Posts

October 08, 2014

+
12:21 PM | The Skinny on Who Eats Meat
By Susan Cosier Say you took all the countries in the world and skewed their borders to represent how much meat each consumes. Well, what you would get is this map. Lands of big meat eaters would bulge, while more omnivorous nations would trim down. Across the globe we are taking increasingly bigger bites of burgers, pork chops, and chicken breasts, but carnivores in the European Union and the United States eat the most meat per person per day. (New […]
+
12:00 PM | Blame humans, not lions, for cheetah declines
Wild cheetahs have suffered tremendously over the last century—their population has been reduced by an order of magnitude, from some 100,000 one hundred years ago to just 10,000 today. While it’s certain that human activity bears at least some proportion of the responsibility for that decline, many have also pointed fingers at other predators in
+
3:01 AM | The Long Bright Path to the Nobel Prize for LED Lighting
A Nobel Prize for the breakthrough behind the LED light bulb honors a long lineage of inquiry.

October 07, 2014

+
8:29 PM | Invasives Week: Clawing Their Way to the Top
By Elizabeth Royte This story is a part of OnEarth's Invasive Species Week.In the chill of a New England April, Chad Coffin, a 12th-generation Mainer, raced against the dying of the light, the rising of the tide, and the prospect of his livelihood falling to pieces. Wearing chest waders, earmuffs, and multiple layers of hoodies, he muscled heavy wooden fence rails—strung with netting and aluminum flashing—into the soft muck at the mouth of […]
+
8:04 PM | Invasives Week: Attack of the Schwartzencrab
By Rocky Kistner When you think of Maine, you probably think of a brisk coastline teeming with lobster and shellfish. But there is one crustacean that just doesn’t belong on those rocky shores. Meet the green crab, a voracious European invader and the subject of “Clawing Their Way to the Top,” Elizabeth Royte’s contribution to OnEarth’s Invasive Species Week. The pinchy poacher is also the star of “Attack of the Green […]
+
7:17 PM | Simple Suppers: Dairy-free creamy pasta
I don’t have photos of these recipes because… well, they were tasty and we ate them. So feast your eyes on my new route to work instead :) One of the great challenges, during our summer of waiting to move, has been feeding ourselves. We packed away a lot of the ‘unnecessary’ cooking equipment for a few weeks, only to find it was out of action for a few months. With numerous false starts, I kept running down the cupboards and the freezer, in anticipation of a move date […]
+
7:16 PM | Chronic pain workshop totally unprepared for patient with chronic pain
The chronic pain workshop was upstairs, but I was sobbing in the washroom, loudly. Despite what you may have gathered from recent reports on my blog, I’m not actually much of a crier. I’m definitely not a public crier. But … Continue reading →
+
7:12 PM | A Tale of Two Poles: Sea Ice in Antarctica Surged in September to Record Extent But Remained Low in the Arctic
Even as climate change continues to be felt around the world, its impact in the Arctic and Antarctic are, in part, a tale of two poles. The National Snow and Ice Data Center is out today with its annual review of sea ice conditions, and in the Arctic the news is in keeping with what […]The post A Tale of Two Poles: Sea Ice in Antarctica Surged in September to Record Extent But Remained Low in the Arctic appeared first on ImaGeo.
+
6:47 PM | Where did the red fox come from?
Researchers at University of California, Davis are studying the genome of the red fox, the world's most widely distributed land carnivore. Some surprising findings about the origins, journey and evolution of the red fox have come to light.Sacramento Valley Red FoxPhoto courtesy of Ben Sacks/UC DavisThe new genetic research suggests that the first red foxes originated in the Middle East before beginning their journey of colonization across Eurasia to Siberia, across the Bering […]
+
6:02 PM | Energiewende: Two Energy Lessons for the United States from Germany
Last month, I had the distinct pleasure of traveling to Germany as a member of the German-American Chamber of Commerce Transatlantic Program for Young Technology Leaders delegation. The program... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
+
4:55 PM | Finding Human Ancestors at the Bottom of the Sea
Researchers are studying the remains of prehistoric human settlements that now lie submerged beneath Europe's coastal seas.More than 2,500 groups of submerged prehistoric artifacts, ranging in age from 5,000 to 300,000 years, have been found in the coastal waters and open sea basins around Europe. Artifacts include hut foundations, hearths, food remains, skeletons, shaped flint tools, hand axes, and canoe paddles embedded in the sediment on the sea floor.Periodically during the successive […]
+
4:22 PM | Gloomy Days Ahead
By Jason Bittel What thrives in urban areas, sports an armored shell, and can cut through tree bark like a samurai’s sword? Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles? No way, dude. Allow me to introduce to you the gloomy scale insect. This mutant-like sap sipper is native to the American Southeast, but it could become more common and deadly as the climate warms. And city trees could suffer mightily for it.Recent research published in the journal Ecological […]
+
3:54 PM | Discoveries of the week
Longivena bilobata featuresLongivena digitata, Longivena bilobata, Longivena flava, Longivena limeiraoliverai, Longivena spatulataLongivena gen. n. and five new species are described and illustrated from caatinga and cerrado habitats from Brazil: Longivena digitata sp. n., type–species (Maranhão, Bahia, Minas Gerais and Mato Grosso do Sul states), L. bilobata sp. n. (Maranhão state), L. flava sp. n. (Mato Grosso do Sul state), L. limeiraoliverai […]
+
2:52 PM | Pourquoi faut-il protéger le petit-duc des montagnes
Voici cinq bonnes raisons de lancer une campagne pour la protection du petit-duc des montagnes
+
2:13 PM | NASA Spacecraft Watches as Sun Belches Spectacularly
On October 2, the Sun let loose with a bright flash of radiation — a solar flare — propelling a cloud of particles probably weighing a trillion tons or so out into space at a million miles per hour. Solar flares and associated plasma belches likes this (the latter are known more properly as coronal […]The post NASA Spacecraft Watches as Sun Belches Spectacularly appeared first on ImaGeo.
+
2:00 PM | Happy Cities, Happy People
By Diane Simunek Have you ever wondered what makes you happy? Is it the warm cup of coffee you enjoy in the morning or the feeling of coming home after a hard day’s work? Maybe it’s riding a bike around your neighborhood or watching your kids joyfully run around a playground. There’s no easy way […]
+
1:00 PM | Roads predict human impacts on biodiversity
There are many hallmarks of human influence in a given ecosystem or habitat. It seems, though, that our habit of leaving roads in our wake pretty much everywhere may be the best predictor of our effect on the world around us. “Biodiversity loss may occur directly via road-kill events, disturbance or pollution, or indirectly by
+
12:21 PM | Mother Nature Brought Us Into This World—Now She’s Threatening to Take Us Out
By Susan Cosier Mom is pissed. Mother Nature—who sounds strangely similar to Julia Roberts—is taking humans down a notch (or seven) in a video released this week at SXSW Eco. Through pollution, mining, drilling, deforestation, poaching, and overfishing, we’ve been biting the hand that feeds us. And she … is … fed … up. Sure, we’ve heard Julia give us the business before, but this is different. Way […]

October 06, 2014

+
9:33 PM | Climate Change Has Uneven Effects on Ocean Warming
Research published Sunday concluded that the upper 2,300 feet of the Southern Hemisphere’s oceans may have warmed twice as quickly after 1970 than had previously been thought.
+
8:37 PM | Meeting Their Match
By Ginger Strand This story is a part of OnEarth's "Invasive Species Week."“We’re like the Sopranos,” Mark Mayer told me. “We kill things.”Most government assassins wouldn’t put it so bluntly. Or maybe they would: I haven’t met too many government assassins. Maybe they like to amuse themselves, as Mayer does, by feeding the hallway crickets to the pet tarantulas they keep in their offices. Maybe they, too, work in […]
+
6:55 PM | Kids and Bugs
Not long ago I reported about the start of our famous School Malaise Trap Program. The trapping period is over and this week we will be receiving all the traps and collecting bottles at our institute. Then it is time for sorting, counting, sub-sampling, imaging, data-basing, DNA-extraction, PCR, and sequencing. We will have to work through 60 schools' samples, 2 bottles each. That's a lot of bugs even this time of the year.The program already got tremendous feedback through our blog. All […]
+
6:26 PM | Are we using Facebook to boost our self-esteem?
When people are in a bad mood, they are more likely to head to social networking sites like Facebook in search of people who seem worse off than they are, a new study finds.Image from the study courtesy of Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick and Benjamin JohnsonResearchers have found that people often use social media to connect with others who are posting positive and success-oriented updates. "But when people are in a negative mood, they start to show a lot more interest in the less […]
+
6:00 PM | Tastes Great, Less Drilling
By Brian Palmer The Bavarian beer purity law of 1516, known as the Reinheitsgebot, limited brewers to three ingredients: barley, hops, and water. For 498 years, water has trailed distantly behind the other two ingredients in the hearts of beer drinkers. Some people like malty beer. Other people like hoppy beer. No one likes watery beer.When I started brewing my own beer, I, too, focused on barley and hops. I dumped nine kinds of malt and four kinds of hops […]
+
3:38 PM | High Temps on the High Seas
By John Upton This story originally appeared at Climate Central.The RV Kaharoa motored out of Wellington, New Zealand on Saturday, loaded with more than 100 scientific instruments, each eventually destined for a watery grave. Crewmembers will spend the next two months dropping the 50-pound devices, called Argo floats, into the seas between New Zealand and Mauritius, off the coast of Madagascar. There, the instruments will sink and drift, then […]
+
2:07 PM | Protected: Understanding past sea-level change
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post. The post Protected: Understanding past sea-level change appeared first on Climatica.
+
2:00 PM | Why Scientists are Seen as Competent but Untrustworthy (and Why it Matters)
According to a recent study, the public's distrust of scientists has gotten so bad that they are now on par with CEOs and lawyers. This loss of trust will almost certainly have profound implications for our future.
+
1:27 PM | Usability Testing, the Report on the Environment, and My Time at EPA
By Taylor Katz As a student of Environmental Health at George Washington University, I was excited to be asked to contribute to the Agency’s Report on the Environment (ROE). The Report is a compilation of information on the best available indicators of national conditions and trends in air, water, land, human heath, ecological systems, and […]
+
1:00 PM | Do Wearables and Health Apps Belong in the Doctor’s Office?
Wearables and health apps made a multi-billion-dollar industry out of healthy peoples' desires to count calories and rack up steps. Now can this technology make the transition to a medical setting, to help people with chronic illnesses?
+
12:36 PM | A New Toy for Weather Junkies
By Susan Cosier This image may look like some epic Game of Thrones battle between winter zombies and dragon fire taking place across North America, but it’s really just a fancy new weather map. The colors—ranging from bright yellow (113 degrees Fahrenheit) to white (freezing)—represent the temperatures measured last week when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration unveiled its High-Resolution Rapid Refresh model. The new […]
+
10:00 AM | The Best Computer-Generated Face Ever
Computer graphics artist Chris Jones has created an amazingly realistic-looking head using the latest software. Watch the short video below. Will you forget that it is computer generated animation?Jones is based in Australia. "Mr. Head," is being called the "most realistic human head simulation" by critics around the web.According to Jones, the model is a work in progress. Also known as "Ed," it was made with Lightwave, Sculptris and Krita, and composited with Davinci Resolve Lite. Jones also […]
123456789
320 Results