Posts

September 20, 2014

+
1:58 PM | On the Path Past 9 Billion, Little Crosstalk Between U.N. Sessions on Population and Global Warming
As the United Nations convenes sessions on global warming and population growth, a new study foresees rising human numbers through 2100.
+
8:05 AM | Book Review: Taste of Beirut
One of my all-time favourite restaurants (which sadly closed, after the smoking ban came into being) was a Lebanese restaurant in Oxford. (There are two more, but they can’t match the quality of the food, or the jovial atmosphere.) It was a wonderful place to go in a large group, as they would just keep bringing out plates of mezze until everyone was stuffed. I found two of the dishes particularly moreish – small triangular pastries (sanbousek) filled with feta cheese, and a salad […]

September 19, 2014

+
10:59 PM | Should pollinator research focus on regions with malnutrition?
Pollination research has focused on places like California and New Jersey, but poverty-stricken areas will be hardest hit by pollinator declines.
+
9:59 PM | #19: Flukes, Flukes and more Flukes
If you an avid reader of our blog then you likely know that we are able to individually identify right whales by using the unique callosity pattern found on the top of their head.  However, in some whale species it's the ventral side of the tail fluke that is used for individual identification.  Example 1: The Sperm Whale Image of a sperm whale taken in 2011 Photo: New England Aquarium
+
9:26 PM | To Score Quick, Cheap Points, Label Someone as Anti-Science
When I was interviewing Robert Kennedy Jr. for my recent Washington Post magazine profile, there was one charge leveled against him that he deeply resented. “I am not anti-science,” he insisted on numerous occasions, and my suggestion a year ago that he was anti-science perturbed him more than anything. After all, Kennedy, like many greens, embraces […]The post To Score Quick, Cheap Points, Label Someone as Anti-Science appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
+
7:53 PM | This Week in EPA Science
By Kacey Fitzpatrick For most of the U.S., access to clean drinking water is as easy as turning on the faucet. In fact, a lot of hard work has gone into making sure our waterways are healthy and the water we drink is safe. Forty years ago, Congress passed Safe Drinking Water Act and since […]
+
6:24 PM | And Here’s Another Astounding View of Cali’s #KingFire
INCREDIBLE photo from #LakeTahoe last night of the #KingFire pyrocumulus!(via Steve Ellsworth) pic.twitter.com/OipOYGAQbA — NWS Boise (@NWSBoise) September 18, 2014 No sooner had I hit ‘Publish’ on my earlier post than I found this mind boggling photograph of California’s King Fire. It’s so dramatic that I decided to share it with you in a separate […]The post And Here’s Another Astounding View of Cali’s #KingFire appeared first on ImaGeo.
+
6:04 PM | Stunning Satellite View of California’s Massive King Fire. With Climate Change, We Should Expect More Such Views
California’s King Fire continues to blaze out of control in heavy timber and steep terrain in Eldorado National Forest north of the community of Pollock Pines. The fire ignited Saturday and spread with breathtaking speed through a landscape desiccated by hot temperatures and California’s profound and record-breaking drought. So far, the King Fire has scorched […]The post Stunning Satellite View of California’s Massive King Fire. With Climate Change, We Should Expect […]
+
5:30 PM | Artificial Sweeteners Linked with Metabolism Problems
The results of a new study suggest that instead of helping people loose weight, non-caloric artificial sweeteners may lead to health problems.Researchers have found a connection between non-caloric artificial sweeteners and metabolic irregularities leading to high blood glucose levels and diabetes.According to the authors of the study, "Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS […]
+
5:26 PM | Obama to Superbugs: We're Watching You
By Susan Cosier Antibiotic-resistant microbes, strains of bacteria that fight off drugs, are a serious problem. Two million people a year in the United States get sick with those so-called superbugs, and at least 23,000 of them die. Yesterday President Obama signed an executive order to begin addressing this growing public health issue.Under the new order, a task force led by the departments of health and human services, defense, and agriculture will […]
+
5:08 PM | Michael Bloomberg, Now a U.N. Climate Envoy, Presses the Case for Urban Action
Michael Bloomberg, a mayor turned U.N. climate envoy, explains what cities can do to blunt climate change and its impacts.
+
4:39 PM | A social media experiment
Boxes waiting to be picked upThe School Malaise Trap Program is up and running again!Last week boxes filled with Malaise traps and supplies went out to 60 schools across Canada. Starting next week classrooms will collect insects on their school yards and we will be helping them by barcoding some of their finds. It is the 4th run of this very successful educational program and this time we were seriously oversubscribed. For the 60 slots we have available over 150 schools applied and our […]
+
4:35 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
Verifiability, truth, and hearsay: feminist point of view on the Geek Feminism wiki After a Puzzling Pause, the Gender Revolution Continues. Interesting point about overwork fueling the wage gap Abstract Parisian Rooftops Photographed by Michael Wolf Artist Hinke Schreuders Alters … Continue reading →
+
4:26 PM | With Summer’s Unequalled Warmth, 2014 is Likely to Finish as the Warmest Year on Record for the Home Planet
August and the summer of 2014 have both gone down in the books as the warmest such periods since modern record keeping began in 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has announced. And with a warmth-bringing El Niño probably emerging, the odds are very good that the rest of the year will be warmer […]The post With Summer’s Unequalled Warmth, 2014 is Likely to Finish as the Warmest Year on Record for the Home Planet appeared first on ImaGeo.
+
4:18 PM | Teaming Up with Science Teachers
By Kacey Fitzpatrick “One afternoon my high school physics teacher said, ‘Wow, you’re picking this up a lot faster than you realize, and you might have a knack for this.’ That comment sort of lit off a bell for me.” If you ask an EPA researcher to share what first inspired them to pursue their […]
+
2:51 PM | Bloomberg's Climate Challenge
By Andrew Revkin Michael R. Bloomberg has been one of the most vocal leaders, at any level of government, when it comes to sounding the alarm about what climate change is doing, and will continue to do, to our planet—including exposing the deep vulnerability that human communities face from climate extremes and coastal flooding. As the mayor of New York City during Hurricane Sandy, Bloomberg was tasked with handling not just one but two disasters of […]
+
2:00 PM | NASA’s Curiosity Rover Arrives at the Foot of Mars’ Mount Sharp
Curiosity has reached the base of Mount Sharp, its primary mission goal. It's a 3-mile-high mound of sediment that preserves a geologic record of Mars going back billions of years.
+
1:50 PM | Louisiana’s Boot Is Shrinking in Size
By Susan Cosier When learning the states as I child, I always remembered Louisiana as the “boot-shaped” one. But as you can see in the illustration on the right, the sole of that boot is wearing thin as the Gulf coastline disappears, thanks to oil and gas drilling, canal channeling, and sea-level rise (see "Losing Lousiana"). Between 1932 and 2000 the state lost nearly 1,900 square miles of land, and an area the size of a football field […]
+
11:58 AM | Anatomy of an earthquake
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. In this video geologist Professor Iain Stewart gives a fantastic overview of what happens to a seismic hazard deep below the Earth’s surface and how it affects a vulnerable population above it. He also explains what can be done to [...] The post Anatomy of an earthquake appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
+
7:43 AM | Write Club: Moving beyond potatoes for more calories in a small space
At times, usually when I supposed to be doing something else because I’m a grad student and procrastination of some form seems to be part of the gig, I find myself planning what plants I would include in an imaginary biodome on a inhospitable planet many astronomical units away. Imaginary biodomes are one of my favourite thought exercises – to me it is the perfect fusion of my love of space exploration and my attempts to grow as much as my own food as I can in my small […]
+
5:20 AM | Another watershed moment
Regular followers will notice that there’s been little to read on this blog lately. Not having posted in over a month, I may even be close to violating my own blog network’s rules of engagement for syndication on the site (sorry Science Borealis!). There are many excuses for why I’ve been so silent. Moving house.…

September 18, 2014

+
8:45 PM | How to Look for Otters
In the first of a new series of posts about “How to Look for Mammals”, I take a look at one of our semi aquatic species, the Eurasian otter. The Eurasian otter is distributed across Europe and into Eurasia, but … Continue reading →

Reid N, Hayden B, Lundy MG, Pietravalle S, McDonald RA & Montgomery WI (2013). National Otter Survey of Ireland 2010/12, Irish Wildlife Manuals No. 76. National Parks and Wildlife Service, Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Dublin, Ireland, Other:

Citation
+
7:59 PM | A mediocre Colorado River Basin forecast
The Climate Prediction Center’s seasonal outlook, published this morning, is another “meh” for the Colorado River Basin. The good news is that odds favor wet for the southerly part of the basin, especially Arizona and New Mexico. The “meh” part is that the low country doesn’t contribute much of the river’s overall supply. Most of ...Continue reading ‘A mediocre Colorado River Basin forecast’ »
+
7:28 PM | USGS Releases a New Mapping Tool to Assist Tsunami Shelter Development
It may happen just once in your lifetime: a large tsunami is coming, big enough to make you run for your life. Where do you go? USGS has released a new tool to help planners plot out shelters in West Coast communities and other tsunami-hazard zones.
+
7:27 PM | Thar They Blow!
By Brian Palmer The Earth almost lost its largest living creature in the last century. Whalers killed more than 350,000 blue whales worldwide, nearly hunting the species to extinction. But according to a recent study, a group of these behemoths living off the West Coast has recovered to almost pre-whaling levels.Worldwide, only 10,000 to 25,000 blue whales remain today, and few communities of these mammals—which can be found in all of the […]
+
4:04 PM | This Land is My Land
As I mentioned in my earlier post, as soon as we close the deal on our waterfront property, I’d start blogging about the land, the plants and animals that inhabit it, the overall ecology of the region, and the process around building as close to a net-zero low-impact home as we can.  Last week the […]
+
3:59 PM | How to Look for Mammals
I was fortunate to have the opportunity to present a workshop at the National Biodiversity Data Centre on Saturday September 13th on the art of “Tracking Ireland’s Mammals”. This was the third year this workshop was held, and over the course … Continue reading →
+
3:49 PM | Moving beyond risk-based governance of agricultural GM technologies
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. The GMFuturos launch event, ‘A new approach to governing GM crops? Global lessons from the rising powers’ at the Royal Society earlier this summer brought together a range of senior academics from across the social and life sciences, together with [...] The post Moving beyond risk-based governance of agricultural GM technologies appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and […]
+
3:14 PM | Odile: The Still-Swirling Storm That Keeps on Giving, Bringing Torrential Rains and Severe Flooding Risks
Heavy downpours from the still-swirling remnants of Hurricane Odile could bring life-threatening floods and mudslides from southeastern Arizona across southern New Mexico and into western Texas and the panhandle through Saturday, according to the National Weather Service. Flooding has already occurred in Arizona — just 10 days after Hurricane Norbert drenched the region, producing a […]The post Odile: The Still-Swirling Storm That Keeps on Giving, Bringing Torrential Rains and […]
+
3:05 PM | DNA Barcoding and killing agents
source INBio Costa Rica[..] sequencing projects require the collection of large numbers of specimens, which need to be killed and preserved in a way that is both DNA-friendly and which will keep voucher specimens in good condition for later study. Factors such as time since collection, correct storage (exposure to free water and heat) and DNA extraction protocol are known to play a role in the success of downstream molecular applications. Limited data are available on the most efficient, […]
123456789
327 Results