiry.

October 07, 2014

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8:29 PM | Invasives Week: Clawing Their Way to the Top
By Elizabeth Royte This story is a part of OnEarth's Invasive Species Week.In the chill of a New England April, Chad Coffin, a 12th-generation Mainer, raced against the dying of the light, the rising of the tide, and the prospect of his livelihood falling to pieces. Wearing chest waders, earmuffs, and multiple layers of hoodies, he muscled heavy wooden fence rails—strung with netting and aluminum flashing—into the soft muck at the mouth of […]
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8:04 PM | Invasives Week: Attack of the Schwartzencrab
By Rocky Kistner When you think of Maine, you probably think of a brisk coastline teeming with lobster and shellfish. But there is one crustacean that just doesn’t belong on those rocky shores. Meet the green crab, a voracious European invader and the subject of “Clawing Their Way to the Top,” Elizabeth Royte’s contribution to OnEarth’s Invasive Species Week. The pinchy poacher is also the star of “Attack of the Green […]
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7:17 PM | Simple Suppers: Dairy-free creamy pasta
I don’t have photos of these recipes because… well, they were tasty and we ate them. So feast your eyes on my new route to work instead :) One of the great challenges, during our summer of waiting to move, has been feeding ourselves. We packed away a lot of the ‘unnecessary’ cooking equipment for a few weeks, only to find it was out of action for a few months. With numerous false starts, I kept running down the cupboards and the freezer, in anticipation of a move date […]
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7:16 PM | Chronic pain workshop totally unprepared for patient with chronic pain
The chronic pain workshop was upstairs, but I was sobbing in the washroom, loudly. Despite what you may have gathered from recent reports on my blog, I’m not actually much of a crier. I’m definitely not a public crier. But … Continue reading →
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7:12 PM | A Tale of Two Poles: Sea Ice in Antarctica Surged in September to Record Extent But Remained Low in the Arctic
Even as climate change continues to be felt around the world, its impact in the Arctic and Antarctic are, in part, a tale of two poles. The National Snow and Ice Data Center is out today with its annual review of sea ice conditions, and in the Arctic the news is in keeping with what […]The post A Tale of Two Poles: Sea Ice in Antarctica Surged in September to Record Extent But Remained Low in the Arctic appeared first on ImaGeo.
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6:47 PM | Where did the red fox come from?
Researchers at University of California, Davis are studying the genome of the red fox, the world's most widely distributed land carnivore. Some surprising findings about the origins, journey and evolution of the red fox have come to light.Sacramento Valley Red FoxPhoto courtesy of Ben Sacks/UC DavisThe new genetic research suggests that the first red foxes originated in the Middle East before beginning their journey of colonization across Eurasia to Siberia, across the Bering […]
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6:02 PM | Energiewende: Two Energy Lessons for the United States from Germany
Last month, I had the distinct pleasure of traveling to Germany as a member of the German-American Chamber of Commerce Transatlantic Program for Young Technology Leaders delegation. The program... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:55 PM | Finding Human Ancestors at the Bottom of the Sea
Researchers are studying the remains of prehistoric human settlements that now lie submerged beneath Europe's coastal seas.More than 2,500 groups of submerged prehistoric artifacts, ranging in age from 5,000 to 300,000 years, have been found in the coastal waters and open sea basins around Europe. Artifacts include hut foundations, hearths, food remains, skeletons, shaped flint tools, hand axes, and canoe paddles embedded in the sediment on the sea floor.Periodically during the successive […]
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4:22 PM | Gloomy Days Ahead
By Jason Bittel What thrives in urban areas, sports an armored shell, and can cut through tree bark like a samurai’s sword? Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles? No way, dude. Allow me to introduce to you the gloomy scale insect. This mutant-like sap sipper is native to the American Southeast, but it could become more common and deadly as the climate warms. And city trees could suffer mightily for it.Recent research published in the journal Ecological […]
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3:54 PM | Discoveries of the week
Longivena bilobata featuresLongivena digitata, Longivena bilobata, Longivena flava, Longivena limeiraoliverai, Longivena spatulataLongivena gen. n. and five new species are described and illustrated from caatinga and cerrado habitats from Brazil: Longivena digitata sp. n., type–species (Maranhão, Bahia, Minas Gerais and Mato Grosso do Sul states), L. bilobata sp. n. (Maranhão state), L. flava sp. n. (Mato Grosso do Sul state), L. limeiraoliverai […]
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2:52 PM | Pourquoi faut-il protéger le petit-duc des montagnes
Voici cinq bonnes raisons de lancer une campagne pour la protection du petit-duc des montagnes
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2:13 PM | NASA Spacecraft Watches as Sun Belches Spectacularly
On October 2, the Sun let loose with a bright flash of radiation — a solar flare — propelling a cloud of particles probably weighing a trillion tons or so out into space at a million miles per hour. Solar flares and associated plasma belches likes this (the latter are known more properly as coronal […]The post NASA Spacecraft Watches as Sun Belches Spectacularly appeared first on ImaGeo.
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2:00 PM | Happy Cities, Happy People
By Diane Simunek Have you ever wondered what makes you happy? Is it the warm cup of coffee you enjoy in the morning or the feeling of coming home after a hard day’s work? Maybe it’s riding a bike around your neighborhood or watching your kids joyfully run around a playground. There’s no easy way […]
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1:00 PM | Roads predict human impacts on biodiversity
There are many hallmarks of human influence in a given ecosystem or habitat. It seems, though, that our habit of leaving roads in our wake pretty much everywhere may be the best predictor of our effect on the world around us. “Biodiversity loss may occur directly via road-kill events, disturbance or pollution, or indirectly by
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