Posts

July 17, 2014

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4:15 PM | Efficient Room-Temperature Phosphorescent OLEDs Developed
The team of Jinsang Kim, a professor of materials science and engineering and chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, developed bright, metal-free, organic, phosphorescent light emitters.
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3:53 PM | Milwaukee Sees the Light
By Richard Manning Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is known for taking prickly offense at the term “Rust Belt.” Nonetheless, the belt fits. The old-line manufacturing cities of the upper Midwest preceded the rest of the nation in collapse by decades. Foreclosure, blight, drugs, failed schools, homelessness, brownfields, pollution, decay, and crime: there’s plenty to justify the term, and Milwaukee has it all. Or maybe had it all. Because a […]
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3:49 PM | The Warming State of the Climate in 2013
A variety of indicators tracked by federal scientists reflect the continued warming of the climate system.
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3:43 PM | Salon in No Position to Judge What Sets Back Science
This week the New York Times published a profile of longtime climate skeptic John Christy. I found the piece perplexing because it contained no obvious hook or peg, as we say in journalism. There were no newsy events in Christy’s life that might have prompted a story about him in a prestige media outlet: No […]The post Salon in No Position to Judge What Sets Back Science appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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2:45 PM | Aussie's Oopsie Daisy, Journey to the Center of Siberia, Great Lake Goes Green (in a Bad Way)
By Jason Bittel Man with a plan: President Obama kicked things wide open yesterday by announcing a whole slew of new climate change initiatives. The list is long, but highlights include: $236 million to help eight states improve electricity infrastructure in rural areas, $13.1 million for 3D mapping data to help cities and states predict and plan for weather-related disasters, and $10 million to help Native American tribes with climate change adaptations. […]
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1:00 PM | Hungry dogs ravaging sea turtle nests
In the farming village of Colola, Mexico, many families have dogs that help guard the house and fields. But these canine companions also wreak havoc on the nests of threatened sea turtles at a nearby beach, gobbling up eggs as a way to compensate for a lack of food at home. There are roughly 700
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10:58 AM | The Frustrating World of Dangerous Living
When I first heard about the show I was very excited. Hollywood finally giving climate change the treatment, yay! I really wanted to like it. And I did - to some extent.
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7:01 AM | California Water Districts Face Suit for Ignoring Conservation Law
Investigative report prompted legal action. And some districts are responding.
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6:01 AM | The House of Dung
We gathered around the specimen with hand lenses, expensive cameras, and intent interest.  After some initial documentation, it was reverently placed in a basket and carried back to the main hall to be further examined and identified.  Pieces were placed under microscopes, and hefty field guides and computer programs referenced.  Read more »

July 16, 2014

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9:14 PM | Baby Mountain Gorillas Celebrated by 40,000 People in Rwanda
Well I just found something to add to my bucket list. Earlier this month 40,000 people gathered in Rwanda for the 10th Kwita Izina, the annual ceremony that celebrates and names all of the known... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:46 PM | Hawaii: Climate Wipeout
By Rocky Kistner The sea-level rise that comes along with climate change won’t only swallow far-flung, exotic islands such as Kirabiti and the Maldives. The rising waters, fueled by melting icecaps, will also inundate our fiftieth state—the land of hula skirts, mai tais, and most importantly, Hawaiians. “I like to think about the islands as they once were … peopled by some of the most fearless and skilled ocean voyagers on the […]
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6:00 PM | The Story of Mr. Bisbing, Part I: A Great Egret with a very special Back-Pack
How often do you see a bird flying high in the sky and wonder where it’s going? Some birds make amazing migrations of many 1000s of miles – how long has that bird already been flying? How much farther does it have to go? Migratory birds must have amazing stories to tell, but we are […]
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5:33 PM | Snake Fungal Disease
Credit: Julie McMahonSnake Fungal Disease (SFD) is an emerging disease in certain populations of wild snakes in the eastern and midwestern United States. Laboratory analyses have demonstrated that the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola is consistently associated with SFD. Ophidiomyces consumes keratin, a key ingredient in snake scales. It can cause scabs, nodules, abnormal molting, ulcers and other disfiguring changes to snake skin. Mortality is 100 percent in Illinois massasauga rattlesnakes […]
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5:30 PM | Good Science Starts with Good Ethics
By Toby Schonfeld, Ph.D. The social media world was rocked recently when a paper published in a scientific journal revealed that Facebook had been manipulating users’ news feeds to determine whether the concept of “emotional contagion” was the same in virtual contexts as it was in person. You know how the whole office lights up […]
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3:08 PM | Stuff I wrote elsewhere: moving groundwater in New Mexico
The Augustin Plains Ranch project, New Mexico’s version of a trend toward meeting urban needs in the west by pumping rural groundwater in to cities, is taking another whack at winning state approval after losing resoundingly two years ago: A for-profit group hoping to pump New Mexico groundwater to the Rio Grande Valley and sell ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I wrote elsewhere: moving groundwater in New Mexico’ »
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2:28 PM | Miami’s Coastal Climate Calamity – in Super Slo-Mo
How to think about, and respond to, Miami's slow-motion demise.
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2:20 PM | I Brake for Humpbacks, West Nile Season, the Chillest Commute Ever
By Jason Bittel All systems go?: Japan is getting ready to flick a nuclear power plant back on for the first time since the Fukushima disaster. The 2011 meltdown led to the country shutting down 54 reactors and with them about a quarter of its energy supply. Japan's nuclear regulator says two reactors have met safety approval and are ready to send 1.78 gigawatts to the grid. The next step is to get public approval, which ... will be a tough sell. In a […]
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1:01 PM | Gum arabic under the microscope
In this video from the University of Cambridge, Rox Middleton shows us a ‘nanoscale’ image of gum arabic, taken with an electron microscope. Gum arabic is the hardened sap of an Acacia tree; this sample was probably collected in Sudan. If you want to see what it looks like on the everyday scale, I took a photo of a chunk when I visited the Oxford University herbarium. Gum arabic is a food additive, E414, used as a stabiliser. It’s also used in paints and pigments. This […]
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12:00 PM | Animals live in 3D, and now scientists do, too
Animals live in a world of three dimensions. There’s the North-South axis, the East-West axis, and a third axis that tells you the elevation, altitude, or depth at which an animal can be found depending on whether the animal is terrestrial, aerial, or marine, respectively. If that seems obvious and not worth pointing out, you’re
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12:59 AM | California Regulators Approve Fines for Wasting Water
Watering your lawn or washing your car may become a lot more expensive. State regulators have approved new fines aimed at water wasters, hoping the penalties will lead to a reduction in water use.

July 15, 2014

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7:57 PM | Tiger Skins Are Like Fingerprints—Could That Help Stop Smugglers and Poachers?
Last month forest rangers in India arrested a 21-year-old engineering student and his friend who had been caught carrying a tiger skin that they intended to sell for nearly $25,000. A few days... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:00 PM | EWEA Releases European Offshore Wind Industry Statistics
According to the report, on the first six months of 2014, Europe fully grid connected 224 offshore wind turbines in 16 commercial wind farms and one offshore demonstration site with a combined capacity totaling 781 MW.
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6:22 PM | California’s Drought Is Hurting Farmers More Than Food Consumers
Economists estimate that the drought will cost the state's farm economy about $2.2 billion this year, including the loss of more than 17,000 jobs.
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5:41 PM | Cheaper Platinum-Yttrium Fuel Cell Catalyst Developed
Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) report that they have developed a platinum-yttrium fuel cell catalyst which is stable, more active and less expensive than the existing platinum catalysts.

Patricia Hernandez-Fernandez, Federico Masini, David N. McCarthy, Christian E. Strebel, Daniel Friebel, Davide Deiana, Paolo Malacrida, Anders Nierhoff, Anders Bodin, Anna M. Wise, Jane H. Nielsen, Thomas W. Hansen, Anders Nilsson, Ifan E. L. (2014). Mass-selected nanoparticles of PtxY as model catalysts for ​oxygen electroreduction, Nature Chemistry, Other:

Citation
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3:40 PM | EIA: Fuel Economy Improvements Exhibit Diminishing Returns in Savings
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), fuel economy improvements show diminishing returns when it comes to fuel savings.
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2:48 PM | China Clarifies its Plans on Setting a CO2 Emissions Peak
A top Chinese official says the country may announce a peak year for climate-warming emissions soon.
Editor's Pick
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2:18 PM | Save the Moon!, Baltimore's Clean Machine, Giant Snails Go on a Picnic
By Jason Bittel Beetle battle: More than a century ago, people planted tamarisk trees in the American West as a way to prevent erosion. Today the invasive tamarisks are a water-sucking scourge, with a single tree drinking up to 200 gallons a day. Efforts to combat the trees' spread have included bonfires, bulldozers, and its most fearsome enemy, the tamarisk beetle. The beetles kill tamarisks like whoa, but some locals worry the insects will turn on native […]
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2:06 PM | New Magnetic Materials Make Electric Motors More Efficient
Scientists at the University of Adelaide in Australia have used two emerging magnetic materials to make electric motors and generators more efficient.
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1:57 PM | Welsh liquid gold
One question I hear rather frequently from people interested in our work is: Once you finished cataloging all life what are you going to do with all that information? For someone who works with DNA Barcoding for almost 10 years it is rather easy to respond with a number of examples especially those we had in mind all along when we build our reference libraries. However, it is much better to refer to examples where DNA Barcoding libraries have already been put to good use:Wales is the first […]
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1:00 PM | Still poison: Lead bullets remain a big problem for birds
You may have noticed a rare of show of Congressional compromise recently, when members from both sides of the aisle jumped at the chance to sponsor and vote for the Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act of 2014. The bill would have done a number of things, but two stood out: it would have exempted lead hunting ammunition and
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