Posts

October 25, 2014

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2:22 PM | Top Ten Funny Halloween Animals
Check out what these black and orange animals have to say about Halloween!
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7:46 AM | Gardening offers 25/10
Penny Royal If you’re stocking up on seeds, then head over to VegetableSeeds.net, where they’re offering a whopping 75% discount on everything until 17th November 2014. Thompson & Morgan are offering ‘buy one, get one free’ on selected varieties of onions for autumn planting. To make use of this offer, click through to see the list of varieties, and add your chosen ones to your basket. The cheapest pack will be free, providing that you complete your order before […]

October 24, 2014

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9:50 PM | While you’re waiting for the bus
9 Things That Reveal How Airbnb Lets Rich People Run a Bunch of Illegal Hotels Tracking one hundred students The iPad Air 2 Has Its Own SIM So You Change Carriers Whenever You Want Controversial: Should Workers Be Paid For … Continue reading →
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9:21 PM | Why Americans Should Fear Fear of Ebola More than the Virus
Two vital efforts to tamp down unfounded fears of Ebola contagion.
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8:18 PM | This Week in EPA Science
By Kacey Fitzpatrick Competition can bring out the best in people or the worst in people. Anyone who’s been watching the World Series or following football this season knows what I mean. But when it comes to competing for sustainability, everybody wins! Read about the student teams selected to compete for this year’s People, Prosperity, […]
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4:31 PM | Florida Lizards Evolving Rapidly: Visible Change in 15 Years, 20 Generations
Scientists working in Florida have documented the high-speed evolution of a native lizard species, in as little as 15 years, in response to pressure from an invading lizard species.Left hind foot of a green anole, with enlarged toepads(Yoel Stuart)After contact with the invasive brown anole lizards, the native green anole lizards began perching higher in the trees. With each generation, their feet have changed to become better at gripping the thinner, smoother branches found higher up.According […]
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4:26 PM | Another Round on Energy Rebound
Two analysts of energy trends expand on their view that efficiency's climate and energy benefits have been overstated.
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4:25 PM | There Will Be Blood
The pressure to reach for a gun to help save one animal from another is stronger than ever. And it has triggered a conservation problem from hell.
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4:24 PM | The Future Will Not Be Dry
The most resilient cities aren't the ones that fight the water back—but the ones that absorb it.
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4:22 PM | Please Step Out of Your Car
With imaginative, green ways of getting around the city, cars may finally go the way of the horse and buggy.
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4:20 PM | DIY Glaciers
In a desert 13,000 feet above sea level, a remarkable man is taking on the global warming challenge—and winning.
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4:20 PM | Add a Few Species. Pull Down the Fences. Step Back.
Brandom Keim reviews George Monbiot's Feral
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4:19 PM | Our Changing Seas
Tiny marine organisms painstakingly build expansive coral reefs, one tiny piece of calcium carbonate at a time. Sculptor and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison mimics that process, patiently handcrafting reef pieces one by one, shaping and texturing them with simple tools such as chopsticks, and assembling them into complex colonies. Mattison has constructed a series of
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4:14 PM | Reality Is Too Confining
We know that nature experiences can change environmental behavior—but it turns out those experiences don’t have to be real.
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4:13 PM | Bug Art
Steven Kutcher is an artist, an entomologist, a teacher—and a Hollywood bug wrangler. Kutcher got his start in bug art in the 1980s when he was asked to figure out how to make a fly walk through ink and leave footprints for a Steven Spielberg–directed TV project. From there he went on to work with
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4:12 PM | Who’s Afraid Now?
In predator-human conflicts, the thing we have to fear most is fear itself
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4:11 PM | The Interspecies Internet
Why restrict the Web to one species?
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4:06 PM | The Sugarcane Borer
The sugarcane borer moth, Diatraea saccharalis, is widespread throughout the Western Hemisphere, and is considered an introduced species in the southern United States. Although this moth has a wide distribution and is a pest of many crop plants including sugarcane, corn, sorghum and rice, it is considered one species.The larvae bore into the sugarcane stalks. In mature plants the tops tend to weaken or die, sometimes breaking off. In young plants the inner whorl of leaves is killed, resulting […]
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3:07 PM | Sustainability and Resilience: Making the Connection
By Alan Hecht, Ph.D. When most people consider “resilience,” they think about bouncing back from some sort of unwelcome catastrophe. Whether it’s “super storms” devastating coastal communities and disrupting millions of people along the east coast, wildfires in the mountain and western states, or natural disasters and related, human-caused emergencies such as the tsunami and […]
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3:06 PM | Texas Power Consumer Complaints On The Rise, Reports TCAP
A recent analysis by the consumer advocacy group Texas Coalition for Affordable Power (TCAP) shows that consumer complaints filed with the state’s Public Utility Commission (PUC) have risen again in 2014, after four years of decline. In 2002, Texas became … Continue reading →
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2:00 PM | Save the Redwood League’s Fern Watch Program Helps Monitor Climate Change
How will climate change affect the redwood ecosystem, which is so dependent on summer fog and plentiful winter rain? Learn about Save the Redwoods' ongoing "Fern Watch" study from Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Park District.
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12:28 PM | When the Rainforests Run Dry
By Susan Cosier If you thought the California drought was bad (and it is), take a look at what's happening in southeastern Brazil. These satellite images of the Jaguari Reservoir—one of the main water sources for São Paulo, South America's largest city—show how much water levels have dropped in just one year. In the lower photo, taken in August, the resevoir is only at 3 to 5 percent of its carrying capacity. São Paulo, home […]

October 23, 2014

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10:46 PM | Indian Vultures Are Dying for Some Good News
When a species experiences catastrophic population declines as high as 99.9 percent, any bit of good news is cause for celebration—even if the news isn’t exactly great. India’s vultures now... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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8:52 PM | South Napa Quake Offers Key Test for Real-Time GPS Detection
The familiar GPS system is being enlisted to help improve earthquake shaking alerts; an experimental system is now operating at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory.
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8:02 PM | Different Worlds, Connected by Climate Change
By Brian Palmer Life in Thule, Greenland, and the Pacific nation of Tuvalu couldn’t be more different. At 750 miles above the Arctic Circle, Thule is among the northernmost inhabited places on earth. In July it reaches an average high of 52 degrees. Tuvalu is a tropical island where the temperature rarely drops below 75, even in the middle of the night. But the two seaside communities have at least one thing in common: Climate change threatens them […]
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7:39 PM | Bay Area Science Festival Kicks Off This Thursday, October 23
The Bay Area Science Festival features events like a bike ride through wetland and a tour of a UPS facility. It begins Thursday, October 23, and will host 56 events over ten days.
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7:29 PM | The Rich Allure of a Peasant Champion
ABC Carpet & Home, for the uninitiated, is a sumptuous home furnishings mecca with a chic interior and socially conscious ethic. The flagship store in Manhattan’s Flatiron district feels like a plush museum owned by a billionaire with a New Age affectation. Reproduced antiques, decorative trinkets, candles, ethnic-themed clothing, Buddhist ornaments and much more are arrayed […]The post The Rich Allure of a Peasant Champion appeared first on Collide-a-Scape.
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6:51 PM | Hikers: Physics Professor Finds Best Backpack Weight
Hikers are often advised that the weight of the packs they carry should be a percentage of their body weight, so smaller individuals must carry lighter loads, right? Wrong. Smaller hikers actually carry heavier loads, and there is a much more accurate way to figure out how heavy a backpack a hiker can carry.A group of backpackers hike on an Outward Bound course in the La Sal Mountains, UT.(M. O'Shea/KSU)While leading students on extended (more than seven days) backpacking trips for […]
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4:59 PM | Boots on the ground for NEON Member Institution Representatives
NEON Member Institution representatives learned about NEON data collection first-hand this week during a visit the Central Plains Experimental Range (CPER), the Domain 10 core site. This site tour was part of the 2014 NEON Membership Meeting, held October 21-22 in Boulder, CO at NEON Headquarters. A group of 20 participants toured the CPER site … Continue reading »
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4:43 PM | Milkfish fry fishery
According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Milkfish (Chanos chanos) is one of the most important food fish species in the world. In Indonesia, Taiwan and the Philippines, more than a quarter of a million tonnes of milkfish are harvested annually in brackish ponds, which represents about 60% of the total fish production from aquaculture in Southeast Asia. This huge amount sourced from a single fish commodity is projected to further increase in the coming years […]
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