Posts

July 28, 2014

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11:01 PM | All 8 Pangolin Species Being Eaten into Extinction
A few days ago customs officials in Vietnam raided a cargo ship from Sierra Leone and seized an astonishing 1.4 tons of dried pangolin scales. The grisly discovery came from the bodies of as many as... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:20 PM | Bacteria Produce Unique Battery Electrode Material
A group of scientists at the Okayama University, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Kyoto University has shown that iron oxide nanoparticles produced by bacteria in groundwater has a potential to be used as anode material for lithium-ion batteries.
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6:03 PM | Study: It Is Feasible to Power California With Renewables
A new Stanford study discovers that it is economically and technically feasible to convert California’s energy infrastructure to renewables like solar energy, wind and hydroelectricity.
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4:45 PM | JRC Measures Smart Meter Deployment Across EU
According to the Joint Research Center (JRC), the EU in-house scientific service, over 70% of European consumers will have a smart meter for electricity by 2020.
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3:25 PM | One more hummingbird picture
Sorry, can’t resist posting one more hummingbird picture. The rufous, on the left, have just finally arrived at our house. They’re usually earlier in the summer, and they’re very aggressive, driving away the black-chins who have been here since late spring. Moments after this picture was snapped, the rufous drove the black-chin away:
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3:22 PM | U.S. Coal Exports Eroding Domestic Greenhouse Gains
Continuing rise in U.S. exports of coal work against domestic reductions in CO2 emissions.
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3:08 PM | NAS Report Provides Lessons Learned from Fukushima Accident
The National Academy of Sciences has published a new congressionally mandated report entitled “Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety of U.S. Nuclear Plants.”
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2:21 PM | When Icebergs Attack, Maggots in the Loo (Yup), the Problem with NYC’s Rat Problem
By Jason Bittel Daddy knows best: Longmont, Colorado, voted to ban fracking a year and a half ago, but a state district judge just struck down the town’s ban, saying it conflicts with state regulations (see "Hometown Heroine"). The highlight (lowlight?) of the story is undoubtedly the following quote from Judge D.D. Mallard’s ruling: “While the Court appreciates the Longmont citizens' sincerely-held beliefs about risks to their health and […]
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2:00 PM | Genetically Engineering Wild Populations Could be Just Around the Corner
We might be able to use selfish genes to cause the population of mosquitoes that carry malaria to crash. Is genetically manipulating these insects out in the wild worth preventing hundreds of millions of people from getting malaria?
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1:37 PM | Roger Pielke Jr. on FiveThirtyEight and his Climate Critics
Earlier in the year, Roger Pielke Jr. was named as a contributing writer for Nate Silver’s newly re-launched FiveThirtyEight site. Shortly after that, Pielke, a climate policy scholar and political scientist at the University of Colorado, in Boulder, published an article at FiveThirtyEight headlined, “Disasters Cost More Than Ever–But Not Because of Climate Change.” Critics pounced immediately in […]The post Roger Pielke Jr. on FiveThirtyEight and […]
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1:32 PM | What sectors use the most natural gas?
The shale boom has been a big force in the energy industry in the United States. Not only has it had a significant impact on the country’s economy, it has managed to touch all of the energy... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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7:01 AM | New Clinics in California Seek to Stop Schizophrenia Before it Starts
A psychotic break can lead to social isolation, hospitalization or medications with sometimes disabling side effects. Now some clinics are taking a controversial approach and trying to intervene earlier.
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3:56 AM | Hummingbird
No summary available for this post.

July 27, 2014

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10:16 PM | Annals of ag-urban transfers: Imperial Valley, December 2002
The Imperial Irrigation District has more Colorado River water than anyone else. That has put them at the center of every major Colorado River Basin conversation about the transfer of agricultural water to urban users, including a particularly dramatic bit of brinksmanship going on in the fall of 2002. The other states of the basin ...Continue reading ‘Annals of ag-urban transfers: Imperial Valley, December 2002’ »
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6:58 AM | Changing landscape
At 5 am this morning, the local landscape changed considerably. Scheduled in the early morning for “healthy and safety” reasons, controlled explosions demolished three of the cooling towers of Didcot A, a coal-fired power station that closed in March last year. There are three more cooling towers, due to be demolished next year. The demolitions gathered a lot of public interest, and despite the early hour many people took to local vantage points to see them come down. Although […]

July 26, 2014

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10:10 PM | Is the basin the wrong scale to look at Colorado River (or Rio Grande) system groundwater losses?
I think the answer to my rhetorical question in this post’s headline is obviously “no”. I think this is enormously useful data. But I’m still puzzling over who beyond clickbaiting bloggers like myself might use it, and how. In his coverage of the GRACE Colorado Basin groundwater depeletion, Brett Walton at Circle of Blue included ...Continue reading ‘Is the basin the wrong scale to look at Colorado River (or Rio Grande) system groundwater losses?’ »
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3:00 PM | A Quest for Vegan Cheese That Actually Tastes Like Cheese
A team of Bay Area scientists is biohacking baker's yeast, in an effort to produce proteins that are just like milk proteins, only they're aren't from milk.
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6:41 AM | Moose dribble v toxic fungus
Photo credit: Steve Wall In my occasional series, “When Plants Attack” we’ve seen some of the ways in which plants can defend themselves. So far I’ve covered the chemicals they produce to discourage other plants from growing in their space (allelopathy) and the conventional weaponry they use to guard against a physical attack. I am planning more posts to continue the series, which will include a look at the chemical defences plants have evolved to protect themselves […]
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3:15 AM | Ag-urban transfers: “a significant fission of costs and benefits”
More from in Brian Devine’s excellent series on the tradeoffs, some quite hidden, in the agricultural-to-urban water transfers that seem the inevitable path forward in the western United States: To many rural communities, water is more than just money. Irrigation is the lifeblood of rural communities’ economies, to be sure, but it is also a ...Continue reading ‘Ag-urban transfers: “a significant fission of costs and benefits”’ »

July 25, 2014

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10:41 PM | Fresh Focus on Siberian Permafrost as Second Hole is Reported
A report of a second odd hole in the Siberian permafrost draws fresh attention to the warming Russian tundra.
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9:37 PM | New Approach to Being There: ‘Fan-bots’ Will Cheer Korean Baseball Team
Cheer on your baseball team through a "fan-bot" set in the stands as you watch and tweet on your phone.
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9:19 PM | Weekend Reads: Virtual Reality Environmentalism, Climate Cowboys, Are Water Witchers for Real?
By Jason Bittel If a Tree Falls in a Virtual Forest…Imagine you’re a little piece of purple coral. Everything’s going swimmingly until the ocean begins to acidify and your reef starts dropping dead all around you. Then, all of a sudden, you watch yourself losing your purple hue … and then the darkness is closes in. Lucky for you, this is just a virtual reality experiment to see if “experiencing” an environmental […]
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8:12 PM | California’s Wandering Wolf Now Has Puppies in Oregon
OR-7 has at least three pups that he and a mate are raising in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon.
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7:43 PM | 7/25/2014 This Week in Energy: Beyond Headlines
Here’s a bit of energy news that didn’t make it into our daily coverage during the past week. In this review, we collected some of less big, but nonetheless interesting news, of the week that went by, from the world of energy science and technology.
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6:13 PM | Mike Adams Capitalizes on the Myth Spread by Vandana Shiva
My colleagues in the media have taken notice of the execrable rant by Mike Adams, in which he likens some science writers and scientists to Nazis. To recap: The self-proclaimed “Health Ranger” said that certain publishers, journalists and scientists “have signed on to the Nazi genocide machine of our day,” which he identifies as the agricultural biotech […]The post Mike Adams Capitalizes on the Myth Spread by Vandana Shiva appeared first on […]
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6:03 PM | Stuff I helped write elsewhere: Endangered Species Act litigation on the Rio Grande
From this morning’s Albuquerque Journal (behind a GoogleSurveyWall for non-subscribers, sorry): Citing “two decades of broken promises by federal and state water managers,” a Santa Fe-based environmental group filed a federal lawsuit against two government agencies Thursday alleging they failed “to secure dynamic and perennial flows for the Rio Grande” needed to protect the silvery ...Continue reading ‘Stuff I helped write elsewhere: Endangered Species Act […]
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6:00 PM | The Story of Mr. Bisbing, Part V: Tag Recovery from Colombia
This is the last chapter of our story about a great egret that we gave a GPS tracking device on the Outer Banks of North Carolina in spring 2013 (see photo). We followed his movements for about 8 months and reconstructed his story with his GPS and ACC data (see parts I, II, III and […]
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5:22 PM | NHL Releases 2014 Sustainability Report
The National Hockey League (NHL) this week released its 2014 NHL Sustainability Report, the first such report by a major sports league in North America.
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5:02 PM | The New Oil Patch: Rail Lines in Albany and Elsewhere
The oil boom in the West is creating traffic jams of oil trains in New York's Hudson Valley.
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4:27 PM | Miscanthus to Play a Major Role in Iowa Agriculture
Agronomists at Iowa State University say that miscanthus, a perennial grass used for biofuel production, would deliver even better yields than once thought in Iowa.
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