Posts

November 07, 2014

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1:00 PM | The tale of the city bird and the country bird
Blackbirds have adapted quite well to the city despite the ever-present glow of lights, but what are those adaptations?
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1:30 AM | Frozen Extinct Bison Found in Siberia
Many large mammals went extinct at the end of the last Ice Age (approx 11,000 years ago), including the Steppe bison, or Bison priscus. A team of scientists has found one of these extinct bison frozen and naturally mummified in Eastern Siberia. It's a complete specimen frozen in time.A Steppe bison on display at the University of Alaska Museum of the North(Bernt Rostad from Oslo, Norway, via Wikimedia Commons)According to the research team, they have uncovered the most complete frozen […]

November 06, 2014

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11:13 PM | Migraine log – October
It’s been some time since I did a migraine log. Let’s slog through some data. Frequency Back when I did my last migraine log at the end of May, I was all aflutter about topamax, which I’d started 6 weeks … Continue reading →
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11:04 PM | Canine Distemper Could Wipe Out Siberian Tigers
In 2001 a few tigers in Russia started to show signs of obvious distress. Endangered Amur (or Siberian) tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) were underweight, weak, disoriented and incapable of hunting... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:02 PM | Waterspout Pas de Deux
Care to dance? Twin waterspouts from Italy today via @ReteMeteoAmator. pic.twitter.com/DgTyykCNvo — Anthony Sagliani (@anthonywx) November 6, 2014   I spotted this spectacular image on Twitter today and had to share it. You’re looking at twin waterspouts off the coast of Italy. A waterspout is a rapidly rotating column of air that stretches from the […]The post Waterspout Pas de Deux appeared first on ImaGeo.
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8:23 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: ASR in New Mexico
I had a lovely afternoon yesterday walking alongside the Bear Canyon Arroyo in Albuquerque’s northeast heights, talking with fellow water nerds Katherine Yuhas and Amy Ewing, and watching water flow in New Mexico’s first operational aquifer storage and recovery project (behind a Google surveywall): Nearly 3,000 gallons a minute of water began spurting from a ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: ASR in New Mexico’ »
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8:10 PM | Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows: a Long-standing Geological Puzzle
The iconic Tuolumne Meadows, in the high Sierra, is a geological puzzle. A newly published study traces the roots of the meadows to an incident deep in time and deep below the ground.
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7:32 PM | A Doctor-Parent Exchange Reveals a Dangerous Gap Between Fears and Facts on Ebola and Flu
A parent presses a doctor to vaccinate a child against Ebola, while rejecting a flu shot.
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5:21 PM | Microarray barcoding
With the rise of various next generation sequencing technologies, RT-PCR based probes, HRM and other methods, one was led to believe that microarray technology for the purpose of species identification is outdated. That's not true. There is still a small research community that looks into the development of microarray chips, as those, once developed, can be simple, mass produced, and can target a specific group of species of interest in a single assay. Past work showed that various […]
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4:46 PM | Latest Forecast: Odds of an El Niño Drop
The odds of an El Niño developing this winter have faded somewhat, further dimming hopes for a break in California’s historic drought. Back in June, forecasters pegged the odds of an El Niño emerging by fall and winter at 80 percent. Today, a bulletin from the National Climatic Data Center reports that the long predicted El Niño […]The post Latest Forecast: Odds of an El Niño Drop appeared first on ImaGeo.
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3:00 PM | Life Aboard a ‘Polar Roller’: America’s Last Heavy Icebreaker
And a trick to prevent seasickness that the skipper swears by (other than staying ashore).
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3:00 PM | The dangers of eating dolphin meat
Eating dolphin meat may seem abhorrent to most Americans, but many cultures around the world include marine mammals in their diets. For instance, people on the tropical island of St. Vincent in the Caribbean can legally hunt and eat dolphins. But these culinary traditions have a health downside: The meat and blubber contain high levels
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2:00 PM | On a Roll with “SustainableJoes”
By Kelly Witter One of the many reasons I love working at EPA is that I enjoy being around people who share my passion for the environment.  But when your day job is devoted to environmental protection it’s easy to be complacent about becoming more sustainable. After all, feeling guilty about the occasional slip up, […]
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9:54 AM | Bill Nye Explains Why he is a GMO Skeptic
Bill Nye, stalwart defender of evolution and climate science, has a new book out called, Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation. Nye, for those unfamiliar with him, is a popular science communicator. He also relishes verbal debate. In recent years, he’s become known for taking on creationists and climate skeptics. Nye’s reputation as a […]The post Bill Nye Explains Why he is a GMO Skeptic appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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3:25 AM | Madagascar: Fossil Offers Clues to Evolution of Mammals
About 70 million years ago, in the heyday of the dinosaurs, a groundhog-like mammal lived on the island of Madagascar. Weighing an estimated 20 pounds (9 kg), it was the largest mammal of its time.This image is a finite element analysis result, showing how stress is distributed through the skull under an incisor bite at a wide gape angle. (UMass Amherst)The mammal is named Vintana sertichi. Its fossilized skull was found in a geological formation that was deposited when a great variety of […]
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2:09 AM | New California County Fracking Bans Likely to Face Challenges
Passage of two out of three local measures may just set the stage for next battle.
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12:59 AM | Bay Area Votes in Favor of Open Space and ‘Smart’ Growth
A local environmental group is declaring victories for open space preservation and smart growth in the Bay Area.

November 05, 2014

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10:14 PM | Rarest Kiwi Species Gets Breeding Boost
Fifty birds flew home last month. Now, 50 may not seem like much and flight might not sound all that unusual for birds, but we’re talking about the critically endangered rowi (Apteryx rowi),... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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9:18 PM | One Factor Blunting Impact of Green Spending on Election: Inertia
What's missed in debates over the impact of liberal and conservative spending on congressional campaigns.
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5:49 PM | Thoughts on: Exotic
A view up through the canopy in the Eden Project’s tropical biome It’s November, and across the world hundreds of thousands of writers are taking part in NaNoWriMo – a month-long sprint to write 50,000 words of fiction. I have no current interest in writing a novel, and indeed I doubt I could manage NaNoWriMo this year. So much has happened that I am struggling to write at all. And so I thought I might take up a different challenge and try and blog every day in November. […]
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5:25 PM | Tired Hospital Workers Wash Hands Less Often
Hand-washing in hospitals is known to reduce patient infections, but a new study has found that hospital nurses and other employees wash their hands less frequently as the workday progresses. The research team, led by Hengchen Dai at the University of Pennsylvania, examined three years of hand-washing data from 4,157 caregivers in 35 U.S. hospitals. The team found that "hand-washing compliance rates" dropped by an average of 8.7 percent during a typical 12-hour work shift. The decline in
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5:25 PM | Mars Spacecraft Reveal Comet Flyby Effects on Martian Atmosphere
A comet traveling from the most distant region of our solar system passed amazingly close to Mars on October 19, and three spacecraft were there to observe the effects. If you had been standing on Mars, you would have seen thousands of shooting stars, according to astronomers from the University of Colorado, Boulder. The comet came from the Oort Cloud and passed within about 87,000 miles (139,500 kilometers) of Mars. That’s less than half the distance between Earth and our moon and less […]
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4:38 PM | How the Elections Matter (and Not), in Five Simple Graphics
| See update below | As expected, Republicans gained control of the U.S. Senate, as well as a good number of governorships, in the midterm elections yesterday. And not surprisingly, even before the votes were tallied some commentators were predicting  that a Republican victory would be a disaster for the environment in general, and efforts to grapple […]The post How the Elections Matter (and Not), in Five Simple Graphics appeared first on ImaGeo.
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4:31 PM | Snake bites
Bites from venomous snakes are common in many parts of the world and an especially serious unresolved health problem to millions of people living in South and Southeast Asia, as well as Africa and Latin America. Although there are no reliable numbers at the global scale, it has been estimated that at least 421,000 cases of venom snakebites with up to 94,000 deaths occur worldwide each year. However, experts warn that these figures may underestimate the real problem, which is believed to affect […]
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3:47 PM | Climate change and migration – Living on the go in Bangladesh
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. A fascinating video from the Climate & Development Knowledge Network on how communities affected by Cyclone Aila migrated from damaged croplands to inland cities in Bangladesh. A research project at the University of Dhaka is investigating public policy options to [...] The post Climate change and migration – Living on the go in Bangladesh appeared first on Institute of Hazard, […]
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3:00 PM | Visualize Air Quality with RETIGO
By Kayla Schulte  Today, more and more researchers and citizens are collecting their own air quality data using lower cost and portable instruments. While air quality monitoring technology has expanded into the hands of the individual with the creation of apps and small mobile sensors, the means to explore the measurements in-depth has been fairly […]
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1:00 PM | Could hand-reared penguins help seed new colonies?
Along the Western Cape of South Africa lives a group of endangered African penguins. These penguins breed from February through September, and then moult sometime between September and January. During the moulting period, the penguins are deprived of their waterproof feathers. That’s 21 days in which they’re prevented from diving for food and must rely
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12:59 PM | Republican Takeover of Senate Will Spotlight Climate Denial
Now that the Republicans control Congress for the next two years, what’s in store for U.S. climate politics? Well, Keystone is the first order of business, and then probably a whole lot of bombast and theater, which many will find unappetizing: Most vocal climate change skeptic in the Senate now runs the Senate’s environmental committee: […]The post Republican Takeover of Senate Will Spotlight Climate Denial appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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3:55 AM | Digital Dinosaurs: Paleontologists Use New Technology to Digitally Restore a Dinosaur Fossil
Fossils are usually crushed or incomplete when they are found. Millions of years can take a toll, after all. Consequently, fossils have to be studied very carefully to avoid damage and sometimes they are hard to access. Now, an international team of scientists has found a better way to examine delicate fossils and reconstruct their original forms. An artist's rendition of Erlikosaurus, depicted with feathers(Arthur Weasley)The team has been using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography […]
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2:04 AM | New Numbers Highlight Contrasts in California Water Use
Who's using the most -- and the least water? The numbers are in -- but officials warn that they can be misleading.
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