Posts

October 10, 2014

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6:00 PM | I Have Seen the Future of Transit and It Is in Raleigh
We long ago lost the skill of paying for the things we need: I won’t bore you with the statistics of how far we are behind in our infrastructure investments. You’ve heard them from me... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4:35 PM | Of headless elephants and diving flippers
Today at Perranporth I found an assortment of children’s toys washed up by the spring high tides. A tractor wheel, a headless elephant, loom bands (a current trend in children’s fashion) and a lego divers flipper: The significance of such a find comes down to the small Lego flipper, which has been drifting around the Cornish […]
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4:13 PM | Stunning New Finds from Ancient Greek Shipwreck, Using Rebreather Technology
An international team of divers and archaeologists has retrieved amazing new finds from an ancient Greek ship that sank more than 2,000 years ago. Because of it's large size and luxury cargo, they are calling this ship the "Titanic of the ancient world."Greek technical diver Alexandros Sotiriou discovers an intact ceramic table jug and a bronze rigging ring on the Antikythera Shipwreck.  (Brett Seymour, Return to Antikythera 2014)The Antikythera wreck was first discovered in 1900 […]
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4:06 PM | Can Peru Control the Murderous Resource Rush on its Forest Frontiers?
A fresh push builds for Peru to bring law and order to its violent Amazon forest frontier.
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3:24 PM | A case of pudding hysteria resolved with a case of pudding
Do you remember the pudding hysteria incident? If you do not, let me refresh your memory: coming out of a migraine, feeling terrible, I developed an overwhelming craving for pudding. When I realized there was no pudding, my migraine brain … Continue reading →
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3:20 PM | Trouble in Paradise
By Brooke Borel This story is a part of OnEarth's Invasive Species Week.Aloft in a helicopter, I look down on the Alakai Wilderness Preserve, a dark, billowing blanket punctuated by smatterings of bright green. From where I’m sitting, it’s hard to see anything but a seemingly endless expanse of tree cover. This 9,000-acre forest on the Hawaiian island of Kauai is a sanctuary for native trees like olapa and ohia, which combine on nearly […]
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1:44 PM | Nobel Peace Prize Awarded to Defenders of Children’s Rights
Two campaigners for children's rights are awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
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1:08 PM | Drinking coffee maybe good for your liver
The beverage on the right is good for your liver. I am not so sure about the cookies though.Important news for academia!Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of a new study show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver. The compounds are yet […]
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12:29 PM | Purple Mountains Majesty—and a Heck of a Playground for L.A.
By Susan Cosier Hey Los Angeles, President Obama wants you to go play outside. And he's even creating the 550-square-mile San Gabriel National Monument today to help you do it—all while conserving habitat for endangered animals such as Nelson's Bighorn sheep, California condors, mountain lions, spotted owls, and mountain yellow-legged frogs. Located in the Angeles National Forest, the new monument is just a 90-minute drive for about 15 […]
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12:00 PM | All Those Drops Add Up: Small Spills at the Gas Station
First, you pull into the gas station. You open the cover to the fuel tank, unscrew the cap, insert the nozzle, and pump away. Once you’ve filled up your tank, you dislodge the nozzle and return it to its starting position. But in between – perhaps without even noticing – you spilled a few drops
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10:17 AM | Music for dancing around while putting your laundry away and thinking about your lovers
No summary available for this post.
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10:00 AM | Anti-Fracking Activists in California Take Fight to County Ballots
Activists are hoping local residents will do what state legislators haven’t done -- shut down the controversial oil production technique known as hydraulic fracturing.
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2:15 AM | Every Day Wonders: Sun Dogs Over the Rockies
As I was picking up Moe, my Labradoodle, from doggie daycare a couple of days ago, I noticed bright, rainbow-like features on either side of the setting sun. So I grabbed my camera, zoomed in, and took some shots. In the photo above, you’re looking at a classic “sun dog,” part of a halo around […]The post Every Day Wonders: Sun Dogs Over the Rockies appeared first on ImaGeo.

October 09, 2014

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10:31 PM | Join a Series of Geological Treasure Hunts With Earth Science Week 2014
The annual open-ended celebration of geology and its related sciences takes place all this coming week. See what's happening and where to take part.
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8:54 PM | Poison Dart Frog Threatened by Toxic Gold Mines
A tiny species of poison dart frog barely the size of a human fingernail has been discovered in a pocket of forest in central Panama, but its unique chirps may not be heard for much longer. The new... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:27 PM | Looking Back at the Water Taste Challenge
Find out what Earth Rangers like you had to say about the Water Taste Challenge!
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6:39 PM | Why Must the Media Supersize Everything?
An emerging scandal–no matter how trivial or short-lived–is often sensationalized with the “gate” suffix. A similar hyping tendency is perhaps now on display with large, powerful storms. The hurricane that developed in the Caribbean in 2012, before weakening and making landfall in New York and New Jersey, was christened Superstorm Sandy. A year later, the tropical cyclone […]The post Why Must the Media Supersize Everything? appeared first on […]
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5:47 PM | Eating Our Troubles Away
By Alexis Sobel Fitts So I’m at Miya’s Sushi in New Haven, Connecticut, seated across from food historian Paul Freedman, chair of the history of science program at Yale. In front of us sit two bowls of miso soup, thick with puréed pumpkin, acorn squash, and, uh, “dead man’s fingers.”“Wonderful…complicated,” says Freedman, slurping the broth. He looks up at Bun Lai, chef and proprietor, hoping for an […]
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5:30 PM | Violin evolution
And Now for Something Completely Different.What could the diversity and beauty of plant leaves have in common with one of humankind's greatest creative inventions, the violin? Certainly more than I imagined. There are many parallels between leaves and violins. Both have beautiful shapes that are potentially functional, change over time, or result from mimicry. Shape is information that can tell us a story. Just as evolutionary changes in leaf shape inform us about mechanisms that […]
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4:35 PM | New Hope for Amputees: Luke Skywalker's Prosthetic Hand is a Reality
Robotic arms and hands controlled by neuromuscular implants are now a clinical reality. These prosthetic limbs are giving amputees new opportunities in their personal and professional lives.An early prosthetic hand prototype,Photo courtesy University of WashingtonMind ControlIn January 2013 a Swedish arm amputee was the first person in the world to receive a replacement arm that is surgically connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles. He can control it with his brain."We have used […]
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4:10 PM | Upcoming Seminar – What next for hazard, risk and resilience in society?
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. 13th October 2014, 13:00 to 14:30, W007, Dept of Geography, Andrew Collins, Northumbria University This lecture given by Andrew Collins, Professor in Disaster and Development at Northumbria University, will address the conundrum of what next for hazard, risk and resilience [...] The post Upcoming Seminar – What next for hazard, risk and resilience in society? appeared first on […]
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4:07 PM | Rewriting the book on living with chronic illness
Have you or someone you loved with a chronic condition been let down by the medical system’s approach to chronic pain self-management? @CampOther, @ElitaBaldridge, @cginpvd, myself, and others are working on a project to improve things a bit and we’d … Continue reading →
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2:40 PM | This Just in: No El Niño Yet, But it’s Probably Coming Soon
The U.S. Climate Prediction Center has just come out with it’s monthly update on the evolution of a long-anticipated El Niño in the Pacific Ocean. And the envelope please: Keep waiting… From the CPC Diagnostic Discussion report issued this morning: The consensus of forecasters indicates a 2-in-3 chance of El Niño during the November 2014 […]The post This Just in: No El Niño Yet, But it’s Probably Coming Soon appeared first on ImaGeo.
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2:05 PM | Bright Idea
By Brian Palmer The day the Nobel committee began announcing its 2014 winners earlier this week, National Geographic published a list of Nobel should-have-beens. Dan Vergano’s contribution—Thomas Edison for the light bulb—proved prescient. One day later, a Nobel for physics was finally awarded for the light bulb. Unfortunately for the Wizard of Menlo Park, it didn’t go to Edison. The winners were Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and […]
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1:59 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
Stuff worth reading Sometimes My Body Is a Cage Do I share everything Roxane Gay writes?I should. What will we do if the system can no longer create jobs? An interview with Ansel… To be chronically ill in our society … Continue reading →
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1:41 PM | Three Stunning Views of Super Typhoon Vongfong, Now Churning Toward Okinawa and Eyeing Japan
After intensifying explosively and becoming the strongest storm of the year earlier this week, Super Typhoon Vongfong is churning toward U.S. military bases on Okinawa and is expected to make landfall in Japan on Saturday. The powerful storm comes on the heels of Typhoon Phanfone, which left at least seven dead in Japan earlier this […]The post Three Stunning Views of Super Typhoon Vongfong, Now Churning Toward Okinawa and Eyeing Japan appeared first on ImaGeo.
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1:02 PM | Coachella: More California drought resilience
In the latest episode of “whos’ not running out of water in California?” we join Ian James for a visit to the Coachella Valley: [V]ast amounts of water are still flowing as usual to the farms of the Coachella Valley, soaking into the soil to produce lemons and tangelos, grapes, and vegetables from carrots to ...Continue reading ‘Coachella: More California drought resilience’ »
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1:00 PM | Will crabs invade Antarctica?
Many predatory crabs don’t live in Antarctica for a simple reason: it’s too cold. But as the Earth warms, these clawed critters could invade pristine polar waters and threaten native species, scientists warn in an editorial. The Southern Ocean “has traditionally been regarded as the most biologically isolated and invasion-resistant ocean,” the team writes in
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12:23 PM | Moon Over Miami? King Tide Underfoot
By Susan Cosier When the moon, sun, and earth align just right, and the full moon is at its closest proximity to our planet, its gravitational pull creates the king of all tides. Seriously, the bi-annual event is called a “King Tide,” and there’s one happening right now, which is sort of bad news if you live in a low-lying city like, say, Miami. The video above shows what the moon did to Miami last October. The city is expecting peak tide […]
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10:45 AM | ¿POR QUÉ EXPLOTA UNA GRANJA DE VACAS?
QUÉ TIENE QUE VER LA EXPLOSIÓN DE  UNA GRANJA DE VACAS CON LA EXTINCIÓN P/T Y EL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICOIGNACIO LÓPEZ GOÑI
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