Posts

August 20, 2014

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7:14 PM | Plankton In Space A Blooming Miracle
Perhaps you never imagined space is home to plankton. Reports are now proliferating that scientists have discovered Earthly plankton in space has taken up residence... The post Plankton In Space A Blooming Miracle appeared first on Russ George.
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7:09 PM | Unique and Alone On the EDGE of Existence
This is a guest post by Simon C. Moore , a Biology graduate and science writer ...
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6:52 PM | Molecular Shuttle Improves Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production
Scientists at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) have found a way to enhance photocatalytic hydrogen production by using a novel molecular shuttle.
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5:35 PM | Research Identifies Method to Optimize Fracking
A study by the University of Leicester has identified a new method to optimize fracking, improving gas yields and reducing environmental impacts.
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5:06 PM | Chilean sea bass and mercury
Despite the many health benefits of eating fish, most commercially harvested fish are contaminated with mercury. The most common form of mercury in fish is methylmercury, a neurotoxin that is especially dangerous to the developing nervous system. Although present in only small quantities in the environment, mercury accumulates in living organisms. Among fish, accumulation of mercury is prevalent but variable, primarily due to differences in trophic level and body size, such that mercury […]
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3:37 PM | Studying Stream Restoration
By Marguerite Huber When I was younger, there was a prairie and stream behind my house. I ran and played there all the time with my friends until a house was built in its place. The lot was transformed from a wild, overgrown landscape to a manicured lawn. With the prairie gone and stream no […]
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3:23 PM | U.S. Coal Exports to South Korea Could Cut Emissions
Counterintuitively, exporting U.S. coal to power plants in South Korea could lead to a decrease in carbon dioxide emissions, according to scientists at Duke University.
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2:29 PM | Flood in the Desert
By Jason Bittel Heavy rains hit Phoenix yesterday morning, prompting massive flooding across the region that knocked out power grids and caused widespread damage. Authorities had to perform numerous rescues like the one in the video above. Many rescues required helicopters. Although no single instance of flooding can be tied to climate change, the most recent deluge fits a growing pattern: Arizona has had seven major water-related disasters since 2000. […]
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1:30 PM | Mixed Industrial Slags Generate Energy, Fuels
NETL researchers have found a way to use mixed industrial slags to generate energy and fuels, reduce carbon emissions.
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1:16 PM | Robert Kennedy Jr. and Mark Hyman to Appear on Dr. Oz Show
I was at the Baltimore aquarium with my wife and kids a few weeks ago when Robert Kennedy Jr. called me on my cell phone to vent about the media’s deep reluctance to take his newly published book seriously. At the time, even the Huffington Post was giving him the back of the hand. This […]The post Robert Kennedy Jr. and Mark Hyman to Appear on Dr. Oz Show appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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12:00 PM | A direct link between ivory trafficking and elephant decline
Over the last four years, the illegal trade in elephant ivory surged, while tens of thousands of elephants were killed for that ivory each year. Those patterns have coincided with increases in seizures of illegal ivory and with increases in ivory prices on the black market. But quantifying that illegal harvest has always proven incredibly
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11:34 AM | The Parlour Bookshop, Didcot
The Parlour Bookshop, Didcot Didcot is home to a secondhand bookshop. I drive past it everyday on my way to work, but for all that it’s not the easiest place to visit, as it has extremely restrictive opening hours. It opens from 10am to 12:45 and from 13:45 until 16:00, hours that are completely incompatible with anyone who works full time. As this was the first free Wednesday I’ve had since moving to Didcot, it seemed rude not to go and have a gander. It’s a little way […]
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7:01 AM | Drought-Stricken California Town Struggles to Keep the Water Flowing
From heavy machinery to hand-held flour sifters, this town is pulling out all the stops to save its water.

August 19, 2014

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7:45 PM | ABB to Connect Europe’s Largest Tidal Project to UK Grid
MeyGen tidal stream project in Scotland’s Pentland Firth, the largest tidal energy project in Europe, will use ABB technology to feed energy into the onshore distribution grid.
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6:51 PM | We're in the Red
By Melissa Mahony Happy Earth Overshoot Day! Um, what? According to the Global Footprint Network, it’s the day of the year that humanity’s use of the earth's natural resources exceeds our planet’s ability to replenish those assets (a.k.a., forests, clean water, fertile soil, carbon absorption, etc.). Every year, the international think tank takes datasets from the United Nations to calculate the day that humanity’s ledger goes into […]
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6:40 PM | 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report Released
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. continues to be a leader in wind energy, ranking second in installed capacity in the world.
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6:00 PM | 10 Years of Extinction Countdown: A Lot of Good in the Face of Mass Losses
Ten years. Nearly 1,200 articles. I have no idea how many species. I have no idea how many tears. *** When I started what was then called “Extinction Blog” on August 19, 2004, I... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:00 PM | The Importance of Debating Energy Policies—Not Technologies
As a researcher working in the area of energy technology and policy, I often find myself drawn into debates surrounding certain energy technologies, and what role they should play in the future... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5:31 PM | Solar Panel Array Designed Using Origami Principles
Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory think that origami principles could help utilize space solar power for Earth-based purposes.
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5:10 PM | Discoveries of the week
It's Tuesday again - time for another round of new discoveries.Jerzego corticicolaJerzego corticicola (taken from paper)A new genus and species of hisponine jumping spider from Sarawak, Jerzego corticicola Maddison sp. nov. are described, representing one of the few hisponine jumping spiders known from Asia, and the only whose male is known. Although similar to the primarily-Madagascan genus Hispo in having an elongate and flat body, sequences of 28s and 16sND1 genes indicate that Jerzego is […]
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3:09 PM | Drought and those yummy California almonds
Via Brett Walton: Continuing a decades-long trend, California farmers will increase their almond acreage next year, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report. An estimated 48,000 acres of new almond orchards will be planted next year, an estimate based on a first-ever survey of nursery sales. The increase is roughly 40 percent higher than the ...Continue reading ‘Drought and those yummy California almonds’ »
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2:52 PM | Infrastructure Upgrades Mean Texas No Longer Wasting Wind Power
According to a report by the Energy Information Administration, curtailments of wind generated electricity in Texas have dropped steadily and substantially since 2011 thanks mostly to the state’s completion of 3,500 miles of transmission lines as part of the Competitive … Continue reading →
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2:24 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: Is our hero (El Niño) abandoning us?
There was a great bit of humorous business that my offspring Reed helped me cook up over the weekend for this column, which ended up on the self-editing floor. The column was in part about how we all put too much stock in El Niño as our savior from drought, and Reed reminded me of that great ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: Is our hero (El Niño) abandoning us?’ »
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2:18 PM | California Is Hot, Hot, HOT
By Jason Bittel You don’t need a beautiful mind to spot the pattern in this National Climatic Data Center graph. See where the red squiggly fires up at the far right, kinda like a Jupiter missile? That’s where California’s 2014 average temperature climbs 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit higher than ever before in the state’s recorded history. But the less dramatic orange line is actually scarier. It represents a temperature […]
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2:12 PM | Shale Oil Profits Can Pay for Emission Reduction
Unanticipated economic benefits from the shale oil and natural gas boom could help offset the costs of reducing the U.S.’s carbon footprint, say agricultural economists at Purdue University.
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1:03 PM | Time-lapse Satellite Animations Show Birth of Giant Thunderstorms in Glorious Detail
I often find myself transfixed when big, towering thunderheads boil up along Colorado’s Front Range, where I live. Hail-spitting, tornado-spawning supercells are not required. Even a lone cell can have that effect on me. So when the folks at the Satellite Blog of the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies began posting animations of thunderstorms […]The post Time-lapse Satellite Animations Show Birth of Giant Thunderstorms in Glorious Detail appeared first on […]
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1:00 PM | How can we translate conservation research into actual conservation?
It’s easy to forget sometimes that the mammoth time, effort, and money spent on scientific research actually does have a point. We hope, as we engage in all that work, that it will actually yield results that we can, you know, use. But one tiny branch of research has shown in the past that people
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12:03 PM | Can isotopes help define the Anthropocene?
By Dr Jonathan Dean, Prof Melanie Leng and Prof Anson Mackay   The Anthropocene is a term that is increasingly being used to refer to the current interval in geological time in which humans have become a dominant force of global environmental change. It was coined by Prof Eugene Stoermer, a biologist, in the 1980s and popularised in the early 2000s by Prof Paul Crutzen, an atmospheric chemist. It is now indisputable that humans are leaving their mark on the planet (see the recent Climatica […]
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8:53 AM | Review: Mrs Crimble's coconut macaroons
There’s a weekly tradition at work of a meeting that involves cake. A nominated person brings in cakes for everyone else, and we sit and have a natter for half an hour or so. Some people bake; some people buy cakes. There is a slight snobbery about it – baking is better, and if you can produce nicely iced cup cakes, that’s a bonus. I think some of my colleagues are avid fans of the Great British Bake Off. We have various allergies and intolerances we have to cater for, […]
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3:28 AM | The Story of Jerusalem’s Railway Park: Getting the City Back on Track, Economically, Environmentally and Socially
Sharing local experience is always important. However in the case of the Jerusalem Railway Park, both the process and the outcome have the level of universal relevance that make so many of the themes presented in “The Nature of Cities” … Continue reading →
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