Posts

August 08, 2014

+
2:00 PM | NASA’s Opportunity Rolls a Record Distance on Mars
One of NASA's most senior and still-operational spacecraft reached a milestone: the rover Opportunity completed its first 25 miles traveling across the surface of Mars!
+
1:43 PM | We Didn’t Start the Fire—Ohhhh Wait, We Did
By Jason Bittel Got three minutes? Dr. John Holdren, science advisor to the president, has a thing or two to tell you about climate change and wildfires. Basically, a warming world fuels the perfect firestorm. Longer, hotter, and drier summers make wildfires more frequent and more intense. Meanwhile, heat stress, droughts, and invasive pests turn trees into kindling. Poof! And this is not only a problem for the West: the Southeast actually leads the nation […]
+
12:00 PM | How Much Logging Can Tropical Forests Withstand?
It is universally agreed in conservation circles that when forests are razed to make room for roads or agriculture, the consequences for biodiversity are dire. But there are other forms of timber harvest, like selective logging, for which the consequences are either mixed or uncertain. In selective logging, only a certain amount of timber may
+
5:08 AM | Why Lake Mead keeps dropping
Water released from Lake Mead, through Hoover Dam’s turbines, travels downstream about 150 miles to Lake Havasu. There, massive pumps on the river’s left bank push the water up on the start of a 336 mile journey that ends in groundwater spreading basins west of Tucson. The Colorado River’s water then recharges an aquifer, where ...Continue reading ‘Why Lake Mead keeps dropping’ »
+
2:45 AM | The Air Up There
By Susan Cosier A foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in 2001 forced British farmers to slaughter more than six million sheep, cattle, pigs, and goats. What caused the outbreak was never definitively determined, but scientists suspect a dust cloud transported the virus from the Sahara Desert in Africa to the British Isles. But because no one had tested the cloud and what it contained, there was no way to tell for sure if the disease had arrived with the dust. […]
+
1:11 AM | #4: Whales, Brownies and Poop
This morning we left the dock around 7:15 AM, slightly later than usual to avoid any lingering fog. We were all thrilled to finally get back on the water, but encountering some of our favorite things made the day even more amazing. Around 9:30 AM, we photographed our first right whale! Everywhere we looked, there were right whales. Typically when we hang in one area for a while, we start

August 07, 2014

+
10:09 PM | Annals of Indian water: “hot, scorching sands”
Most of the land in these reservations is and always has been arid. If the water necessary to sustain life is to be had, it must come from the Colorado River or its tributaries. It can be said without overstatement that when the Indians were put on these reservations they were not considered to be ...Continue reading ‘Annals of Indian water: “hot, scorching sands”’ »
+
7:53 PM | Moldy yogurt
Last year a bad batch of yogurt was giving its manufacturer a really bad case of heartburn and making some of its customers sick. The company had to recall of the mold-infested yogurt following reports of over 200 customers becoming ill with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.Earlier, consumers had complained about the strange taste of the yogurt and reported that some containers bulged oddly, however, there were initially no reports of illness. The company had previously claimed the mold did not […]
+
7:08 PM | Shale Gas Boom Can Revitalize Domestic Manufacturing
A new report from a University of Michigan-led panel suggests that the American shale gas boom has the potential to revitalize domestic manufacturing.
+
6:59 PM | Low testosterone could be what made us civilized humans
Rachel Feltman, writing for the Washington Post: According to a study published in Current Anthropology, our transition into modern civilization might have coincided with our species’ drop in testosterone. The hormone, associated with both biologically male characteristics and aggression, makes skulls grow those heavy brows we associate with our evolutionary ancestors. Lead author Robert Cieri, […]∞
+
6:30 PM | Copper Kills Salmon Sense Of Smell
Will The Largest Mine Waste Disaster In History In Canada Destroy The Largest Salmon Run In History A study in Ecological Applications reveals incredibly small... The post Copper Kills Salmon Sense Of Smell appeared first on Russ George.
+
6:12 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: forest health = watershed health
From last Sunday’s newspaper, a solutions-oriented piece on an effort to scale up forest and watershed restoration in the mountains around me: Trees being cut last week on Forest Service land near the Sandia Crest Road can be used as firewood, but there is not enough money to be made from cutting the small timber ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: forest health = watershed health’ »
+
6:00 PM | Stanford Scientists Use Fruit Flies to Study Diabetes
Stanford researchers have developed a new way to use fruit flies to sort through the complicated genetics of Type 2 diabetes.
+
5:25 PM | Devil in the Deep Blue Sea
By Brian Palmer A stretch of the Gulf of Mexico spanning more than 5,000 square miles along the Louisiana coast is nearly devoid of marine life this summer, according to a study released this week. Caused largely by nutrient runoff from farm fertilizer, this oxygen-deprived “dead zone” is approximately the size of Connecticut. Although slightly smaller than last summer’s edition, the Gulf dead zone is still touted by some as the largest in […]
+
5:22 PM | High-Brightness Perovskite-Based LEDs Developed
Researchers from the University of Cambridge, University of Oxford and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich have developed high-brightness perovskite-based LEDs.
+
3:46 PM | Why Vaccine and GMO Denial Should be Treated Equally
Earlier this year, two writers at Mother Jones noted: It’s easy to find bad information about the safety of vaccines on the internet. True, that. It’s also easy to find bad information about the safety of GMOs on the internet. What puzzles me is why liberal outlets recognize “bad information” about vaccines but not GMOs. (Grist is now a […]The post Why Vaccine and GMO Denial Should be Treated Equally appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
+
3:41 PM | Southerners Think Differently on How Energy Affects Environment
According to the University of Michigan Energy Survey, Southerners, compared to individuals in other parts of the country, are less likely to believe that energy affects the environment by at least a fair amount.
+
3:00 PM | Cap and Trade Faces First Major Political Test
A group of Democrats wants to delay the planned expansion of California's cap-and-trade system. They're worried about the impact of higher gas prices.
+
2:51 PM | Around the Water Cooler: Green Infrastructure Research All-STARs
This post originally appeared on EPA’s Healthy Waters for the Mid-Atlantic Region blog. by Ken Hendrickson and Jennie Saxe A few weeks ago, Major League Baseball (MLB) held its annual All-Star Game. This is a chance for the best players from across MLB to work together and showcase their talents. EPA recently had a chance to host […]
+
2:14 PM | Shark Bites Robot, Robot Lives to Tell Tale
By Jason Bittel Researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution built a torpedo-shaped robot (named “Remus”) that can find and follow any radio-tagged marine animal they tell it to. Last year, they let the bot loose on great white sharks to see what these feared predators do in their natural habitat (without the distraction of human divers or shark cages). Surprise: sharks bite things in their natural habitat—including Remus! One […]
+
2:00 PM | A Simple Mineral Has Geochemical Power That Helps Spark Life
New work shows that the simple mineral sphalerite has geochemical powers suitable for helping life to arise from precursors in the mineral kingdom.
+
1:27 PM | New Method Improves Performance of SiC Power Devices
Scientists at the University of Tokyo have developed a novel dielectric film growth technique which improves the performance of SiC power devices.
+
1:00 PM | Do landscape corridors help invasive species?
Landscape corridors are a popular way to expand wildlife habitat. But since these connectors allow native animals and plants to travel between habitat patches, it stands to reason that they might also help exotic species invade new territory. “[T]he same principles that support corridor establishment for threatened species… suggest that corridors could simultaneously jeopardize entire
+
1:00 PM | El Niño Fizzle: No Relief Likely for California Drought
Odds of a strong pattern of warm Pacific waters forming in time to bring winter rains are diminishing.
+
12:21 PM | GeoPoll #3 – What got you interested in geology?
After a bit of an opinion hiatus I am back with the third geopoll. Every day I go to work at a university department filled with geologists. All of us are tackling different questions, but in the beginning we all started at the same place. Namely, not knowing anything about geoscience. In my conversations with colleagues over […]
+
10:49 AM | High-speed rail’s slow progress
Ron Nixon, reporting for the New York Times: Still, even if the California, Florida and Texas projects all succeed, transportation experts say it is unlikely that the United States will ever have the same kind of high-speed rail systems as China or Europe. C. William Ibbs, a professor of civil engineering at the University of […]∞
+
10:23 AM | #3: Try, Try Again
We were unable to survey yesterday because of rain and fog. But, we are giving it a shot today despite a somewhat foggy forecast. Here we go!
+
12:45 AM | Iselle Now a Hurricane Threat to Hawaii; Julio is Following — and a New Disturbance Has Just Formed
Yesterday, I posted a satellite image showing double cyclonic trouble headed for Hawaii. Today the threat became even more troubling. At 5:15 p.m. EDT today, the National Weather Service issued a hurricane warning for the Big Island of Hawaii, as Iselle is now expected to lash the island with hurricane-strength winds on Thursday. Maui and […]The post Iselle Now a Hurricane Threat to Hawaii; Julio is Following — and a New Disturbance Has Just Formed appeared first on ImaGeo.

August 06, 2014

+
10:46 PM | Rosetta Has Arrived, and the View is Astounding
It took five loops around the Sun, three gravity-assist fly-bys of Earth and one of Mars, and a journey of 3.97 billion miles lasting 10 years, five months and four days. After all that, the Rosetta spacecraft finally reached it destination today — and made history. Rosetta is the first spacecraft ever to rendezvous with […]The post Rosetta Has Arrived, and the View is Astounding appeared first on ImaGeo.
+
8:15 PM | Researchers to Use Camelina for Biodiesel Production
Camelina sativa, a flowering plant native to Europe and to Central Asia, can be a valuable biofuel crop because it can grow on poorer quality farmland and needs little irrigation and fertilizer.
123456789
382 Results